America and West Indies
April 1711, 11-19

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1924

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456-466

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'America and West Indies: April 1711, 11-19', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 25: 1710-1711 (1924), pp. 456-466. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73856 Date accessed: 18 September 2014.


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April 1711, 11-19

April 11.799. Certificate from the Remembrance Office that security for £2000 has been given on behalf of Charles Craven (v. Feb. 22). Signed, Fra. Butler. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 13th April, 1711. ¼ p. [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 114; and 5, 1292. p. 272.]
April 11.
St. James's.
800. H.M. Warrant for affixing the Great Seal to Governor Douglas' Commission (v. April 1st). 1 p. Enclosed,
800. i. Duplicate of No. 770 i. [C.O. 152, 42. Nos. 58, 60.]
[April 12.]801. Capt. Walton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Upon considering the objections (to the settlement of the Virgin Islands), which Mr. Popple acquainted him was made to your Lordshipps, he humbly conceiv's they can have no weight. For how inconsistant is it to beleive that the inhabitants of the Leeward Islands shou'd quit the settlements they have made, to go and make others amongst the Virgins. And as for any that have represented them as useless rocks, recourse to the draught before your Lordships will evince the contrary. Another no less efficatious then the foregoing says that they wou'd be a harbour in time of peace for the buckaniers; he always, (with submission) conceived that it was for want of a Goverment's being settled, that they have hitherto used them. And the last plainly demonstrates, that they know nothing of the present circumstances of those Islands, for as to the Spaniards, there hath not one appeared for these many years last past, besides Spanish Town (as it now is) need not fear all the power they have in those parts, and might easily be made almost impregnable, the rest might be supported under it. Upon the whole, he hopes it will appear that what he hath offered must be a support and defence to the Leeward Islands, rather then any subduction from them. For the people drawn thither will not be them that are settled on the Leeward Islands, but (if any come thence) it must be those that are a weight and charge to them, therefore if any from a suppossistion that their private property may be impeded by a cultivation and improving of the Virgins, he may fully depend your Lordships will not encourage what shall not only obstruct the enlargement of trade, but be a prevention even to piracy and clandestine trade. Prays, in consideration of his expences, services and knowledge in those parts (besides loossing a company of Foot by serving there, upon the Generall's assurance that he shou'd have the same sallary as the other Lieut. Governors had), that he shall have your Honours' recommendation for the Government, or for having a pattent constituting him Proprietor for 30 years renewable at an easy quitt-rent; either of which ways those Islands might be made in a few years, as advantagious to the Crown as the Leeward Islands are now. Endorsed, Recd. 12th, Read 13th April, 1711. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 60.]
April 12.
Whitehall.
802. Lord Dartmouth to Governor Douglas. H.M. commands me to acquaint you that it is absolutely necessary for her service you should go to your Government as soon as possible; when I have told you this and that your powers and instructions are already finished, I am sure I need not add any other motives to incline you to use all imaginable diligence in transporting yourself thither. Signed, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. p. 70.]
April 13.
Whitehal.
803. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. We having receiv'd a certificate that the Lord Craven hath enter'd into a bond for Charles Craven's due observance of the Acts of Trade, (v. Ap. 11), we humbly lay before your Majesty the draught of Instructions for your Majesty's Royal signature to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina, relating to the said Acts, being to the like effect as those that have been usually given to them and to all other Proprietors of Plantations on the like occasion. Annexed,
803. i. Instructions to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina relating to the Laws of Trade and Navigation. St. James's, March 10, 1710/11. [C.O. 5, 1292. pp. 273–307.]
April 13.
Whitehall.
804. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lt. Governor Spotswood. Enclose Orders in Council of March 24 and April 17, 1707, relating to seating and planting of lands, with reasons for repeal of Act 1666, etc. (v. Feb. 22). [C.O. 5, 1363. pp. 270–273; and (rough draft) 5, 1335. pp. 110–114.]
April 13.
Whitehal.
805. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. Refer to letter of April 6th, and forward recommendation of Mr. Lightfoot (April 7th) to be a member of the Council of Antegoa. "We have no objection thereto." [C.O. 153, 11. pp. 282, 283.]
April 13.
St. James's.
806. H.M. Additional Instructions to Governor Douglas, relating to the trial of those concerned in the late rebellion at Antegoa, as ordered No. 795, q.v. Signed, A.R. Endorsed, Recd. 14th, Read 15th May, 1711. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 68; and 153, 11. pp. 310, 311; and 324, 32. pp. 70, 71.]
April 14.
On board the Defiance, Spithead.
807. Lord A. Hamilton to [? Lord Dartmouth.] I am honoured with the Queen's commands signified to me by your Lop's. letter of the 10th instant, and will upon our arrival at Jamaica, endeavour to execute them with the care and despatch that my duty to H.M., the regard I have to your Lordship's recommendation, and the melancholly circumstances of those prisoners at Lima do jointly require. Signed, A. Hamilton. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 38.]
April 14.
Barbadoes.
