America and West Indies
March 1710

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1924

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55-68

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'America and West Indies: March 1710', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 25: 1710-1711 (1924), pp. 55-68. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73828 Date accessed: 30 September 2014.


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Contents

March 1710

1710.
March 4.
Whitehall.
147. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Report upon petition of Francis Pouch and Daniel Gashet of Martinico, for compensation for the seizure of the Society sent as a flag of truce with English prisoners from Martinico to Antegoa. (v. Dec. 15, 1709). Concludes: There are several other instances of an illegal trade carryed on from the Leeward Islands, Barbadoes etc., by means of such flaggs of truce. We are therefore of opinion that there is no reason why your Majesty should gratify the petitioners, and that for the preventing the like illegal practices for the future, your Majesty's pleasure be signifyed to the several Governors that, whenever they have occasion to send out flaggs of truce, no more goods or provisions be permitted to be laden on board such vessells than what shall be necessary for the voyage. Set out, A.P.C. II. pp. 617–619. q.v. [C.O. 153, 11. pp. 4–9.]
March 4.
Whitehall.
148. Mr. Sharpe to the Earl of Sunderland. It is with the greatest sense of joy and gratitude that this wretched place has received the happy influence of H.M. Royal clemency and goodness in the Order for recalling Mr. Crowe; nor can we ever sufficiently express the obligations your Lordship's compassion and protection have drawn upon us in that matter. I humbly conceive it would have been as much for Mr. Crowe's as the country's safety had it brought a quietus with it, and put an immediate stopp to his administration of the Government; for as it would have put us past all danger of suffering any longer by his unhappy management, soe would it have freed him from the temptation of any further disobedience to H.M. by continuing longer at the helm, which we have very good reason to apprehend he designs, etc. etc. Signed, Wm. Sharpe. 2pp. [C.O. 28, 43. No. 37.]
March 6.
Barbados.
149. Governor Crowe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I sent your Lordships duplicates of what went per the packet by the Mary Gold, Capt. Welsh. This conveyance brings me none from your Board. I have received H.M. Orders for returning home, which I shall doe by the first vessell that goes from hence for England, and I hope fully prepared to answer all these complaints your Lordps. has been pleased to assigne against, Signed, M. Crowe. Endorsed, Recd. 4th, Read 5th July, 1710. 1 p. Enclosed,
149. i. Naval Officer's List of ships entered and cleared in Barbados, Sept. 25—Dec. 25, 1709. Endorsed, Recd. July 4. 1710. ¾ p. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 29, 29 i.; and (without enclosure) 29, 12. p. 110.]
March 6.
Barbados.
150. Same to the Earl of Sunderland. Acknowledges Order of recall, Oct. 8, which I should in the same minute have obeyed, if your Lordp. had been pleased to order by what conveyance. The Master of the packet reports the Newcastle was a fitting out at Plymouth to relieve H.M.S. Hector, so I hope your Lordp. will send directions by her: for here is not any vessell at present that designs for Europe, but a smal Scotch ship without a gunn of 90 tunns for Leith, and I cannot think H.M. would expose the charracter or my papers in a smal packet boat wch. is a prey for every French privateer sloop which all these Islands are now infested with, one of them carried the last packet but one into Martineque, insomuch that Mr. Dummer's Agent here has applyed himself to me for one of H.M. ships to convoy this to Antigua, which I could not grant, by reason of two sloops, lying to windward of this Island, who are so dareing as to make an attempt to land in ye night under the Forts in hopes to surprize some of them, and so take off what negroes they could gett. I desire nothing so much as to clear myself of what is alleadged against me, and I will take the first oppertunity that offers for Europe. If I had the power to have commanded of one of these men of warr that attends this Island from their stations, I should not have troubled your Lordship with this, etc. Signed, M. Crowe. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 43. No. 38.]
March 6.
Barbados.
151. A. Needham to the Lord Chief Baron Ward. Complains of harsh treatment at the hands of Major Lillington in the matter of a plantation, etc. Signed, Allen Needham. Addressed. Sealed. 2½ closely written pp. [C.O. 28, 38. No. 76.]
March 9.
Antigua.
