America and West Indies
December 1710, 1-9

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1924

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293-310

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'America and West Indies: December 1710, 1-9', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 25: 1710-1711 (1924), pp. 293-310. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73844 Date accessed: 25 November 2014.


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December 1710, 1-9

Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
521. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lt. Governor Bennett. Since out letter of Feb. 9, 1709, we have received yours of June 13 and Aug. 30, 1710. We have consider'd what you writ concerning James Briggs; enclose letter from Sir C. Hedges thereupon, and certificate from Capt. Ferdinando (v. Nov. 28), both which, seeming to us to relate to the same facts as are mentioned in the affidavits you sent us, and Sir C. Hedges informing us he findes nothing further relating to the said Briggs, who was not accused here; you will do well to consider whether there be any new matter alledged against him before he be discharged. In the mean time we are to inform you that you are under a mistake in supposing that the Act for the more effectual suppressing of piracy is not in force, the same having been continued by an Act pass'd in the 5th year of H.M. reign intituled, An Act for continuing the Laws therein mentioned relating to the Poor, and to the buying and selling of cattle in Smithfield, and for suppressing of piracy, which Act is here enclosed and was formerly sent you, tho it may have miscarried. We have also consider'd what you write relating to the sloop St. James of Barbados, and have read the depositions and proceedings in the Admiralty Court, relating thereunto; and observe that the Spanish merchant on board that sloop and five more of the crew, were set on shoar on the South side of Hispaniola, which is very irregular; for when a prize is brought into port in order to an adjudication in the Court of Admiralty, (as the Law directs) it will be difficult to prove whether such capture was made within the limits mentioned in the Act for the incouragement of the trade to America, or not, without a discovery thereof by some of the captor's crew, or unless some of the men belonging to the prize be brought into port to evidence the lawfulness of the capture; and therefore, for the future, we expect that you give an Instruction to all privateers in your Government that they always bring into port some of the crew of such prizes as they shall make, and that you take care the said Instruction be strictly observed and comply'd with. The cruel and inhumane treatment of the Spanish merchant on board the said sloop is of very ill consequence, as tending to discourage our trade with the subjects of Spain in America, and directly contrary to Article IV. of the Instructions given to privateers here, and which were sent you in 1704, by Sir C. Hedges, then Secretary of State, a copy of which Instructions we again inclose, whereby you will be informed what you are to do in the case of those that misused the said Spanish merchant. You tell us that you hear the owners of the sloop St. James will apply to H.M. for restitution, but you should have acquainted us in what manner they intend to make the said application, whether by Appeal or otherwise, and if by Appeal, whether the same was made within time after the adjudication. We have received the Act relating to Capt. Richard Jennings, and when any persons shall appear in behalf of the said Jennings, we shall then consider the said Act. We shall expect the old seal, according to your promise. We are sorry to hear the Island has laboured under such a violent sickness as you mention, and hope that, long ere this, it is abated. [C.O. 38, 6. pp. 507–509.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
522. Mr. Popple to Josiah Burchet. Encloses extract of Governor Handasyd's letter, Oct. 3, relating to French and Spanish ships at Carthagena. [C.O. 138, 13. p. 303.]
Dec. 1.
Whitehall.
523. Same to Capt. Gardner. Gov. Handasyd (Oct. 3) has not received the pardon, nor the duplicate thereof, which you informed their Lordships you had sent, etc. [C.O. 138, 13. p. 304.]
Dec. 1.524. Capt. Moody to Lord [? Dartmouth]. Last year I took a more exact survey than I formerly had done of all our inhabited parts [in Newfoundland], but found none so strongly and conveniently situated for fortification and fishery as Ferryland, a draft of which I have ready and is the same that at my arrival in England was approved etc. Signed, J. Moody. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 22. No. 76.]
Dec. 2.
Whitehall.
525. Duke of Queensberry to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses petitions of the Royal African Company and of several planters and inhabitants of Barbadoes, etc., for their opinion. Signed, Queensberry. (v. Dec. 9.) Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 4, 1710. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 13. No. 77; and 389, 21. p. 332.]
Dec. 2.
Whitehall.
526. Memorandum as to papers sent to the Council of Trade by Richard Warr. Signed, Adrian Drift. ¾ p. Enclosed,
526. i.–xiii. Duplicates of Nos. 332 i.–iii., v.–vii., x–xv.
526. xiv. List of 62 French prisoners sent home by the Fleet (v. No. 333). 1 p. [C.O. 28, 43. Nos. 47, 47 i.–xiv.]
Dec. 2.
Whitehall.
527. Lord Dartmouth to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following for their opinion. Signed, Dartmouth. Endorsed, Recd. 4th, Read 6th Dec., 1710. 1 p. Enclosed,
527. i. Mr. Waterhouse to Richard Warre. General Post Office Nov. 15, 1710. Encloses following from Virginia, there being no such person to be heard of, as it is directed to. Signed, Ben. Waterhouse. Addressed. 1 p.
527. ii. William Killick to Charles Kennett. Asks for some books, etc. Since ye late Governor's death, we live very peaceably, etc. July 14, 1710. Addressed. ¾ p.
527. iii.–v. Testimonials and informations ad gradum in the Society of Jesus, on behalf of George Dyne and Edmund Clarkeson. Signed, Gul. Hunter, and Robert Brooke S.J. in Maryland. July 20–22, 1710. Latin. 5 pp.
