America and West Indies
June 1710

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Cecil Headlam (editor)

Year published

1924

Pages

108-122

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'America and West Indies: June 1710', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 25: 1710-1711 (1924), pp. 108-122. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73832 Date accessed: 20 August 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

June 1710

June 1.
Whitehall.
252. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Since our letter of May 17, we have received a Memorial from the merchants of Bydeford, (No. 250). We referr your Lordship to Representation of June 2 last, and shall now only observe that from the first discovery of Newfoundland till about ye 9th year of King James I., the English were the sole possessors of that Island, and of the Fishery in those parts, at which time the French first began to fish at Newfoundland, and in the reign of King Charles I., they were allowed to fish to the westward of Cape Raze, paying 5 p.c. for all their ships going thither. King Charles II. confirmed to them the foresaid liberty of fishing free and discharged of the said payment of 5 p.c., as did likewise his successor King James II., which several confirmations so accepted of are an evidence that the French had no other right to that Fishery than what they derived from the Crown of England. King William did not confirm those grants, but on the contrary in the 10th and 11th of his reign an Act was passed, Chap. 25th for resuming that Fishery, and for reinstating the subjects of this Kingdom in the sole enjoyment thereof. Tis to this Fishery that the great encrease of their shipping and numbers of seamen are owing. And another advantage they have by that trade is, that of late years 4 or 500 sail of ships have been employed therein, which is a much greater number than what has been employed by H.M. subjects. The French have the best and most convenient part of the Country for fishing; for their harbours lying to the southward are seldom annoy'd with the ice, whereas ours being more northerly, rarely are clear of it, till the beginning of May, and in their harbours there is a much greater plenty of fish, and more early in the season than in ours, whereby the French are frequently enabled to supply the markets in the Streights before our ships can sail from Newfoundland. By all which it may appear of what advantage it will be to the Fishery and Trade of this Kingdom, if upon a Treaty of Peace the entire possession of Newfoundland and the right of Fishery in those parts be delivered up to the Crown of Great Britain. [C.O. 195, 5. pp. 146–148.]
June 4.
St. Jago de la Vega in Jamaica.
253. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letters etc. of Nov. 25 and Jan. 19, 1709/10. As to what your Lordship says in relation to Capt. Gardner's answer about the recruits, I thank your Lordps. for your care, as well in regard of me, as of my Regiment: I must say, I have received 78 or 79 recruits by the two last pacquetts, but most of them being the sadest mortalls that ever was sent out of the Kingdom, being of all nations and languages, and of as many religions. I am sorry to say that I thinke H.M. service, as well as my honour and reputation will very much suffer in case any attempt from the enemy be made on this side, by the sadness of such mortalls. I know no other reamedy on my part but patience: which I do assure your Lordships I have had opportunity enugh of tryall, since I have been concern'd as Governor of Jamaica. I pray God send me and H.M. Regiment under my command with honour out of it. And I heartly wish some ingenious brave man had the Goverment with all my heart. As to what your Lordships is pleas'd to say about my disbursements upon the account of private intilligence, what I did in that case, I gave an accot. from time to time of it; and if I had not done what I did, it had been imposible for me to have preserved the Island from the misfortunes of the enemy's invasions: as I now do experience, since I can have no farther intilligence, and as to the rebursement, I never expect a farthing of it, without your Lordships' assistance. As to what your Lordships says in relation to the decay of the Spanish trade, I gave an accot. some time agoe, that the reason of it was by the French carrying all comoditys to the South Seas, and selling them there, as cheap as wee can sell them here; which discourages the Spaniards from buying in these parts, and so are ready to sterve, as well as our other merchants here. As to the Flags of Truce, there has never been admitted to come into this harbor but two Spanyards, the one from St. Auga upon Cuba, and the other from Porta Prince. And one French man from Pettaquavous, which I wou'd not suffer any to converse with him, but order'd a Captain of a man of warr, and my owne son to stay constantly by him, that nobody did converse with him, or he with them: and so soon as wee had put wood and watter on board of him, he was order'd imediatly to sayle under convoy of a man of war, who had orders to see him to his owne port. As to the Spanyards, I treated them with a great deal more civility, and gave them leave to buy such things of our merchants as the law admitted, provided they were put on board English vessells to be carryed to the Spannish coast. As to the ambergreasse, I did all that lay in my power to support H.M. intrest, and put myself to between £47 and £48 expence; but shall sett that on the backside of my booke, as well as severall other actions, that I have caused to be brought against other persons for clandestine trade, but never found that any of them has had any effect, notwithstanding all the expences and paines I have been at the Jureys has always been pleas'd to bring in their virdicts ignoramus, or to that effect, except one sloop seized upon by Commadore Carr, and here condemed in the Admiralty