808. G. Lillington to Mr. Popple. Acknowledges letter of Feb. 19. The Assembly some time since pass'd a leavy bill, wch. being sent up to the Councill they thought fit to make an amendment and lessen the sum on the Town, wch. has not been as yet laid before the Assembly, they being very backward in makeing an house, but if they had, I'm afraid would not have agreed thereto, that house expireing the 18th. I shall issue writts immediately thereon for calling another, at the opening of wch. I hope and desire our expected Governor will be present. I am proud that I have so little to trouble their Ldps. with in relation to this Governmt., etc. Signed. G. Lillington. Endorsed, Recd. 25, Read 27 June, 1711. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 60; and 29, 12. pp. 352, 353.]
April 14.
Barbados.
809. Andrew Boult to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The greatest Princes have in all ages thought it their glory to be avengers of blood, when the common courses of the Law have been insufficient, etc. The successours of Alexander afford many instances how Crowns have been the reward of such exemplary justice, and if mankind, were not frighted from such villainies by an uncommon load of infamy, and the certain resentment of all mankind, few Princes, and I am afraid much fewer first Ministers would live out half their dayes but some desperado or giddy mobb would Felton d' Witt or Parke them for performing the dutys of their high function which may not be agreeable to their palate, etc. I have therefore took the liberty to trouble your Lordship with an account of the murther of my friend General Parke, etc. To attack and murther their chief magistrate and his friends, that were with him, and the soldiers that were in her immediate service, who were actually under her colours, and to revile him after he was mortally wounded is treatment few but the Grandfather of their Royal Mistress have among the English had the misfortune to meet withall.. None ever revered the memory of that Prince more than Col. Parke, etc. It was his frequent dissolving their Assemblys on their obstinate resolving to wrest from H.M. that essential part of her prerogative that set their blood into such a ferment, that nothing but the letting out of his could cure. A sort of an Ordinance they have pass'd, not to have their murther talked of, is in effect making for themselves an act of indemnity and oblivion, But 'tis well they continue not their strain of balads, and sing the murther they so long threatned, and which in the dark they so frequently attempted. And how heroically they used the General when they had mortally wounded him, broke his back-bone with their musketts, strippt him and dragged him by the heels about the streets when but half dead, denying him water, and insulting him in the agonies of death, exposing the secrets of nature and refusing him buryal. Nay my Lord, they have gone yet further, they have signed a paper to justify the action, and owned themselves guilty, and wou'd kindly have suffered the other Islands to have shared the glory, on the easy terms of approving their proceedings. But the eyes of all the Colonys are on their Mother Kingdom, and how she will punish such an outrage. 'Tis certain, my Lord, the majority of Antigua have drank so deep of this gentleman's blood, they will find no person guilty of tasting it, and the most solemn tryal there will be but eluding justice. And I am not lawyer enough to know how practicable it may be make a Lord High Constable, and send for the ring-leaders and try them in England, on this extraordinary occasion. Your Lordship will forgive my presumption if I humbly propose what my experience of the people makes appear to me the most likely way of punishing them, and frighten the other Colonys from insulting H.M. in the person of Her Chief Officer. 'Twil be my Lord to punish them on the side of their pride which is their darling vice, by excluding them all places of honour and profit in the Government, particular, by making all that appeared in that riot on the oath of two witnesses to be forever uncapable of any post civil or military, or of being members of the Council or Assembly, or officers of the Militia. And as the name of a Parliamt. is very awful to them, if a short Act was passed to that purpose with a suitable preamble it would effectually terrify them and learn them submission. To which if the General had instructions for some time to reside at St. Christophers, it would further mortify and punnish them. To which may be added the changing the Regiment there for another, the present regiment being unfortunately divided by the faction. And the Colo. a mortal enemy to the late General, between whom there ought to be the strictest correspondence and perfect harmony, which some particular instructions about, might considerably forward and improve. For nothing at this time especially less than a power that can put the laws in excecution will subject them to them. They are by their clime and nature haughty and whenever their Governours shall displease them they will not fail to remind them how they have handled their predecessors, and what they dare do when they shall think themselves opprest. In the Island of St. Christophers, he that basely murthered Col. Johnson, Commander in Chief before Col. Parke was cleared by a jury, is since chose a Representative and lives there in splendour, and your Lordship sees to how much a more exalted pitch of wickedness they are arrived to in Antigua, and how indifferently H.M. must be served, if the sword of justice is so far from being able to punish criminals it cannot defend itself. Col. Hamilton summoned a General Assembly to meet at Antigua, but they refused to come, and some plainly return'd as an answer they would not come to an island where the people would perhaps murther them if they contradicted or disagreed with their proceedings. So immediate a remedy seems to be required for these raging evils. And so great occasion is there for finding out a Governour whose capacity is equal to the present calamitys, who has spirit enough to administer whatsoever remedy shall be applyed to this dangerous distemper, and at the same time who is acquainted with their