America and West Indies
January 1711

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1924

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332-351

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'America and West Indies: January 1711', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 25: 1710-1711 (1924), pp. 332-351. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73847 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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January 1711

Jan. 2.575. Mr. Secretary Boyle to [? Lord Dartmouth.] Encloses following. Signed, H. Boyle. 1 p.
575. i. Governor Dudley to Mr. Secretary Boyle. Nov. 15, 1710. Since the advice of my Lord Sunderland's laying down the office of the Secretary of State to whom I was by H.M. commands directed to address my letters and having yet no farther signification of H.M. pleasure, allows me humbly to address your honour, etc. Since my last to my Lord Sunderland, I have received only two letters from his Lordship, the first of April 17th, 1710, commanding the putting forward the Expedition to Port Royall etc., which I have in all poynts obeyed, and as the last summer all the Provinces stood in armes four months expecting H.M. fleet and forces for the reduction of Queebeck and Montreal, which was diverted by greater affayrs, but upon the humble application of the congress of H.M. Governours and the address of the Assemblys, H.M. was pleased to revive the matter. etc. Announces fall of Port Royal. v. C.S.P. Oct., 1710 etc. If the warr continue and H.M. shall be pleased with a proportionable force to send to Queebeck and Montreal, and it should please God to succeed our forces for the reduction thereof all the invaluable Naval Stores, fishery and lumber, sufficient for all Europe would be entirely in H.M. own hands. The other letter contayned an Instruction from H.M. referring to Flaggs of Truce (v. May 2, 1710). I am very confident nothing of that nature has been practised here. I have sent but twice to Port Royal and once to Queebeck this whole warr for eight years past in very small and mean sloops to transport prisoners who alwayes have been strictly commanded to carry nothing but their own subsistance, and have alwayes been as strictly searched and examined by the officers, and alwayes reported to have nothing on board but what was necessary for their voyage out and home, and I am now out of any farther use of flaggs of truce by the reduction of Portroyal. The charge last year when we did nothing and the reduction of Portroyal this year have cost this Province £40,000, which added to their debts for the defence of the Frontier will leave them greatly in arrear, whilst Virginia, Maryland, Pensilvania, Jerseyes and New York are covered by these Northern provinces, and sit quiet from losses or charges, att which the people here take the umbrage of dissatisfaction which will appear by their Address, and which the people here have thought a good reason to give their Governour so little as will not support the figure of the Goverment, unless my own estate had been here to assist, however I am well rewarded by H.M. acceptance of my service. etc. Signed, J. Dudley. 2pp. [C.O. 5, 898. Nos. 3, 3 i.]
Jan. 2.576. Sir Thomas Laurence to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays for satisfaction for the arrears due to him on account of Ordinary licences in Maryland, and that H.M. will declare her displeasure at the illegal proceedings of the Council and Assembly therein. (v. March 14 and 30, 1709/10 etc.) Signed, Thomas Laurence. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 2, 1710/11. 1⅓ pp. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 25; and 5, 727. pp. 221–224.]
[Jan. 2.]577. Proposals for redressing the irregular proceedings, and for preventing the unnecessary delays in the Courts of Justice of Barbadoes. The law by which the Judges are appointed by the Governor with the consent of the Council to be repealed, it often happening that those appointed are unskilled in the law and the the creatures of the Governor. The Chief Judge to be appointed by commission from H.M., with 8 assistants. to hold two Courts of Common Please, instead of five etc. etc. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 2, 1710/11. 11½ pp. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 53.]
Jan. 3.578. Ambrose Crowley to Arthur Moore, one of the Lords Commissioners of Trade Encloses following. I do beleive that the very drawbacks upon the unmanufactur'd iron and steel doth not amount to less than £3000 per annum in prejudice to H.M. Customs, and will be a growing evill. Have here also inclos'd you the objections the people of New England made in 1708, and the answers thereto. I need not tell you that it's England's interest to have New England and yt. Continent depending upon it. Where other nations can send iron and steel, it's highly necessary there should be a drawback, but in New England I think nothing ought to bee encourag'd in the manufactoring any commodities to the prejudice of Great Brittain. I am solicited by the rest of the trade to petition the Parliament this sessions, wch. with your approbation I shall do. Signed, Amb. Crowley. Endorsed, Recd. 4th, Read 5th Jan., 1710/11. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
578. i. The case of the honest exporters of Great Brittain's manufactured iron and steel to H.M. Plantations and Collonies. In the first and second years of the late King William and Queen Mary, there was an impost laid upon the unwrought forreign iron and steel imported, whereupon the manufacturers of iron and steel in England complained, by reason 'twas a prejudice to them and an advantage to the forreign manufacturers, and for remedy the Parliamt. then encreased the duty upon imported manufactured iron and steel. To evade this duty, some selfish merchts. shipped great quantitys of manufactured iron and steel in Holland, brought the same to some westward port in Great Brittain, there enter'd and reshipt itt for New England etc., and receiv'd the custome again by a drawback. To remedy this a clause was inserted in the subsidy Act of 2nd and 3rd Anne, by which no drawbacks are granted on such reshipped manufactured iron and steel. To evade which clause great quantitys of unwrought iron and steel scantlings are still reshipped to the Plantations, the re-exporter drawing back the custom, by which means there are very great quantitys of iron and steel manufactured in America; espetially in New England, and, there being no drawback on the manufactured iron and steel exported, that manufactured in America has the advantage of what is manufactured in England to the extent of £ 15 15s. 9d. per ton. In New England they have coals in their neighbourhood cheaper than the smiths in London, and by reason of the great plenty of provisions and increase of people, they have at present more done in New England for an English crown than is in London, being incouraged by these advantages they have made most of their iron and steeled ware for these two years past, and much incommoded the Great Brittain manufacturers by selling their iron and steeled ware to their neighbouring Collonies. It is therefore humbly hoped that there may be a stopp to the drawback of customes on forreign unwrought iron and steel as there is upon the manufactured, etc. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 14. Nos. 9, 9 i.; and 389, 21. pp. 400–404.]
Jan. 3.
London.