Court, but since repeild in England. As to the Counscelers here, I think that they are no sooner put into the Councill, but they are troubled with one distemper or other, which they pretend makes them uncapable of doing their duty, so that I am the hardest putt to it to gett a Councill when there is a necesity for it. As to the Pyrats I gave you an accot. of before, I think most of them are either perished for want of support, or disperced elsewhere, there is not now above 200 that I can hear of upon the Spanish coast, and there is 37 of them come in hear (power sorry fellows) upon the proclamation. As to the escheats, I think it a very great discouragement to any person for ye future, for the discovering of them, by putting themselves to so much expence as they do, being 3 quarters of a year before they can regularly go through the Courts; besides the vast charge they are at to bring up their wittnesses to every Grand Court. I dar say that the 1/8th part of the land of this Island has had no heires for this 30 or 40 years past, nor pays no quitt-rent, notwithstanding the hardships the Treasurey lyes under, not being able to defrey one half of the yearly expences for the payment of the Governor, and other sallerys which are allowed on. As to the disputes between the Collector, Captors and private saylors belonging to the privateers, etc., your Lordships must have an Address from the Councell, Assembly and your humble servant before this time, by which accot. your Lordships will be informed the hardshipps this power Island lyes under. As to the proposalls of the 1000 Palitinates, in case they are sent over upon these proposalls, I beg leave to give your Lordshipps my oppinion what the faite will be, the nature of the planters in this part of the world are very ready in great promisses, but very backward in any performances. I remember that I have lost of my recruits since I came into this Island above 50 that have starved for want of lodging etc., and was not in my power or the officers to releive them, any other way than in money. Notwithstanding very few was taken into their houses, untill there was a law made by the Assembly which obliged them therein. In case every planter that has 50 negros [were obliged? Ed.] to take a woman and one child into their plantations, to those that have 100 negroes to take four, and so on, to those that have 4 or 500 in greater or lesser proportions for six months, and to furnish them with provisions and necessarys such as the plantation affoards, untill their husbands could clear ground, and build little houses to live in, and to plant corne and roots for their support, after which time their Familys may be united together in such parts, with such allowances of land as H.M. should thinke fitt to assigne them, now unpossessed, but in case it's left to the discretion of the planter what allowance of provisions he will give each of them, or whether he will give it them gratis, or bring them in as servants, I dread the consequence, but shall leave the further management thereof to your Lordships. As to the accot. you have sent me of the illegall trade, I do not know what to do in it, since I have no wittnesses to make it appear; it will be only putting myself to more needless expences. There being 2 or 3 Gallons at Carthagenia, in number in all 9 shipps, 7 being Spaniards, and 2 French, by the last accots. I had, they are making all the preparations they can to go for Europe. Our Commadore, Capt. Spann, is out with 4 men of warr; but what success he may have, God knows; he has about 150 of my Regiment on board the 4 shipps. There has been taken and brought in here 2 small French sloops laden with hides, tallow etc., and also 2 French privateers, and have also retaken two of our Sugger Drovers, whose business it is to fetch and carry things to and from the Island. Wee are sevearly pliqued with the enemy's small privateers, when ours meats with them, they commonly dust their dublitts. Ours has also brought in a large Spanish ship, about 250 tunns, which they say is loaden with Canary, Spanish brandy, vinager, olives, sweet meats, razions, and some dry goods; the value of which I do not know; but it's beleiv'd will prove a considerable prize. They had in passengers and men belonging to the ship 157 men, and the privateer that tooke her had no more than 65 men on board. Our Fleet it's beleived will sayle the 14th or 15th with Capt. Harris, Commander of the Kingston, Capt. Man, Commander of the Portsmouth, with 10 or 12 merchant men under their convoy; which I pray God send safe to great Brittin, etc. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. 14th, Read 19th July, 1710. 3 large pp. [C.O. 137, 9. No. 13;and 138, 13. pp. 157–165.]
June 4.
St. Jago de la Vega in Jamaica.
254. Governor Handasyd to the Earl of Sunderland. Acknowledges letters of Feb. 8 and 11. As to Capt. Fisher Wansworth's effects, he left the care of his affaires to 3 gentlemen, who has proved his will etc., and am of the oppinion that they are very honest men, etc. I have recd. yr. Lordship's orders for hireing of saylers for manning home the Kingston and Canterburry. As to the Kingston she is already mann'd, and I beleive with little expence to H.M., what with passengers and English saylors, and some French prisoners of war, etc. As to the Canterburry, I am informed she will require more to put her in a condition to sayle home, than she is worth; but shall be able to give your Lordships a better accot. when Commador Spann comes in, etc. As to the decay of the Spanish trade, the reason thereof is, by the French carrying all commoditys to the South Seas, and selling them there as cheap as wee can sell them here, which discourages the Spaniards from buying in these parts, and so are ready to sterve, as well as our merchants here. Repeats parts of preceding. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. 3 pp. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 22.]
