America and West Indies
April 1710

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1924

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68-84

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'America and West Indies: April 1710', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 25: 1710-1711 (1924), pp. 68-84. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73829 Date accessed: 30 September 2014.


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April 1710

[April 1.]178. Observations on the Instructions to George, Earl of Orkney, Lt. and Governour General of H.M. Colony of Virginia. 1–3. mention of certain Acts omitted. (4) Whenever the Kingdom of England in mencon'd. to be Great Britain, and instead of English Mariners, British. Endorsed. Recd. (from Col. Spotswood) 1st. Read 3rd April, 1710. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 1316. No. 43.]
April 1.
St. James's.
179. H.M. Warrant to Geo. Lillington, Councillor of Barbados, for 20 months' leave of absence, etc. Countersigned. Sunderland. [C.O. 5, 210. p. 206.]
April 2.180. Mr. Jackson to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I heartily condole with yr. Ldships. the present miserable state of Newfoundland, and hope that some man of honour and probity may be sent Officer in Chief, who will not be bribed to betray it, nor afraid to defend it, etc. Nothing but treachery or cowardice could have made the enemy possessors of it, for that place and garrison as we left it could never have been thus surprised unless a profound lethargy had seized on both officers and soldiers all at once, etc. Praises Capt. Moody, and Mr. Colin Campbell in the former defence, etc. Signed, John Jackson. Addressed. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 194, 4. No. 127.]
April 2.181. Same to Mr. Popple. Enclosing preceding. Signed, John Jackson. Endorsed. Recd. 3rd, Read 4th April, 1710. Addressed. ½ p. [C.O. 194. 4. No. 128.]
April 4.
Whitehall.
182. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Handasyd. Acknowledge letter of Dec. 17. We are sorry to perceive that the sickness you mention has swept away so many of the inhabitants and soldiers. However we hope the loss of the latter will be made up by the recruites lately sent, for, as we have been informed by Capt. Gardner, there are more gone than will compleat your Regiment. What you write touching the bad condition of the men of war, and the Island's being infested by the enemies privateers, has been laid before the Commissioners of the Admiralty. You would have done well to have transmitted to us a copy of the Proclamation you issued for granting a pardon to the pyrates on the Spanish coast, etc., that we might thereby have been more particularly informed of the said pirates. We do not understand that any of the members of Councill who trade in negroes on their own account are disqualifyed from sitting on Appeals, so they do not act as Agents or Factors for others in that trade. We are somewhat surprized to hear of the arrival of the flotilla at Cadiz, under the convoy of only two French men of war, and wonder that they should escape the observation of the Queen's ships, and your privateers, so as to have no manner of intelligence of them from you. P.S. Enclose Order confirming Acts, March 30. [C.O. 138, 13. pp. 102–104.]
April 4.
Whitehall.
183. Mr. Popple to Mr. Carkesse. Explains, for the information of H.M. Commissioners of Customs, why the Council of Trade do not think it necessary to make the corrections proposed by Col. Spotswood in the Earl of Orkney's Instructions (v. April 1). "As to the alteration of ye word England for Great Britain, it is not used otherwise than as a reciteals out of Acts pass'd before the Union." [C.O. 5, 1363. pp. 169–171.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
184. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord High Treasurer. Enclose accounts of incidental expenses of the Office, and pray for payment of six months' salaries of Secretary and under officers. v. Journal of Council. [C.O. 388, 76. Nos. 96–98; and 389, 36. pp. 457–460.]
April 6.
Whitehall.
185. Mr. Drift to Col. Spotswood. Encloses packets from the Council of Trade for New York, New England, Maryland, and Col. Jenings. Signed, Adrian Drift. [C.O. 5, 1363. pp. 171, 172.]
April 9.
Spanish Town.
186. Governor Handasyd to Mr. Popple. Acknowledges duplicate of letter of Sept. 14th, the originall being not comed to my hand, etc. One of our privateers has brought in about 6 days agoe a brigantine and a sloop taken from the French loaden with tobacco, talloe, hides, sugar and Maderay wine, etc. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. 4th, Read 5th July, 1710. Addressed. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 9. No. 9; and 138, 13. p. 142.]
April 9.
Spanish Town.
