America and West Indies
November 1710, 1-10

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1924

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247-253

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'America and West Indies: November 1710, 1-10', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 25: 1710-1711 (1924), pp. 247-253. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73841 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


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November 1710, 1-10

Nov. 1.
Whitehall.
461. Mr. Popple to John Pery, Secretary of the Royal African Company. Asks for several returns, including an account of the number of negroes furnished by the Company to the several Plantations, Michaelmas 1708–1710, at what rates and the condition upon which they have been sold. [C.O. 389, 21. pp. 293, 294.]
Nov. 1.
Whitehall.
462. Same to Richard Harris. Encloses following to be communicated to the separate traders for their answers. Annexed,
462. i. Queries for the separate traders. (1) How much has been paid to the company by the separate traders on account of the 10 p.c. (to the South African Company), Michaelmas 1709–1710? (2) How many ships have been sent out on account of that trade by the private traders within that time? (3) What number of negroes have been imported into the Plantations by the private traders, Michaelmas 1709–1710, and at what rates have they usually been sold within that time? [C.O. 389, 21. pp. 294, 295.]
Nov. 1.
Virgenia.
463. Col. Jenings to [? Lord Dartmouth]. Congratulations. Continues: — An Assembly approaching, I have delayed my intended [? return home] till the spring, etc. Signed, E. Jenings. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1337. No. 6.]
Nov. 1.
Virginia.
464. Col. Jenings to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers to letter of Aug. 19 q.v. The Assembly being mett, where I hope I may be serviceable to H.M., I shall delay my voyage till the spring, etc. Signed, E. Jenings. Endorsed, Recd. 4th, Read 8th June, 1711. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1316. No. 60; and 5, 1363. pp. 273, 274.]
Nov. 2.
Hampton Court.
465. Order of Queen in Council. Upon Representation of Sept. 26 (q.v.), ordered that the Engineer at Jamaica be sent to New Providence to make a survey and estimate of the charge of fortifying it. The Lords of the Admiralty are to order his transport etc. (v. A.P.C. II., No. 1060). Endorsed, Recd. 24th, Read 27th Nov., 1710. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 104; and 5, 1292. pp. 233, 234; and (signed, William Blathwayt) 5, 11. No. 57.]
Nov. 2.
Barbados.
466. Mr. Lillington to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letter of Aug. 29 and encloses duplicates of Minutes of Council and Assembly sent by the Lusitaniah. The refusal of the Councill to confer with the Assembly (after the Councill had once before and since their appeal to H.M. confer'd with the Assembly upon the like amendments to a former Bill) I humbly submitt to your Lordships consideration. Signed, G. Lillington. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read 23rd Jan., 17 10/11. Addressed. Per ye Mattapony Gally. Postmark. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 54; and 29, 12. pp. 325, 326.]
Nov. 2.
Whitehall.
467. Mr. Popple to Col. Steward and Mr. Royle. H.M. having by her Order in Council (Jan. 26, 1710) directed the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations to report to her what they shall judge most requisite and proper to be done for preventing any irregular proceeding in H.M. Courts of Justice in Barbadoes, they desire you will consider thereof, and consult with Mr. Waters and such other gentlemen as you may think proper, and then let their Lordships have in writing an accot. of such irregularities in the proceedings of the said Courts as have fallen under your observation, as also that you would propose to their Lordships what you think proper for redressing the same. The paper that was read to you yesterday (? v). Oct. 26) being the private thoughts of a particular person, and only read to open the matter to you, and let you see what it was their Lordships enquired about, they do not think convenient to give you copies of it. [C.O. 29, 12. pp. 315, 316.]
Nov. 2.
Hampton Court.
468. Order of Queen in Council. Repealing laws of Maryland, as recommended Oct. 26, q.v. Signed. Wm. Blathwayt. Endorsed, Recd. Read Nov. 8, 1710. 4¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 18; and 5, 727. p. 197.]
Nov. 2.
Whitehall.
469. Mr. Popple to Sir Robert Raymond, Solicitor General. Encloses Laws past in Maryland 1706, 1707, 1708. The Council of Trade desire your opinion in point of law upon 5 of these, (1) An Act declaring several Acts of Parliament to be in force within this Province; (2) An Act against forging and counterfeiting of foreign coines of gold or silver; (3) An Act confirming and explaining the Charter to the City of Annapolis; (4) An Act directing the manner of electing and summoning delegates and Representatives to serve in succeeding Assemblies; (5) An Act ascertaining fees to the Attorneys and Practitioners of the Law. [C.O. 5, 727. pp. 199–201.]