579. Jeremy Dummer, jr., to Lord Dartmouth. Having been lately empower'd by the Governor, Council and Representatives of the Massachusetts Bay to be their Agent here, I have recd. instructions to represent to your Lordship severall matters in their behalfe persuant to the Addresses, which by the favour of your Lordshp's. introduction, I presented to H.M. The first thing is that Port Royall, now Annapolis Royall being happily reduced, the Province most humbly hopes and prays that H.M. will be pleas'd to consider that that Countrey was the ancient inheritance of her Ancestours and does of unquestionable right descend to her Crown; that it is a great defence to the Northern Collonies, and that the furrs, fish and naval stores with which it abounds will render it of unspeakeable advantage to this nation; and that H.M. will fix her Royal resolution not to part with it, whenever it shall please God to send peace to Europe. They also pray for a free liberty to fish and whale off of that coast in all it's creeks, bays, harbours etc, and to cure the fish on the shore; and also to dig and fetch seacoal from thence, which is found in great plenty there. They are encourag'd to ask this, not onely because H.M. was graciously pleas'd in Her Royall Instructions to assure those Governments that were assisting in the reduction of Port Royall that they should enjoy a priviledge of commerce etca., but also because this liberty will very much redound to the advantage of this Nation. The freedom of fishery will inable the merchts. there to make good returns for the very great quantity of British manufactures continually imported; and the liberty of fetching coal will be a means to preserve the woods for H.M. service. There is another petition (which was in the addresses read to H.M.) that H.M. will in great compassion to Her Plantations on the Continent persue the happy success at Port Royall by forming another expedition against Canada. The reasons humbly suggested for this are the same with those already mention'd with relation to Port Royall with onely this addition that whereas there are numerous Indian Nations that are now supplyed by the French with cloaths and other European manufactures, for which they give in exchange furrs; Great Brittain will by the reduction of Canada secure this very valuable trade to themselves. And whereas there have been jealousies lest some of the Plantations on the Continent should in time come into the woollen manufactures, and so be less serviceable to the Crown, there will be no hazard of that here, Canada being a countrey so extremely cold, and the ground for halfe the year so cover'd with snow, and consequently unfit for the nurture of sheep, that it will be ever impracticable for them. whatever may be thought as to the more southern settlements. In summ, Canada with the savage Nations bigotted to their superstitions and devoted to their interest will be able notwithstanding the happy conquest of Port Royall to allarm all the English Continent, and even the Island of Newfoundland, (as we have lately had sad experience) and to carry on their wonted cruelties and depredations upon H.M. good subjects. So that no settled repose is to be expected till Canada (the American Carthage) is subdued. Which if it be once effected, the Brittish Empire in America will be secure and flourishing and the Crown of Great Brittain may in time be as opulent and powerfull in the West Indies as the States of Holland are in the East. The advantage of which to this Nation is, that this being the center of their trade, and the Magazine where the wealthy American merchts. covet to make their hoards, it must follow of course that the wealth of the Plantations is the riches of Great Brittain, and that as the former thrive and prosper, the latter must increase with 'em in a double proportion. And for the expence of this expedition to ease the charge of the Crown, not onely the Massachusetts (tho' greatly enfeebled by bearing in a manner the whole weight of the French and Indian war in those parts) will furnish their Quota, but New Hampshire, Connetticutt, Rhode Island, New York with the Jerseys, Pensilvania, Maryland, and Virginia, who are all interested in it, will without doubt upon receiving H.M. instructions in that behalfe, chearfully contribute theirs. 2¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 9. No. 48.]
Jan. 3.
Whitehall.
580. Mr. Popple to Mr. Attorney and Mr. Solicitor General. H.M. having been pleased by Order in Council, upon an address from the General Assembly of Barbadoes, complaining of certain illegal proceedings of the Court of Grand Sessions in that Island, to direct the Council of Trade and Plantations to consider the same, etc., they send you the inclosed heads, upon which they desire your opinion, and that you will add such further regulations as you shall judge proper to prevent irregular proceedings in civil and criminal matters. [C.O. 29, 12. p. 324.]
Jan. 3.581. Separate Traders to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reasons against the granting of an exclusive trade to the Royal African Company. Argue that planters will be more freely supplied with negroes and on easier terms by free traders etc. Signed, Rd. Harris, Hum. Morice, for the separate traders to Africa. Endorsed, Recd. Read 3rd Jan., 1710/11. 2½ large pp. Enclosed,
581. i. A scheme for the more effectual carrying on of the African Trade by free traders. Signed and endorsed as preceding. [C.O. 384, 14. Nos. 3, 4; and 389, 21. pp. 386–398.]
Jan. 4.
London.
582. Mr. Harris to Mr. Popple. Encloses following. "With it came a letter, that 'twas signed by some of ye Council, most of ye members of the late Assembly and all the considerable merchts., and if our Assembly had not been suddenly dissolved, it had been done by the whole body of the Island," etc. Signed, Rd. Harris. Endorsed, Recd. 4th, Read 5th Jan., 1710/11. ½ p. Enclosed,
582. i. Petition from the Planters of Jamaica to the House of Commons. Since ye laying open ye Trade to Affrica in 1698 the Island of Jamaica hath been better supplyed with negroes by ye seperate traders to Affrica than at any time before by the Affrican Company when exclusive, and ye numbers have often times been so large and this market so plentifully provided for that great quantitys of negroes have been yearly exported from hence to ye Spanish West Indies, and there sold for gold and silver. Many of petitioners (sending for their woollen and other manufactures from England) have fitted out and sent vessels from hence to ye coast of Affrica to furnish their own Plantations with negroes. The continuall supplies of negroes with which seperate traders have afforded us at moderate prices since ye opening of this trade, has produced infinite advantage to this Island in respect of its productions, which have greatly added to ye improvement of navigation, ye increase of ye revenue of ye Crown and advancing ye ballance of trade of Great Brittain, Hereby ye former mischiefs and hardships of not having negroes enough for our Plantations, and being oblidg'd to buy them but of one seller only (ye Affrican Company's factor here) and to sell most of our Plantation commodities again to but one buyer (ye same person) at what price such buyer pleases has been by this liberty of trade wholly redress'd to ye great benefitt and incouragement of this Island. If ye Affrican Company should again obtain this trade in a joint-stock Company exclusive, as we are inform'd they endeavour at, under pretence of many groundless suggestions, petitioners with great reason fear yt. all ye same prejudice and inconvenience of a monopoly of this trade to Affrica so often complained of heretofore and wch. has been so grevious already to yr. Plantations will naturally return, and if granted will occasion ye ruin of this Island, ye loss of ye Spanish trade and ye decrease of Navigation. Wherefore petitioners humbly pray yt. ye trade to Affrica may be open and free to all ye subjects of great Brittain to trade thither on equal terms in such manner as in your great wisdom you shall thinck fitt. Signed, William Brodrick and 58 others. 1½ pp. [C.O. 388, 14. Nos. 8, 8 i.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
583. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. Enclose Address from New Hampshire, praying for the reduction of Quebec etc. to be laid before the Queen. Autograph Signatures. 1 p. Enclosed,
583. i. Address of New Hampshire (v. No. 491 xiv.) 1 p. [C.O. 5, 931. Nos. 8, 8 i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 913. pp. 306, 307.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
584. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Encloses extract from Governor Dudley's letter Nov. 15, 1710 q.v. The Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations desire you to lay the same before the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty for their consideration, whether it may not be proper to have a clause in some Act of Parliament for incouraging the importation of sparrs and boards from the Plantations, and as in the case of the other Naval Stores mentioned in the foresaid Act, what premium will be fit to be allowed upon such importation. [C.O. 5, 913. pp. 308, 309.]