187. Same to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Since my last (duplicate enclosed), here has happened some alterations. I told you that I hop't in 10 dayes the Assembly would have finished both to the satisfaction of themselves as well as me; but as commonly our temper is here not to be very study, oftentimes troubled with a great deal of air and emptiness, blown up by the misunderstanding that has happen'd betwixt Mr. Beckford, who is Collector for foreign dutyes, and the Gentlemen here who believes the Island has suffered a great deall by it, as certainly it has, as your Lordshipps will see by the enclos'd coppyes. The originall of which was sent by a Bristoll runner named the Elton gally, it was signed by the Clerk of the Council, the Speaker of the Assembly Mr. Beckford and myself, in behalf of the whole Island; but this misfortune which I shall give you the following account is the reason why the duplicate is not sign'd as well as the originall, but I do assure your Ldshipps. that they are true coppyes. On Monday night last being the 3rd inst. the Assembly at an unusuall hour betwixt 9 and 10 a clock at night, meet at the Assembly house, and their ffell into such warm debates about turning out their Speaker, that they put the whole Town in an uproar and murder was cryed out in severall places. Upon which alarum I run with all speed towards the Assembly house, in my way I heard a voice and a man comeing towards me, which I took to be Col. Beckford, altho' at some distance, who said that the Assembly had or was goeing to murder his sonn the Speaker, to which I answer'd, that I hop't to God I should come time enough to prevent, if not already done; upon which I heard a noise, which was the poor old Gentleman that ffell; by which he dy'd in 2 or 3 minutes, notwithstanding there was severall hundreds of people abt. him, and endeavour'd all they could to bring him to life again, but nothing to the purpose. When I came at the Assembly house, haveing no Provost Marshall nor anybody with me, I resolved to prevent what mischeifs might happen, finding them all in an uproar and confusion, I rusht in amongst them, and in H.M. name commanded the house to adjourn till next morning, which I must say they immediately obeyed, nor did I see any sword drawn. The next morning I endeavour'd to send for the cheif of them to reconcile matters betwixt them, but found they had divided in relation to the chuseing of a new Speaker, one party pretending they would continue for the old, and the other for a new one; but finding the party for the old to be the majority, and finding they had done all the bills they designed to doe for this Sessions, that is to say, the quartering Act, an Act for the maintenance of prisoners of war, an Act for the raiseing of £5000 for fitting out 2 sloops for the security of the coast, an Act for raiseing an additionall duty and appropriateing severall summs of money. The Councill did unanimously advise me since they resolv'd to goe upon noe other business, and that the heat and divisions amongst them was grown to such a height, that it would be of evill consequence to keep them any longer together; I sent the Provost Marshall for these in the house, the other party being out of doors, for them immediately to attend at the Councill Chamber, where these four bills was past, where both these that was with the old Speaker, and these with the new one came immediately. I took noe notice of the disputes that they had had amongst themselves nor named neither of their Speakers, but thank't them for their quick dispatch, and dissolv'd them as customery, which I found was very much to all their satisfactions. I have likewise sworn into the Councill in the place of Col. Beckford decd. according to H.M. Privy Seal Capt. Francis Oldfield. I shall take care to get the Acts as also the minutes of the Councill and Assembly ready to send by H.M. man of warr the Kingston, who will be ready to saile against the middle of the next month; but cannot possibly get them ready to send by this pacqt. boat, neither do I think them safe, by reason she has been 11 or 12 weeks in her passage, etc. The pacqt. has brought me 37 recruites, the Capt. told me there was 70 put on board, but cannot give any acct. what's become of the rest, which I think is very hard usage, altho' the men says their was but 3 dy'd in their passage. P.S. the poor Sergt.'s pardon I have hourly expected, but as yet have not receive(d) it. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 3 pp. [C.O. 137, 9. No. 10; and 138, 13. pp. 142–147.]
April 9.
Spanish Town.
188. Governor Handasyd to the Earl of Sunderland. Duplicate of preceding. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 20.]
April 11.
Dartmouth.
189. Mayor of Dartmouth to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Our traders at Newfoundland, upon promises of an early convoy, have fitted their ships for Fishing voyages, and unless they forthwith proceed, they are in noe manner of hopes to gett a Farthing, for the fishing season will be spent, etc. They pray your Lordships' assistance, they having laid this matter before the Lds. of the Admiralty, but find noe redress, etc. Signed, Tho. Newman, Mayor. Endorsed, Recd. 15th, Read 19th April, 1710. Addressed. ¾ p. [C.O. 194, 4. No. 129.]
