America and West Indies
November 1710, 11-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1924

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253-273

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'America and West Indies: November 1710, 11-20', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 25: 1710-1711 (1924), pp. 253-273. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73842 Date accessed: 02 October 2014.


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November 1710, 11-20

Nov. 11.
Boston.
482. Address of the Governor. Council and Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay to the Queen. Our late humble Address of thanks (v. Aug. 22) to your Majesty for your Royal resolution to reduce Port Royal and the French settlements in Nova Scotia to your Majesty's obedience etc., has waited till now for a safe conveyance, when by the blessing of Almighty God, in the success of your Majesty's armes, we are favour'd with the happy occasion for accompanying the same with this our further Address, humbly to congratulate your Majesty, as Soveraign Lady and Possessor of that important Fort and Country, not only by conquest, but of indubitable right, annex'd to your Majesty's Imperial Crown; and the name of Port Royal, now changed into that of Annapolis Royal, hears pleasantly. The advantages that will arise thereby to the Crown are very considerable, particularly by naval stores, furs and fish, whereof that country and the adjacent fishing banks do produce great quantities; and the ease and tranquility of these your Majesty's Northern Plantations in some measure procured, by cutting off the supplies from the Indian salvages, which they used to depend on the French for. As also the Navigation and Commerce to and from your Majesty's Kingdom of Great Britain, and your Majesty's Plantations in America, will be rendred more safe, being freed from the insults and rapines of the nest of robbers now removed from thence, wherewith this coast was wont to be infested, and when a Colony of your British subjects shall be planted there, which we humbly hope and pray for, and that it may ever be continued under obedience to the Crown of Great Britain, as it was originally established, setled and intended by your Majesty's Royal Predecessors. And have a just consideration in all Treaty's as a country of very great consequence to the British interests. We perswade ourselves your Majty's General, Col. Nicholson, will humbly represent the ready and chearful obedience of this Government to your Majty's Royal commands to be assisting in the late important Expedition, and their doing of their duty in all things required of them in that respect; as well as the obedience and good courage of the troops levyed here for that service. And we may not be wanting in our duty humbly to represent to your Majesty the uncommon zeal for your Majesty's service, and the unwearied application and prudent conduct, wherewith your Majesty's said General carryed through the sd. expedition with good success to your Majesty's honour. And upon encouragemt. of the assurance given in your Majesty's name in your Royal Instructions to General Nicholson, of a preference in the benefits of that country. both with regard to the soile and trade, to such of your Majesty's subjects as should contribute to the reduction thereof, we are humbly emboldned to pray, that your Majesty's good subjects of this Province may in all times hereafter have and enjoy the liberty of catching fish and whales in the rivers and bays upon the coast, and of makeing their fish and oyle on the shoar; as also of digging and fetching of sea-cole from that country; without any imposition, toll, custom or duty's to be paid for the same. We are humbly bold further to represent to your sacred Majesty, as absolutely necessary to the repose and tranquility of all your Majesty's Northern Plantations in America, that the country of Canada be reduced to your Majesty's obedience, towards which we shall chearfully do our duty according to our ability, if your Majesty in your princely wisdom shall be pleased to form an Expedition for the same, but are so weakned and enfeebled, both in men and money, that we are utterly unable to afford so great a quota of men or charge, as by your Majesty's Royal commands was required of us towards the late Expedition. And most humbly suggest, if it be your Majesty's pleasure to direct an Expedition for that important service, and command the assistance of these your Majesty's Plantations towards the same, your Royal commands therefore may extend to all your Majesty's Governments on the Continent, so far southerly as to include Virginia, for a proportionable assistance, who will receive equal benefit by the reduction of that Country. Signed, J. Dudley; Isac. Addington, Secretary of the Council; John Clark, Speaker of the Representatives. 1 large p. [C.O. 5, 10. No. 138.]
Nov. 11.
Antigua.
483. Governor Parke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I had the honour of a letter from your Lordshipps by this packett, and I had a letter from Mr. Burchett by order of the Lords of the Admiralty about the men of warr apointed for this station. 'Tis true the Captains sends to me for orders, and I send them such as I think most for the service of the Islands, but they take little notice of them; there has been three of the Queen's shipps lost on this station since I came, who had been now in being if my orders had been followed. When I have it in my power to punish I will be answerable for their behaviour, but to send home a complaint against any one of them is to put my hands in a wasps' nest; when I arrive I shall lay this before the Queen and Councill, especially the behaviour of Capt. Norbury, who is now on this station. I have sent a duplicate of my Answer, if your Lordshipps will please to read it, I shall take it as a favour, and a greater if then your Lordshipps will please to order it to be deliver'd to my Agent, Mr. Perry, that he may be able to make my defence, in case the complainants desire a hearing before I can come. Since the Fleet sailed, the mann of warr on this station has been in Harbour on pretence of carreening, and he is just gott out, and now sends me word he must go to Barbados to gett provission; I don't expect to see him back in two months, so that I have had no opertunity (as yet) to goe to Leeward. I am in hopes some man of warr will call here that I may have an opertunity of comeing home for I earnestly desire it, if not I will come in the first good shipp that sailes after Christmas. The whole Government is very healthy, and I have not yet lost one foot of ground to the enemy, nor have they ever plundered any one part, though they have often attempted it, yet last warr they were plunder'd, and this warr before I came, Nevis and St. Christophers were taken; this and what else relates to these Islands shall be putt in it's true light, if (Please God) I live to wayte on your Lordshipps att Whitehall. Since the Fleet sail'd, I have detected some of my Article subscribers that had French passes; I took a sloope laden with goods from Martineque and one of Mr. Chester's sloopes takeing it on board att sea. This I did with soldiers for the Custom house officers are soe link'd with the inhabitants that they durst not doe their duty, except Mr. Buckeridge the Collector. I called a Sessions, and forgave all that were bound over for insulting me, and indicted three for high treason, upon the Act for holding a correspondence with ye French, the Grand Jury found the Bill, but it signified nothing, for their friends helped them to gett away; I see plainly 'tis morally impossible to punish any inhabitant, lett him committ what crime he will; whilst I stay, I shall do my duty to the utmost of my power, as I have allways done. If some of their laws had been repealed, I should have had a greater authority, and should have been able to have done the Queen more service. Signed, Daniel Parke. Endorsed, Recd. 10th, Read 19th Feb., 17 10/11. 2pp. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 36; and 153, 11. pp. 100–103.]