152. Governor Parke to the Earl of Sunderland. It is now above four months since I had the honour to receive any letter from your Lordshipp. I order'd a meeting of a Generall Councill and Assembly to meet me at St. Kitts Feb. 27, expecting a packett, but that not comeing I prorogued them to the 20th inst., and if there comes in no packett, I shall still prorogue them, for till theire be a determination of the complaint, there will be nothing done. Mr. Tankerd has basely murdered a poor man, he waylayd him and pretended to fight him, but before he could take his pistoll, hee shott him, his brother killed one some time before. 'Tis my good fortune to have neither of the quarrills o[n?] the publick differrences, they are both villannous murders, therefore hopes your Lordship will interpose th[at] no pardons may be had, they are not to be taken, one is gott off this Island, and for the other, I know not if he is gott off, or no. Wee have had a great drougth, but otherwise the Islands are in good health and prosperity. Seaven privateers landed some men on Mountserrat. I had an account sent me that [the 29th] night. Imediately I pressed a briganteen and a sloope, and put the Queen's troopes on board, and went to their assistance, but before I came, they were gone; they return'd on board without doing any damage, neither they nor we so much as lost a man; the Queen's shipp (the Diamond) joyned me and for 7 days I followed them, but could not come up with them. I visited all the Islands of my Government, and when I secured them after the best manner I was able, I returned to this. Signed, Daniel Parke. 2 pp. [C.O. 152, 42. No. 17.]
March 9.
Antigua.
153. Same to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Duplicate of preceding. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 7th July, 1710. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 23; and 153, 11. pp. 39–41.]
March 10.
Virginia.
154. Lt. Governor Jenings to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers to letter of Jan. 11. (q.v.) I'm sorry to acquaint your Lordps. that the Enterprize is still absent, and according to the time of her sailing from New England for this place in Dec. last, there is reason to doubt of her safety. It has however happen'd very fortunately that the Captain of the Enterprize directed a sloop from New York to meet him here. This sloop arrived about six days agoe, and by comparing the quality and built of the vessell and the place from which she came, with certain instructions wch. my Lord High Admiral was pleased to give last summer for the hyring such a vessell at New York to be sent hither and man'd for cruising with the guard ships appointed on this station, there seems no reason to doubt but that this is the very same wch. my Lord High Admiral intended for this service. Whereupon considering the danger to which this countrey is exposed from the enemy's privateers (wch. are generally most busy on our coast in the spring) and the uncertain expectation of H.M.S. the Enterprize for our protection, I have with the unanimous advice of the Council given order for the immediate fitting out of that sloop for answering the intentions of my Lord High Admiral in the protection of the trade from the small privateers of the enemy that lurk within and about the Capes, as your Lordships may be pleased to observe more fully in the proceedings of the Council in this matter (enclosed). I am sensible that the taking on me to fitt out this vessell, and to appoint a Commander and other officers and seamen on the establishment of H.M. Navy without particular directions from my Lord High Admiral is so far out of my power, that nothing but absolute necessity for H.M. service could excuse the presumption; but as my Lord High Admiral's intentions for obtaining such a vessell to be employed here at H.M. charge was very apparent, that accordingly endeavours had been used for that purpose the last summer at New York, and that now a sloop is arrived answerable in all respects to the design, and no Captain of any of H.M. ships here to give any directions concerning her, I think I should have been as inexcuseable to have sufferred such a vessell to ly useless, when H.M. service in the defence of the country did so pressingly require her being imployed, and especially having so fair an opportunity to man her with the seamen belonging to H.M. late ship Garland, who have been subsisted here ever since the loss of that ship at H.M. charge. I beg the favour of your Lordps. to believe that what I have done herein proceeds from the sincerity of my intentions for H.M. service, and I'm well satisfyed your Lordps.' favourable opinion of me in this particular will justify me very much with my Lord High Admiral. I am also an humble suitor to your Lordps. that you will be pleased to interpose with my Lord High Admiral for his directions to the Commissioners of the Navy and Victualling offices to provide for this vessell so long as it shal be thought fitt to continue her in this service, and that in the mean time care be taken to pay the bills which the Master shall have occasion to draw for the necessary provision of victualls and ammunition for the said sloop. Prays for speedy directions in the business of patenting of land, etc. Signed, E. Jenings. Endorsed, Recd. May 26th, Read June 6th, 1710. 2½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1316. No. 46; and 5, 1363. pp. 184–187.]
March 13.155. Sir T. Laurence to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Complains of Mr. William Bladen, etc. cf. following. Signed, Thomas Laurence. Endorsed, Recd. Read March 13, 170 9/10. Holograph. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 6.]