527. vi. William Killick to James Whittmore. July 14, 1710. As to ye accounts you desire of me of our factory, (fn. 1) I'm sorry I can't give you any such tydings as you hear from that of Madera and ye East, etc. It goes here much as in England, where by ye severity of times, we do little more then keep our own. I think there is between 200 or 300 yt. frequent my store: all ye good I do is to try to make them constant and good customers, thousands of whose failings I hope I have concurred to prevent, who otherwise without our help wu'd become renegades. This and the will of God makes me content with my station, even without that great advance wch. is made in ye Eastern factorys. 'Tis our joy to read of them; and as [a] great a trouble to hear of ye unfortunate jarrs of China. We, God be thanked, live in good peace and union one with another, in expectation of better times to advance our trade etc. I am building now a house in a place which by Mr. Cataway was christned Paradise: 'tis indeed a pretty situation, with a fine prospect of our River; it resembles something the Hill, etc. The 2 underfactours, Mr. Dyne and Clarckson (v. iii.–v.) are passed there time of giving us new bonds; as also Mr. Delveaux is. They all seem to me to be fitt for our purpose: and to have those conditions our factory requires. My bonds were sealed long ago. We have imploy for 2 or 3 factours more: but whoever comes, please(d) to lett them be well qualifyed: others do but disgrace our trade. The wares I want are chiefly those wh. you cant send, being they are prohibited goods. I shud be glad (for my diversion) to read ye lives of ye modern Hero's of Don Inago's company, etc. My kind love and respects to Mr. Sheldon, etc. Signed, William Killick. 2 pp.
527. vii. — to Thomas Parker. Refers to some bills drawn upon Mr. Kennett (v. ii). July 20, 1710. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 717. Nos. 20, 20 i.–vii.; and (without enclosures) 5, 727. p. 207.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
528. Lord Dartmouth to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Having laid before the Queen your Lordships' Representation of Feb. 23 last, concerning the state of Newfoundland, and severall papers on the same subject, which have been lately putt into my hands, your Representation being of an old date, H.M. would have you take it again into your consideration, as also the other papers, etc., and report your opinion what may be fitt and expedient to be done for the good of that Colony, and for the advantage and security of our navigation and fishery there. Capt. Moody and Mr. Vane, whose papers are enclosed, will waite on your Lordships, etc. List of papers enclosed. Signed, Dartmouth. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 6, 1710. 2¼ pp. Enclosed,
528. i. Capt. Moody's Proposal for building a Fort at Ferryland. Signed, J. Moody. Endorsed, Recd. 6th, Read 8th Dec., 1710. ¾ p.
528. ii. Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to Lord Dartmouth, Admlty. Office. Dec. 2, 1710. There were sent to Newfoundland the last year three ships of her Majesty's of fifty gunns, one of two and thirty, and two frigats of the sixth rate, and when the Trade shall have occasion for convoy and protection the next year, wee will endeavour to furnish them with the like security. Signed, J. Leake, P. Methuen. J. Aislabie, William Drake. Endorsed, Recd. 6th, Read 8th, 11th, 1710. 1 p.
528. iii. George Vane to Lord Dartmouth. Aug. 2, 1710. In pursuance of your Lordp's. orders, I have here sett down the just relacon of the takeing of St. John's Harbour and Fort. A detachment of the French that were coming from Placentia commanded by Monsr. de St. Ovide, Lt. Governour of the aforesaid place, being composed of part of the said Garrison, of part of a shipp's company of a small friggate of the King's of 20 gunns call'd the Venus, as likewise of a mercht. ship bound for Hudson's Bay that winter'd there, some of their inhabitants fishermen, some Canadians and 7 Indians, in all about 170 men, each arm'd with musquett bayonett, one or two pistolls, a small ax, etc., having made the journey by land from Placentia, Dec. 22nd, 1708, about 4 a'clock in the morning came within little more than pistoll shott of the pallasadoes of the cover'd way, on the side of the great Gate, before they were perceiv'd by the centryes, that before the centry had challeng'd them and fired his peice, the headmost of the enemy were entering the cover'd way, so into the ditch, (where they were under cover of our cannon) placeing their scaleing ladders and mounting. Our guard that consisted of 13 men of the garrison and 19 of the inhabitants fishermen, commanded by a serjant, who being wounded, his corporal and some of the soldiers rann away and gott over the ramparts on the other side, as the French were entering on that. Having rose att the fireing of the first musquet I came to the ramparts about that time, there not being yet one Frenchman in the place (as I cou'd perceive) by their not having been able to pull down the new pallasadoes I had about a month before sett up in the room of the old rotten ones that were on the Berme before, so that they were forced to pull up their ladders unto the Berme to gett over them, finding scarce anybody on the ramparts, went and call'd over to the inhabitants who kept a guard without the sally porte to come to our assistance, was answer'd they cou'd not gett in, then ran to the guard house to see if any were there, and found almost all the inhabitants men, who woud not take their arms and mount the rampart, for all the intreaty I cou'd make them, meanwhile severall of the Frenchmen were entered the place, others having lett down the drawbridge of the great gate (the lock of which is said to have been simply hung on and not lock'd) forced open the gate, and were entering in a body, seing myself almost surrounded and having no men to make head against them retired towards my house, the