Nov. 11.
Antigua.
484. Governor Parke to the Earl of Dartmouth. I had not the honour to recieve any letter from your Lordshipp by this packett. Refers to previous letters and affidavitts. Repeats part of preceding. There is nothing I desire more then to be with your Lordshipp, that I may convince all the honest world how villainously I have been persecuted for supporting the Queen's Prerogative and the principles of the Episcopall Church. I hope I shall find so much favour as not to loose my Government till I am first heard; nor is it for the Queen's interest or the Ministery's quiet to turne out Governours only to please a parcell of clamorous villains who are called here the Calves Head Clubb; and have vallued themselves upon that account, for they found it did them no disservice with some people, whome I hope never more to see in any authority. For whatever becomes of me, I doe rejoyce to hear the Episcopall Church is like to be trumps. I will be at home time enough to be chose into the house, if the Parliament is not dissolved till after this sessions. P.S. I desire the favour of yr. Ldpp. I may be incerted in the Comm. of the Peace and Lieutenancy for Hampshire, where I have a clear estate of £550 the year. My Lord Cowper I hear by Mr. Woollaston's intrest left me out of the last Comm. If I am the same in Midlesex where I have a small matter t'will be a greater favour. I beg the favour of yr. Ldpp. to give my service to Mr. Benton. I am shure he thinks I am glad to hear he is in a good post, etc. Signed, Daniel Parke. 2¼ pp. [C.O. 152, 42. No. 43.]
Nov. 13.
New York.
485. Mr. Bridger to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays for a separate Commission for the services commanded Jan. 3, and travelling charges allowed, the expenses thereof being heavy, and to be Surveyor General of H.M. lands and Naval Stores in America, etc. I have layd out for the Palatines five towns all on Hudson's River, where I must be in the summer, and at Piscataqua in the winter, for there is nothing to be done in the woods till then by reason of the Indians, etc. Signed, J. Bridger. Endorsed, Recd. 2nd, Read 22nd Jan., 17 10/11. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 12; and 5, 1122. pp. 256–258.]
Nov. 14.
New York.
486. Governor Hunter to Lord Dartmouth. Refers to letter of Oct. 13 and repeats part of following. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Sent an extract to the Treasury, Jan. 5, 1711. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1091. No. 29.]
Nov. 14.
New York.
487.Governor Hunter to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers to former letters Oct. 3, etc. I was able to give you then but an imperfect account of these Provinces, and am sorry that I can mend the matter but litle now; for tho' the Assembly here hath sate ever since Sept. 1st, except during an adjournment of about 10 days, whilst I was setling the Palatins on Hudson's River, they have gone through but very litle business necessary for their own preservation or the support of the Government. Untill such time as I can send your Lordps. the Journals of their house intire, I must beg you'l be satisfyd with what I now send with an account of some of their proceedings and some remarks upon the same. I told your Lordps. what I had recommended to them (v. Oct. 3). Soon after my Speech, I was informed that they had the Bill of Fees, which had been dissapproved by H.M. mightily at heart, and were preparing another, upon which I sent them a message, that in conformity to one of H.M. Instructions (a coppy of which I then laid before them) I was then with the advice and assistance of the Council preparing such a regulation of fees as I made no doubt would be satisfactory to them; and I accordingly sent them that regulation, with the ordinance annexed, when we had prepared it. Imediatly upon this they prepared a Bill intituled an Act for the more ease of H.M. subjects, which past their House but was rejected in Councill, and they are now forming another Bill of fees, which I believe may have the same fate. Answerable to these proceedings, the next thing they do, is to resolve that 2500 ounces of plate should be levyed for the Governour's necessary expences for one year, which is litle more then half of the salary appointed by H.M., upon which I sent for their house, and told them that reading their votes of Oct. 25 relating to the support of Government I took occasion to acquaint them with some of my Instructions relating to that matter lest they should make a wrong estimate of the yearly expence of the Goverment., and accordingly read to them the 25th–28th Instructions, deliver'd them a copy of the same, and desir'd they might be enter'd in the Journals of their house. I told them also I could not accuse myself of anything even in my thoughts that might have deserv'd my being distinguisht by them from all former Governours in that manner, yet I should be very unwilling to believe that any of H.M. subjects, but more especially such as lay under so great obligations to her, would call in question her power of appointing such salaries for her Governours as she should think fit, out of the subsidies granted her for the support of her Government. The effect this had upon them was only this, that they went on striking out some articles intirely that had formerly been allowed for these purposes, and retrenching others to less then one half, and tho' some of their Members frequently moved, that what I had then said to them, might be taken into consideration, it was industriously put off, and waved from time to time, and Col. Morris, one of their Members, who in a speech pressed the considering of that matter with some warm expressions which they interpreted to be falsly and scandalously vilifying the honour of their house, was expelled the same. The money bills which have passed their house are, (1) An Excise Act to Nov. 1711, (2) a duty on tonnage and slaves for the same time, (3) a duty on chimneys for the same time, (4) a duty on goods sold by auction for the same time. Which severall Acts will not raise a fund sufficient for the support of the Government even according to their own appropriating Articles in an Act for that purpose now passing their house. Observing that there were no steps made towards the payment of the publick debts, I sent on Saturday last for the Assembly and spoke to them, and at the same time gave them H.M. letter relating to the demand of the Lady Lovelace and desired it might be entered also in their journals: what effect it will have upon them I know not, but I have small hopes of a good one, and indeed of anything else that has been recommended to them. Your Lordships will be at a loss to find out the reasons of these proceedings, and their backwardness for their supporting the Government. I will tell you the pretended ones, and then as farr as I am able to guess, the real ones. It is pretended that the Expedition intended against Canada hath sunk them so low, that they are not able to raise the ordinary allowances for the Government; But that is meerly a pretence, for the fund appointed for the defraying the expences of that Expedition was a land tax, whereas the money formerly given for the uses of Government, arose by an impost on goods imported and exported and by an Excise. Another reason given is the misapplication of former Revenues, which hath involved the Country as is alleaged in a considerable debt. If I am rightly informed, Revenue might have been so husbanded that the Government might have been supported by it, as formerly it was. That the Country might be assured that what Revenue they should think fit to give for the purposes mention'd should be duly