Jan. 5.
Whitehall.
585. Lord Dartmouth to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Governor Hunter in his letters to me referring himself to what he had writ to you in relation to Naval Stores, I am commanded to desire you will let me know what account you have received fit to be laid before the Queen on this subject, and what improvements have been made as to Naval Stores, with your opinion what may be further done, for promoting that important service. Signed, Dartmouth. Endorsed, Recd. 5th, Read 8th Jan., 1710/11. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 4; and 5, 1122. pp. 203, 204.]
Jan. 6.
St. James's.
586. H.M. Warrant to the President of the Council of Maryland for admitting John Dorsey to the Council. Countersigned, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. p. 52.]
Jan. 6.
Whitehall.
587. Mr. Popple to Mr. Carkesse. Encloses extract from Governor Dudley's letter, Nov. 15, 1710 q.v., relating to contraband, for the information of the Commissioners of Customs. [C.O. 5, 913. p. 316.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
588. W. Popple to W. Lowndes. The Council of Trade and Plantations have considered your letter of Dec. 9th (q.v.), relating to the high duties payable on prize goods at Jamaica and revis'd their letter to the Earl of Sunderland of May 16th. Refers to correspondence with Mr. Carkesse (Dec. 20, 23 etc.) On perusal whereof, and consideration had of the several Representations from Jamaica and of what they have been informed by Planters and others now here, and the several instances that have been given in their letter to Lord Sunderland, whereby it plainly appears that should the captors be obliged to pay the said duties there will not remain a sufficient encouragement to them; the apprehension whereof has already been the occasion of most of the seamen's deserting the said Island; their Lordships are of opinion that the duties arising in pursuance of the Act for the incouragement of the trade to America, upon cocoa, sugars, indigo, snuff, tobacco, piemento, and other commodities of the growth of America, which are usually afterwards imported into this Kingdom and pay the full duties here, and also wines and brandies which are seldom sent from Great Britain, may reasonably be discharged of the sd. British duties; and the rather, because the said several commodities are upon importation into Jamaica, lyable to pay large customs towards the support of that Government. But in regard their Lordships do observe that in some of the said prizes, there have been taken several European commodities, such as wollen, linnen, iron, steel, and other goods, which by law ought only to be imported into H.M. Plantations in America from Great Britain; they are therefore of opinion that in cases where any commodities of the growth or manufacture of Europe, (wines and brandies excepted) or other commodities which have usually been sent from hence to the Plantations, are taken as prize, the same ought to remain charged with the said British duties, in favour of the Trade and Navigation of this Kingdom. [C.O. 138, 13. pp. 311–314.]
Jan. 9.
Montserrat.
589. Extract from a letter to Col. Gledhil. On the 9th ultimo, Antego, the country all came in well armed, and was divided into 2 parties, who were commanded by Capt. Piggot and Painter, in order to kill the General, provided he would not give up his Commission which he refused; they forced about 70 of the Queen's troops, and broke open his chamber door, and shot him there, tho' it was beleived the wound of itself was not mortal. After that they broke his backbone, dragged him by the heels down the stepps, suffering his head to fall from step to step, tore off his shirt, reviled him, and shot him in many places after dead, exposing even his private parts, and in short by all accounts I have heard, they used him barbarously and inhumanely; the Granadiers were most of them cutt off after they begged quarter. Poor Ayon whom you know both his honour and gratitude would not permit to relinquish his patron, was the only man in the chamber with him and killed Piggot, he afterwards had several shots thro' the body, but the last news we had from thence brings us the good news of his being in a fair way of recovery. The Lieut. General is since gone up, and all is hushed up, no enquiry made into anything, but all seems to be easy and quiet; There were 30 killed, and about as many wounded in that unheard of action. Lieut. Walsh was in the country, Capt. Piggot, Gervais Tourton, Francis Young were all that were killed of any note. The General was acquainted of it before, advising him as the Queen had superseded him, so they begged he would make them easy and leave the Island and a hair of his head should not be molested. If not they would make themselves easy. So that he had put all his affairs into a posture, sent for the Minister, took the Sacrament, and behaved himself with a great deal of bravery, alledging that as the Queen had given him a Commission, he would not part with it otherways than by sword and pistol in hand. Endorsed, Recd. Read March 9, 1710/11. Copy.pp. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 40; and 153, 11. pp. 118–120.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
590. Mr. Popple to the Postmasters General. Encloses extract from Lt. Governor Spotswood's letter, Nov. 14, 1710, (v. Oct. 24, 1710) relating to Mr. Hamilton. [C.O. 5, 1363. p. 245.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
591. Mr. Popple to Mr. Carkesse. The Council of Trade and Plantations, being requir'd to lay before H.M. some matters relating to the improvement of Naval Stores, desire an account of Naval Stores imported Christmas, 1708–1710 etc. [C.O. 389, 21. p. 405.]
Jan. 9.
Whitehall.
592. Same to same. Desires an account of unwrought iron and steel exported to the Plantations annually from Lady-day 1702 to Michaelmas last etc. Encloses account of prize-goods entered at Jamacia. [C.O. 389, 21. pp. 405, 406.]
Jan. 10.593. Commission and Instructions to Charles Hart to be Secretary of South Carolina. [C.O. 5, 290. p. 6.]