April 17.190. W. I'anson, Gunner at Fort William, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following. The memoryalls relating to Quebeck, etc., in Canada, and to ye barbarous usage of English prisoners there, are what Major Lloyd delivered to mee att Renes in France, where hee still remaines, to bee layne before yr. Lordshipps, etc. He prays to bee specially demanded from France, and that yr. Honors will suspend judgment upon him, etc. Recommends a pilot for those coasts. Signed, Wm. I' Anson. Endorsed, Recd. Read April 20th, 1710. Addressed. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
190. i. Narrative of the state of Fort William and the surprise thereof. In ye night between Dec. 21 and 22, 1708, and between ye hours of 4 and 5 of ye clock, Fort William was surprised and taken by 160 French, Canadyans and Indyans, there being att that time 13 soldiers and 19 inhabitants with a sergt., corporal and gunner on guard, besides others present in ye Fort, Major Lloyd, Lt. Tym. Gullye, Lt. Tho. Phillips, Wm. Chalmers, Surgeon, and 40 or 50 soldiers more. 16 guns were mounted on the ramparts, and one fronting ye Maine Gate and Bridge. Arms and ammunition were ready and in good order. New pallasades had been sett upp near ye trench. In ye New Fort adjacent to Fort Wm. was another guard (of ye Militia), about 40 men, besides abt. 400 men more nott on guard but within ye sd. Fort. The enemy, with scaling ladders, one to every 6 men, wch. they had made ye day before in ye neighboring woods, approacht within musquett shott of ye outward pallasades before discovered; ye first centrye yt. challenged ym. was that on ye S.W. corner of ye new Fort; who (after 3 or 4 essays to fire his peice in vaine) quitted his poste and ranne to alarme ye next centrye on ye N.W. of ye new fort; crying as hee rann, Fire, Fire, but ye other centrye, thinking (as supposed) some of ye inhabitants' houses might have been on fire, might turne his eyes that way, for hee saw not ye enemye untill ye other centrye arrived, and shewed him, when he fired on them, and killed one man. After this, all ye centryes round both ye Forts fired to alarme. But ye enemye, upon ye first challenge, with all their speed rann upp to Fort Wm. in order to scale ye same, insomuch yt. myself (being in less than a minute after ye fire of ye first musquett on ye rampts.) saw the foremost of their bodye descending ye trench with their ladders. In my passage to ye rampts. I had mett Fra. Neall (a Frenchman who had deserted and by Engineer Vane ordered to doe dutye of gunner instead of Wm. Mathews deceased, and for that night was gunner on guard) from whom I recd. a lighted match and a horne (as I supposed) wth. powder; hee going from mee to allarm ye other gunners, and to unlock ye powder chests (as I understood). Passing by ye guard house, I saw a number of inhabitants without. I pray'd some of them to goe and assist mee on ye plattforme, but not one went with mee, some answering mee, it was none of their buisness. When I came on ye rampts. I lookt over, and saw ye enemy entering ye trench, when I forthwith layd down a gunn and poynted it towards ye enemye; butt (when I came to prime ye same), I discovered affter sundrye essays yt. ye horne (I recd. from Neall) had no powder in it, upon which I ran to ye nearest powder chest, with hopes to have torne ye same open, but could nott by reason they had been lately fixt wth. new leather. Mr. Jno. Huxford joyned mee, and I left him to trye his endeavours, while I went to ye barrack for another horne of powder. When passing againe by ye inhabitants yn. crowding under ye shelter of ye Guard-house chimney, I taxed them with their cowardice. But none of them did goe on ye ramparts, except two, who were both killed or wounded. I was hasting back with another horne and match, but perceived numbers of the enemye allready within upon ye plattforme, and some of ym. fighting even att ye foot of ye ramparts. I judged then yt. ye onely refuge left was ye small armes. I went to furnish myself therewith in ye Major's Hall, when I saw Major Lloyd come in for ye keys, crying as hee rann, To ye Gates, Open ye Gates! when perceiving yt. hee wou'd have ye sallyport opened for ye inhabitants, and that no person followed to assist him, I rann after him, but was intercepted by a croud off our own men flying before ye French and pressing into ye Hall, by whom I was forced back againe, having been so farr out as to see Major Lloyd in his runn towards ye sally port to seize on a Fuzee in a Frenchman's hand, by pulling which either ye Major or ye Frenchman fell. The foresaid English after they had entered into ye Hall, shutt to ye door; upon which I made my way through the back doors for ye sallyport, speaking for them in ye Hall to follow mee, but none did. I heard some say ye Major was shott. I made my way to ye sally port, and found myself amidst a number of French cutting down an Englishman with their axes, wch. occasioned mee to retire by the same way I came, etc., etc., and was made prisoner with Major Lloyd much wounded and bloodye; and this nott more than 3 minutes after ye first musquetts firing to alarm. Major Lloyd and Mr. Huxford were ye onely officers I saw abroad during ye time of action. The calling of the centryes Fire! Fire! did, I believe, amuse ye soldiers in bedd, with ye thoughts of some house in ye new Fort to bee on fire, as had often happened. If they had gott to their armes, they would have given a good acct. of their enemyes, being known to bee generally resolute bold fellows. But one of our most immedyat misfortunes was yt. of those 19 inhabts. then on guard in Fort Wm., so few would meet ye enemy on ye walls, which had they done, they then had given time enough for ye rest to have turned out. The South Castle surrender'd two days after, etc. Signed, Wm. I'Anson. Endorsed, Recd. April 20, 1710. 7¼ pp.