apply'd, I proposed to several of their Members (judging it not proper to do it to the house) that they might incert in their Bill a clause obliging the Receiver General to be accountable to them as well as to H.M.; and that it might not be in the power of the Governour and Councill to load the Country with further debts, by warrants on the Revenue, I proposed to them likewise the framing a clause whereby no warrants signed by the Governour in Councill should be a debt on the Country or a demand on the Revenue till it was first accepted by the Receiver Generall. And that no more warrants might be drawn on him then he had money in his hands to answer, he should at the expiration of every quarter lay before the Governour and Councill a true state of the Revenue as it then stood, that so warrants might issue for so much, if the service required it, and no more, and be paid in course as they should be numbered; and for this he should give security here to H.M. as he has done in England, which I think would answere all their objections, and take from them all pretences of appointing a Treasurer of their own for the Queen's Revenue. The true reasons as far as I can understand from private discourse with the most considerable amongst them, are the exemptions in a great measure of the neighbouring Governments from such expence. But they do not consider that the Government of Massachusets Bay is at £20,000 yearly charge at least, for the defence of their frontiers, whilst their are for the most part defended by H.M. Forces and Purse, for it is apparent that it costs the Queen at least £20,000 a year in maintaining of Forces and ships of warr for the defence of their Country and Trade. Another reason is that by vertue of an Act giving a daily allowance to each Assembly man, it is now become a trade, and brings them in more then most of them can get by their imploymts., and by the popular argument of having saved the Country's money, some have got the Election secured to themselves, who have always been, and ever will be refractory in what relates to the expence of Government. Your Lordps. have a ready remedy in your hands for this evill, if you think fit to apply it. In the 3rd year of K. Wm. and Q. Mary, an Act of Assembly was passed in this Province whereby each Assembly man had 10s. per diem allowed him for that service, which Act continued in force till the 13th of K. Wm., at which time another Act pass't, whereby the first was repealed and allowing only 6s. a day to each representative, which last mentioned Act was likewise repealed among others by an Act of Assembly made in the first year of H.M. reign for repealing several Acts etc. In 1700 this last mentioned Act was disallowed by the Queen, so that the second mentioned Act came to be in force again, and still continues so. Now this Act being thus in force and not particularly approved by H.M., your Lordsps. if you so think fit, may advise H.M. dissapprobation of it, by which means the first Act for the 10s. a day will be in force, but never having received her approbation may likewise be disallowed, and then there will be no Act in force whereby the Assembly can demand or receive any wages. For now that expence for this Session only amounts to near half as much as they have voted for the support of Government for one year, and then it may be hoped we shall have men of substance, sense and moderation for Representatives who come with a true intent to serve their Country and not themselves. One thing I will be bold to affirm, the warmest Assembly of men in the most tumultuous times never strained the word Priviledge to that bent they daily do. Their particular reasons for retrenching my sallary at this time is an opinion that has very much obtained, that H.M. hath no power to appoint salaries, which most of them venture to say in their house, and some of the most considerable of them out of it, with this weighty argument to back it, that by the same rule she appoints £1200 she may appoint £12000. Now my Lords I have shewn you the evil, the pretended and real causes, I wish it were as much in my power to point at a remedy. But this is better suited to your Lordps.' wisdom to find out. But I assure you that our circumstances here do require an effectual and speedy one unles H.M. will be satisfy'd with a very precarious Government in this place for the future, if any at all. There is one thing I would propose to your Lordps. as a remedy in part. In the infancy of the English Governmt. here lands were granted without any reservation of quit rents, at least there appears none in the Records of many Patents, others were granted with a reservation of such quit rents as then were or should thereafter be establisht by the laws of the Country, others, and indeed all that have [? been] granted till after the death of the Lord Lovelace are under a very inconsiderable quit-rent, those granted since are under a reservation of 2s. 6d. each 100 acres. But the quantity is so small and there is so litle in H.M. gift that if all were patented the quit-rent would amount to a very inconsiderable summ: so that if your Lordships thought fit to advise the passing of an Act of Parliament at home, that all lands within this Province granted or to be granted should pay to H.M. a quit-rent of 2s. 6d. sterl. for every 100 acres, or such further summs as your Lordps. shall think fit, I believe it would goe a great way in raising a Fund sufficient for the Government here. And if it should be objected that persons holding great tracts of land would upon such an Act resign them, it is evident that nothing could be of greater advantage to this Colony: for then great numbers of persons who remove from hence into the Proprietory Governments for want of lands would by that means find lands at home, for there is nothing that has contributed more to the keeping this Country unpeopled then single men's possessing vast tracts of land of some 20 some 30 miles square, which they keep in their own hands in hopes of planting them with tenants, which is never to be expected in a Country where the property may be had at so easy a rate. And I am affrayed we must come at length to some such contrivance in order to get the pine lands out of their hands, which are of no manner of use to them, but when H.M. has occasion for them, they will then set a value on them. Another remedy which would effectually answer the end is the laying by Act of Parliament an impost on all goods imported and exported into and from this Province. But I believe your Lordsps. will in this case think it adviseable that this Act should extend to all sorts of strong liquors retailed. If your Lordps. think fit to agree to this, for your information I referr you to an Act establishing a Revenue here in 1692. These are all the remedies which I can think of, unless H.M. will be pleased to defray the charge of this Governmt. from home. As to my own particular, I must beg the favour of your Lordps. to recommend to H.M. that my sallary for this year (if no provision be made for me here, as I am apt to think there will not) be paid out of the duty's arising from cocoa imported here by my incouragement in a prize taken by two Jamaica privateers, the Customes whereof will amount to a very considerable summ, and that your Lordps. will be pleased to procure H.M. Order to the Collector of this place for that purpose, or out of any other money in his hands arising by vertue of any Act of Parliament, which tho' formerly applyed by the Governors here to the uses of Government in common with the Revenue, yet I find it out of my power, the Collector having orders from the Commrs. of the Customes to remit all such summs to them for the future.