Jan. 11.
Whitehall.
594. Lord Dartmouth to Lt. Governor Bennett. v. June 13 and Dec. 15, 1710. Since the Council of Trade has lately sent to you several affidavits etc. relating to James Briggs, the first person mention'd in your letter, H.M. would have you proceed further in this matter as you shall find good grounds to do, etc. As to Anthony Kenty, H.M. is graciously pleased at your request to pardon him. And as to John Collins, John Smith, and Philip Casady, the other three involved in the same crime and for it condemned to dye, H.M. considering that you are best able to judge whether they have such a due sense of their crime and sorrow for the same as may induce you to believe they will not be guilty of the like for the future, in case of a pardon, and that the example in this case will not be of ill consequence for the future, leaves it to you to do therein as you shall judge best for H.M. service, and the safety of the Island, according to the power vested in you by your Commission. Signed, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. pp. 53, 54.]
Jan. 12.
Admiralty Office.
595. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple Reply to Jan 5. The Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty having discoursed with the Navy Board, have no objections to the importation of such stores as Col. Dudley mentions, but as they cannot advise what præmium may be proper to allow in such case, so am I further to observe to you that the charge thereof ought not to be born by the Navy, but rather to be defrayed by the Customes or in some other manner; and that the Navy Board inform them they can buy the stores from the East Country much cheaper than those which have been already imported from the Plantations, the præmium paid for which hath been already very considerable, and no provision made by Parliament for defraying the same. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. 13th, Read 16th Jan., 1710/11. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 58; and 5, 913. pp. 317, 318.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
596. Lord A. Hamilton's receipt for the new (silver) seal of Jamaica. Signed. A. Hamilton. Endorsed, Jan. 12, 1710/11. ½ p. [C.O. 137, 9. No. 27.]
Jan. 12.
Custome house, London.
597. Mr. Carkesse to Mr. Popple. Encloses following in reply to Jan. 8. Signed, Cha. Carkesse. Endorsed, Recd. 13th, Read 16 Jan. 1710/11. 1 p. Enclosed,
597. i. Quantities of Naval Stores imported to England from H.M. Plantations and other Foreign parts, Xtmas 1708—1709. Hemp, rough, 166, 990 cwt. (Russia 145, 969, East Country 13, 190, Germany 187, Holland 7643.) Masts, great, 1576 (Denmark and Norway 697, Sweden 305, New Engld. 174); small, 2277 (Denmark and Norway 2157, Sweden 101, New Engld. 19); middle, 1263 (Denmark and Norway 1192, Sweden 51, New Engld. 20). Pitch and tarr 2923 lasts, 4 barrels (Denmark and Norway 268 lasts, 5 barrels; Germany 2, 4; Holland 10 barrels; Russia 9 barrels; Sweden 2059, 6½ Carolina 359, 5; Jamaica 10 barrels; New England 207, 8; New York 7, 9; Virginia and Maryland, 15, 10.) Rozin, 494 cwt. 0 qr. 13 lb. (Spain 89. 2. 13, Carolina 2. 1. 14; New England 402. 0. 14.) Turpentine, 5848 cwt. 2 qr. 8 lb. Carolina, 39; New England 5332. 0. 6; New York, 399. 2. 2., Pensilvania 78. 0. 0. Signed, Charles d' Avenant. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 14. Nos. 17, 17 i.; and (without enclosure) 389, 21. p. 418.]
Jan. 12.
Whitehall.
598. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. Reply to Jan. 5. We have appointed Mr. Dupré, Commissary of the Stores at New York, to attend us, and shall with all convenient dispatch transmit to your Lordship a state of that matter, to be laid before H.M., with our opinion what may be further done for promoting the produce of such stores in those parts. There are several other matters in Mr. Hunter's letters which we have likewise under consideration and do intend so soon as may be to lay an account thereof before H.M. for her pleasure therein. Autograph signatures. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1084. No. 43; and 5, 1122. p. 237.]
Jan. 15.599. Copy of the Establishment for Brigadier Handasyd's Regiment of Foot in Jamaica. Totals:—951 officers and men= £16, 126 18s. 4d. per annum. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 25, Read March 16, 1710/11. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 9. No. 33.]
Jan. 15.600. Copy of the Establishment of Col. James Jones' Regiment of Foot in the Leeward Islands. Total: 834 officers and men=£14,520 18s. 4d. per annum. Endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 45; and 153, 11. pp. 134, 135.]
[Jan. 15.]601. Petition of Capt. John Walton to the Queen. Your Majesty hath severall Islands in America (called the Virgins) which for want of a representation to the Lords Commissioners of Trade have been so neglected that there hath not been any due and regular administration there and thereby many considerable advantages that might accrew to the Plantation Trade are not only lost, but great prejudice thereto doe likewise arise by reason that the Government of the said Islands hath not hitherto been settled. Petitioner was constituted Leiut. Governour of the said Islands, and endeavoured to suppress all clandestine trade, and did whatever else he apprehended for the service of the publick and the improvement and advantage of the said Islands, and as yet hath had no sallary or reward for the same. Prays H.M. to grant him the said Island or a Comission for the Government thereof and improvement of the same for the benefit of H.M. subjects in such manner and under such restrictions as to your Majesty in your great wisdom shall seem meet. Subjoined,
601. i. Lord Dartmouth to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Whitehall, Jan. 15, 1710. H.M. is pleased to referr this petition to the Council of Trade for their report, etc. Signed, Dartmouth. The whole endorsed, Recd. 10th, Read 13th Feb., 17 10/11. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 35; and 153, 11. pp. 98, 99.]
Jan. 16.602. Mr. Noden to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays that an Act of Bermudas, Jan. 19, 1710, impowering Richard Jennings to sell one share of land in Smith's Tribe may be confirmed. Signed, Cha. Noden. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 16, 17 10/11. ¾ p. [C.O. 37, 9. No. 14; and 38, 7. p. 1.]
Jan. 16.
Whitehall
603. Mr. Popple to John Pery, Secretary to the Royal African Company. Invites attendance of the Company to consider the scheme of the Separate Traders (Jan. 3) etc. [C.O. 389, 21. p. 417.]
Jan. 17.604. Commission and Instructions to Col. Wm. Rhett to be Receiver General of South Carolina. [C.O. 5, 290. p. 6.]
Jan. 17.
Craven House.