190. ii. A small description what the Indians did to the English prisoners six years agoe. There were about 300 Indians and 100 French, who came upon Dearfeild, where they killed and took about 200 prisoners. Ye Minister was taken with his wife and six childring, one of them they knock his brains out against the wall; his wife being a Gentlewoman bred and borne, daughter of Mr. Mayther, Minister at Northampton, brother to Mr. Cotton and Mr. Warram Walker, both Ministers in Boston, was most cruelly murthred, for she being bigg with child was not able to travail wth. her pack; she was oblidged wrest herself; her Indian master runs to her as she sat upon the snow and gives her a blow with his hatchett and stunned her, and than with all fury possible he strips her stark naked, and rips her belly open and brings forth ye child, and then sculps her, and when her husband came up, he took her sculp and threw at his face, many others they most cruelly put to death, this I speak not by hearsay, for I was a spectator and prisoner with them, some were starved, others was froz'n to death, others had their brains knock out, and of 100 prisoners, there was not above 40 when they came to Montryall. There was some that they burnt, and some yt. they scalded to death in ketles of boyling water, and made ym. suffer all sorts of cruelltys imaginable. I shall give you an acct. of two young men who suffered the cruelest death yt. ever was thought of, one was Jno. Kunball, a very stout-hearted man, being taken by the Indians he was condemned to be scalded to death; he was sent out with an axe to cut and gather wood together to heat the water; it was a great ketle that held nigh a barrell, ye Indians thought to have a brisk bout of dancing that would last 4 or 5 days, but as it happned they were greatly cheated, for whilst he was dancing round the boyling ketle with an(d) Indian boy, as it was the custome (and as it fell out was his master's son, he being a chief Captain) he hopping and skipping befor the Englishman, playing all sorts of his impish bastardly tricks till at last the english man perceived that the water was boyling hott, he catches up the little imp by his heels and flings him headlong into ye boyling ketle, the Indian Capt. further [? father] to ye boy, with some others takes up the Englishman and flings him after him, so he not only saved himselfe from an languishing death but he took revenge by sending a little whelp to Tophet headlong. They have a maxime among them yt. he yt. is to be burnt, is sett out in the feild and all the Indians make a ring round him, and there comes one of the old segnors and strips him stark naked, and with a deale of their reeding stuff they reed him all over as reed as blood, and that is to say yt. your to be burnt without any hops, that being done they give him an axe to cutt wood and gather it in together for to burn himself, and for to aggravat his sorrow, they will make him cutt a post and putt it in the ground to be tyed to, yt. being done, they make him strick fire and kendle it up himselfe, and then they tye him to the post, then they take pieces and barr of iron and old barrels of guns, and 1000 other instruments, which they put in the fire, and whilest they are heating, they dance round him. It may be that their is some hundreds to be tormenters, and he yt. invents most cruellty is ye best man. So when the irons be hott, each will take his instrument, one passing ye same across his shoulders, another will cast a gunn barrell betwixt his leggs, and so burn his private parts, others will take their knifes and cut gashes in leggs; others in his thighs and others in their armes, and they will mix powder, salt and brimeston and put it in their gashes, and sometimes hot embers, and then they will cease and unty him, and lead him to their wigwams, and give him some food, and so the next day they will begin again with some new inventions more cruell than the former, they will ty to the stake, and they will have 4 or 3 axes chain'd together which they heat reed hot, and then they put them round his neck for a necklace of amber beads or pearls, and with their hot irong which they will pass over all his body, so that he will not have a place so bigg as your finger but what is burnt and scorched, then comes up the women, all the old devillish sq[u]aws and childring and take their men's places, for they being weary and their sport is begune to grow old. End by tying his head between his leggs so yt. he will be quite round and so burn him to ashes, etc. 4pp.
190 iii. Names and condition of all English prisoners taken this year. Quebec, Oct 3, 1709. (1) The first prisoner that was taken and brought to Cannada, Mamed Mehumain Hindille belonging to Dearfield, brought to Muntryall by some Cannada Indians, and much misused by these barbarous heathens, first brought to the Governour and examined and brought to the Indian toun, and forced to rune the gauntlett, where they beat him as long as they would, and was given to the Governour and putt into prison att Quebec, and lying there about 6 weeks, the Indians was a going to warr, they begune to call to mind of their damnabl practice of burning an English prisoner before their departure to warr, they sent for him for to be burnt, the Governour readily gave him. We have had no news of him since. (2) Mrs. Whiten, from Dunstable, sick at Quebec. (3) One Moudy taken from Execter with his brother and Jeremiah Killman and Saml. Stevens. Moudy was burnt by the Indians near Willmarie, who suffere manfully all the torments that the barbarous heathns could inflict upon him. Sir Kilman his fellow martyre was likewise burnt att the same time and did suffer all the torments that those cursed Devills could inflict on him. I have spoken with one Martin Kellog, a very credible young man, weel known to all Northern parts of New England, who buried him. (4) Joseph Clesson and Jean Armjes, of Derfield, arriving in sight of Mountryall, the Indians began to call to mind of their damnable practise, which is when they come in sight of a French place, they make a stope, and strips their prisoners stark naked, and with their painting stuff red them all over, and sett them before the company that has been to warr, who have each of them a club in their hands, who, when the word is given, they run and their prisoners run, and what blows they can give them befor they get into the fort they have for to welcome them to their new habitation, and