I have now setled the Palatins upon good land on both sides of Hudson's River about 100 miles up, adjacent to the pines. I have planted them in 5 villages, 3 on the E. side of the River on 6000 acres which I have purchased of Mr. Livingston about 2 miles from Roloff Jansen's Kill; the other two on the W. side near the Sawyers Creek, as your Lordships will observe by the inclosed sketch etc. The lands on the W. side belong to the Queen. Each family hath a sufficient lott of good arable land and ships of 15ft. draught of water can sail up as far as their plantations. They have built themselves comfortable huts, and are imployed in clearing the ground. In the Spring I shall set them to work in preparing the trees according to Mr. Bridger's direction, whom I must recommend to your Lordps. for an additional salary, not being able to attend this work upon his own. And now, my Lords, this universally beneficial scheme cannot fail of succes, but by being neglected at home, which I hope there is no reason to apprehend. For I myself have seen pitch pine enough on the River to serve all Europe with tarr, and I hope I have hands according to the modestest computation that has been made of one man's labour for a year to serve H.M. Navy at least with that commodity. Mr. Bridger's letter which comes with this will further inform your Lorps. of this matter. The Accounts which I have sent the Lords Commrs. of H.M. Treasury will shew you how well I have husbanded the small summe intrusted to me for their subsistance; and I hope your Lordps. will think yourselves concerned to take care that what bills I shall draw for their future subsistance be duly comply'd with, lest by their failing the whole design should prove abortive, seing by H.M. commands to put in execution the scheme projected by your Lordps. I am directed to subsist them at 6d. per diem for adult persons and 4d. for children, out of which fund I have saved in proportion to the time the officers allowances and some part of the emergencies. Considering that by next spring they will have cleared small tracts of ground for gardens and Indian corn, I compute that £15000 a year for two successive years will be sufficient to defray the expence of their subsistance, officers' sallarys, and contingent charges, except the cows, horses and sows mentioned in the account sent to the Lords of the Treasury. For whatsoever besides I may have omitted in relation to the Palatins, I referr your Lordps. to the bearer, Mr. Du Pré, Commissary of the Stores, who has been of great use to me; I beg you will dispatch him speedily back to my assistance, and I hope with a favourable return to the errand he is sent on. Besides the Acts mentioned in the former part of my letter, I have passed and transmitted to your Lordps. these that follow:—(1) for the better setling the Militia of this Province; (2) for returning able and sufficient jurors; (3) repealing a clause in an Act against clipping and counterfeiting of foreign coin. This Act is only intended to prevent slaves stealing of household plate to clip; (4) for the better setlement and assuring of lands. The reasons which induced me to pass this Act were, that the Assembly seemed to be very fond of it, and I was willing to leave them without this pretence for their not setling a Revenue, tho' I own I passed it with some reluctancy, being there was no saving of the Queen's right in it. But the persons who hope to receive any benefit by this Act being to remain in the peaceable possession of what they now claim till Sept. 1, 1713, without any suit to be prosecuted for the same. H.M. will have so long time to dissallow it, without receiving any prejudice by it, if any incroachments have been made on any of her lands. I send your Lordships also home (5) an Act to repeal an Act to oblige Robert Livingston to account, etc. When your Lordships read this Act, which was passed in Col. Ingoldesby's time, I am perswaded you will think it reasonable to offer it to H.M. for her approbation. I have also sent your Lordships the Minuts of Councill from my arrival here to this time. The slow measures of this Assembly has obliged me to adjourn that of the Jerseys to Dec. 1st, which should have met this day. I acquainted your Lordps. in mine by the Deptford (v. Oct. 3) with the expedient I found to end their dispute about the place of meeting of that Assembly. If your Lordps. think it for H.M. service that there should be but one Assembly for the two Provinces, Her approbation of the Act past in Col. Ingoldesby's time for that Assembly's meeting constantly at Burlington for the future, would be an inducement to the majority of the Proprietors and inhabitants to address for such an union. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. 2nd, Read 11th Jan., 17 10/11. 14 pp. Enclosed,
487. i. Copy of Mr. Lewis Morris' Speech in the Assembly of New York recommending the reconsideration of the Governor's salary. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 2, 17 10/11. 3¼ pp.
487. ii. Minutes of Assembly of New York. Sept. 1st—Nov. 11, 1710. Printed.
487. iii. An Ordinance by the Governor and Council of New York, Oct. 19, 1710, for the regulating of fees. Endorsed, Recd. Jan., 17 10/11. 26 pp.
487. iv. Copy of an Act of New York for the more ease of H.M. subjects, etc. Endorsed as preceding 1 large p.
487. v. Copy of Revenue Act, 1692. Printed. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 2, 17 10/11. 8 pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. Nos. 7, 7 i.–iv. (without encl. ii); and (letter and enclosure ii. only) 5, 1091. Nos. 19, 30; and (without enclosures) 5, 1122. pp. 213–236.]
Nov. 14.
Boston.
488. Mr. Addington to Mr. Popple. Acknowledges letters and encloses public papers by H.M.S. Norwich. This governmt. have constituted Jeremiah Dummer jr. resident in London, to be their Agent. We are extreemly joyful for the success of H.M. armes in the late Expedition, etc. Signed, Isaac Addington. Endorsed, Recd. 1st, Read 5th Jan., 17 10/11. Addressed "on Her Majties.' service" etc. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 57; and 5, 913. pp. 313–315.]
Nov. 14.489. Petition of Ann Pauley to the Queen. Prays for the discharge of Charles Arabella, master of a sloop, a subject of the Duke of Florence, and now a prisoner near Chester River in Maryland at Virginia. He was condemned for blasphemy and fined £20, bored three times thro' the tongue, and sentenced to six months' imprisonment. Being unable to pay, he has continued above a year in prison, etc. Subjoined,
489. i. H.M. refers preceding to the Council of Trade for their opinion. Whitehall, Nov. 14, 1710. Signed, Dartmouth. Endorsed, Recd. 24th, Read 27th Nov., 1710. 1p. [C.O. 5, 717. Nos. 19, 19 i; and 5, 727. pp. 201, 202.]
Nov. 15.
Newport, Colony of Rhode Island.