March 14.
Whitehall.
156. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Representation upon petition of Sir T. Laurence (v. Jan. 26 and March 30, 1710). Set out, A.P.C. II. pp. 532–534. q.v. [C.O. 5, 727. pp. 171–175.]
March 14.
Whitehall.
157. Mr. Popple to Mr. Lowndes. Communicates Mr. Laws' Memorial (Feb. 23) relating to Lord Carberry's proposed surrender of lands in Jamaica, etc. [C.O. 138, 13. pp. 98, 99.]
March 15.
New York.
158. Lt. Governor Ingoldesby to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Since my last (July 5), the Assembly of this Province mett and sett from Aug. 15th—Nov. 12, and past severall Acts, which I could not send the Secretary and Clark of Assembly being not ready with there minutes. On Nov. 18 I went to Burlington to meete the Assembly of ye Jerseys, which satt untill Jan. 31st. having past tenn bills, which I doe now send, etc., and 3 others past before, with the Minutes of Councell and of the Representatives, so that your Lordships will see what has been done in that province as to the last expedition designed against Cannada. Refers to Col. Nicholson's account. But as I must in justice informe H.M. of what the Assembly and people have done thereon, I beg leave to acquaint yr. Lordships that neaver people went on more cherfully on any designe then they have don on this having raised £14000 for the execution thereof and which will not doe as I am tould by £4000 which I cannot know presisely untill the accounts are setled. As we are informed that H.M. has appointed Col. Hunter Governor etc., I shall not fall into any particulars on any of the Bills, etc. Signed, Rich. Ingoldesby. Endorsed, Recd. 13th, Read 25th. Oct. 1710. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
158. i. Address of the Assembly of New York to Lt. Governor Ingoldesby. Compliment his care and prudence, etc. Continue:—The expedition which was design'd against Canada, and has now met with a manifest disapointment, has put this Colony to a vast fatigue and expence, and must have alarmed and awakened the enemy, who have not only taken some prisoners to informe them of the withdrawing of the forces from Wood Creek, but are now well instructed by the lateness of the season of their security during this winter from all danger by sea. We have great reason to apprehend that they will bend their greatest force against our frontiers, where our forts and fortifications are soe farr out of repair, that it will hardly be possible before winter to make any considerable additions to them, and this disappointment and the bad effect it has produc'd amongst the inhabitants in generall, has rendred it almost altogether impracticable to reinforce the frontiers with fresh detachments of the militia. Pray that H.M. regular troops be posted this winter upon the frontiers of Albany, etc., our maritine confines being sufficiently defended by the season, etc. Signed, W. Nicoll, Speaker, Hend. van Renslaer, Johs. Cuyler, Cornelis Seberingh, Johan. Hardensoeck, John Hillcock, Abraham Lake(r)man, John van Hoo, Pieter Harring, Josiah Hunt, Robert Livingston, Ebenezer Willson, Henr. Beekman, Myndert Schuyler, Samuell Mulford, Tho. Garton, Joh. Jansen, Oct. 12, 1709. Endorsed, Recd. Oct. 13, 1710. 1 p. torn. [C.O. 5, 1049. Nos. 164, 164 i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 1122. pp. 186, 187.]
March 18.
St. James's.
159. H.M. Warrant granting John Rayner, Attorney General of New York, leave of absence for 18 months, provided he appoint a Deputy approved of by the Governor, etc. Countersigned, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. pp. 203, 204.]
March 20.
Admiralty Office.
160. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Saml. Brice, Mariner, having represented to my Lords of the Admiralty that he is negotiating a considerable affair, with the Lords Commrs. for Trade, that will conduce very much to ye benefit of the Nation and desireing to be protected for one month to attend thereon, I desire you will give me an account if there is further occasion for this mann, and if so, for how long time. Signed, J. Burchett, Endorsed, Recd. Read 21 March, 170 9/10. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 6. No. 100; and 324, 9. p. 431.]
March 21.
St. Kitts.
161. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I came to this Island the 19th inst. to meet the Generall Councill and Assembly, that were prorogued to the 20th of this month. I went from Island to Island with the man of warr to take on board the Councill and Assembly of each Island, the Councellours all came with me, so did the members for Mountserratt, but those from Antigua and Nevis not comeing, I was oblieg'd to prorogue them to the 23rd inst., at which time I hope they will meet, but I cannot promise myselfe they will either repeale the badd Laws, or make any new ones, for I don't expect they will do anything till there is a determination of the complaint, but I have called them that I might not be wanting in my duty; had I justice done me in that they would soon come to a better temper. About a month ago a passenger that came in a Leverpoole man publickly reported that I had got the better of the complainants, the very next day severall of them sent to me to begg pardon, which I freely granted, and had that news been confirmed by this packett, by this time we had all been reconciled, for I will forgive all that have done me any injury, and when this is done. I have no doubt but to bring all those Islands under as good a Government as any of the Queen's Collonys, for hitherto they have been under no manner of method. The former Generalls used to governe as arbitrarilly as Bashas, and my proceedings according to the Laws of England and putting their Assemblys on the same foot (as near as the circumstance of the place will admitt) with the House of Commons in England makes them angry at present, but hereafter they will thank me for it. If I have Justice done me, by degrees they will be brought to reason, if not, they will be the same with the next Governour that comes, expecting to gett him out by claymour. Repeats account of attack on Mountserrat. Imediately I impressed a sloope and brigantine, and with what troopes I could gett, went to their assistance, they haveing chaced the boat that brought me the advice, and not takeing her, they concluded I would soon be with them with the forces of the Islands, which made them think fitt to retire. By good luck I mett with the man of warr, andd went on board her and being also joined by two of our privateers pursued them till I dispersed them and after I had vissited all the Islands and left them safe, I returned to Antigua. The Treasurer of Antigua refused to pay for the hire of the two vessells, and provisions put on board for the men, so that for ought I see. I must pay it myselfe. Had the vessells been lost, I should have had £2000 to have paid, etc. I must informe your Lordshipps of a very extraordinary proceeding of the Speaker of Antigua Assembly. Just as I was stepping into the boat, he and Mr. Chester and Col. Fry (two other members) brings me a paper signed by himselfe as Speaker and at the topp was writ the Address of the Gentlemen of the Assembly to the Generall, wherein after haveing asserted severall things that the records makes appeare false, they tell me if I will call them then together they wou'd pass Laws as other Islands do they would not say they would allow the Queen a negative voice. I told them there being a Generall Councill and Assembly called all particular Assemblys were dissolved in course, but if they had let me have knowne as much sooner, I would have called them together, but that the Proclamation was already writt for their dissolution, but when the Generall Assembly was over, I would call another for Antigua, and then I should see if they would allow the Queen a negative voice or not, but that I wondred to see an Adress from the Assembly signed by their Speaker when the Assembly had not mett, that their meeting at the election of Generall Assembly men were but as so many private men, and that it was their being unacquainted with the constitution of the House of Commons made them run into these errors; but I thought it was yet more extraordinary for them to indeavour to stopp me when I was just going on board with the troopes to protect one of the Queen's Islands which was actually attacked by the enemy, and should I stay to call a Councill for ought I knew it might occation the loss of Mountserratt. As soon as I had made an end, I went on board and sett sayle, the people of Mountserratt were so sensible of the obligation that the Councill and Assembly unanimously agreed upon the inclosed Adress, and presented it me in a full body at my comeing there to call for their Councill and Assembly men and withall told me (if I pleas'd) every man in that Island would signe it. I heare one Parson Field and one Col. Thomass claymours very much against me, there are very strong circumstances to believe those two were the contrivers of my assassination and stole away the night before I was shott, for fear of the negroe that did it, or Captain Otto that was with him should be taken and confess who sett them to worke. Inclosed I send a petition delivered in Councill by one Parson Buxton against Field. I hope what such a profligate wretch (as Field) shall say will find no creditt. I have sent affidavitts of all that ever went in the Flaggs of Truce, by which your Lordshipps will see how farr I have been concerned in tradeing, had I winked at that trade, I had had fewer enemies then I have, and the affidavitts sent I hope will cleare what is layd to my charge about Mr. Chester. The reason of their mallice to that poor woman is because she sent me word of a designe that was layd to murder me some time since; this poor woman is in a deep consumption, and has been so for this two yeares, and wants a nurse more than a gallant, and has the fate to be marryed to a cruell madd man and a foole who turned her out of doores twice before I arrived. She was an orphan and has no relations to protect her, which is the reason she is made a sacrifice in hopes to throw dyrt on me. 'Tis strange that I am to be attacked thus in the darke, what affidavitts I take are done in publicke in the Court House before the Lt. Governor and Councill, and everyone has liberty to take coppys of them; their affidavitts are soe secrett I can't yet heare but of one, and she that made that I have proved perjured, and don't doubt but to do the like by all the rest, if I had them sent me. I desire no favour in this affair but common justice. P.S. March 27th I send the Minutes of the Genll. Assembly to this day. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 9th June, 1710. 4 pp. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 18; and 153, 11. pp. 21–27.]