French pursuing me and fireing att me, and that so close (as since they told me) that just as I gain'd the rails before the door one had clove me down with his ax but that another call'd to him, don't kill him, 'tis an officer, wch. words I heard but knew not then 'twas me they meant. I gain'd the door and shutt it, but scarce had lockt it when the balls came in att the windows very thick, and some to batter att the door, having ask'd in French who was there, was answer'd good quarters, on which I surrender'd. While I went to the Guardhouse, Majr. Loyd had quitted the ramparts as he said since to fetch the keys and open the sally port to lett in the inhabitants, was really knock'd down and taken a little after coming from his house with the said keys in his hand. There was not above 6 or 7 of the soldiers that were not on the guard that took arms and came out of the barracks, the rest refuseing (as Steel the eldest serjant of the Garrison since told me) to do it, that in less than half an hour the enemy was intirely master of the place. On the first alarme 6 or 7 of the inhabitants came running from their houses with their arms, and fired on the French as they were mounting, but not being seconded were 5 of them kill'd or wounded by the fire of some of the French who turn'd upon them. This was all the defence the inhabitants made, and it's not much to be wonder'd since 'tis assur'd that some of them said after, they were glad provided Majr. Loyd was hang'd, as they hoped he wou'd be, besides the great distinction and favour the French are said to have shown to some of them, give great reason to believe it was not for nothing, and it's well known that nothing passed on our coast but the French were inform'd of it. I heard myself one of them say he had lain att the house of one Minchin of Petty Harbour 2 or 3 times the summer before, of wch. none of H.M. officers were ever inform'd of, as ought to have been. A boy belonging to one of the inhabitants named Gilbert Jane, having been in the woods the day before we were taken, saw the musquetts of some of the French sett up agt. a tree, heard them talk etc., came home and told his said master, who instead of advertiseing of it, threatned the boy to break his bones, if he said another word of it, for he was a lying rogue, and wou'd make them be all night under arms, if Major Lloyd came to hear it. One of the French who spoke good English being one night a little in drink was ask'd what they wou'd have done, if they had fail'd in their attempt, for provisions to have gone back with, answer'd that in Gr—y's house up the Harbour were provisions enough, and that they were sure of that before they sett out, but for their lives should not say he had told it, for Monsr. de St. Ovide wou'd have him hanged, if he were discover'd, etc. The Castle that defended the harbour's mouth might have made a very good defence, had an officer been there, being rather stronger then the fort, and furnish'd with all warlike stores to the full as well, yet was surrender'd up without fireing a shott. About a fortnight after wee were taken, the French having prepared a challoway, Major Loyd, the youngest Lieut. and myself were put on board it and sent for Placentia, the eldest Lieut. being sick staid behind, about 2 months after took hostages for the inhabitants and demolished the fortifications, bringing the said Mr. Gully, about 50 of the soldiers, the gunners etc. prisoners, the cannon ammunition with what else they thought proper, for which end the Governour of Placentia had sent thither the aforesaid friggate with 3 sloops, the rest of the soldiers, some took on with the French, others hid themselves in the woods, or engaged or took on with the inhabitants as fishermen, so were left behind. About the end of April 1709, the Governour of Placentia having had news from Europe that a strong squadron of English men of warr were design'd for those parts, with a great many land forces, sent Major Loyd, his nephew, and the rest of the prisoners to Quebeck in Canada, Mr. Gully being sick was to stay, myself with one of the gunners (by the intercession of the Lt. Governour) got leave to stay, to be sent by the first opportunity to Old France. In the beginning of June arriv'd att Placentia the Fidelle man of warr of 54 gunns commanded by Monsr. della Rochalare, with a large flyboat of the Kings, having on board them 200 extra marine soldiers devided into 4 companys design'd for a garrison for St. Johns with stores etc. for the same, not knowing of its being demolished till on the Banks. The Governour caused the said troops and stores to be landed to strengthen his garrison. The man of warr continued there till the Fall to convoy home the shipps there, when the Governour sent Mr. Gully on board the flyboat, with the gunner, but me on board the man of warr, which brought and landed me att Rochfort, where I continued prisoner till July 12th, 1710 N.S., that I obtained my liberty on my parole of honour to come for England. Insists on necessity of fortifying St. Johns so as to render it impregnable, with a garrison of 200 to 300 men and an experienced Governour, etc. 30 of the garrison to be New England Indians for running the woods, so as to prevent correspondence with the enemy, and to give timely notice of his approach. If the country be as I left it, it's open for the French to come and ruin all the stages, train fatts etc. on our coast every winter wch. will in time be the ruin not only of the inhabitants, but of the fishing shipps that use that trade, for tho' the inhabitants att Ferryland have the Island of Boys where they secure their persons and provisions, those in Conception Bay, Bell Isle and Carboneer, those att Trinity, Green Island not securing their stages and train fatts lye open to all insults, as doth St. Johns having no Island att all and by consequence every way exposed to all the attempts of an enemy. Signed, G. Vane. Endorsed, Recd. 6th, Read 11th, 1710. 3 large pp.