490. Depty. Governor Cranston to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have had the honour to receive your Lordships' letter dated Jan. 16, 170 9/10, the wch. I communicated to the Generall Assembly of this Colony, who most gratefully acknowledged your Lordships' favour for so freely expressing your satisfaction in the answers to the heads your Lordships were pleased to require from them, and return their most humble and hearty thanks for the most noble and kind offer your Lordships have expressed in contributing (what in you lyes) towards the welfare and prosperity of this Government, and have requested me to assure your Lordships, that there will be nothing wanting on their parts (so farr as it shall please God to give them understanding and ability) to serve H.M. and to oblige your Lordships to favour them in the continuance of your friendship in contributing to their welfare and prosperity; and that your Lordships (in your great wisdom) should anything hereafter thro' weakness or want of ability in them be represented or contrived to their ill conduct or remissness, will be pleased to put the best instructions thereon, and give them such correction and advice as your Lordships, in your great wisdom, may think proper for H.M. service; which will oblige them at all times to be more circumspect in their duty and redressing what may be deemed amiss. H.M was graciously pleas'd, the last year, to order an Expedition against Canada, wherein the Colony was at considerable trouble and expence in setting forth transports and 200 men towards said Expedition, wch. lay at the Colony's charge upwards of 6 months, H.M. having occasion to imploy her Brittish forces upon some other service, the sd. Expedition did not proceed: this year H.M. see just cause to send shipps of warr and warrlike stores wth. British troops under the command of the right Honourable Generall Nicholson Esq. for the reduction of Port Royall and the countrey of Nova Scotia and La Accada; towards which service this Colony equipped the like force as they had done the last year (but to better effect), who under the good conduct and command of the aforesd. Generall (in conjunction of the rest of H.M. arms) soon reduced that strong and important fort and Countrey to H.M. royall obedience. Your Lordships will have a more particular account of the reduction of that important place and countrey than I am capable of giving you, having instanced the aforesd. Expedition to your Lordships in discharge of our duties to you, it being we have, that is anyways materiall to communicate at this time, it having pleased God to favour us this last summer so as we have not been disturbed wth. the Enemie's privateers upon our coast, as they were accustomed to do. The Colony's time having been taken up (so much) upon the aforesd. Expedition, they have not gott their Laws perfected for the Press so as to comply with your commands at this time; but are now forwarding the same with all expedition, and begg your Lordships' pardon for their neglect and remissness therein. I am requested by the Generall Assembly to represent unto your Lordships the discouragement that is given to the traders and coasters of this and our neighbouring Colonys trading to this Colony, by the late Collectors commissionated for this and our sd. neighbouring Colonys, in exacting of fees above the usuall custom of our former Collectors, who faithfully served H.M. without any sallery allowed them, praying that your Lordships will be pleased to take the same into your wise and prudent consideration, and if your Lordships shall judge it proper to procure the inclosed table of fees (which is conformed here by an Act of this Colony) to be allowed and approved of as the stated fees, till it shall be thought expedient to make any alteration thereof: but if said fees be not approved of, then it is humbly pray'd that such emendation may be made, or other reasonable fees stated as your Lordships in your great wisdom shall think meet, so as we may not be imposed upon by such as covet their own private interest and gain more than H.M. interest. In this and the neighbouring Colony, there are sundry ports allow'd of where Navall officers are settled by the severall Governors thereof, some of which Ports are upwards of 100 miles distant from each other: notwithstanding which the late Collectors will not allow of any more than one port (for entring and clearing) in each Government, threatning to seize all vessels and coasters trading from one Colony to the other, that do not make their entry and take their clearing from them at such a particular port where they reside: the which is also deemed as a very great imposition upon H.M. subject, and to the great discouragement of trade: we having small sloops and open boats constantly trading from one Colony to the other, some for provisions and others for lumber, as staves, boards and timber, etc., and it often happens that the wind and weather is such, that they cannot (without great danger, or to the ruin of their voyage) reach that particular port that the sd. Collectors do impose upon them; and their fraight and profit being very small, the masters of such sloops and boats will be exposed to the expence of the greatest part of their fruit, should they be impos'd upon to travel 100 miles (some more and some less) to enter and clear their vessels. We therefore most humbly pray that the Collectors of the particular Governmts. may be directed to settle their Deputies and Officers at each trading Port allow'd of by the severall Governmts., or that the entries and clearings from the Navall Officers may be approved of: all wch. is most humbly submitted to your Lordships' wise and juditious considerations. May the Almighty bless and preserve your Lordships, etc. Signed, Saml. Cranston. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 23rd Jan., 17 10/11. 2 pp. Enclosed,
490. i. Copy of an Act of Rhode Island, Oct. 1710, for stateing Collectors' and Naval Officers' fees. Endorsed as preceding. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1264. Nos. 109, 109 i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 1292. pp. 243–248.]
Nov. 15.
Boston, New England.
491. Governor Dudley to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers to papers sent by H.M.S. Reserve with the mast fleet. This is by Capt. Studley, who brings home the mast fleet with the other ships that are ready, and has the year's papers from both the Governments in like form, which I pray may be acceptable to your Lordships and in both provinces will demonstrate the duty and obedience of H.M. good subjects in their Assembly, in their just and ready provisions for and payment of the forces for the defence of the frontiers and for the foreign Expedition the last year intended for Canada and this year sent to Port Royal. Acknowledges letter of Jan. 16, 170 9/10, received June 21st following, wherein I have your Lordships' directions for the care and government of the trade for these provinces agreable to the Acts of Parliament. I have alwayes as is my duty laboured in that matter, and have some years past represented to the Commissioners of the Customes the impossibility to govern our extended coasts by one office of Collection, who have thereupon this year divided the coast into four heads, and sent as many Collectors, whom I have sworn and admitted, and they shall want no encouragement in their duty, there wants one thing more to make that prevention perfect, which is a small scout boat such as we have att the Isle of Wight and elsewhere in Great Britayn, to meet all foreign ships on the coast and put a waiter on board to prevent running of contraband goods. The woollen manufactory for the supply of the inhabitants here will prevail every year unless the people be directed and put upon building of shipps for H.M. royal Navy, or that we gett into a further masting and providing of sparrs and boards, such as are not either for lenght or breadth to be had in the Baltick, or more tarr and resin, hemp and flax of which I have often advised, or some such imployment to cloath the people, but any trade or