[?]255. Same to Same. Acknowledges letter of Oct. 7, 1709, in the behalf of Mr. Robt. Hay. Compliments etc. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. No date. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 23.]
June 5.
London.
Ye Rainbow Coffee-house, Ludgate Hill.
256. John Phillips to [the Earl of Stamford.] Proposes to inform him of certain "indirect practices that are acted by a person employed in H.M. service in the Plantations," etc., "and expect you will give me satisfaction for my trouble," etc. Signed, Jon. Phillips. Endorsed, Recd. June 6th, Read 19th July, 1710. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 47; and 5, 913. p. 248.]
June 6 (N.S.)
Rio Essequibo, Fort Kykoverall.
257. P. Vanderheyder Réze to the Dutch West India Company. Signed as above. Endorsed, Recd. Sept. 22 (N.S.), 1710. Dutch. 8 pp. [C.O. 116, 21. No. 2.]
June 7.
Whitehall.
258. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Encloses extract from Col. Jenings' letter, March 10, relating to a sloop hired at New York. [C.O. 5, 1363. p. 188.]
June 7.259. Account of losses sustained by Mr. Campbell at the taking of St. Johns, May, 1705, and of property left in Newfoundland by his Agent Colin Campbell, etc. Total, £10,737 2s. 6d. Attested by Colin and Ja. Campbell. 3 pp. [C.O. 194, 4. No. 137.]
June 8.
Antigua.
260. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Whilst I was rejoiceing with my friends on May 29 in comemoraction of the Royall Famally's and Monarchy's being restored, I had an order brought me by one Nivine for comeing home to answer to complaints; I assure your Lordshipps this order as severe as it is did noways damp my mirth but added to it, for now I shall have an opertunity to expose their perjurys, and all their other villannys, and prove they assassinated first my reputation and then my person for no other reason but my zealously maintaineing the Queen's prerogative, and my indeavours to make them honest, and all the bribery, opression and tyranny I have been charged with, I shall not only clear myselfe off, but fix it on them; the people are told I can't punish them for whatever they shall say, swear or do, so that now they are secure, and may committ all sorts of villanny in relation to Generall Parke with impuneity. I must confess the order is so worded that it may admitt of such a construction, for no one is to be troubled for what they shall say or doe against me, either by the civill or millitary power, so that it seems to debarr me of the right of an Englishman. They have chose three magistrates to take their affidavitts, whose characters I shall sett forth when I arrive in England. They cite all sorts of people to apear before them, and then swear them to answer to all such questions as shall be asked them relateing to me and some of my intimate friends have been forced to discover on their oath all my private conversation and actions; I think this may be very properly called a Court of Inquissition, for my part I am glad of it, for in the conclusion it will be for my honour, and I heartily wish the jest were to go round, and that all that have the honour to serve H.M. were to pass through such a tryall; I have no other notice given me when the Court of Inquissition are pleased to sitt then by fixing a note on the Court House door, as if I were an outlaw, and all this glorious usage of the Chief Governour shall not provoke me to say an angry word, tho' all people that have any notion of honour or Goverment, are shock'd at it, yet I am not because at last this my cause is to be heard before the Queen, who I have no doubt will do me justice in the conclusion. My two chief enemies are dead, Codrington and Hodges, the Governor of Mountserratt, whome had he lived I would have suspended, for I found out his clandestine trade and his altering the records to gett a summ of money, tis thought my discovering his roguery broke his heart. I have not as yet put in anybody, at present the President of the Councill acts as Lieutennant Governour, and I begg your Lordshipps that no one be made Lieutenant Governour till I have the honour to lay it before the Queen and Councill. For tho' it is of small sallary, and taken but little notice of in England, yet 'tis of great consequence. I am surprized that neither your Lordshipps nor my Lord Sunderland should mention this order to me, for as yet I have had no notice of any such order, but from Mr. Perry (my Agent), and the complainants. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. 5th, Read 7th Sept., 1710. 3 pp. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 29; and 153, 11. pp. 61-64.]
June 8.
Antigua.
261. Same to the Earl of Sunderland. Duplicate of preceding. [C.O. 152, 42. No. 24.]
June 9.
St. Jago de la Vega in Jamaica.
262. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have little to add since my last, a duplicate of which is here inclos'd, excepting a very barbrous murther which has happened upon a poor man, who was servant to one Mr. John Sutton, a planter here, who barberously caused him to be strangl'd, as he lay sleeping upon his bed, by six slaves; the reason appears to be, this poor man was sent for before the magesterats to be an evedence against his master, who it seems was guilty of perjury. His master lock him up all the day in the boyling house to secure him from the constopples, and at night order'd this barbarity to be done, and comitted, obligeing himself to give every negro 5s. in money, and a gallon of rumm. And tooke care to send all white people off the plantation, untill this barbarity was committed. Whether the Jury will bring him in guilty or not, I cannot tell. But I must say there is very few people put to death here for committing of murther or fellony. In case he be convicted, as by the Coroner's inquest it appears to be imposible to avoide it. Then I beg your Lordshipps' favour in procureing me the preferance of the Escheat, since it's what has always been customary to the Governor. Since this 8 years I am concern'd in this Island, I have been at great expences not only for intillagence, but also upon publick days of rejoyceing about 3 times a year, which I never charged a farthing for, and also upon persueing H.M. intrest about the ambergresse and other matters that I have been at great expences upon. And in case this should happen, I should make no other pretentions to any disbursements that I have been at for H.M. intrest, or the Island's. I send 4 Acts past the last Sessions, and also the Minuts of the Counsell and Assembly. P.S. It will be the latter end of August before wee can know whether found guilty or not. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. 7th, Read 11th Sept., 1710. 2 pp. [C.O. 137, 9.No. 17; and 138, 13. pp. 286–289.]
June 10.
Virga.
263. Col. Jenings, President of the Council of Virginia, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Pursuant to H.M. commands, I have appointed Col. Philip Ludwell and Mr. Nathaniel Harrison to be Commissioners on the part of this Colony, who will speedily have a meeting with the Commissioners of Carolina to settle the method of proceedings, but the season of the year will not permit them to go about surveying the bound till Sept. It is with much concern that I find myself obliged so frequently to inform your Lordships of the great damage done on this coast by privateers; it is now about seven weeks since they were first discover'd about the Capes, since which they have taken and plundered the William and Mary of London bound in hither, with Palatines, but the passingers on board being too numerous for them to keep, they lett the ship go; a few days thereafter, the ship Lark of Falmouth, Edward Poor, master, was taken, and the cargo of English goods, (which amounted to 6 or £700) taken out and the ship burnt. On the 29th May, one of the privateer sloops came and anchored in Linhaven Bay at night, and in the morning by break of day landed their men, plundered two or three houses, and carry'd off one of the inhabitants, with some negros, and next day fell in with the James of Plymouth of nine guns, which after two hours dispute, they took and sent to Petit Guavas; since which another privateer sloop took and plundered a sloop from Bermudas bound in hither, the master of which reports that a ship of 30 guns from Martinico is speedily expected on this coast, besides the vessels abovementioned, there has been taken on this coast two sloops belonging to North Carolina with provisions, and our look-outs report that they have seen two other vessels burnt. but what they were is not known, there being no men set on shore. I inform'd your Lordships in my last of the arrival of H.M.S. Enterprize, but she was in so bad a condition that the Captain has been ever since employed in refitting her, she is now ready to sail bound for New York to clean, and then to proceed to the Bahama Islands, to put in execution an order from Col. Dudley for discovering the strength of the enemy in those Islands, after which she will return hither to attend as guardship, but that cannot be expected till September, so that in the meantime this coast will be left without any manner of defence, and unless the convoy with our London fleet do arrive speedily, I do not see what should hinder the Privateers, not only to ly within the Capes and intercept the Trade, but to come into ye Rivers and destroy ye ships there. I used all the arguments possible to engage the Captain of the Enterprize to stay for the defence of ye Country and delivered him copy of the opinion of the Council, inclosed. But in answer he urged his orders from Col. Dudley, which was in pursuance of Instructions from my Lord High Admiral, and that he could not delay the putting them in execution, nor could he attend this station, till that service was over. I also understood from him that upon his being ordered hither, the Admiralty had recalled their directions for hyring a sloop to attend this Coast, which has been a very unhappy resolution for this country, for certainly such a vessel would have been of much more service than the Enterprize. Had such a vessel been here now. we should not have been so unhappily at the mercy of the enemy, nor H.M. subjects suffered so considerable losses on this coast. I have again, as it is my duty, represented this to the Admiralty, and humbly pray your Lord ships will be pleased to use your more powerfull interest at that Board for obtaining a 4th rate man of war, and a sloop to be imployed for the defence of this Country, and that they may be appointed entirely for this station, without being sent upon other intermediate services, which being lyable to many accidents may hazard the safety of this country and trade, as this expedition of the Enterprize is now like to do. Since my last, two of the negros that were ringleaders of the intended insurrection have been condemned and executed, and I hope their punishment will secure us against future attempts of this nature. This being intended by a runing ship, I have not thought it safe to send the publick papers, but shall by the first opportunity of a convoy. Signed, E. Jenings. Endorsed, Recd. 14th, Read 25th Aug., 1710. 2½ pp. Enclosed,
263. i. Minutes of Council of Virginia, April 19, 1710. Copy. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1316. Nos. 49, 49 i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 1363. pp. 192–197.]