if they have strenth for to gett into the fort in the favor of the blows, there is att the entry of the fort gate a heap of squaws and childring who stand ready for to receive them with their sticks, clubbs, pols and fire—brands, who lay on with all the force and might till he getts into the wigwame where he is to live, and being once there, he is safe from all their cruelties. The Indians carryed Joseph Clesson and Jean Armes to rune the gautlett (as above) and sett them befor their damned crue, and the word was given to start. Clesson being a very nimble man, seeing a horse that was feeding not farr from the Fort, he runn att once and leapt up on the horse, and away runns he streight to the fort, but the Indians who seeing their prisoner fleed fort was in such a rage and fury that some of them flung themselves on the ground, and others out of madness pulled their hair, and wrang and twisted their hands, in the same time made crys that the very elements did thunder with the echo thereof, but poor Jno. Armes, who being in doolfull dumps behind, fearing that his turn wold come and pay for all, which indeed likeways came to pass, for the Indians sett him to running, and he had not run farr, but these barbarous heathns struck him doun to the ground, and beat him so pitifully that the young man could neither stand nor goe, neither could he speake, for he was carried into the Fort by two French men, who lay'd [him] upon a bed, and there he lay from 1 p.m. till 7 at night without speaking. The Governor sent for him to examine him for to know what news there was, which was their only end and designe in sending their Indianitish dogs for ym., but the poor man could never speak a word to ym. The next day he was a litle better, and the Indians carry'd him away into the woods, but we have not heared of him since. Clesson was by the French given to the Indians, which having laid their claws on him, soon called to mind what a trick he had served ym.,begune as it is a custome for to take revenge; they fell on him with their clubs and axes and some with their knives and others with stons, and beat him in such a shamefull manner that they had like to have killed him,they cut off his right hand and his face was cutt and hacked to pices, but they did not kill him as it happn'd, he is now with the Indians, but it is much to be feared that they will doe by him as they have done by many others. (5) Two Dutchmen that belong to Albany was taken by their brother in law, a Frenchman latly a liver in Albany, but these letter years was become a traitor, who being out with a small pairty of French and Indians, happn'ed to light of these two men, and had very like to have been burnt, but were put into prison att Quebec, and there they are both weel. (6) The last prisoner that was made was brought to Quebec about a week agoe, he was taken from Wels, Saml. Russell by name, but they have misued him much, for he being shott into the arme, and more then that it was the Lord Intendant that sent them and gave them 600 livers for to take an English prisoner. He is now att the Hospital att Quebec. etc. There never passes a summer but there is a considerable number burnt and most cruely murthered. I have been 6 years a prisoner in Canada, etc. Endorsed, Recd.April 20, 1710. 6 pp. [C.O.194, 4. Nos. 131, 131 i.–iii.]
April 19.
Whitehall.
191. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Enclosess letter from the Mayor of Dartmouth concering convoys for Newfoundland (April 11th). [C.O. 195, 5. p. 140.]
April 19.
Admiralty Office.
192. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Mr. My Lords of the Admiralty are very much surprized at this application of the Mayor of Dartmouth (April 11th, 19th), since there are convoys appointed which have lain for some days under orders to proceed to Newfoundland with the fishing ships,and to call at Dartmouth and the several ports westward for the trade, and that nothing but contrary winds can hinder their sayling from Spothead, where ye convoys now are; and Capt. Aldred, Commander of the Rochester,who is ye Commmodore, has directions to send notice overland to the severall ports between that and Falmouth, by what time he shalbe off the said ports, that so the Trade may gett ready to joyne him upon his calling for them, and I believe he has ere this sent notice accordingly. Signed, J.Burchett. Endorsed,Recd.Read April 20, 1710. Addressed. 1½ pp. [C.O. 194,4. No. 130; and195,5.p. 144.]
April 20.
St.James's.
193. Order of Queen in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Signed, Chris.Musgrave. ¾p.Endorsed,Recd.Read May 11, 1710.1p.Enclosed,
193. i. Petition of Capt.Edward Cowley to the Queen. In 1698 and till the death of King William, Petitioner was engaged with severall others, for the carrying on and settleing a Colony on Tobago, of which he was unanimously chosen Governour by all the undertakers, and that with H.M.Royall approbation, who was pleased to declare that petitioner's charges in the carrying on that design should be repaid, with a consideration for his time and trouble, if it should not succeed. His late Royall Highness, the Prince of Denmark was a great promoter and favourer of that undertaking, as were others of great quality, which to pursue he did his utmost endeavour, and disposed above 500 families, besides masons, carpenters and other handicraftsmen, and a great number of fforeign Protestants to settle on the said Island, and with his said late Majesty's consent, officers commissioned for the Militia to be there, were taken out of the half—pay officers of the English Army, they desiring it. Which notwith standing, the French Ambassador and the Dutch having put in their caveats, Petitioner found himself oblieged to make a voyage into Holland to attend H.M.on that affair; of which he conceived great hopes,for that the House of Commons had desired H.M. to encourage as many as would make acquisitions in America. Notwithstanding all the trouble,pains and care taken by Petitioner, and the expence of £600 with his being out of Commission 3 years, the undertaking fell by the death of his then Majesty, whom petitioner had the honour to serve in the Household for severall years, till his death. And besides that, Petitioner was a great sufferer by the violence of the Papists in Ireland, etc., etc. Prays for compensation. Copy. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 23, 23 i.; and 29, 12.pp.101–104.]
April 20.
London.