528. iv. Extracts of letters from Mr. John Collins to his brother, Edwd. Collins, Minister of Wimbledon, Surrey. (a) St. Johns, July 16, 1709. Thank God I am escaped with my life, tho' near losing ye same, having ye next man to me kill'd and another wounded, and all to little purpose, the Garrison being lost without firing a gun, or not above 4 or 5 musketts, which when they were masters of commanded ye inhabitants being under ye said garrison. No doubt but ye inhabitants lye under ye same scandal as those that belong'd to the garrison; if so, it must be by them that are not acquainted with ye same. The French obliged us to ransom our houses etc., or threatned to carry us off for Canady, etc. After we had consented to their articles and gave them ransoms, and they oblig'd themselves not to disturb our Fishery, nor carry none of us inhabitants away from ye same, without any manner of notice carried me with them to Placentia, and before I return'd it was ye 27 of June, etc., etc. (b) Oct. 24, 1709. The Garrison being repair'd, in wch. ye inhabitants desire to live this winter, they have with all others as merchts., masters of ships and Commanders of H.M. ships, etc., pitched on me to command ye same, etc. It will cost me abundance of money to fitt myselfe for that post, wch. I hope to maintain if not surpris'd before we can settle ourselves and gett ye people in, if doe, I do not doubt of making a handsome defence. I am told that I need not doubt of ye Government's making me satisfaction, etc Encloses copy of his Commission. (c) Nov. 8, 1709, we have (in the garrison) near 500 souls, but not att most 4 months provision, and of which one half women and children. I desire you will make our condition known, that we may have a speedy relief, without it, 'tis impossible we shou'd subsist, but must become tributaries as before, etc. (d) June 27, 1710. We have had a miserable hard winter, but thank God our people stood very well in health, in ye garrison, we have a man of war arrived and many other ships, but no relief to ye garrison, no further than he is persuaded to quitt some marines in for ye ease of ye poor people, that they may go on their employment, but requires me to continue in ye same, which is a great hindrance to my business, besides a considerable charge I have been att. I have wrote to ye Commrs. of ye Ordnance relating to ye same, etc. All yt. know ye benefit and worth of this trade and income to our Crown admire there should be so little care taken of it. Same endorsement. Copy. 3 pp.
528. v. (a) John Collins to the Board of Ordnance. Fort William St. Johns, Newfoundland. June 27, 1710. As I was appointed the last fall by Capt. Joseph Taylor, Commander of H.M. Garrison in this harber, beleave itt my duty to acquaint your honers that with the few inhabitants left in the garrison have securde the same the winter and for the better security have carried round the works a forth rank of pallasadoes, wch. hass bin of sum charge, etc. (b) Same to same. Oct. 24, 1710. Encloses account for above, etc. Signed, John Collins. Endorsed, Recd. Nov. 27, 1710. Addressed. Postmark. Seal. 1 p.
528. vi. Major Lloyd to Solomon Merit. Placentia, Nov. 13, 1709. Having write to Capt. Lloyd and Mr. Reynolds, I referr you thereto, and here will venture a few lines, which recommend to the Secretary of State, having not an oppertunity to writ to him in that manner I ought, the which I will endeavour to do when I am in France. When I was in Quibec this summer, it was the news the English were design'd for Canada (vizt.) by water for Quibec 12 menn of warr with transports etc. and 6000 Scotts and their families commanded by Macharty; by land from New York, Albany and Boston 3000 to attacque Mon Royal. You must understand that on the River Canada the French have four Governours as vizt. at Quibec the Governour Generall Monsr. Marquis de Vadrele at Mon Royal Monsr. Ramsey 60 leagues distance from the former, in the middle between both a place called the Three Rivers another who died last winter; and at New Misasippy, which goes into the sea towards Mexico, another who likewise died last winter; Monsr. Ramsey with 700 menn was sent with intent to surprize the English from Albany as they crossed a Great Lake, which they were obliged to doe in their canoes etc., he was on that expedition about 20 days, but finding they were in two small forts which they had built, he return'd with two prisoners having killed four more, which the French called 60. At my parting from Canada the Governor Generall with 3000 menn was at a place called Chambly by Mon Royal building a small fort at a pass where they expected the English would come, but they may march another way and avoid that if advertised of it, beleive me at that time 500 was sufficient to take Quibec, there being neither officer, soldier or inhabitant hardly left there; most part of last summer they worked about the fortifications of Quibec from 3 to 600 men a day; the back part towards the land which was formerly weakest is now much the strongest, it being where they think the English would attempt; they have in all Canada 6000 menn, and noe more including the soldiers; at Quibec 72 pecies of canon mounted, which they call 100, it is a very foolish fortification that cannot be defended with less then 20,000 menn, it being at least 8 or 9 miles round, of no strength in severall places, tho' strong in some others, what is of greatest danger is, that this summer they had an invention as following, they had bound together vast quantity of wood which is bound with iron barrs, two or three foot under water, and this being above the towne the first night the ships anchored before the place they were to lett it goe with the tyde which is vastly strong, and put it a fire, being contrived with all manner of combustable matters for burning; and where the ships will anchor (as presumed they will if not advertised of this) it would reach from one shore to the other, or very near, and without dispute, if the fire would not take, as it probably would, the weight of it would either break the cables or make the anchors give way and so drive the ships aground, the flowing and ebbing there being a perfect sluice. At a place called the Gulf about 30 leagues before you come to Quibec, they have likewise severall small ones of this kind, but of no great danger, unless the ships anchor there, the last news we had at Canada was that the Allyes had lost a considerable battle in Spain, which occasioned the 6000 Scoth to be sent to Portugal, that there was 8 menn of warr at Boston, but would not stirr by orders of the Governour, expecting orders from England, that the army from Albany etc. had burnt their forts etc., and were retired; Monsr. Vadrell on this was on his journey from Mon Royal to Quibec, and was expected to arrive the day I left the place being Sept. 30th. At Plaisence likewise I find they have minded their garrisons very much; they have here seaven companys of soldiers; Capt. Goddrell and a detachment of about 36 of them goes in a privatier sloop, that belongs to the Governour to cruize on the coast of Martineco, the rest winter here; I had it from the mouth of the Lieut. du Roy, who took St. John last year (in his passion he spoke, on account of some part of the ransom being not paid) vizt., now they were resolved the English should have Placentia or he would see all the English had in Newfoundland levell with the ground before a 12 month came about. It is true I have been unfortunate and am in a manner ruined; but were I but at liberty to serve my Nation, I believe myselfe capable to be a means to retrive their loses and my own too; could I have my revenge I would be contented. That cowardly villian of an Enginier Capt. Vane, I am sure is a traytor, and will betray the Government whatever they trust him, had it not been for him I should not have been a prisoner here, it is my opinion the French will burn and distroy all they can this winter, etc. I expect to be at Rochell in France soon, etc. Signed, T. Lloyd. Same endorsement. Copy. 5 pp. [C.O. 194, 4. Nos. 143. 143 i.–vi and (without enclosures) 195, 5.pp. 160, 161; and 324, 32. pp. 46, 47; and 324, 31. pp. 8, 9.]