June 11.
Barbadoes.
264. G. Lillington, President of the Council of Barbados, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The Governor having left this Island on May 15th, in a very divided and turbulent condition, as it has been for some years past, I endeavour'd by all the means I could, and particularly by severall speeches to the Councill and Assembly to bring them again to an Union and good agreement, and assur'd them, that as no person had recd. more injurys then myself, soe I would sett them an example, and that I was resolv'd to sacrifice all resentment to duty and our common interest as the persons concern'd should really find. This promise I have kept, and carried it soe far as to putt all my chief adversaries, from whom I have recd. the greatest wrongs in Sir B. Granville's time, into the Commission of the Peace, in hopes that such an example would have been followed by a generall union and reconcilemt. How much I have been disappointed in this the Minuits of Councill and Assembly, and other papers sent herewith will shew. By which it will appear, that this Island has been now severall months without a Treasurer, and without a Revenue, and that two Excise Bills have been flung out by the Councill in about 3 months time, only because the Assembly had nominated Mr. Downs for Treasurer. It likewise appears. Mr. Downs desir'd the Assembly to nominate another Treasurer, that the displeasure conceiv'd agt. him by some of the Councill might not obstruct the publick good of the Island; which the Assembly thankt him for offering; but did not think fitt to doe. After which I prorogued the Assembly, and on their first meeting I exhorted them to bring in a new Excise Bill in such manner that all future disputes with the Councill might be avoided. The same day they passed a new Excise Bill, and named a new Treasurer, Mr. Ball, and sent it up to the Councill, and there it sticks, the Councill having rejected Mr. Ball for Treasurer, and ordered their Committee to putt in another Treasurer, soe that I see no probability that this or any other Excise Bill will pass, till two or three of the most violent Members of the Councill are gratified with the dissolution of the Assembly, and the election of a new one, which I doe not think fitt to be done att this time. Thus the Govermnt. is left without any Revenue to support it; the Island exposed to danger and in confusion, and no prospect of relief but what should be produced by speedy and effectuall orders from H.M. I am much mistaken if I have given any Members of the Councill just cause of discontent, and yet some of them have began a kind of paper warr agt. me here, and have likewise threatned to complain to H.M. Knowing my own integrity and good intentions in all I have done, I shall expect Her determinacon with great impatience, and doe humbly pray your Lordships that it may be speedily done, and that the reall offenders may be duely censured, and they and others thereby effectually discouraged from the like for the future. I am far from thinking all the members of the Councill, who have sign'd the paper sent home herewith guilty of ill designs in soe doing, but your Lordships on the severall informations formerly sent home, will find and distinguish who are the leaders and who are the persons led. The complainants doe always take care to have their affairs well sollicited in Brittain, whereas there being no Agents for the Island, now in England, I can only lay these matters before your Lordships, etc. Signed, G. Lillington. Endorsed, Recd. 15th, Read 28th August, 1710. 3 pp. Enclosed,
264. i. Abstract of proceedings in the Government of Barbadoes from the departure of Governor Crowe, May 15, to June 8, 1710. (v. Minutes of Council and preceding letter.) The Council insisted that they had an equall power to reject as the Assembly have to nominate a Treasurer. The Assembly insisted on the Treasurer they named. Seven members of the Council, Messrs. Sharpe, Cox, Chamberlain, Walker, Alleyne, Pilgrim and Salter then pressed for the dissolution of the Assembly, and presented a paper to the President justifying their attitude. Their points answered. Three members were against the dissolution, and the Attorney General gave his opinion that it was an extreme measure, and all proper remedies should be first tried in the then excited state of the Island. The President therefore prorogued the Assembly (as supra). Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 15th, 1710. 16½ pp.
264. ii. Seven members of Council of Barbados to George Lillington, President. Paper referred to in preceding q.v. Signed, Wm. Sharpe, Sam. Cox, Timothy Salter, Middleton Chamberlen, Alexander Walker, Tho. Alleyne, John Pilgrim. June 6, 1710. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 15, 1710. 4 pp.
264. iii. Minutes of Council of Barbados, Dec. 17, 1690, relating to the manner of choosing a Treasurer. Endorsed, as preceding. 2½ pp.
264. iv. Deposition of Col. John Milles. Governor Crowe, at a meeting of the late Assembly, declared in Council the sureties (Col. Christopher Coddrington, Guy Ball, Thomas Horne, and Thomas Hothersall), offered in behalf of Col. Downes as Treasurer, and it was acknowledged there could be none better. Signed, John Milles. Same endorsement. 1 p.
264. v. Certificate that the Memorial (No. ii.) was delivered to the President of the Council, June 10, etc. Signed, A. Skene. Same endorsement. ½ p. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 35, 35 i.-v.; and (without enclosures) 29, 12. pp. 245–248.]
June 11.