exportation of any such wool or woollen manufactory will be easily prevented by further act of Parliament, when there shall be need. I shall strictly do my duty in the preservation of the mast trees, and shall hope for your Lordships' obtayning an Act of Parliament therein. I humbly thank your Lordships' acceptance of my care and service in the preservation of H.M. subjects from the mischeif of the French and Indians their dependants, everybody here is sensible that we are in a better posture then in any former warr, and I am well rewarded by your Lordships' approbation of my service herein. Mr. Vaughan upon his return has represented to the Assembly of New Hampshire how much they are indebted to your Lordships' care and favour in the dispatch of his attendance and have prayed me to represent the sense they have of their obligations to your Lordships, and further to pray your Lordships' influence that they may once see an end of a 30 years quarrel between Mr. Mason, Mr. Allin and themselves. I have agreable to H.M. commands sent to the board of ordenance the present state of H.M. castles and ports the thrifty expences of the year to June 24th. In the affair of Mr. Allin I am humbly of the opinion that since Mr. Mason and Mr. Allin have expended a great summe att first in planting of the Province tho' very imprudently, and have made their challange these 35 years past, and have never been dismist by the Goverment of England, it will be very hard for them to lose all. I am firmly of opinion, that the poor people tertenants and inhabitants have possessed those lands 30 years and more, subdued them at the cost of the true present value, defended them for 60 years past with the loss of their blood and treasure, it will be inconsistant with H.M. grace to her good subjects either to eject them or to put them to a rack rent. To prevent and to put an end to all, if H.M. would be pleased to reasume that grant and take the province into H.M. own hands, and give Mr. Allin some compensation agreeable to his pretensions and demonstration of charge thereupon, H.M. would then have it in her imediate power to plant the great wast yet undisposed, and make it much more serviceble to the Crown then at present, and more defensible and secure for the inhabitants, which I shall humbly lay before your Lordships if it shall please H.M. to put it into that way. I have used all methods to enquire and find out the great Landlord mentioned in Mr. Usher's letter to your Lordships, and can find no man that challenges a grant of that summe of acres mentioned in his letter, and have enquired of Mr. Usher himself, who acquainted me that he meant Mr. Waldron (whose case was heard before the Lords Delegates when Mr. Vaughan attended last year) and he slightly alledged that he was told so, upon which I wrote to Mr. Waldron and had his answer assuring mee he made no such chalenge. I have given Mr. Pople a copy of that clause in his letter on that head, if there be anything too harsh in that letter I ask pardon for the Gentleman, who is of H.M. Council and wrote it onely to myself, who in everything for estate and ability for H.M. service is Mr. Usher's superior, excepting H.M. Comistion for Lt. Governour, which Mr. Usher has. However, if there be any town grants for lands in the province for any greater tracts of land, they were made 30 years ago, in which I am not concerned, and the Laws giveing the towns that or any other powers are taken away, H.M. since my being here having repealed those laws and utterly restrayned that power. Refering to mony in these provinces your Lordships will please to understand that the first order or direction about money in this Government was the Assembly's affirming their former usage of 17 dwt. in anno 1697, which was in that year sent home and approved by his late Majesty. Then followed H.M. proclamation for 17½ dwt. in 1702, which was here upon my receipt of it imediately printed and published. And in 1704 agreed to be declared and published by the Governour, Council and Representatives in Generall Court assembled. And last of all, in 1708, the Act of Parliament strictly injoyning the use of 17½ dwt. was here printed and solemnly published. Since which the practise of all our Courts gives judgment for 17½ dwt., and H.M. Treasuory can receive nor pay one penny but att that weight, and the judgment and receipts are in no other form or manner whatsoever, all this Mr. Usher well knows unless he be more careless or ignorant then I ought to hope he is. Col. Cranson is att a farther distance, and so is more excusable in his ignorance, tho not at all in his following the Massachusets in an ill precedent. Yet after all my Lords there is so little silver money in these Provinces, it having been all these seven years past so industriously gather'd up to be sent into Great Britayn that I have not myself received out of the Treasury nor of rents or otherwise tenn pounds att one time these four or five years last past, and our Province chequer notes are of that currency and honour, that wee buy all merchandize goods, ships, houses, estates of land, or whatever els with those bills preferable to money, and the little silver stirring sometimes tho' seldom payes a reckoning att the tavern, or a ferryman, or such trifles, and if anybody will convict his neighbour of paying that at 15 dwt. they are criminall in the law, and will have judgment against them, and Mr. Usher might have made the tryall before he acquainted your Lordships if so he had pleased, if your Lordships please to direct the Government to do anything more for its prevention, I shall obey it carefully, haveing alwayes been of opinion that the lowering of money to 15 dwt. is a mischeif to the Province. Refering to the price of tarr set by the Act of Assembly of Newhamshire, your Lordships will please to understand that the Acts of ye Revenue in Newhamshire are considered as money 17½ dwt., that the current price of tarr att that time was 6d. or 12d. more then it was sett at in the tax, but the people having their market to look, and sometimes transportation to make, and other accidents made the certayn receipt in the Treasury more easy for the people, and if your Lordships see mete to have me continue that law, I shall alwayes keep the price in the treasury below the market price. Your Lordships' next letter is of May 2, 1710, which I received by Col. Nicholsen, 19th July. The first clause whereof refers to the obedience of the provinces to H.M. commands last year, and our hopes of the revival of that service. I am glad the readyness of the provinces was acceptable last year, and we have been as ready this sumer. I have in the present expedition to Portroyal 1000 musquetiers besides officers 20 shipps and vessells for transports with subsistence of all sorts for 3 months from their sayling, with all stores of cannon powder and other stores which Col. Nicholsen thought necessary, which were all ready Aug. 22, as agreed in a Council of warr, though the other Colonyes came not till Sept. 8th, and the frigatts from New York on the 10th of the said month. Your Lordships' intentions for an Act of Parliament for the preservation of masts in the Massachusets Province will be effectuall and take away any pretensions whatsoever. The present Councellours sworn and assisting att the board of Newhamshire are, Peter Coffin, Robert Eliot, John Gerrish, Samuel Penhallow, Mark Hunkins, William Vaughan, Richard Waldron. Nathaniel Wyre, John Plaisted; to which if your Lordships please to have added John Wentworth, George Vaughan, Shadrack Walton, the Councill will be full; as your Lordships have directed, the last I offer are men of estates and reputation and very loyall to H.M. Goverment. I shall obey your Lordships commands in any further commands refering to negroes. I most humbly thank your Lordships' acceptance of my care refering to H.M. stores sent to Newhamshire. The Engineers for the present expedition to Port royal agreable to H.M. lycence have drawn 50 barells of powder and the tenn feild peices, and other stores there and elswhere, of which I shall give exact account att the board of