Nov. 2.
Hampton Court.
470. Order of Queen in Council. The Lord Dartmouth is to prepare an Instruction empowering the Governor of New York to alter the covenant in grants of land as proposed Oct. 26 q.v. Signed, William Blathwayt. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 1091. No. 25.]
Nov. 3.
Whitehall.
471. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Dartmouth. Having received from the President and Councill of Maryland the three (enclosed) Addresses, we desire that you will please to receive H.M. pleasure thereupon, that in case it be thought requisite, Additional Instructions may be prepared for Col. Corbett before his departure for Maryland. [C.O. 5, 727. pp. 194, 195.]
Nov. 3.
Whitehall.
472. Same to Same. Enclose draught of Instructions for Col. Corbett, Governor of Maryland, "which are to the same purpose as those that were given to Col. Seymour, or sent to him as Additional Instructions except that we have added one clause, No. 17, relating to the passing of Laws, which affect the property of H.M. subjects residing in Great Britain, which clause we humbly submit to H.M. And there being three vacancies in the said Councill by the death of three of the Members thereof, and Philemon Lloyd, Richard Tilghman and John Dorsey Esqs. having been recommended to us as persons of good estates, well affected to H.M. Government and well qualify'd to serve H.M. in that station, we have incerted their names in the list of Counsellors, and humbly offer that H.M. be pleased to constitute and appoint them accordingly." Mem. Col. Corbet not going over to Maryland his Commission and Instructions are not entred. [C.O. 5, 727. pp. 195, 196.]
Nov. 4.
Whitehall.
473. Mr. Popple to William Penn. The Council of Trade and Plantations having under consideration your proposal for a surrender of your Government of Pennsylvania, and taking notice that the expence you have been at, in the setling of that Province, is among other things made a ground of your demand of a sum of mony upon such surrender, wherefore in order to their laying a full and clear state of this matter before H.M., their Lordships judge it necessary to have plain and distinct answers to the several following queries, vizt., (1) What are the profits you have made of that Province, computing the yearly value of quit-rents or other the property remaining in you? (2) How the said profits have arisen, whether by fines, forfeitures, or otherwise? (3) What benefit or advantages will the Crown receive from that Colony by purchasing the Government, more than it now hath, and how the same may arise? (4) What is the annual charge of that Government? (5) What revenue is now subsisting for the support of that Government, the yearly value of such revenue, and for what time granted? (6) Whether you have granted any priviledges and immunities, by Charter or otherwise, to the city of Philadelphia, or other towns or Corporations in the Province of Pennsylvania, other than what are granted by the Charter to the City of Philadelphia, dated Oct. 25, 1701, and by the Charter of Priviledges to the People of Pennsylvania, dated Oct. 28, 1701? So soon as you shall have given in your answer to the above queries (which you are desir'd to do as fully, and as far as may be without reference to any papers formerly deliver'd into this office or any former transactions thereon), their Lordships will then proceed in the further consideration of this affair, and confer with you as occasion shal require, that the same receive all possible dispatch. [C.O. 5, 1292. pp. 229–231.]
Nov. 4.
Maryland.