March 22.162. Council of St. Christophers to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Certify that Lt. Governor Walter Hamilton is a gentleman of courage, experience and good conduct in military affairs, and best fitted to command as Lt. General, in case of the death or absence of the General, etc. 8 Signatures. 1 large p. [C.O. 152, 42. No. 16.]
[March 22.]163. Lt. Governor Hamilton to the Queen. Prays to be appointed Governor of the Leeward Islands, in succession to Governor Parke. No date or signature. ¾ p. [C.O. 152, 42. No. 15.]
[March 22.]164. Memorial by R. Tryon, in behalf of Lt. Governor Hamilton. setting forth his services in expeditions against the enemy (St. Kitts 1689, Martinique 1692, St. Kitts 1702, Guarda loupe 1703), and as Lt. Governor of St. Kitts, and supporting preceding petition. Signed, Rowld. Tryon. 2 pp. [C.O. 152, 42. No. 14.]
March 22.
Whitehall.
165. Mr. Solicitor General. Encloses Act of Jamaica for regulating fees, for his opinion in point of law, especially upon the clauses obliging lawyers to take retaining fees, and for qualifying of writing clerks, etc. I have given notice to Mr. Baber and the other Patentees here who oppose the Act, as also to such gentlemen of Jamaica as appear for the Act, that they may attend you when you shall desire it. [C.O. 138, 13. p. 100.]
March 23.
Craven House.
166. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Governor Tynte. Enclose letter etc. from the Board of Trade (Jan. 19 q.v.) relating to illegal trade. We require you to make a strict scrutiny into the several matters of fact alledged, and to cause such persons as have been any ways concern'd in such illegal trade to be prosecuted according to law. We think it highly necessary that care be taken that in case any flags of truce arrive at our Province, that they be not permitted to trade during their stay there, or to go on shore to examine the strength and condition of the place, etc. Signed, Craven Palatin, Beaufort, Craven for Ld. Carteret, M. Ashley, Holleton, J. Danson. [C.O. 5, 290. p. 1.]
March 23.
Craven House.
167. Same to same. Warrant to the Governor and Surveyor General to set out 100 acres of land, free of quit rent for 10 years, and thereafter to pay 1d. yearly per acre, to as many poor Palatines as shall arrive in Carolina. List of 7 families of Palatines going thither (Mandorf, Stanser, Stark, Jansen, Fried, Steinman and Kraft). Signed as preceding. [C.O. 5, 290. pp. 2, 3.]
March 24.
Whitehall.
168. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Recommend for confirmation Acts of Jamaica, 1709, for securing Port Royal, and appointing way wardens, regulating wharfage, and buoying out the Channel between Port Royal and Kingston. [C.O. 138, 13. pp. 101, 102.]
March 25.
Whitehall.
169. The Earl of Sunderland to Col. Jones. The Queen having received several complaints of the great male administration and violent proceedings of Governor Parke, and that several officers and soldiers of your Regiment being encouraged thereto by him have for a considerable time committed very high outrages upon the persons of many of the complainants, H.M. has commanded me to express to you her displeasure that the troops she always designed to be employed for the protection and defence of her subjects should be made use of as instruments of their oppression, and to signify her commands that you examine and enquire into the truth of any complaints of this nature which shall be made to you against any of [the] officers and soldiers under your command, that if you find any of them guilty, you inflict such punishment upon them as the nature of their offence shall deserve, and let them know how much H.M. is dissatisfyed with those proceedings, and that she is resolved to make such offenders feel the effects of her displeasure, and that you use all other proper methods and ways to prevent such disorders, which especially at this time might interrupt the course of justice in the examinations of the several complaints agst. Colonel Parke. You are to send me an account from time to time of your proceedings in this matter. Countersigned, Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. pp. 204, 205.]
March 25.
Spanish Town.
170. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The great mortallity yt. we have had here of all sorts of people both white and black, I gave you acct. of in my last, since which time we have had ye acct. of ye Laverdecrous Fleet being sailed from the Havannah, which sailed about Jan. 7 to ye number of 16 or 17 ships and vessells, being all very illmann'd and ye ships very much out of order, by their being so long in these parts, and had no other convoy but 3 letter of marque men, two of wch. was French and one Spaniard. I hope some of our cruisers or other ships may meet with them before they get home, our men of war here in number 5 are in a very miserable condition for want of men, 2 of which cannot goe to sea except a third or fourth part of their compliment be soldiers out of H.M. Regiment, which I am affraid in a very little time will destroy the remainder of ye regimt. We have been sadly pestured by our enemy privateers, who have taken severall ships and vessells in sight of the Island, for which reason the Assembly is now fitting out two vessells to cruse round the Island, etc. By our last advice from Carthergena, the gallion is still in that Harbour, which has on board a vast quantity of money, as also another a French ship which they say is very rich and incapable of goeing to sea. We also hear there is 2 French men of warr come into these parts, the one of 44 gunns, and the other betwixt 30 and 40, the one of which was an Englishmann of war, the Dymon frigatt. Two Dutch privateers abt. 10 days agoe brought in a French ship loaden with negroes to ye number of 380, which they took off of Cape Debrown, they also met with this Dymon frigat abt. 10 leagues off of this Harbour, and exchanged severall broad sides, but ye French run away, on board of which they report there is near 500 men, which to me seemes to be extraordinary, therefore I am apprehensive that that number of men is with a designe to man the gallion, or to take the money out of her and to steale away with it as the Laverdecrous Fleet has done, in case the Spaniards will admitt of it, which they seem to be resolved not to do, they supposeing yt. they will cary it to France. The great misfortunes that has attended us here is by our great loss of men occasioned by ye disputes that has happen'd betwixt ye Collector of ye forrain dutys, and the captures of ye privateers. Refers to enclosures and prays the Board to lay Address before H.M. The Assembly and Councill haveing requested of me to stop the Elton gally for Bristoll, who was for saileing upon Satterday morning, till Wednesday following when they resolve to have the Address and everything ready to send with her, the Capt. of her was very unmannerly and told me that his owners would complain to H.M. in Councill, etc., so yt. in case such a complaint should happen, I hope H.M. as also yr. Ldships. will consider ye necessity of doeing it, and yt. it has always been my study to encourage as much as lay in my power all tradeing ships. Our trade with ye Spaniards is very dead, tho' we have always sloops and vessell(s) upon that coast, but all their advantage, as they tell me, is that they gett a new penny for an old. The Assembly has been sitting since the first of this month, and I hope in 10 days they will finish what they have to doe. Our privateers has taken 5 French privateers, and we are endeavouring all we can to destroy them, they being so prejudiciall to us, and are in swarms round us; they have also taken two or three small prizes with cocoe, tobacco, etc., but ye dutys being one half more then they are worth, after their condemnation they ly rotting in the Harbour. The Attorney Generall being dead, Mr. Percivall who had H.M. Privy Seale has succeeded him accordingly. The Clark of ye Patents and Chancery haveing refused to act any longer, I have appointed Mr. Arnold Brown to supply his place till H.M. pleasure is known. The Island is at present pritty healthy except the small pox, by which in some places severall dye. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 4th May, 1710. 2½ pp. Endorsed,
170. i. ii. List of prize goods and duties demanded on them in Jamaica, with particular instances of hardships, referred to in following. Signed, by Order of the House, March 28, 1710, Jer. Collins, Cl. Assembly, and, by Order of the Council, Richd. Rigby, Cl. Council. Endorsed as preceding. 24 pp.