605. Patent of the Lords Proprietors of Carolina constituting and erecting a port upon the River Port Royal in Granvill County, Carolina, to be called Beaufort Town, with such jurisdictions, priviledges and franchizes as the sea-port of Charles Town, several merchants and inhabitants having applied to the Board to that effect on April 9, 1709, with a view to export of naval stores. Signed, Craven Palatin, Beaufort, Carteret, M. Ashley, J. Colleton, J. Danson. [C.O. 5, 290. pp. 6–9.]
Jan. 17.
Custome house, London.
606. Mr. Carkesse to Mr. Popple. Encloses following, etc. Signed, Cha. Carkesse. Endorsed, Recd. 18th, Read 19th Jan., 1710/11. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
606. i. Account of foreign unwrought iron and steel exported to the Plantations, Christmas 1701—Michaelmas, 1710. Totals: Iron, 1959 tons. Steel, 707 tons. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 7. Nos. 6, 6 i.; and 324, 9. pp. 448, 449.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall.
607. Mr. Secretary St. John to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following, that the necessary directions may be given. Signed, H. St. John. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 19, 1710/11. 1 p. Enclosed,
607. i. Address of the House of Commons to the Queen, that the Commission constituting Trustees for distribution of the Charity collected for the Palatines, and all papers relating to the bringing over and subsisting them may be laid before the House. Signed, Paul Jodrel. Cl. Dom. Com. Copy. ¾ p. [C.O. 388, 76. pp. 109, 110; and 389, 37. p. 1.]
Jan. 18.
Jamaica, St. Jago de la Vega.
608. Governor Handasyd to the Earl of Rochester, Ld. President. Since my last of Dec. 4th, Mr. Percival, Attorney General dyed, and Mr. Brodrick is appointed to succeed him dureing the Queen's pleasure. The applications that have been made to me by some other persons for that employment, give me sufficient ground to conjecture, that endeavours may be used to supplant him by a patent from Engld. I find that his entire dependance is on your Lordship's favour etc. Recommends his confirmation as Attorney General by a patent under the Broad Seal, etc. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 31.]
Jan. 18.
Jamaica, St. Jago de la Vega.
609. Same to Lord Dartmouth Recommends Mr. Brodrick, as preceding. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 30.]
Jan. 18.
Whitehall
610. Lord Dartmouth to Col. Corbett. I am ordered by H.M. to acquaint you that she thinks your presence very necessary at Maryland, and that if it is not your intention to go thither very soon, the service will require that some other person be sent in your room. Signed, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. p. 55.]
Jan. 20.
Fort Annapolis Royall in Nova Scotia.
611. Col. Vetch to the Earl of Rochester. Congratulates his Lordship and asks for his patronage as in letter to Lord Dartmouth Jan. 22 q.v. Signed, Sam. Vetch. Addressed.pp. [C.O. 5, 9. No. 87.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
612. Mr. Sloper to Mr. Popple. Encloses following. Signed, Wm. Sloper. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 22, 1710/11. 1 p. Enclosed,
612. i. Abstract of Muster-Rolls of the 4 companies at New York. Total effectives, 17 officers, and 388 men. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1050. Nos. 10, 10. i; and 5, 1122. pp. 250, 251.]
Jan. 22.
Fort Annapolis Royall.
613. Col. Vetch to the Earle of Dartmouthe (sic). I had the honour of your Lordship's bearing date August 31, which came not to my hands untill Dec. 20. I think myself happy in having so fair ane oportunity att once to congratulate your Lordship upon H.M. and allys glorious successes in Europe and more particularly those in this American part of the world by the reduction of this place and the large and noble countrys of Accadie and Nova Scotia to her royall obedience, which will be extreamly advantagous not only to the American Colonys, but to the whole Empyre of Great Brittan both with regard to trade and dominion, but what must crown all is the reduction of that large country possesst by the French under the name of Canada large enough to forme four or five kingdoms as bigg as Great Brittan, which I hope the happy conjuncture of afairs in Europe will allow H.M. to enterprise next summer. Congraiulates his Lordship upon his accession to office. As I hade the honour to lay the scheam of the reduction of the above mentioned countrys before H.M. and Ministry, so I hade the honour of being assured of being left Governour of that country, when it should please God to crown H.M. arms with conquest, what is already done (I hope) presages the accomplishment of the rest, when H.M. shall be pleased to undertake the same, and I doubt nothing but your Lordship in whose breast principally it lys will be pleased to incertt such ane Instruction to the Generall for that Expedition as their was to Generall Nicholson with regard to this place, and att the same time that I may [be] honoured with such a Commission as I hade the last summer to have the second command. Refers to Major Forbes' account of the Fort (encl.I), and to General Nicholson for the politicall state of the country. I think fitt to aquaint your Lordship of my having taken the title of Governour for her Brittanick Majesty of all the territorys of Accadie and Nova Scotia, though they are not yett wholly reduced, this I assure your Lordship I doe not out of the least vanity, but to assert H.M. soveraignety to the same, and as for that of Generall and Commander in Chief of H.M. forces, I have the honour of H.M. royall Commission for the same bearing date in Apryle last in the absence of Generall Nicholson the inhabitants within the banlieu which containts a league round the Fort have all taken the oath of aledgeance to H.M. Encloses list. All' the rest of the inhabitants and [=? are] absolutly at H.M. discretion nor have I given them any tearms of protection though they have frequently applyed for it and offered to take the oath of aledgeance, but I told them I could give them no tearms untill H.M. more particular orders, only that if they remain'd in peace, I should not disturb them during this winter, and hoped in the spring to have H.M. particular orders about them, this uncertainty of their circumstances keeps them still in a ferment, and makes them hinder the Indians altogeither from comming in and keeps them at warr with us, to that degree that they have severall times threatned to dispossess us of the fort before spring, this together with the ramparts being totally fallen doun by the excessive rains oblidges the garrison to so hard duty that the souldiers are every third night upon duty besides their fatigue of working att the building of barracks. Encloses account of expenses, for which I have drawn bills on the Treasury, which I hope your Lordship will advise punctuall payment of, it having been done with all possible frugality and being absolutly necessary to be done as must also the whole rampart in the spring to be repaired as the Engineer's more particular account will inform your Lordship and the ministry. As he is