Barbadoes.
265. George Lillington to the Earl of Sunderland. To same effect as preceding letter. Addressed. 2½ pp. Enclosed,
265. i. Duplicate of No. i. supra. [C.O. 28, 43. Nos. 41, 41 i.]
June 13.
Bermuda.
266. Lt.-Governor Bennett to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The last letter I have been favoured with from your Lordships which hath arrived here (but I understand the Governor of Barbados hath a packt. for me with a new Seal) was dated July 15, 1709, which I answer'd Oct. 30. Inclosed are affidts. taken agst. one James Briggs, who is charged with piracy and in custody here. He pretends he was examined and cleared by Sir Char. Hedges in 1700, but produces noe voucher for the same. But if he could, these depositions are fresh matter, and I pray your Lordps'. directions what must be done therein, the Act for more effectual suppressing of piracy being expired. Also is inclosed the trials of severall sailors that belonged to a sloop called the Flying Fame, Capt. Hobart Commander, for combining and conspireing to run away with the said vessell, and goe a pirateing. Likewise is inclosed the trials of several soldiers belonging to H.M. Indipendt. Company of Foot here att a Court Marshal, for confederating and agreeing with those sailors to joyne in the running away with the sloop, and to goe a pirateing with them. As also for contriveing, conspiring and agreeing togeather, that when they were released from their confinemt., they would take an opportunity to seize some vessell, and run away with her for France, and there Collins (one of them) was to acquaint his brother (who he said was a Lieut. Colonell) from whence they came, and to request him to inform the French King and to send Force, and he (Collins) would undertake to conquer these Islands, and prescrib'd ways of doing it, and severall other matters which the Judge Advocate drew up by way of information (inserted in the tryals), and exhibited to the Court as being contrary to the 10th Article of war; and upon a full hearing the soldiers were all found guilty and sentence of death passed upon them: but I suspended execution until H.M. pleasure was further known. It was proposed amongst them that after they had entred the town with a French Force, the first thing was to secure the Governor, but they concludeing I would not be easily taken, Collins replyed he would value shooting the Governor noe more than to shoot a dog, upon which Anthony Kenty, one of them (as appeared on their trials), said, God forbid I should have anything to doe with his blood; which tenderness engages me to become a most humble supplycant to H.M., that she would be gratiously pleased to extend her mercy to that man; and doe pray that when your Lordps. make a representation of this matter, that my most humble supplycation for Anthony Kenty may be reported. Pardon me, my Lords, if I mistake the means or manner of addressing myself to H.M., which I conceive in this case could not be soe properly done as thro' your Lordps. or the Earl of Sunderland as Secretary of State, to whom I have wrote to the same purpose. As also concerneing the pirate, and transmitted all papers relateing to both matters, conceiveing it my duty soe to doe. This Country has been very sickly for these severall months last past by an acute distemper (the Doctors wants a name for) which took people with a pain in their head and side, and usually killed in five dayes, and was concluded infectious. Others have been afflicted with a flux, soe that few Familys throughout these Islands escaped one of them: but now the inhabitants in generall are indifferent healthy. Signed, Ben. Bennett. Endorsed, Recd. 13th, Read Nov. 14, 1710. Holograph. 3 pp. Enclosed,
266. i. Copy of the trials of several soldiers in Bermuda for conspiring with some sailors to run away with the sloop Flying Fame and turn pirates. See preceding. Feb. 9, 1710. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 10 pp.
266. ii. Trials of Capt. Hobart's sailors for conspireing to run away with the Flying Fame etc. See preceding. Same endorsement. 8 pp.
266. iii. Depositions of Samuel Saltur, William Richardson, Ricd. Jenings, and Joseph Dill, as to acts of piracy committed by James Briggs, now in custody. March, 1710. Endorsed, Recd. Nov. 13, 1710. 4 pp. [C.O. 37, 9. Nos. 8. 8 i.-iii.; and (without enclosures) 38, 6. pp. 494–498.]
June 13.
Bermuda.
267. Same to the Earl of Sunderland. Duplicates of preceding, and copy of writ of error relating to Mr. Jones, Secretary. [C.O. 37, 28. Nos. 4, 4 i.-vii.]
June 13.
Bermuda.
268. Same to Mr. Popple. Acknowledges letter of Sept. 14, etc. This country has been very sickly, of which unhappyness I have partaken myself, and also my private Secretary, Mr. Davis, who has been given over, and still in a languishing condition, so that one of us for above these eight months hath been always incapassitated for business: and he goeing with me to view the Fortifycations and amunition intrusted to the care of the Militia Officers, took down all the Memorandums from me in order for the makeing up and transmitting an account of the same, and when I have been in condition to proceed thereon, he was soe ill as not to be able to explain the Minutes he had taken, which has been truly and only the reason that acct. has not been sent. etc. Signed, B. Bennett. Endorsed, Recd. 13th, Read 14th Nov., 1710. Holograph. 2 pp. [C.O. 37, 9. No. 11; and 38, 6. pp. 504, 505.]