170. iii. Address of Governor, Council and Assembly of Jamaica to the Queen. We being sensible that our safety and preservation through this bloody and perillous war is (under God) entirely owing to your Majesty's care and protection, etc., now in our extream necessity and low condition to which our misfortunes have reduced us, and the impending danger which seems to threaten us, venture to prostrate ourselves at your Royal feet, etc. We humbly presume your Majesty must have been already inform'd of our many losses sustain'd of late from the enemy, and of the great desertion of our seafaring men, in whom consisted our best defence, and we have reason to fear, those which remain will continue to desert, unless your Majesty extend your bountiful relief to us in what we humbly conceive to be the cause of our misfortunes, etc., which we take to be the demand of duties upon prize goods by colour of the Act for encouraging the trade to America, most of which very much exceed the intrinsick value of the said goods themselves, to the unspeakable prejudice of the merchants and others concern'd in fitting out private ships of war. Refer to the preceding. This we look upon to be the fountain and source of our misfortunes, which are the more sensible to us, when we reflect upon the happy effects that Act of Parliament seem'd to promise; at its first publishing great numbers of seafaring men from all parts resorting to us, and abundance of private ships of war fitted out, which did very great service against our enemies. Your Majesty will be concern'd to hear that by an interpretation of an Act made for the encouragement of Trade, Trade is decay'd amongst us; what was intended for the benefit of private ships of war has prov'd the ruin of several persons concern'd in them, and that what was design'd for the strengthning your Majesty's Colonies and destruction of your enemies, has in effect dispeopl'd this your Island, and given your enemies and opportunity of triumphing over us. And whether your Majesty's ships here have not suffer'd in their proportion by desertions occasion'd in great measure by the aforesaid demands, we leave to be represented to you by your Majesty's late Admiral here and other your Majesty's Commanders. Wherefore we humbly hope your Majesty will be of opinion that this is an unnatural construction of an Act of Parliament, etc., and that the duties intended to be paid by that Act are such only as always have been paid for the support of your Majesty's Government of this Island, without which we have not means to support it; and that your Majesty will be graciously pleased to give directions that no further or other duties be demanded on prize-goods, and what has been exacted to be restored, etc. Signed, Tho. Handasyd, Richd. Rigby, Cl. Concil., Pe. Beckford, Jr., Speaker. March 28th, 1710. Same endorsement. Copy. 3 pp. [C.O. 137, 8. Nos. 80, 80 i.–iii.; and (without enclosures) 138, 13. pp. 108–114.]
March 27.
St. Xphers.
171. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I here send your Lordshipps the Minutes of the Generall Councill and Assembly to this day. I shall use my utmost indeavours to perswade them to do what may be for the Queen's service and intrest of these Islands. I hope I shall do my duty, though 'tis difficult to guess what they will do. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read 9th June, 1710. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 19; and 153, 11. p. 28.]
March 28.
Whitehall.
172. Mr. Secretary Boyle to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following. Signed, H. Boyle. Endorsed, Recd. Read March 30, 1710. 1 p. Enclosed,
172. i. Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to Mr. Secretary Boyle. Admiralty Office, March 24, 1709/10. As to what is proposed by the Report [of the Council of Trade and Plantations] towards lessening the freight of pitch and tarr from North America (v. Feb. 14), protections are always given to such ships as proceed to the Plantations, when their owners or masters desire the same, but it has been customary for the Captains of H.M. shipps to take their men from them, when they arrive in England, and to put the like number of their own men in lieu, to sayl them to the ports where they are design'd to unload, for without doing this, the greatest part of those men, if not all, would be intirely lost from H.M. service, etc. There is not only the Law relating to the colliers, but another also which forbids the taking men from tradeing ships or privateers in the Plantations, so that the men are thereby effectually secured in those parts, but then it is attended with this ill consequence to H.M. service, that when by death or sickness the Queen's ships in the Plantations are rendered incapable to proceed to sea, their Commanders dare not use such methods as formerly to supply themselves with men; insomuch that severall ships have remain'd intirely useless, as at this time at Jamaica two of H.M. ships of the fourth rate have layn long in harbour for want of men to bring them home; and several others cannot, for the same reasons, proceed on those services which are necessary, as well for annoying the enemy, as the security of the trade. Besides, it is reasonable to believe that this restraint from pressing men in the Plantations does induce many seamen to runn from H.M. service, and betake themselves to the privateers. As to what is further proposed, that good and regular convoys may be appointed twice in each year for the aforesaid trade, we do humbly represent to H.M. that ships of war are constantly appointed every year to convoy merchant ships and vessells to the Plantations, and when they arrive, either those very ships, or such as they relieve in those parts, bring the Trade from thence, so that the ships for pitch and tarr may have opportunitys of going and returning with them. And if it shall be H.M. pleasure that two convoys be particularly appointed in each year, to attend on the aforesaid pitch and tarr ships, we cannot conceive that the advantages, which may arise from that trade will ballance the charge of such convoys. It is further proposed by the Council for Trade that the commanders of the convoys to the Plantations may be strictly enjoin'd to sail from thence at the time which shall be first prefixt by them; to which we do humbly answer, that it has been always usual to fix a number of days, at the desire of the merchants for their stay in those parts, but in regard of accidents by bad weather or otherwise, by which the merchant ships might be interrupted in taking in their loading, it has been frequently left to the Commanders in Chief of the Convoys, to stay some few days longer in case the Governors of the Plantations, or the merchants there, should represent it to be necessary, otherwise the ships of warr appointed for the good of the trade in generall, might return to England with the smallest part thereof. Signed, Orford, G. Byng, Geo. Dodington, P. Methuen. Endorsed, Recd. Read March 30, 1710. 3½ pp. [C.O. 388, 12. Nos. 92, 92 i.; and 389, 21. pp. 98–101; and (enclosure only) S. P. Naval, 8 under date.]