194. The Four Indian Kings'[Sachems']Speech to the Queen. Great Queen! We have undertaken a long and tedious voyage, which none of our predecessors could ever be prevail'd upon to undertake.We have been as a strong wall for the security of H.M.children against her enemies the French, even to the loss of our best men. The truth of which our brother Queder (Col. Schuyler) and Anadagarjaux, Col.Nicholson, can testify, they having all our proposals in writing. We were mightily rejoiced when we heard by Anadagarjaux that our great Queen had resolved to send an army to reduce Canada; from whose mouth we readily embraced our Great Queen's Instructions; and in token of our Friendship, we hung up the Kettle, and took of the Hatchet; and with one consent joined our brother Queder and Anadagarjaux in making preparations on this side the Lake, by building Forts. Storehouses, canouws, and baatows; whilst Anadiasia. Col.Vetch, raised an army at Boston, of which we were informed by our Ambassadors, whom we sent thither for England, to join Anadiasia, to go against Quebec by sea, whilst Anadagarjaux,Queder and we went to Mont Royal by land; but at last we were told that our Great Queen, by some important affair,was prevented in her design for that season. This made us extream sorrowful, lest the French, who hitherto had dreaded us, should now think us unable to make war against them. The reduction of Canada is of such weight, that after the effecting thereof, we should have free hunting, and a great trade with our Great Queen's Children; and as a token of the sincerity of the Six Nations, we do here, in the name of all, present our Great Queen with these Belts of Wampum. In case our Great Queen should not be mindful of us, we must, with our families, forsake our country and seek other habitations, or stand neuter; either of which will be much against our inclinations. Since we have been in Alliance with our Great Queen's Children, we have had some knowledge of the Saviour of the world; and have often been importuned by the French; both by the insinuations of their priests, and by presents, to come over to their interest, but have always esteem'd them men of falshood. But if our Great Queen will be pleas'd to send over some persons to instruct us, they shall find a most hearty welcome, etc. Endorsed, April 20, 1710. Printed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1049. No. 157.]
April 20.
Maryland.
195. Mrs. Contee to Mr. Seymour. The duties of ships cleared in Potomack, before your father died, and by vertue of his order amounted to £56. I thought it was reasonable it should belong to the Governor's estate, but Col. Lloyd commanded the bills out of my hands, etc. cf. Aug. 14. Endorsed, Recd. Read Oct. 27, 1710. Copy. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 17.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
196. Mr. Popple to Thomas Newman, Mayor of Dartmouth. Encloses Mr. Burchett's reply relating to Newfoundland convoys, April 19. [C.O. 195, 5. p. 142.]
April 20.
Whitehall.
197. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Encloses Heads of Enquiry (same as June 9, 1709) for the Commodore of the Newfoundland Squadron. [C.O. 195, 5. p. 143.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
198. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Enclose extract from Governor Dudley's letter, Jan. 31, relating to the desire of the Massachusetts Bay and New Hampshire that the expedition against Canada may be renewed, etc. [C.O. 5, 913. p. 203.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
199. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Encloses extract of Col. Jenings' letter, Jan. 11, relating to the loss of H.M.S. Garland, etc. [C.O. 5, 1363. p. 180.]
April 21.
Whitehall.
200. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Encloses extract of Governor Dudley's letter, and representation of merchants of the Massachusetts Bay relating to Naval Stores. v. Jan. 31. [C.O. 5, 913. pp. 223, 224.]
April 22.
Barbados.
201. Council of Barbados to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The favourable reception as well as justice, which some of us have met with from your Lordship's honourable Board, has encourag'd us to make fresh application to your Lordships, etc. 'Tis not but with the greatest concern that we finde ourselves oblig'd to lay before your Lordships some resolves of the late Generall Assembly against us for not passing, as they pretend, the Excise Bill, but in truth for our disagreeing to their choyce of Mr.Downes, whom the Assembly had appointed Treasurer by that Bill, for, excepting that appointment, the Councill unanimously agreed to every thing elsse contain'd therein. Your Lordships have very lately had an occasion of inquireing into that Gentleman's conduct, and we have been soe happy to have seen your Lordships' report thereon to H.M., and her Royall approbation thereof, which was one of the greatest inducements wee had to oppose be laid before H.M.in Council.Your Lordships will please alsoe to peruse the draught of a Bill which now lyes before the Governor and Councill, the passing whereof we hope will in a great measure take away the bone of contention, and consequently put an end to our unhappy differences, etc.; but if from private views this Bill should meet with opposition in the Assembly,as we have great reason to apprehend, we hope to stand fair in your Lordships' good opinion, having contributed on our part everything for promoting the publick good. Signed, Wm.Sharpe, Saml.Cox, Middleton Chamberlen,Alexander Walker, Tho. Alleyne,Sam.Beresford,Jno.Pilgrim,Timothy Salter. Endorsed, Recd. Read July 13th, 1710. 2 pp. Enclosed,
201. i. Copy of resolves of the Assembly of Barbados, March 14,1709, against the Council, upon their amendment to the Excise Bill, proposing to appoint a Treasurer, Raines Bate, in place of the Treasurer appointed by the Assembly. Same endorsement. 2 pp.
201. ii. Copy of reply of the Council of Barbados to preceding. Signed as covering letter. Same endorsement. 2½ pp. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 30, 30 i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 29, 12. pp. 111–113.]
April 23.
Barbados.