June 15.
London.
269. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Representation upon Capt. Edward Cowley's petition, April 20. The petition is quoted with the evidence in support of it. v. May 17, 25. [C.O. 29, 12. pp. 107–109.]
June 15.
Custom House, London.
270. Mr. Carkesse to Mr. Popple. The Commrs. having received a letter from Mr. Perrie, Surveyor Generall of the Leeward Islands, wherein he complains of an unwarrantable proceeding of the Governor of Antego, send you a copy to be laid before the Council of Trade and Plantations. Signed, Cha. Carkesse. Endorsed, Recd. 15th, Read 20th June, 1710. Addressed. ½ p. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 20; and 153, 11. p. 29.]
June 16.
New York.
271. Governor Hunter to Mr. Popple. I arrived here two days agoe, we want still three of the Palatin ships, and those arrived are in a deplorable sickly condition. All is quiet on the Frontiers. By the next occasion I shall be able to inform their Losps. more particularly, this ship being ready to sett sail for Lisbon, etc. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd 11th, Read 28th Aug., 1710. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1049. No. 160; and 5, 1122. p. 170.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
272. Mr. Popple to Charles Carkesse. Reply to June 15. The Council of Trade and Plantations have frequently reciev'd complaints of the like nature from several of the Plantations, and lately represented to H.M. that her pleasure be signified to the several Governors in America, that whenever they shall have occasion to send flags of truce to any of the French Islands, they take care that no more goods or provisions be permitted to be laden on board such vessels, then what shall be necessary for the voyage, which H.M. was pleas'd to order to be done accordingly, and further their Lordships have writ to the said Governors, directing them that when any flags of truce do arrive from the French Islands, that the persons who come therein be not permitted to come on shoar, nor speak with any persons but such as the said Governors shall appoint, so that if the Governors observe these directions, their Lordships hope the abuse complained of may be prevented. [C.O. 153, 11. pp. 35, 36.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
273. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. Enclose copies of letter from Governor Parke, April 24, and petition from the Regiment in the Leeward Islands, to be laid before H.M. [C.O. 153, 11. p. 37; and 152, 39. No. 119.]
June 25.
Barbadoes.
274. George Lillington to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Since my last letter (June 11), nothing of much importance has hapned. The Excise Bill, and the other tax are not yet passed, and I doubt will not, by which the Government still continues without any Revenue, and the Island extreamly expos'd; and I have reason to fear it will soe continue till some effectuall remedie be applyed by H.M. Att the Grand Sessions which sate last week, there were severall Address made by the Grand Jury (enclosed). Notwithstanding the respect shewn to me [therein], I think it my duty to observe that Grand Jurys in this Island are not appointed and return'd as in England, but are always compos'd of such persons as the Cheif Justice is pleas'd to appoint. And that severall of the Grand Jury were persons whom the late Govr. had remov'd out of the Commission of the Peace, and some of them for good reasons, as particularly the Foreman of the Jury, who was unanimously censur'd by the Governor and Councill in 1708, on a complaint against him by the Attorney Generall, and was thereupon turned out from being a Cheif Judge, as may appear by the Minuits of the Councill, in the Plantation Office. Signed, G. Lillington. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read 11th Sept., 1710. Addressed. 1¾ pp. Enclosed,
274. i. (a) Address of the Grand Jury of Barbados to the Queen, Return thanks for the recall of Governor Crowe. Signed, Joseph Salmon jr., Tho. Harper, Christo. Fowler, John Trent, Robt. Harrison, Stephen Browne, Jno. Wiltshire, John Rolstone, Jer. Chace, Cha. Egerton jr., Henry Taitt, Alexander Anderson, J. Scott, Richd. Sandiford, Joseph Hannis, Mathew Keynell, Saml. Maverick, Wm. Cogan, Goner Platt, Thos. Palmer, Thos. Carew.
(b) Address of the Grand Jury to George Lillington, President of Barbados. We gratefully acknowledge your impartiality in establishing the Commission of the Peace, particularly in reinstateing severall gentlemen illegally displaced by Mr. Crowe, etc. Our divisions have a fatall influence upon our credit, and we have so many growing rivalls in our staple commodity that nothing but united counsells cautiously resolved upon and vigorously executed to the improvement of our advantages by art and nature, can put us upon a ballance. Signed as preceding.
(c) Address of the Grand Jury to William Sharpe, Alexander Walker, and Samuel Berresford. Return thanks for their great and unselfish services in charging Mr. Crow with male-administration, etc., also to Lord Sunderland and the Commrs. for Trade, etc. Signed as preceding.