Dec. 4.
Whitehall.
529. Lord Dartmouth to the Board of Ordnance. Encloses following for their opinion. You are to consult Mr. Vane, etc. Signed, Dartmouth. 1p. Enclosed,
529. i. Capt. Moody's proposal for building a fort at Ferryland at the cost of £5000, etc. Signed, J. Moody. Copy. 1p. [C.O. 194, 22. Nos. 77, 77 i.]
Dec. 4.
Spanish Towne.
530. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Since my last dated Oct. 3, Commador Littleton arrived here with one man of war, and about 3 or 4 merchantmen, the two other men of war that came along with him, he left cruseing off on the Spanish Coast, which is not yet arrived. We have 7 or 8 traders now upon the Spanish coast, and one man of war to attend them, there is one of the number since come in and has brought with her in returne for her small cargoe about 15 or 16,000 peices of eight which has given encouragement for more goods and sloops to be sent out upon the same accot. Since the last sloops sayled wee have had an accot. by a vessell from the Island of Cuba, that there came from France and Spain a Fleet of ships to the number of 15 or 16 sayle, for the Havana and Laverde Cruse (if it be so will spoyle our trade) under the convoy of 4 Spanish and 2 French men of war. It's reported they are to convoy home the galloon that escaped last, with what other ships are then ready. We are also informed they were not sayl'd a month ago. Commador Littleton has dispatched two men of war, 7 or 8 days agoe, for the coast of Carthagen to gett intilligence whether the afforesaid information be true or not, and in case they are not gone, he will take all the care that is posible to interscept them, but I am very apprehencive they will steal away. Mr. Littleton intends to send in case nothing intervene to prevent all the traders that are ready to sayle to the number of 10 or 12 ships under the convoy of one or two men of war, who will saile the 8th or 9th inst. I heartily wish them a safe-arrival in Great Brittain. As to other newes here, wee have little material, the Island has been afflicted for this six weeks past with sickness, as feavers, sore throats etc., but not so mortal as formerly. I understand that some of our privateers has taken and carry'd into New York 3 or 4 French merchantmen, they being so leakey they could not bring them to the windard to their commission'd Port. I hope soon my Regt. with myself will be releived, etc. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. 10th, Read 15th Feb., 1710/1011. 2pp. [C.O. 137, 9. No. 31; and 138, 13. pp. 318–321.]
Dec. 4.
Spanish Towne.
531. Same to Lord Dartmouth. Duplicate of preceding. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 29.]
Dec. 5.532. Affidavit of R. Love, master of the Abraham galley, in favour of Charles Arrabella (v. Nov. 14). Signed, Richard Love. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 7, 1710. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 21.]
Dec. 6.
Whitehall.
533. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Duke of Queensberry. In reply to Dec. 2, refer to their representations of Feb., 1708 and Dec. 1709. [C.O. 389, 21. pp. 334, 335.]
Dec. 7.
Craven House.
534. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the Receiver General of South Carolina. You are to send over the account of the late Receiver General and remit the balance due to us in rice etc. by 2 of the next ships that shall come for England. You are to pay no money to any persons whatsoever, except ye usual and allowed salaries of our officers of that part of our Province as they are mentioned in our late Receiver General's Commission and Instructions, unless you have an express warrant for the payment thereof under our hands and seals. P.S. You are required not to make any payment to ye person in present possession of the Govermt. since the death of the late Governor unless you have further orders from us. Signed, Craven, Palatin, Beaufort, Maurice Ashley, John Danson. [C.O. 5, 290. pp. 4, 5.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
535. Lord Dartmouth to the Council of Trade and Plantations. A letter from Governor Bennet, June 13, directed to the Earl of Sunderland having been put into my hands, I observe he desires H.M. directions (i) About one James Briggs, charged with piracy and in custody at Bermuda; (ii) relating to several soldiers condemned to death there; (iii) a pardon for Anthony Kenty, one of them. He says you are as fully informed as I am in these matters. I desire therefore your opinion on these particulars etc. Signed, Dartmouth. Endorsed, Recd. 9th, Read 13th, Dec., 1710. 2 pp. [C.O. 37, 9. No. 13; and 38, 6. pp. 510, 511.]