202. Governor Crowe to the Earl of Sunderland.Since my last (March 6) Capt.Spann arrived here with the Jamaica Fleet, who bringing me no orders from your Lordp., nor advice od any of H.M.ships to conduct me home, and least any delay should be numbered among the many crimes I am censured with, I intend to embarke on a merchant ship, Capt.Swann,who is now a loading and will sail in 15 dayers for London, being the instructions with Major Lillington who is the first in H.M.Council, etc. No signature or endorsement. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 43. No. 39.]
April 24.
Admiralty Office.
203. Mr.Burchett to Mr. Popple. Acknowledgesletter of April 21.My Lords Commrs.of the Admiralty have sent the Heads of Enquiry to Capt.Aldred of the Rochester, who is Commander in Chief of the ships going to Newfoundland, and given him directions thereupon accordingly. Signed,J.Burchett. Endorsed, Recd.25th,Read 26th April, 1710.Addressed. ¾ p [C.O. 194, 4. No. 132.]
April 24.
Antigua.
204. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses petition from the soldiers, upon which I have had them before the Generall Councill, and everyone upon oath examined in the presence of Col. Jones and the officers, and it appeared to me and the Councill their condition is very deploreable, and rather worse then sett forth by their petition. I have carryed Col. Jones with me from Island to Island, and muster'd the whole Regiment, and find in the whole but 260 effective men, tho' the severall Lt. Governors (whose business it was to muster them) have constantly muster'd them full. The Islands have been very healthy ever since the Regiment came, that few or none have died but for want of necessarys, some of the men have been sold to the Planters by the Coll. and many have chose to desert rather then perrish. I have often writt about the abuse of this Regiment, but have not been so happy to receive any answer, and what officers I have placed have been superceded, though in so doing I am not only warranted by my commission, but by the particular establishment of this Regiment signed by the Queen and Lord Treasurer, so that some Gentlemen have been superceded 10 months after they have done duty and ventured their lives. If this be Justice, I leave your Lordshipps to judge. I have so often writt upon this and other affaires, I should hereafter be silent did I not think the lives of so many poor wretches that perrish would lye at my doore, if I neglected endeavouring their reliefe to the utmost of my power. This is the originall quarrill of Col. Jones, who in revenge, has joined with Codrington's faction, and has vanity to think he shall (with his intrest and their money) remove me, and gett into my place. But I hope I am secure your Lordshipps and the Ministry will protect me whilst I do my duty, and I desire no more. There is an old maxim, Truth may be trampled underfoot, but never trodd out. And notwithstanding the vast summs raised and expended to procure friends, to remove me, and blacken my reputation, I shall (at long runn) be able to expose those that have espowsed their cause. I have religiously followed my Instructions, maintained H.M. Prerogative, and increased her Revenue, and those are my crimes, lett them pretend what they will to the contrary, and I don't doubt but to make the same apeare. The Generall Assembly has done nothing, but I am oblieged to the news brought whilst they were sitting, for they had yielded to my putting in their Clerk, and sent me a message writt by the Clerk I putt in, and was going to enter on business, but a Bristoll man arriveing that night at Nevis, Col. Jones, who was there, sent them word I was put out. The next morneing they insisted anew to choose their owne Clerk. I shall send the Minutes home, and leave it to your Lordshipps then to judge, whether I have acted well or ill. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. 19th, Read 20th June, 1710. Addressed. Postmark. 3 pp. Enclosed,
204. i. Petition of the poor and distressed soldiers belonging to Col. Jones' Regiment to Governor Parke. Some of us formerly belonged to Col. Whetham's regiment, and upon the officers being recall'd, we were here left without being paid, tho' we were in hopes after your Excellency had promised we should have our case represented home, we should have been paid, and been allow'd for the cloaths we had due to us. But to this day we have received neither. And for us that came from Ireland, 'tis now above 3 years since we came from thence, and dureing all this time wee have received hardly any pay, and only one coat, one capp, one shirt and one course lining jackett and breeches, one pair of shoes and one pair of stockings, all which were sent over by Col. Lillington, since which time, what shoes we have had from our officers, are charged to us at 12s. per pair, and course yarn stockings at 7s. the pair, and whatever we have had of them is charged proportionably, so that our whole pay is thus discounted; and to subsist us, wee have allow'd some of us 7lb. of beef, and others but 4lb. all the week, without any bread, and others of us have no allowance at all. All this great misery has befallen to us since Col. Jones had the Regiment, for before we had some cloaths and some money. But since he was our Col., which is about two years, we have had neither cloaths nor money. Our Officers tells us that they receive none from their Colonel. All provisions (such as we want), ever since Coll. Jones has been Coll., has been and still continues so cheap, that if wee were cloathed and paid, we might live comfortably without being obliged to the charity of the people, and lay up so much mony out of our pay, as to buy fresh meat, to relieve us when sick, for the want of which great number of us has perrished, and are already reduced to less then half a Regiment, and we are all like to perrish in a litle time, except your Excellency and Honours will recommend our sad and deplorable condition home to the Queen. We had long since laid this our condition before your Excellency, but for fear of our officers, from whose fury wee now begg protection. 110 signatures. Copy. Signed, Wm. Martin, Clerk of the Genl. Council. Endorsed as preceding. 1 large p. [C.O. 152, 9. Nos. 21, 21 i.; and (without enclosure) 153, 11. pp. 51–54.]