extreamly capable so he is indefatigably diligent, etc. I wrote to the Rt. Hon. Secritary Boyle about two months agoe (in whose province I was informed wee were) that besides the small briganteen left here by order of the Counsel of Warr a friggatt of fourty gunns att least was verry much wanted here as early as possible in the spring not only to protect the coast and fishing trade from the insults of Martinico and Placentia privateers, but to be assistant in the reduction of the severall setlements along shoar, which will require both time and force to doe, and more especially if the inhabitants be to be transported hence, it will be absolutly necessary that the friggatts atending. New York and Boston doe come here to assist in that service, otherways it will be impracticable, so I begg your Lordship will direct the Admiralty to order them here accordingly as H.M. shall resolve to dispose of the inhabitants, all which save such as will become Protestants, should in my humble opinion be sent hence to Martinico and Placentia, which will straiten these places with regard to provisions and not strengthen them much, being mostly women and children. I humbly begg from your Lordship H.M. particular commands with relation to all the premisses, and that as soon as possibly may for untill that be done wee can expect no peaceable possession here. Generall Nicholson, whose unparaleled zeall for H.M. service and that of his country and this British Continent hath rendred him so verry deserving att all hands will at more length informe your Lordship of the method to be taken with regard to transporting the inhabitants hence, which I doubt not your Lordship and the ministry will see cause to hearken to, etc. Signed, Sam. Vetch. 2½ pp. Enclosed,
613. i. The present state of the Fort of Annapolis Royall. (Jan. 15, 1710/11). Description of fortifications and repairs needed. Signed, F. Forbes. P.S. Jan. 25. The Governor hath given orders for cutting 4000 sparrs to renew the pallisadoes of the covered way, which we are under an absolute necessity to do with all possible dispatch, for securing ourselves, least the Indians and French here by the influence and assistance of their friends in Canada should make any attempt upon us, which wee have reason to expect, having advice that ther's come over from France to Quibeck a Lieut. Generall, 40 captans, and a great [? many] subalterns to command their inhabitants and Indians. Signed, F. Forbes. 3 pp.
613. ii. A list of the masters of familys who are inhabitants within the banlieu of Annapolis Royall who have taken the oath of aledgeance to H.M. conform to the Artickles of Capitulation. 57 names. Signed, Sam. Vetch. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 9. Nos. 84–86.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
614. Mr. Popple to George Granville, Secretary at Warr. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire copies of the establishment of the 4 independent companies of soldiers at New York, as also of the establishment of the regiment in Jamaica, and of that in the Leeward Islands. [C.O. 5, 1122. p. 259.]
Jan. 24.
London.
615. Jeremy Dummer to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Duplicate of Jan. 3 to Ld. Dartmouth. Signed, Jer. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. Read Feb. 5, 1710/11. 2½ pp. Enclosed,
615. i. Copy of Mr. Dummer's Commission to be Agent of the Massachusetts Bay. Signed, J. Dudley, Nov. 11, 1710. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 865. Nos. 60, 60 i.; and 5, 913. pp. 325–329; and 218, 218 i. pp. 6–11.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehall
616. Mr. Granville to Mr. Popple. Encloses copies of the establishments of the 4 independent companys at New York and of the regiments in Jamaica and the Leeward Islands. Signed, G. Granville. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 25, Read March 16, 17 10/11. 1 p. Enclosed,
616. i. Establishment of the 4 independent companies at New York=£7093 3s. 4d. per annum. Same endorsement. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 1050. Nos. 16, 16 i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 1122. pp. 319.]
Jan. 25.
Whitehal.
617. Mr. Popple to Charles Carkesse. The Council of Trade and Plantations enclose for the consideration of H.M. Commissioners of Customs and extract from Governor Cranston's letter Nov. 15, 1710, giving an account of the Collectors' exactions etc. at Rhode Island, together with the copy of an Act past in that Colony relating to officers' fees. [C.O. 5, 1292. p. 249.]
[Jan. 25.]618. Abstract of papers referred to in Order of Council, May 11, 1710 (q.v.) on the petition of Wait Winthrop etc., relating to the Narragansett Country. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 25, Read April 17, 17 10/11. 14½ pp. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 63.]
[Jan. 25.]619. Copy of an account of the number of Palatines subsisted Sept. 28–Oct. 28, 1710, with an estimate of things necessary for their settlement at New York etc. 3 pp. Endorsed, Recd, from Mr. Du Pre, Read Jan. 25, 17 10/11. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 13.]
[Jan. 26.]620. Mr. Keen (Merchant in Newfoundland and Agent for prizes to the late Prince of Denmark) to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I am in duty bound to discover some impositions uppon the Government by the comanding officers in Newfoundland. (1) As to trade: Notwithstanding the directions given to the commanding officer to the contrary, it has been the dayly practice since Nov. 1706, and such commoditys as has been purchas'd by the officer, payment has been made by Bills of Excha. drawn by the Engineer uppon the Paymaster of H.M. Ordinance, and solv'd by sundry articles in their accots. charg'd the Government for repairs and pallasadoing the Garrisons, when to my certain knowledge there has not been sixpence expended for that end, the inhabitants of N'fland haveing constantly furnish'd the commanding officer with what pallasadoes has been demanded at their owne propper charge for the yearly repairing H.M. Fort and Castles. (2) Att the yearly survey of the provisions, such as were not thought fitt for victuling were condem'd, and insted of being thrown into ye sea, were resalted and ye mouldy bread pack't in cask, and serv'd out in the room of good provisions, and the good provisions under pretence of being lent to the inhabitants were sold. This was the practice dureing Major Lloyd's command, the stuard yt. deliver'd the same was favorite and factor to Major Lloyd. (3) It has been the custom of the commanding officer to lett out soldiers to the inhabitants for the summer season, for wch. the officer recd, for every such soldier 12 to £18. The hard useage of the soldiers has put them uppon commiting severall roberys, and no reparation made to the loosers, altho' the soldiers has been taken in the fact. Signed. W. Keen. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 26, 17 10/11. 2 pp. [C.O. 194, 5. No. 1.]
Jan. 26.
Whitehall.
621. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. Enclose following to be laid before H.M. Autograph Signatures. 1 p.
621. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Having had under consideration the state of the manufacture of iron and steel in this Kingdom, with regard to your Majesty's American Plantations, and having discoursed some of the principal manufacturers of those goods, we humbly represent that the duty laid in the first year of the reign of their late Majestys on foreign unwrought iron and steel imported into this Kingdom, having been found prejudicial to the said British manufacture, for remedy thereof an additional duty was soon after laid on all manufactured iron and steel imported hither. To evade which last mentioned duty, great quantities of manufactured iron and steel were imported from Holland into some of the western ports of this Kingdom, and upon re-exportation thereof for New England, and other the said British Plantations, the said duty was drawn back; which drawback was afterwards in the second and third years of your Majesty's reign taken off; however it proved of little advantage to the said British manufacture, for that great quantities of foreign unwrought iron and steel made into near scantlings were and still are shipt off from Holland, imported hither, and re-exported to the Plantations. Upon which re-exportation, a drawback is allowed, by reason whereof great quantities of iron and steel are manufactured in America, particularly in New England, where there is plenty of coles, and that sort of labour, cheaper than in this Kingdom. On this occasion we sent to the Commissioners of your Majesty's Customes, and have received from them an account of the quantities of foreign unwrought iron and steel exported to the said Plantations from Christmas 1701 to Michaelmas, 1710; by which it appears that, for several years past, the reexportation of foreign unwrought iron to the said Plantations has greatly increased. Wherefor, for the incouragement of the manufacture of iron and steel in this Kingdome, we humbly offer that no drawback of Custom be allowed on ye re-exportation of foreign unwrought iron and steel to ye said Plantations. Autograph Signatures. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 4. Nos. 1, 1 i.; and 389, 21. pp. 434–437.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
622. Lord Dartmouth to Col. Corbett. Having not yet received any letter from you in return to mine (v. Jan. 18) I am obliged to give you the trouble of this, to desire you will lett me have your answer in writing, that I may lay it before H.M. Signed, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. p. 59.]
Jan. 27.
Barbadoes.
623. Mr. Lillington, President of the Council of Barbados, to Mr. Popple. By yours of Aug. 29th I flattered myself I should long agoe have recd. H.M. determination and pleasure in the controversie depending betwixt the Councill and Assembly for the nominating a Treasurer in the Excise Bill, for want of which the countrey has been a great sufferer by wines etc. imported the last fleet, and by other vessells since; and if such effectuall orders should not reach this Island before the arrivall of the next fleet, the countrey will not only be in a most miserable condition, but without retreive; for such duty upon strong liquors has always been esteem'd the most easie and equall method of raising monies; the generality of the inhabitants are in such a poor condition, and the Island in common soe destitute of cash, that it is the only means of raising monies. The uncertainty of the packett boats (for we have had none here since the Union, the begining of Novr. last) and my impatience for the receipt of H.M. orders, makes me entreat their Lordships' favour in dispatching duplicates by the first good vessells from Europe. Nothing of moment has interven'd since mine of Nov. 2nd, etc. In Dec. last the Court of Grand Sessions etc. being appointed as usuall, H.M. Attorney Generall acquainted them that he knew of no business the Queen had depending; upon which the Court broke up. Which fatigue and trouble to the countrey might have been sav'd, had the Assembly agreed to a Bill brought in by some of their members for the putting off those Courts to June next. On Jan. 23rd, I recd, from Monsieur Phelypeaux, Governor of Martineque a letter concerning the exchange of prisoners. I was necessitated first to send down the Fr. prisoners to Martineque, they being in number 20 odd, the countrey having no revenue to maintain them; and the Councill refusing to join with me out of our private purses to raise something for their sustenance, as we had formerly done for the prisoners we sent in our fleet for Great Brittain. Papers enclosed. I have been very carefull, according to H.M. Instructions May 2nd, that no manner of traffick or trade should by means of Flaggs of Truce be carried on betwixt this Island and Martineque. P.S. By the return of the flagg of Truce we have recd, a gentleman who coming up from Antigoa in a sloop was taken into Martineque, and having had sometime before an imperfect account that the Gentlemen of Antigoa had slain Generall Park, I ordered Samuell Cox and Alexander Walker Esqrs. to examine him upon oath etc. (r. encl. ii.) Signed, G. Lillington. Endorsed, Recd. 14th, Read 16th March, 17 10/11. 2 pp. Enclosed,
623. i. Copy of Orders relating to a flag of truce for Martinique about exchange of prisoners, and of a letter from M. Phelypeaux, Governor of Martinique, dated Jan. 28, 1711. (French). Endorsed, Recd. March 14th. 1710/11. 1½ pp.
623. ii. Examination of John Burke and James Young as to the disturbance in Antigua. The latter said he knew nothing but by hearsay. Burke declared that some time before the difference happened, they had an acct. of 5 men of warr and some land forces arriving at Martinique, with a designe to attack Antigua, and the inhabitants being fearfull thereof, the Council and Assembly addrest General Parke to joyne with them to make laws to put the island in a posture of defence. But ye Genll. delaying ye time gave ye inhabitants great cause of suspicion; and that he had a designe to give up the Island. wch. so enrag'd a major part that they were resolv'd if he would not joyne with the Councill and Assembly as aforesaid, to remove him to some other island in his Government and defend themselves. But his refusing to joyne or remove occasioned a number of people to rise in armes in order to remove him. Whereupon ye Generall summoned H.M. regular troops to keep about his house in order to protect his person. And both parties being in armes severall messages were sent to acquaint him that they resolv'd in case he would not remove off the island or joyne as aforesd., they would remove him. But he refused to quitt ye Island, or to give up his power invested in him by the Queen. Then they march't up to his house in order to take him. Whereupon they fired on each other, and then ye inhabitants took ye house and troops then remaining. In wch. action ye Genll. was shot in ye thigh and died ye same day. And there allso died of their wounds, of the Genll's. side, an Ensigne named Lindall and about 13 souldiers and severall others wounded. And of ye country party there was 4 killed, Capt. Jno. Piggott, Jarvis Turton, Tho. Young, and one more. Burke saw the Genll. laid out, and did not perceive any other wounds on him. He was handsomely buried by ye Lt. Govr. Yeamans. After wch. ye Lt. Goverr. sent one of ye Councill and some of ye Assembly to Nevis to acquaint Lt. Genl. Hamilton of ye misfortune and to request him to take on him ye administration of ye Government, which he did 4 or 5 days. Whereupon ye Island was very quiet, and so remained till his coming away. Burke waited on ye Lt. Genll. ye day he sail'd, to know if he had any commands for Barbados, who said he had not etc. Barbadoes. Jan. 25, 1710 (11). Signed, Sam. Cox, A. Skene. Copy. Same endorsement. 3 pp. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 55, 55 i., ii.: and (without enclosure) 29, 12. pp. 330–335.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