Dec. 7.
Craven House.
536. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the Council of Trade and Plantations. We having receiv'd information of the death of our late Govt. Col. Edward Tynte, have agreed to constitute Charles Craven Esq., Govr. of that Province, whose integrity and capacity for that imployment we very much rely on. We therefore desire your Lordships to lay this matter before the Queen and humbly desire H.M. approbation of our said Governor. Signed, Craven Pallatine, Beaufort, M. Asheley, J. Danson. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 8, 1710. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 105: and 5. 1292. p. 235.]
Dec. 7.
Whitehall.
537. William Penn to the Council of Trade and Plantations Honble. Ffrds. I have no other accounts to lay before you of the proffits and charges of Pensylvania, but what you had from me about two years agoe so that I cannot so fully answer your 6 Queries (v. Nov. 4) as perhaps you may expect. If I could, yet do I not conceive, how your first and second have any relation to the surrender of my Governmt. For I do not remember to have made an offer of alienating any part of my Propriety (strictly so called) but only the Governmt., which will alone, I presume, entitle me upon a surrender, to aske a considerable sum of money, as well in consideration of the expence I have been at, in making it a country, as of the benefit and advantage the Crown has already, and hereafter will receive thereby, in the increase of the Customs, as well as other parts of the Revenue, which I am inform'd, have amounted for several years to between 10 and £12,000 per annum, and sometimes double that sum, and especially surrendring it at a time when in keeping it in my own hands, I may reasonably expect a great proffit thereby, the Country being now come to that maturity, to stand upon it's own leggs, that is able to raise supplies, equall to most of the neighbouring Collonies, more than sufficient to defray all the charges of Governmt., which are less considerably in my Governmt. than in other places. I cannot possitively say what revenue at present is setled to defray such charges. But the same has been maintain'd heretofore, partly out of my own private fortune, and partly by ye people. Which I have been the more willing to comply with, because it was my opinion taxes in ye infancy of a Collony, would be a cramping of the industry of the People, and experience has since shown, my notion was not ill-founded, by ye superiour improvemts. and trade, above many of their neighbours. It having been during the late scarcity of corn in Europe, not only ye granary of ye W. Indies, (which it hath been many years) but also of some part of Europe, and what has been may be again. The proffit the Crown will gain by my surrender, may easily be perceived to be very considerable, if it be considered that upwards of 25 years since, the people made a free gift of a small duty upon goods exported and imported, which at that time of day would have brought in by a modest calculation £1200 per annum. This I thought fitt to let fall, in consideration of £600 and intended it should lye dormant for sometime. And soon after coming for England, it was never revived. The flourishing state of Pensilvania neither requires nor expects to put me to further charge. But will, I am well assured, upon my going there, setle a handsom revenue, if the same be not already done, to defray the charges of Governmt., and enable their Governour honbly. to subsist. The Crown has formerly desired my Governmt., when it was not arrived at ye ability and perfection it now is, and I am sure it will appear, if I surrender my Govermt. to the Crown, that the Revenue will not fall short of its neighbours, and at the same time the charge much less, so that upon the whole the Crown will be more a gainer by my Governmt. than by some others. I hope not only this, but the making a wilderness, a fruitfull country, without any expence to ye Crown, who will reap the fruit of my labour and expence in the increase of the English navigation and customs, and the maintaining, as well as making that country, chiefly out of my own estate, does intitule me to a good and valuable consideration. And I doubt not but in justice you will so report it, that this affair may have a speedy issue. Upon the whole matter, I expect £20,000 for my governmt., but am content to allow seven years for the compleating the full paymt. thereof, receiving yearly proporconable sums, till the whole be paid. Which is so far from being a boon, that it has sunk my patrimony, several hundred pounds per annum to bring it to what it is. If you are not pleas'd with this proposal, then I only begg that what was intended for a satisfaction as well as a favour (I mean the grant of Pensilvania) may not be made the ruin of my other estate, and family to support it, as it hath hitherto been, by the many interrupcons, and avocacons there, and here, for 28 years past. I have been several times there, and as often called home to my great expence, fatigue, and danger, to defend my just right, not to say merit, to the Crown. Signed, Wm. Penn. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read 22nd Dec., 1710. 2½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 106; and 5, 1292. pp. 237–240.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
538. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. Enclose following, "communicated to us by Mr. Stephen Du Port." Annexed,
538. i. Extract of a letter, dated St. Christophers Sept. 16, 1710, relating to Guardaloupe:—One of our privateers has taken a small vessel coming from Guardaloupe. One of their chief officers writes as follows: "It is two years since M. de Philipeaux was appointed to this Government, and he comes not. The Court leaves us without ships, money, flour or Government. M. de Gabarett, the present Governor, is so weak that the negroes intended to take advantage of it to plunder the whole Colony, but were discovered and nearly 40 of the leaders punished by wheel and fire, and in faith it is time M. de Philippeaux came." I have the original of this letter signed De Lavalmiuiere, Lieut. de Roy de la Guardaloupe. It is certain that if we could profit by this occasion, we could go very far towards the conquest of this Island. Copy. French. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 39. Nos. 120, 120 i.; and 153, 11. pp. 96, 97.]