March 30.
St. James's.
173. Order of Queen in Council. Approving Representation of March 14 concerning Sir T. Laurence. Instructions are to be given to the new Governor of Maryland to use his utmost endeavours with the Assembly there that a law be passed for regulating Ordinaries without limitation of time, and that the benefit of the licences be thereby appropriated to the use of the Secretary, and that they compensate Sir T. Laurence for the loss of the same since 1704, etc. Set out, A.P.C. II. pp. 532–534. q.v. Signed, Wm. Blathwayt. Endorsed, Recd. 17th, Read 19th April, 1710. 2½ pp. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 7; and 5, 727. pp. 175, 176; and 5, 11. No. 7.]
March 30.
St. James's.
174. Order of Queen in Council. Confirming 2 Acts of Jamaica, for securing Port Royal, and appointing way wardens, etc. of. Feb. 24. Signed, William Blathwayt. Endorsed, Recd. Read April 5, 1710. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 137, 8. No. 79; and 138, 13. pp. 105–107.]
March 30.
St. James's.
175. Order of Queen in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Signed, William Blathwayt. Endorsed, Recd. Read May 17, 1710. 1 p. Enclosed,
175. i. Petition of Alexander Skeene to the Queen. Governor Crowe refuses to restore petitioner to the office of Secretary of Barbados. Prays that H.M. Order (Ap. 28 and May 7, 1709) may be enforced. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 24, i.; and 29, 12. pp. 104–106.]
March 30.
St. James's.
176. Order of Queen in Council. Approving of Representation upon petition of Francis Pouch and Daniel Gashet, and ordering accordingly as to flags of truce etc. Set out, A.P.C. II. pp. 617–619 q.v. of. March 14. Signed, Wm. Blathwayt. Endorsed, Recd. 17, Read 19 April, 1710. 3½ pp. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 16; and 153, 11. pp. 17, 18.]
March [ ].
Antigua.
177. Extract of letter from Jonathan Dickenson to John Askow in London. The Caribbee Isles are so much troubled with the French privateers from Martinico, that no vessells can pass in or out for them, Monserat they attempted to attack with six sail of their privateers, but were repulsed on their landing; they have plundered the Dutch Island named Stacia: about two months since a small galley belonging to Leverpoole, the evening before she made Antigua, a French privateer sloop came up with her, lay by all night, and about 5a.m. attack'd the galley with a design to board her, but the Leverpoole man having provided broken glass bottles with which he covered his decks, and retiring to his close quarters, as the privateer came up, he so levelled his chase guns upon him, that he made a lane fore and aft on the French man's decks, who still advanced and boarded him, but finding it impossible to keep the galley decks by reason of their warm fire from their close quarters, powder chests, etc., they were obliged to retire, etc. This is the more remarkable because almost every week since I have been at Antigua, we have heard of our vessells being taken and carried into Martinico. Fr. Pinnel from Bristol was taken into Martinico, he came in a flag of truce to Antigua, and going from thence to Nevis, was again taken by another privateer, and sett on shoar at Barbuda, whence in a small boat he got to Nevis. We have certain advice from Martinico that 4 sloops, and our late West India Packet boat taken in Oct. last, are fitted out to cruize this summer on the coast of Virginia, Pennsylvania and New York, and the French in Hispaniola intend two sloops for the same coast; they also threaten the River Delaware, and they will be on that coast from this month untill Sept., unless they are disturbed. Endorsed, Recd., from Mr. Penn. 17th, Read 19th July, 1710. Copy. 1½ pp. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 27.]