April 24.
Whitehall.
205. Mr. Popple to Mr. Solicitor General. The Council of Trade and Plantations having received frequent complaints of great waste committed in H.M. woods in New England, which, if not timely prevented, may be a great hindrance to the supplying of H.M. Navy with masts, send you enclosed Charter of the Massachusetts Bay. You will find a clause marked, by which all lands etc., formerly granted to any person or persons, towns, colleges, etc., are confirmed, and another clause whereby all trees of a certain diameter, growing upon any lands not heretofore granted to any private persons are reserved to the Crown. By this last mentioned clause the Crown is restrained from the cutting of masts growing upon the lands of private persons. But there has been a doubt made upon the meaning of those words private persons. Their Lordships desire your opinion whether by the words private persons mentioned in the last clause the lands granted to body's politic, towns, villages, colledges or schools, are to be understood. [C.O. 5, 913. pp. 234, 235.]
April 24.
Virginia.
206. Lt. Governor Jenings to the Council of Trade and Plantations. It is with a particular gratitude that I have had the honour to receive from your Lordships in your letter of Oct. 12 H.M. royal commands for settling the boundarys between this Colony and the Province of Carolina, together with H.M. Order in Council for removing those illegal interruptions that Government had given to our Indian trade, both which will prove as great a satisfaction and benefite to this country, as they are indeed of importance for H.M. service. The sudden departure of the ship, by which this is design'd, while the General Court is sitting, will not give me leave to enlarge upon what has been resolved on, in obedience to H.M. Commands, but I shall take the first safe opportunity to transmitt the same to your Lordships. I can only now acquaint your Lordps. that upon the arrival of Captain Smith last week in H.M.S. the Enterprize, I find that the sloop (v. March 10) is on the account of private persons, and so I have been obliged to discharge her: but the arrival of that ship, tho' she be in a bad condition (as having suffered very much in her passage) will be of great service to secure us against the privateers. There hath of late been very happily discovered an intended insurrection of the negroes, which was to have been put in execution in Surry and James City Countys on Easter Day; but the chief conspirators having been seasonably apprehended, their design is broke. There are two of them tryed this General Court, found guilty, and will be executed, and I hope their fate will strike such a terror in the other negros as will keep them from forming such designs for the future, without being obliged to make an example of any more of them. I am sorry to informe your Lordps. that diverse parts of the Countrey continue still very sickly, and that a great many are dead of that distemper which has in some degree or other gone through almost the whole Country. As to anything else, I thank God the country is in perfect quiet, and enjoys a greater plenty than could have been expected from the last years cropps. Signed, E. Jenings. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 7th July, 1710. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 1316. No. 47; and 5, 1363. pp. 189–191.]
April 25.
Whitehall.
207. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Enclose for H.M. signature draft of warrant to the Governor of Jamaica to use the new Seal for the Island prepared by Mr. John Roos, H.M. Seal cutter (cf. July 17, 1708, July 12, 1710.) [C.O. 138, 13. pp. 107, 108.]
April 25.
Admiralty Office
208. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. In answer to you letter of 21st inst., my Lords Commrs. of the Admiralty have ordered the Tryton's prize, a ship of the sixth rate, to be forthwith fitted for a voyage to Virginia, and to proceed and joine the Enterprize cruizing between the Capes there, in the roome of the Guarland. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. 25th Read 26th April, 1710. Addressed. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 1316. No 45; and 5, 1363. p. 181.]
April 27.209. Mr. Campbell to Mr. Popple. Desires to see the draugh of the Representation upon his petition, etc. Signed, Ja. Camp bell. Endorsed, Recd. Read April 27, 1710. Addressed. 1 p [C.O. 194, 4. No. 133].
April 28.210. Minutes of the Society (?for propagating the Gospel in Foreign parts). Reported from the Committee, that upon consulting Col. Nicholson, Col. Schuyler and the Indian Sachems themselves, for the more effectual prosecuting the design of converting the Indians. (i) That the Society should begin with sending two ministers, single persons, and an Interpreter. (ii) who should reside at Tynderooghe, the principal village of the Mohawks. (iii) £150 per annum to be allowed to each minister, and £60 to the Interpreter. (iv) That a chapel and house should be prepared in the said village for the missionaries and an Indian fort for their defence. (v) The Ministers are to perswade the Indians to permit their children to be instructed in our tongue, etc. and by help of those who have the education of the English youth in those parts, they are to take care to have some of them learn the Indian language. (vi) That a brief History of the Bible or New Testament, a catechism, some prayers, psalms, etc. be translated into the Indian language, and printed and copies thereof disperst among the Indians, and therein notice taken occasionally of the errors in the Quebec catechism, publisht by the French. (vii) That it be recommended to the Govrs. of New England and New York, strictly to put the laws in execution, against selling rum, brandy and other intoxicating liquors, to the Indians, this being the earnest request of the Sachems themselves. Signed, W. Taylor, Secretary. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 9. No. 51.]