Dec. 8.
Whitehall.
539. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. Representation on petition of Ann Pauley (v. Nov. 14). Charles Arrabella having already suffer'd the greatest part of his penalty, we are of opinion that, if H.M. shall judge him a fit object of her royal compassion, he be not discharged from his imprisonment till an opportunity shall offer of his being put on board some ship bound for Europe, in order to his leaving the Province of Maryland. [C.O. 5, 727. pp. 204–206.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
540. Lord Dartmouth to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Returns above Representation for a fuller report of the circumstances of the case. Signed, Dartmouth. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 12th Dec., 1710. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 717. Nos. 22, 22 i.; and 5, 727. pp. 207–210.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
541. Duke of Queensberry to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Having laid your answer (Dec. 6) in relation to the Royal African Company before the Lords of the Committee of Council, it has been represented to their Lordships that the papers I transmitted to you did contain several new proposals, and I therefore inclose the said papers again to you for your further consideration. Signed, Queensberry. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 12th Dec., 1710. 1p. Enclosed,
541. i. Petition of the Royal African Company and their Creditors to the Queen. It is generally admitted that the trade to Africa is naturally adapted to the common interest of Great Britain and the Plantations. Reason, experience, and the singular nature of the trade itself, and the universal and continued practice of all other European nations trading thither, demonstrate that it can never be carry'd on and improved by any other method so securely and advantageously as by a Company exclusive. While the present Royal African Company had the countenance and authority of the Sovereign on their side, no trading Company in Europe did, in so short a compass of time, carry on and improve their trade so much as they did, etc. For besides their having built a considerable number of forts, they increased the export of far greater quantities of British manufactures; they furnish'd the Plantations with constant supplies of choice negro slaves at very moderate rates, and imported such quantities of gold dust from the coast of Africa, that in few years time before the Revolution, they coin'd many more guineas in the Tower, than both the Company and separate traders together have done in quadruple the number of years ever since. By reason of the unrestrain'd liberty assum'd by the interlopers for some years after the Revolution, and the temporary permission which the Parliament were prevail'd upon to grant to the separate traders for an experiment under the plausible (tho' fallacious) pretence of benefit to the nation by laying the trade open to all your Majesty's subjects, the trade to Africa has fallen ever since under very great and unavoidable disorders; for as the French, Dutch, Danes, Portuguese, etc., were always rivals and competitors with the Royal African Company for the trade of the coast of Guinea, so the private traders having not only separate stocks, interests and designs quite different from that of the Company, but likewise very uncertain, precarious, and disconcerted methods of trading thither, the British interest by being so divided on the coast, is thereby reduced to very great extremities: insomuch that for the want of a preconcerted, uniform and regular management of the trade there, the British interest daily declines, their manufactures are still more and more depretiated, the value of. negro-slaves are by degrees advanced to the treble or quadruple of what they cost the Company formerly, the Plantations have been but very indifferently and uncertainly serv'd with slaves, and those they get are at excessive dear rates, the importation of gold dust etc. not worth the naming, the French, Dutch, etc., taking advantage of our separate interests, are gaining ground daily with the natives, and the Royal African Company who (while encouraged and protected in the enjoyment of their privileges) were alone capable of out-rivalling all their foreign competitors, are now under unsuperable discouragements and difficulties both abroad and at home, so that if some effectual care be not speedily taken for remedying those growing evils, that most valuable branch of our foreign trade is in extreme danger of being irrecoverably lost to this nation. Tho' what is above represented was in a great measure laid before the honourable House of Commons in both the Sessions of the last Parliament, yet some few private traders had the art of imposing impracticable notions on some members in such a manner, and possessing them with very groundless prejudices against the Company, that both the Sessions terminated without any effectual care being taken for the preservation of that trade, but leaving it (as it still lyes) in extreme disorder, and the Company (merely for want of encouragement and protection) wholly expos'd to the most intolerable insults and reproaches imaginable, both abroad and at home. Describe conditions of the trade on the African coast, the financial position of the Company, which has lost £400,000 by seizures by the enemy in the late and this present war. The Company's creditors are willing to unite with the Company to carry on this trade, which is absolutely necessary for the good of the nation, upon any reasonable terms, provided they might have the Company's priviledges, as by their Charter, mutually secur'd to the Company and their creditors. Petitioners enclose their scheme, by which they humbly conceive the Trade would be effectually preserv'd to the Nation, and carry'd on to the utmost extent, and the Plantations most certainly supply'd to their satisfaction, etc. Signed, By order of the Royal African Company, John Pery, Secretary, and 256 other signatures. Enclosed,