624. Mr. Popple to Lt. Governor Spotswood. Acknowledges letter of Oct. 24. The Council of Trade and Plantations have the several matters therin contained under their consideration, and hope to be able by the next packet, to give you a particular answer thereunto. In the meantime, I am to acquaint you with their Lordships' opinion, that in case any Act be passed in the Assembly for incouraging of iron mines, the same being of an unusual and extraordinary nature, you do not give your assent thereunto, unless there be a clause inserted therein, suspending and deferring the execution of such an Act, till H.M. pleasure be known thereupon, as is agreeable to your Instructions in yt. behalf. [C.O. 5, 1363. p. 248; and (rough draft) 5, 1335. pp. 80, 81.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
625. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Hunter. Enclose duplicate of Oct 26 and acknowledge letters etc. one without date, and the others of Nov. 14 and 28. But that paper which relates to your conferrence with the Five Nations of Indians, which you promised in the first to transmit by the Mast fleet, is not yet come to hand. You will therefore do well to send the same to us by the first conveyance. We are laying before H.M. what you write in relation to the settlement of the Palatines; as also your proceedings with the Assembly touching the settling of a revenue, whose noncomplyance we hope will be overcome by your prudent endeavours, and that they may be prevailed upon at their next sitting in March to act conformable to what you have recommended to them, and to the good and welfare of the Province; and so soon as we shall be acquainted with H.M. pleasure upon the foregoing particulars, we shall give you an account thereof. We have had under consideration your ord'nance for establishing a table of fees; and the better to judge of the reasonableness of those fees, we did endeavour to compare them with those of 1693, but finding a difficulty in it, by reason they are not in the same method, we desire that you will send us another copy of the said ord'nance distinguishing what fees are new in this, which were not in the former, and wherein the fees in this ord'nance differs from those of 1693, together with your reasons for such variations. We shall take the severall Acts you have transmitted to us into consideration at a proper time. Having considered what you propose in relation to the Acts giving an allowance to Members of Assembly, that the same may be repealed, we do find upon examination that the first of those acts past 1691, for the allowance to Representatives is confirmed by Order in Councill May 11, 1697, and shall expect to know what you have further to offer on that matter. As to what you write touching your being paid your salary out of the duties arising on cocao, we are to acquaint you that by H.M. commands we have had under consideration an address from the inhabitants and planters in Jamaica complaining of the high duties payable on prize goods in that Island, and have thereupon reported to H.M. our humble opinion that the duties arising in pursuance of the British Act upon cocoa, sugars, indigo, snuff, tobacco, piemento and other commodities of the growth of America, which are usually afterwards imported into this Kingdom, and pay the full duties here, and also wines and brandies, which are seldom sent from Great Britain, should be discharged of the said duties. But that the said duties do remain on goods as are of European growth or manufacture, as woollen, linnen, iron and steel etc., which by law ought only to be imported into the Plantations from Great Britain, and a Bill enacting that prize goods taken and carried into any of H.M. Colonies and Plantations in America, shall upon the importation thereof, be liable to such duties only, as would have been payable for the same upon the importation thereof into those Colonies or Plantations respectively, in case the Act for the encouragement of the trade to America had not been made, being now depending in the House of Commons, if our said report should be laid before the House, and that bill framed conformable to our said opinion, the duties at New York upon the cocoa you mention will of course be remitted, as the like duties on cocoa and other goods imported into other Plantations. As to what you mention concerning the Councill of New Jersey their being divided about the place of the Assembly's meeting, and what you proposed to them thereupon, we have considered the same, and shall lay the Act passed in that Province, ascertaining the place of setting of the Representatives, before H.M., etc. [C.O. 5, 1122. pp. 260–266.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
626. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Dudley. Acknowledge letter of Nov. 15. We have acquainted the Commissioners of H.M. Customes with what you write in relation to the want of a scout boat, and the Commissioners of the Admiralty what you mention in relation to the importation of boards and sparrs, and when we are informed of what is done therein, we shall give you notice of it. There is now depending in the House of Commons a Bill for the preservation of white pines, or mast trees, in New England to the like purpose with the Act which was pass'd in New Hampshire, which we hope if passed into a Law, will be effectual to preserve such trees for the future. We take notice that you have sent to the Board of Ordnance a state of the Forts, and an account of the stores of war in your Government, but you ought likewise to have sent to us duplicates thereof, for though the issuing of such stores for the Plantations does not belong to us, yet 'tis necessary we should be informed from time to time what is remaining and what is wanting in each respective Government, in order to our laying a particular state thereof before H.M. as occasion may require. We are satisfyed in what you wrote relating to the rates of foreign coin, and therefore shall add nothing further upon that subject. As to the New Hampshire law for setting a price on tar, we have no objection, so that the price at which tar is to be received in the Treasury be under the market price. We shall make use as occasion offers of the list of names of persons to fill up vacancies in the Council of New Hampshire, but as we do not know of any persons here, that are willing to pay the fees due on the warrants for consistuting them members of the Council, it will be to no purpose to propose any of them to H.M. for that station till we hear further from you herein. What we sent you in relation to illegal trade, was not particular to you. But the like was sent to the rest of the Governments in America, upon several informations that had been laid before us. However we will not doubt, but that you will take all the care that in you lies, to prevent such illegall trade for the future. We congratulate with you the success of H.M. arms in the reduction of Port Royal. There are no complaints before us made by the Governments of Connecticut or Rhode Island, against the Massachusets Bay. If any such do come you may depend upon it that Province will have an oppertunity of being heard before anything is determined therein. [C.O. 5, 913. pp. 320–324.]
Jan. 31.627. Commission and Instructions to Nevill Low to be Secretary of North Carolina. [C.O. 5, 290. p. 10.]
[Jan. 31.]628. Mr. Keen to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Repeats and elaborates charges against Major Lloyd and the Commanders of the Newfoundland Garrison, v. Jan. 26 etc. Set out, A.P.C. II. pp. 634–637 q.v. Signed, W. Keen. Endorsed, Recd. Jan. 31, Read Feb. 1st, 1710/11. 4 pp. [C.O. 194, 5. No. 2.]