474. President and Council of Maryland to the Council of Trade and Plantations. As wee hold it an indispensable duty and obligation on us in the absence of a Governour in chiefe continually by all occasions to correspond with your Honble. Board, so wee shall allways endeavour to performe and discharge the same as farr as in us lyes, etc. Acknowledge letter of Jan. 16. In answer whereto wee have used our best endeavours to make the Assembly which met Oct. 24 last sencible [of the advantage the country reaps from the itinerant Judges], and perswade them to settle such reasonable allowances as your Lordships may see by the Journalls of the Councill and Assembly now transmitted, but have not been able to prevaile with them, nay they are so farr averse to that method of judicature, that they have absolutely refused to make any satisfaction to the Gent. whome his late Excellency Col. Seymour appointed to that service for the payns they have already taken, having resolved in the House of Delegates in their proceedings of Oct. 26, that the country ought not to be at that charge, and that that Constitution is very ill convenient to the Country, and imposed upon them against their consent, and indeed the Province seems at present a little to young and thin seated for that Constitution, as hath been found upon the experience had for these two years, and the lawyers living most of them at the seate of Governmt. upon the Assembly's refusing to allow them fees for attending the Assizes, being unwilling to make up their issues to the severall Countys, avoid the same as much as in them ly's, and lay all their transitory actions in Ann Arundell County where the Provinciall Court is held, and often when concern'd in locall actions refuse to go to the Assizes held in the remoter Countys, which wee must needs say has been a great delay and hindrance of justice since this Constitution has been sett on foot, and is generally complayn'd of through the whole Province. Wee herewith transmitt the number of men, women, children, servants and slaves within this Province, and cannot but observe to you how great the encrease of negroes is with us, and the miserable and deplorable circumstances of many good planters, to whom their servts. and slaves are become even burthensome by the low price of tobacco's at home. The generallity of the Planters, especially such as have shipped their tobaccos to their correspondents in London, are become greately indebted to the merchants, and very many of their plantations and stocks are wholy mortgaged and forfeyted to them, and others dayly desert their abodes for feare of being imprisoned, and repair to the Southern Colonys, vizt. South or North Carolina or elsewhere, to seeke new settlemts., all manner of cloathing and English goods is and has been excessive deare all this warr, the country merchants advancing 200 p.c. on their comoditys, and refusing to deale for tobacco, when at the same time the country produce both of tobacco and stocks of cattle is extreame low, tobacco generally not above 4s. per cent., and cows and yearlings rated at 30s. current, which used to be £3 10s. and £4 sterl., by which your good Lordships may well see how much land is likewise fallen, and the present distressed circumstances of this Province, notwithstanding all which oppression is still encreased by the insatiable avarice of many creditors, who are very instant in renewing their debtors' protested bills, refusing to take any other satisfaction than money sterl. which cannot be had here, and threatning them with imediate imprisonmt. in case they renew them not, with their best friends endorsers thereon, so that many others besides the principall debtors are become desperatly involved. Wee doubt not but your Lordships are sencible the charge of this Governmt. is supported and defrayed by an equall assessment in tobacco raysed upon the severall taxable persons of this Province, and that by speciall Acts of the Generall Assembly and not otherwise. For the discharge whereof and for that severall necessary laws were allmost expired, wee thought it advisable to convene the Generall Assembly the 24th of Oct. last, who among other of their transactions this Session presented and earnestly insisted upon a law herewith transmitted, for relieving the inhabitants from some agrievances they lie under, and as wee knew it was our duty to be very carefull of H.M. Prerogative in not lessning the jurisdiction of the Provinciall Court, so wee were very unwilling to concurr with the House of Delegates pressing instances. But being throughly sencible of the deplorable circumstances of very many of H.M. subjects here dayly arrested, and brought from the remotest parts of the Province to the Provinciall Court, wee were, though very much against our will, prevayled with to agree to the passing of the said Bill for two years continuance, hoping it may be some ease to the inhabitants, and prevent their fears and deserting their settlements, for wee could not but be sencible of the great oppression of the creditors and ill practices of attorneys in suing the drawers of bills and endossers severally to their manifest impoverishment and utter ruine. Wee assure your Lordships that if wee had not thought this law was of the greatest importance for H.M. service in easing the hardships and fears of her subjects here, and preventing their desertion from this her Province, where if it pleases God to send us an happy Peace and the marketts open they may be most serviceable to Her and her Kingdom of Great Brittain, wee should not have ever adher'd thereto, for wee are not unapprehensive of the many ill colours and misrepresentations of it that will be handed to your Lordships. But when it is considered that speedy justice is no ways prevented, the creditors having their spedyer remedy in the severall County Courts (tho' it must be confest with a little more payns in solliciting their suits by themselvs and agents there), yet at the same time at farr less charge, wee hope the good intent may well appologize for the unwilling essay wee have made on this so pressing occasion, and that your Lordships will accept our demeanour herein as candidly as wee have used it for H.M. interest and service, etc. Signed, Edwd. Lloyd, Wm. Holland, Will. Coursey, Tho. Ennalls, Saml. Young, Tho. Greenfield, Jno. Hall, Cha. Greenberry. Endorsed, Recd. 16th July, Read 3rd Aug., 1711. 5 pp. Enclosed,
474. i. Census of Maryland, 1710; Masters and taxable men, 11,091. White women, 8294. White children, 15,411. Negros, 7945. Examined by, W. Bladen, Cl. Concil. Endorsed, Recd. July 16, 1710. 1 p.