Ordenance as I am commanded having taken the Engineers receipts for the same in due form, but the small armes being now the second time born agreable to H.M. direction, are given to the soldiers for their incouragement. I humbly thank your Lordships for your favourable acceptance of my service and dilligence referring to Naval Stores, in which I have every year earnestly intended H.M. service and the supply of the Kingdom of Great Britayn with those comodityes, yet I labour under a very great difficulty, having all this sumer 17000 men in armes, 1000 att portroyall 700 in the Castles and frontiers, among whom are all my loose people that should be imployed in those manufactoryes, besides the danger of the sculking enemy in the woods, all which when it shall please God a peace comes will be ended, and I doubt not from hence H.M. Kingdoms will be perfectly supplied without any foreign dependence, if it be persued with the care that it has been for these 7 years last past, which I shall never fayle (of) while I have the honour to command here. What your Lordships observe refering to the survey of all Naval Stores by persons appointed by the Navy Board is what I expressly told the merchants here when it was offered me, but they were very urgent that it might be written. The refusal of it was what they expected and will be no hindrance in the service. I continue in behalf of the Massachusets province to pray they may be heard refering to any complaints made by Connecticut or Road Iland, who are both concerned in the province dividing lynes, which were runn and stated many years before the letters pattents for those Goverments were granted by the Crown of England. I shall do what lyes in my power for the supply of men to H.M. ships without running directly contrary to the Act of Parliament and humbly thank your Lordships' acceptance of my service therein. On the 21st of June last past I received H.M. warrant Oct 29, 1709, covering the new seals for the provinces of Newhamshire and the Massachusets, in which I was commanded in the presence of the Council to break the old seals and put the new into the service of all publick instruments, which accordingly I have done in both the Provinces, and the letters are upon record in the Council books, and the originalls upon fyle in the offices and the old broken seals are in your Lordships packett (with this), etc. I have also under cover from my Lord Suderland H.M. Instruction of May 2, 1710, refering to an illegal trade caryed on with H.M. enemys by flaggs of truce, etc. which I received Oct. 25th. I am very confident nothing of that nature has been practised here. I have sent but twice to Portroyal and once to Queebeck this whole warr for 8 years past in very small and mean sloops to transport prisoners who have alwayes been commanded strictly to carry nothing but their own subsistence, and have alwayes been as strictly searched and examined by the officers, and alwayes reputed to have nothing on board but what was necessary to preserve them in their voyage out and home, and I am now out of any further use of flaggs of truce for the future by the reduction of Portroyal. I have lastly humbly to acquaint your Lordships with the success of H.M. arms under the command of Colonel Nicholson who after a week's service on the shoar had the Fort of Portroyal and the country renderd to him on the second of October last past, and has left Colonel Vetch Governour of the Fort with 400 men in Garrison with stores and provisions and Colonel Nicholson is retur[n]ing home for Great Britayn and all H.M. Goverments are still humble and earnest petitioners that H.M. will once more send a number of shipps and forces to Queebeck and Mountreal early next year, which will put H.M. into the possession of all the North America with the invaluable treasure of all the fishery, masts, lumber, and naval stores whatsoever. I most humbly refer myself and service to your Lordships' patronage, and pray your Lordships' favourable representation to H.M. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed, Recd. 1st, Read 5th Jan., 17 10/11. 6½ pp. Enclosed,
491. i.–vi. Lists of causes in the Inferior Courts of Bristol and Barnstaple in New England. The whole endorsed, Recd. 1st Jan., 17 10/11. 9 pp.
491. vii. Proclamation by Governor Dudley for a General Fast on Sept. 28. H.M. Forces being now embarquing on the design'd expedition for the reducing of Port Royall, etc., an affair of the last consequence to these H.M. Plantations. Signed, J. Dudley, Boston, Sept. 12, 1710. Printed by E. Green, Boston. 1p.
491. viii. Proclamation by Governor Dudley against harbouring deserters from H.M.S. Dragon, Chester and Falmouth, appointed to attend the Expedition. Signed, J. Dudley, Boston, Aug. 15, 1710. Printed. 1 p.
491. ix. Proclamation by Governor Dudley. Calling upon those who bore arms last year, to enlist for the present expedition. All voluntiers shall have a coat of 30s. value given them, and one months wages paid before their embarquing; they shall bear the Queen's armes, and enjoy them as their own for ever, and be exempted from all impresses for 3 years, etc. Signed, J. Dudley. Boston, July 29, 1710. Printed. 1 p.
491. x. Duplicate of No. viii.
491. xi. Duplicate of No. ix.
491. xii. Proclamation by Governor Dudley, for a General Thanksgiving throughout the Massachusetts Bay and New Hampshire, Nov. 16, for the general health, a very plentiful harvest, after awful threatnings of pinching scarcity by an early scorching drought, and the success of General Nicholson's expedition. Signed, J. Dudley. Boston, Oct. 28, 1710. Printed. 1 p.
491. xiii.Journal of Col. Nicholson's Expedition against Port Royal. Printed in the Boston News-Letter, No. 342. Boston, Nov. 6, 1710. Endorsed, Recd. 1st, Read 5th Jan., 17 10/11. 12 pp. double columns.
491. xiv. Address of the Governor, Council and Representatives of New Hampshire to the Queen. Portsmouth in N. Hampshire in N. England, Oct. 23, 1710. Your most sacred Majesty's most dutifull and loyal subjects are deeply sensible of your Majesty's princely regard and favour in the support and defence of this Province by the late supply of cannon and other warlike stores sent hither, as well as in your Majesty's most gracious care for us in sending such a force of ships and marine forces, who in conjunction with the forces drawn out of these Provinces, have by the good Providence of Almighty God put your Majesty into possession of that important Fort of Port Royal, the head of Nova Scotia and L'Acadie, who have been these seaven years the great pest and trouble of all the Navigation and Trade of your Majesty's provinces on the coast of America. Your Majesty's most dutifull and loyal subjects do from this success and benefit take incouragement most humbly to address your Majesty, that such a number of your Majesty's ships of war and forces may be sent early the next spring to visit Quebec and Mount Real, with such additional forces from all your Majesty's Govmts. on the shore of America as may by the favour of Almighty God reduce those places to your Majesty's obedience, and thereby make the whole North America an addition to your Majesty's Imperial Crown and dignity, from whence by the industry of your Majesty's liege people at present inhabitants, with such others as may be planted here, all sorts of Naval Stores may with industry and without any hazard or interruption be transported home, sufficient not only for your Majesty's service in the Kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland, but for all Europe, to the great increase of Trade and Navigation, the improvement of ships and breed of sailors. Your Majesty's most loyal and obedient subjects most humbly beseech Almighty God for your Majesty's health, long life, and the addition of further glorious victories over the great oppressor of the liberties of Europe. Signed, J. Dudley, Ch. Story, Sec. Council; Richd. Gerrish, Speaker of the Representatives. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 1st, 1710. Copy. 2½ pp. [C.O. 5, 865. Nos. 55, 55 i.–xiv.; and 9(without enclosures) 5, 913. pp. 279–306; and 218, 1. pp. 4–6.]