(d) Same to William Sharpe, C. J., June 15, 1710. Return thanks and present preceding addresses. Signed as preceding.
(e) Presentments of the Grand Jury of Barbados, June 13–16, 1710. That the laws against cursing and swearing be put into force. That all due encouragement for the advancement of good literature, so much heretofore mentioned in former presentments, be noe longer delayed. That the indifferent state of the highways be amended, and surveyors of highways severely punished for failures in their dutys. That effectuall care be taken that the streets and common shores of St. Michael be frequently cleansed and repaired, the neglect whereof has been the occasion of many distempers and consequently may tend to the discouragement of trade. That owners of tottering and decayed buildings about the townes be obleidged either to rebuild or pull them downe. That for the commodious loading and unloading of vessells, a strict and dilligent enquiry be made into the condition of the wharffs, and those out of repair amended. That the great Bridge leading from the towne to Carlisle Bay be speedily built at the publick charge. That many practices have of late been used to procure hands to a petition addrest to H.M. in favour of Mr. Crow; that the same has been tendered to troops of the Militia upon duty to signe it, children and servants have been prevailed with to putt their hands to it, and many illiterate persons have bin deluded to allow their names to be putt to it, under a pretence that the same was only to prevent taxes; all which practices have bin designed to misrepresent the inhabitants as approveing Mr. Crow's administration, when the same was grievous to the greatest part of the Island. That propper application be made to H.M. to ascertain the value of gold as well as silver coine throughout H.M. Plantations in America. That in passing an Excise Act, care be taken that the person nominated to be Treasurer be neither a member of Councill or of the Assembly; out of debt, of a clear and unspotted reputation, and that he doe not hold or intend to hold the same in trust for another, or give any consideration for his appointment but reap all the profitts to his own propper use, and that by the said Act he may be obleidged to frequent and fair accomptings, thereby to retreive the lost creditt of the Country. Signed as preceding. Copy. Signed, Norman Mackaskell. The whole endorsed, Recd. Sept. 8, 1710. 7 pp.
274. ii. Copy of proceedings of the Court of Grand Sessions, St. Michael's, Barbados, June 13–15, 1710. Endorsed as preceding. 13½ pp. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 39, 39 i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 29, 12. pp. 266–269.]
June 25.
Barbados.
275. George Lillington to the Earl of Sunderland. Duplicate of preceding letter. Addressed. [C.O. 28, 43. No. 42.]
June 26.
Newcastle.
276. Governor Crowe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I dispatch this express on purpose to acquaint your Lordps. of my arrival here this morning. I shall take the first oppertunity from hence in order to waite on your Lordps. Signed, M. Crowe. Endorsed, Recd. 28th, Read 30th June, 1710. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 28; and 29, 12. p. 110.]
June 27.
Whitehall.
277. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Handasyd. Acknowledge letter of March 25. Having already acquainted you (April 4) that the Flottilla was arrived at Cadiz, we have only to add, that if it could have been possible that timely notice of its departure had been transmitted hither, such measures might then have been taken as to have intercepted that Fleet before they had got into Port. We have again laid before the Commissioners of the Admiralty the bad state H.M. ships of war are in at Jamaica, as likewise what you write of the arrival of two French men of war in those parts. We have also laid before H.M. the Address to Her (March 25), together with our observations, etc. Copy enclosed. We do not as yet hear of any complaint made against you by the owners of the Elson gally. If any such complaint does come before us, we shall take care that no wrong be done you. Repeat objections to the Act for regulating fees, a hardship upon practicers at law, for it may happen they shall be then retained against a friend or nearest relation, or perhaps in a cause which they may think unjust, etc. Enclose Mr. Solicitor General's opinion thereupon, which you will do well to lay before the Assembly, and endeavour to get them to pass a new Act for regulating fees, not liable to the objections Mr. Solicitor has made; otherwise we shall be obliged to lay the abovementioned Act before H.M. for her disallowance. [C.O. 138, 13. pp. 137–140.]
June 30.
Antigua.
278. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have not reciev'd any letter from your Lordshipps by this packett, only duplicates. The Complainants have taken severall affidavitts against me to support their villannous complaint; all their affidavitts to any crime they have charged me with, I have proved perjuries. I have also proved they designed to assassinate me that night the riot was committed. When your Lordships sees the whole, you will be amazed that so much villanny should be acted against a Governour in so small a place, and without any provocation except it was his indeavours to make them honest, and to establish some forme of Government amongst them. As yet they have subscribed to no Articles against me, only taken some ridiculous affidavitts, so that I know of no answer, but I shall religiously obey the Queen's Order, and come home with the first man of warr. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read 11th Sept., 1710. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 30; and 153, 11. p. 65.]
June 30.
Antigua.
279. Same to the Earl of Sunderland. Duplicate of preceding. [C.O. 152, 42. No. 26.]