474. ii. Minutes of the Committee of Accounts, Oct., 1710. Endorsed as preceding. 26 pp. [C.O. 5, 717. Nos. 43, 43 i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 5, 727. pp. 295–302.]
Nov. 9.
Hampton Court.
475. Order of Queen in Council. Appointing Philemon Lloyd, Richard Tilghman and John Dorsey Members of Council of Maryland. Signed, William Blathwayt. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 721. No. 9.]
Nov. 9.
Whitehall.
476. Council of Trade and Plantations to Edward Lloyd, President of the Council of Maryland. Enclose Order of Council, Nov. 2, and repeat letter of Oct. 26. [C.O. 5, 727. pp. 198, 199.]
Nov. 9.
Whitehall.
477. Mr. Popple to Mr. Lowndes. Representation on Mr. Day's petition, Oct. 13 q.v. The Council of Trade have considered Mr. Blathwayt's report etc. They find that by the proceedings of the Court of Assize, Bermuda, Dec. 1701, the title to the land in question is in the Crown; it contains about half an acre of ground, and did formerly belong to the house appointed for the Governor and called a garden, tho' we cannot learn it was ever cultivated as such; it lyes at some small distance from the house in which the present Governor now lives; the building the said house on that ground is not any inconvenience to the said Governor, and cost Mr. Day, as their Lordships have been informed by the Petitioner, between 5 and £600. Their Lordships observe that by virtue of an Act past in Bermuda in 1693, for selling the Governor's old house and directing a new house to be built for the entertainment and accommodation of the present and succeeding Governors, the said old house and land on which it stood (which belonged to the Crown) were sold; but a new house not having yet been built, the Assembly do rent a house for the Governor at the rate of £40 a year, which is not so good or convenient a house as that built by Mr. Day. Wherefore their Lordships, having discoursed with the Petitioner, who has declared his readiness to dispose of the said house for £200 sterl., are of opinion that it would be for H.M. service that the Assembly of Bermuda do purchase that house of the Petitioner for the Governor's use, in lieu of the old one sold by them, and which has not been rebuilt as aforesaid. But in case the Assembly shall not comply herewith, then their Lordships have no objection why H.M. may not graciously be pleased to grant the said ground to the petitioner according to the prayer of his petition. [C.O. 38, 6. pp. 492–494.]
Nov. 9.
Whitehall.
478. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lt. Governor Spotswood. Enclose letter from Mr. Burchett (Oct. 28, q.v.) relating to guardships for Virginia, etc. [C.O. 5, 1363. pp. 224, 225; and 5, 1335. pp. 76, 77.]
Nov. 9.
New Yorke.
479. Mr. Bridger to [? Lord Dartmouth] the Principal Secretary of State. Compliments on his appointment etc. I have with the Governor (cf. July 26, Nov. 14) been up Hudson's River at Albany and Schinectada, and have view'd several great tracts of pitch pine proper for the making tar, pitch, etc. Those tracts together with some more I have since seen will be capable of producing a sufficient quantity for the Royal Navy, and if fully supported at home enough for all Brittain; and this Goverment together with those on this Continent will be capable of making Great Brittain the mart or sale of all Europe for Naval Stores, but unless fully supply'd this great and good designe must fall entierly. This land proposed in the Maquas countrey for the setlement of the Palatines is so far up into the country and no pitch pine there renders it uncapable of that service; in order therefore to lay this designe on a better and more sure foundation, the Governor has purchased 6000 acres of land on Hudson's River, etc. v. Nov. 14. The last spring was advanced so far before the Palatines' arrival, that it was to late to prepare any trees, by wch. a year is lost, etc. I am more than £500 out of my own money above my salary for the past 5 years, having no travailing charges, etc. Signed, J. Bridger. Endorsed, Sent an extract to the Treasury. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1091. No. 26.]
Nov. 10.
New Yorke.
480. Same to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Duplicate of preceding. Signed, J. Bridger. Endorsed, Recd. 2nd, Read 22nd Jan., 17 10/11. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 11; and 5, 1122. pp. 252–255.]
Nov. 10.
Whitehall.
481. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. An Act having been passed here in the 3rd and 4th years of H.M. Reign for incouraging the importation of Naval Stores from America, and there being no provision in it for preserving of white pines, which are the only trees proper for masts, refer to letter etc. Dec. 19, 1709 q.v. Not being informed whether the same has been laid before H.M., we inclose copies thereof. [C.O. 5, 3. Nos. 39, 39 i; and 324, 9. pp. 447, 448.]