Nov. 15.
Boston, New England.
492. Governor Dudley to Mr. Popple. Acknowledges letters of May 2, 1710. Continues: I would be very glad the heats and inconveniences between Mr. Collins and Mr. Bridger were ended, but that must be by Mr. Collins fetching home the masts long since cut which lye in hazard alwayes as well as wasting by time, which Mr. Micoe, Mr. Collins' Agent, assures me shall speedily be done. I shall obey their Lordships in that matter as I have alwayes done, and Mr. Bridger is sensible he wants no warrants, nor power, nor assistance, nor guards of soldiers in his service; he is att present at New York takeing care of the palatines, etc. I have given account of Mr. Usher's letters as well as I can to their Lordships att the board. That Gentleman has been very unfortunate in putting himself into Mr. Allin's affayre, the delay of which has made him poor and angry, and perticularly with Mr. Waldron, whose estate was acquitted out of that challenge by the Lords delegates when Captain Vaughan attended, and that has made him more angry with him, inclosed is the clause of Mr. Waldron's letter too harsh to be shewed directly to their Lordships, but the matter of fact is true that Waldron has no such lands nor any other man in the province of the seventh part of that value by town grants. I have now propounded Counsellors (v. preceding). I do not remember ever to have written Mr. Packer, because he keeps a tavern, and it would be very odd to have him att the board of H.M. Council while he is in that imployment. I have sett the matter of the money in a true light to their Lordships, however people in corners no doubt keep the usage of 15 dwt., but it is true there is no money att all, and I challenge the gentleman that complains to shew me tenn peices of 8/8 that he has received in a twelvemonth in silver, tho he has need enough of it. I am not used to angry clauses in letters, and shall not endeavour to hurt that gentleman, because he will do it himself fast enough. P.S. I am glad Mr. Drift has his money, pray give him my service. Signed, J. Dudley.Endorsed as preceding. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
492. i. Extract of a letter from Richard Waldron to Governor Dudley. June 30, 1710. As to the gentleman that holds 18000 acres of land in this province, I can find none. I valued myself as one of the greatest landed men in the province, but if he that writes this story will make good to mee but 1000, he shall have all the lands that myselfe, or my Father before mee had in this province by town grants. Indeed my father purchased some addition to his lands, and I have done the like, but all falls much short of a quarter part of 18000 acres. I hope your Excellency will give a true account of this matter, that the author of that story may be discovered to be an envious malicious lyar as all the inhabitants of this province are ready to prove him to be. Signed, Richard Waldron. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 865. Nos. 56, 56 i.; and 5, 913. pp. 309–312.]
Nov. 16.
Whitehall.
493. Mr. Popple to Sir C. Hedges. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire to know whether the allegations of James Briggs (v. June 13, 1710) are true, etc. [C.O. 38, 6. p. 506.]
Nov. 16.494. Petition of Clerks etc. of the Board to the Council of Trade and Plantations. There was 6 months salary due to petitioners at Michaelmas. There is an order from the Treasury directing the payment of 3 months salary to Midsummer in tallies upon tin. Petitioners, who have no perquisites as in other offices, will be considerable losers thereby. Pray their Lordships to interpose, etc. Endorsed, Recd. Read 16 Nov., 1710. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 76. No. 105.]
Nov. 17.495. Mr. Popple to Mr. Lowndes. The Council of Trade desire you to move to Lords of the Treasury for the relief of petitioners as preceding, and that the doorkeeper of this office be paid in money for the wood and coal supplied to this office, not in tallies on tin by wch. he would be a great looser, etc. [C.O. 389, 36. pp. 465–467.]
Nov. 17.496. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords' Commissioners of the Treasury. Enclose following,
496. i. Salaries and Expenses of the Board of Trade Midsummer to Michaelmas, 1710. v. B. of T. Journal. 5 pp. [C.O. 388, 76. Nos. 106–108; and (covering letter only) 389, 36. pp. 469, 470.]
Nov. 18.
Whitehall.
497. Mr. Popple to Col. Nicholson and Col. Vetch. Having communicated the favour of yours to me of Sept. 16, to the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations, touching your embarkation for the Expedition, etc., their Lordships have commanded me to acquaint you that they wish you all imaginable success etc., and that they shall be glad to receive as early an account of that affair from you as possible; and you may assure yourselves that I joyn very heartily with their Lordships in their good wishes etc. As to Court news, I have only to tell you, that the Lord Treasurer has been removed, and that the Lord Pawlet, Mr. Harley, Mr. Paget, Sir Thomas Mansell, and Mr. Benson are appointed Commissioners of H.M. Treasury. The Lord Dartmouth is Secretary of State in the place of the Earl of Sunderland, Mr. St. John in Mr. Boyle's place, the Duke of Shrewsbury in the Duke of Kents, Lord Rochester in the Lord Sommer's, Duke of Buckingham in the Duke of Devonshire's, there are several other changes, but I have not time to enumerate them at present. P.S. Sir Simon Harcourt succeeds my Lord Cooper as Keeper of the Great Seal, Duke of Ormond is Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, and a new Parliament is chosen. [C.O. 5, 865. pp. 268, 269; and 218, 1. pp. 2, 3.]
Nov. 20.
Boston, New England.
498. Governor Dudley to [? Mr. Secretary Boyle.]. Recomments Col. William Taylour, a son of this Country, who has served H.M. in the reduction of Port Royall, etc. Signed, J. Dudley. [C.O. 5, 898. No. 4.]
Nov. 20.
St. James's.
499. H.M. Warrant to Governor Hunter as to granting lands in New York, pursuant to Representation of Oct. 26 q.v. Countersigned, Dartmouth. Endorsed, Recd. 24th, Read 27th Nov., 1710. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 1; and 5, 1122. pp. 200–202.]
Nov. 20.
Whitehall.
500. Mr. Blathwayt to [? Mr. Popple]. As I am in waiting at the Councill I have recd. from you a duplicate of a Representation of the Council of Trade Feb. 23 last past, with papers relating to Newfoundland, wherewith having immediately acquainted my Lord President, His Lordp. who has had so late notice of those matters has express'd his desires that upon a review of all those papers by the Lords Commrs. I might be enabled to let him know whether there may be anything to be added unto them or any alteration fit to be propos'd to H.M. at so great a distance of time. Signed, Wm. Blathwayt. Endorsed, Recd. Read Nov. 21, 1710. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 4.No.140; and 195, 5. pp. 149, 150.]