541. ii. Petition of Planters and other inhabitants of Barbados to the Queen. Barbados, July 20, 1710. Petitioners are deeply concerned in the trade to Africa, the constant supply of negroes at moderate prices being the cheif support of this Colony, whereby we can only be enabled to preserve the staple of sugars, and other commodities and to afford them in greater quantities and cheaper than other nations. For many years, while the Royal Affrican Company had the sole management of that trade, this Island was duely supply'd with a sufficient number of negros at moderate prices, from £10 to £20 per head, which was a very great encouragement, and enabled us greatly to improve the manufacture of this Island; but for several years past, since that trade hath been laid open, the number of negroes imported by the Royall African Company and separate traders together hath not been sufficient to supply this Island, and those which have been imported have been sold at extravagant prices, from £20 to £40 per head, which petitioners conceive to have been occasioned by the different intrests of the Company and separate traders, each biding on the other; of which the natives of the coast taking an advantage have raised the price of their own commodities and sunk the price of those of Great Brittain and this Island, which is an unspeakeable damage and discouragement to petitioners, tends to the ruine of this trade, the lessening your Majesty's Revenue, and the navigation of Great Brittain. Pray that the British interest on the coast of Africa may be effectually preserved, and the trade put on such a foot that a sufficient number of negroes may be had on the coast, on moderate rates. Signed, Thos. Carney, Tho. Beckles, Reynd. Alleyne, Wm. Sharpe, S. Durousseau, Wm. Allumby, Benj. Alleyne, Saml. Cox, S. Matson, Ben. Bullard, Josph. Haines, Tho. Alleyne, Manass. Gillingham, Tho. Alleck, Saml. Osborn, Midleton Chamberlain, Edwd. Jordan, Richd. Parsons, Geo. Walker, Alex. Walker, Wardll. Andrews, Tho. Stokes, Richd. Sandiford, Timot. Salter, Hen. Lintott, Tho. Prideaux, Robt. Hamson, Saml. Beresford, Saml. Brown, Hen. Carter, Wm. Cleland, Jno. Frere, John Dolin, Nth. Ides, John Trent, Jno. Whetstone, Raynes Bate, Richd. Carter, Thos. Waite, Jno. Sandford, Robt. Vaughan, Benj. Matson, John Sober snr., Saml. Gollop, Saml. Nauterick, Mar. Niccolls, Jo. Scott, Jno. Colleton, Wm. Dottin, Edwd. Niccolls, Mat. Reynell, Joseph Todd, Jno. Eastmond, John Sharp, Const. Kelley, Dan. Hooper, Jno. Hottersall, John Jordan, Saml. Haggard, Wm. Hooper, Edwd. Hooper, Jos. Salmon, Guy Chapman, Steed Bonnet, Saml. Collyns, Jno. Rous, Tho. Carmichael, Rd. Morgan, Jos. Puckering, Wm. Howard, Tho. Rollfone (?), Hen. Piers, John Naucrick, Ja. Waterman, Will. Carter, Robt. Osborn, James Dotin, James Cowse, Edwd. Morgan, Tho. Harper, Josph. Brown. Elisha Holder, John Clarke, Tho. Steward. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 12th Dec., 1710. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 50, 51 (covering letter and enclosure i. only); and 388, 13. Nos. 94, 95; and (without enclosures) 389, 21. pp. 344–356.]
Dec. 9.
Whitehall.
542. Lord Dartmouth to Governor Hunter. Encloses H.M. Warrant of Nov. 21. Signed, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. p. 49; and 324, 31. pp. 9–11.]
Dec. 9.
Treasury Chambers.
543. Mr. Lowndes to Mr. Popple. Encloses following. My Lords of the Treasury request the Council of Trade and Plantations to report to them what abatements of these duties they think may be a reasonable encouragement for those privateers, in order to the laying the same before the Parliament. Signed, Wm. Lowndes. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 12th Dec., 1710. ½ p. Enclosed,
543. i. Address of the Governor, Council and Assembly of Jamaica to the Queen. March 28, 1710. Duplicate. 3pp.
543. ii. Memorial of merchants and inhabitants of Jamaica to the Lord High Treasurer. Copy. 4 pp.
543. iii. H.M. Commissioners of the Customs to the Lord High Treasurer. Custom-house, London, May 19, 1710. Report on preceding. The Collector, Peter Beckford, hath not done any more than his duty according to his Instructions from this Board, in pursuance of your Lordship's warrant July 6, 1708, the Act being silent, by whom the said duties should be received and accounted for. We shall direct him to remit hither the money he has received on account of the duties on prize goods in Jamaica. It appears that he has been greatly obstructed in the execution of his duty by Wm. Norris, the Naval Officer there. And forasmuch as he has signify'd to us that the powers he collects the said duties by are questioned as not sufficient, we humbly pray your Lordship will write to the Governors of the Plantations to countenance the officers of the Customs in the execution of their respective duties, and in remitting the Queen's money home. Signed, J. (=T) Newport, Will. Culliford, J. Werden, J. Stanley. Copy. 4 pp.
543. iv. Same to [? Same]. Custome-house, London. Aug. 19, 1710. Refer to preceding and following. In consideration of the hardships represented in following petition, which we believe in great measure to be true, we think if security could be taken to answer ye duties till the persons concerned shall have an oppertunity of applying to Parliament, it would very much conduce to the encouragement of captors, the benefit of the trade and security of that Island, and that the same may be made generall for the releif of all H.M. Plantations in America. Signed, T. Newport, Will. Cullyford, M. Dudley, J. Shute. Copy. 2 pp.
543. v. Order of Queen in Council, Kensington, July 31st, 1710. Referring following to the Lord High Treasurer. Set out. A.P.C. II., 1120. Signed, John Povey. 1p.
543. vi. Petition of Merchants, Traders and Inhabitants of Jamaica to the Queen. Pray for the remission of the duties on prize goods, which frequently exceed their value etc. Copy. 4 pp. [C.O. 137, 9. Nos. 23, 23 i.–vi.; and (without enclosures) 138, 13. pp. 304, 305.]

Footnotes

1 Jesuit propaganda.