constitutions and temper, and knows where to apply such lenatives as may heal their breaches, recover their reputation by reconciling 'em to one another, and beget that reverence in them, which always accompanys virtue in authority. Yet that alone will not do without the protection of your Lordships tho I dare prophecy the Islands will never be happy, nor H.M. well served till a Governour shall want no patrons at Court, but a perfect integrity, etc. I can't help here observing that the method of taking depositions against Col. Parke, as directed by my Lord Sunderland's letter, brought his, and will bring any Government into contempt. The summoning and inviting common people to say and swear a hundred idle storys that lye before your Lordships, many of which seem calculated only to cause laughter, exposing his authority and Hers he represented beyond all imagination. And if H.M. own Order had not been the pretence that impowred them to ridicule her authority and affront him to his face on the Bench the awe of him at least under H.M. ensigns, would probably have kept him sacred. 'Twas these ridiculous storys below the dignity of a Governour to bear, and against nature to hear, that made him, desire me to be his Deputy to hear the depositions against him, and take those for him, which occasioned me to make those frequent speeches that are among his papers before your Lordships, and at least to draw his defence for him, the depositions on both sides having gone wholly through my hands, which laid me under a sort of necessity at least a point of honour in laying these things before your Lordships. I should have acted but a mean part to have been frightned by his murther from putting the last hand to his justification. And I cant but think myself unhappy that a sickness this fatigue brought on me forced me off the Island just before this happned. For tho' Col. Parke was too sanguine, and apt to dispise them, he having left the managemt. to me, during the taking the depositions, and I having been so happy as to free him out of several intricacies, he would probably have took my advice, which would have been, when they formed a Proclamation and summoned one another to meet to force him off the Island, and sent a message to him with their resolution, to have pretended a complyance and seemed to form a treaty, during the management thereof to have slipt to Monks Hill or Mountserat, which might have saved his life, and the lives of those poor innocent souls who on their knees begged for quarter in vain, and were murthered for standing guard to their General when they were too few to defend him. I must beg the liberty to add for myself, that I having formerly paid the troops there; and laid out about £10,000, which the suddain disbanding Col. Fox's Regiment, and the destruction of Nevis St. Christophers made me loke to lose, and being well acquainted with Col. Parke in England; and he having directions from home to give me any civil or military vacancy that should happen in his Government, he gave me a Company in Col. Jones' regiment Jan. 6, 1709. However, none of the Commissions given by him have been confirmed, a mortification few other Governours or of his predecessors have been used to. And if my defence of him in the answer to his Articles make him appear a good tho' unfortunate Governour and a dutyfull servant to H.M., and that he lost his life in so uncommon a manner for maintaining the dignity of his mistris, your Lordships may think it not unworthy your charecters to appear ye protector of one that suffers on the same side; altho' I have not the honour of being known to your Lordships. And if it appears difficult to right me in this perticular, and that the later Commission shall be thought to supercede the first, tho' that is by vertue of a great Seal from H.M., yet your Lordships may find out an equivolent. Newfoundland Carolina, as they are but ordinary Governments, and but indifferently healthy, very few in any degree qualifyed for them will accept them, and as such infant and unsetled Colonys want in an especial manner some person of experience and understanding who knows something of manking, the interest of the Plantations, what improvemt. they are capable of by their soil or scituation, and what relation their whole traffick and produce has or may have to their Mother Kingdom, and who is not unacquainted with their temper which must be kept easy, since their tranquility increases the treasure of England, and which restraining them from lycenciousness will soon bring them to, if it appears by any of the papers before your Lordships that I have had woful occasion from the differences at Antigua to learn any of these lessons, as I have been at almost all H.M. Plantations, I have made what observations I was capable of in Her interest, so I assure your Lordships I should with a double care endeavour to desirve Her favour. Desires their Lordships' recommendation etc. Encloses Some reasons for keeping St. Christophers. Signed, Recd. 15th, Read 18th June, 1711. 8pp. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 65.]
April 14.
Boston.
810. Similar letter to the Lord Dartmouth. Enclosed,
810. i. Reasons for insisting on the keeping the whole Island of St. Christophers on a General Peace. (1) Altho' it was restored to the French by the Treaty of Reswick, the warr broke out so soon they had not resetled it. So that they having of late years made little or no advantage of it, it is not likely they will insist much on the restitution of it. (2) Brimstone Hill being the only place in the Leeward Islands capable of being made really strong without a prodigious expence and a stronger garrison than any of those Islands can furnish, and that being capable of being made impregnable because unaccessable with an inconsiderable charge, and of being defended with a few hands. When setled entirely by us 'twill be a considerable strength to all the Leeward Islands, and be capable of making such a stand, that they will defy any attempts of the French to dispossess us, which they are too able to do, whenever they shall incline to, or receive possitive orders for from France, we owing our security in my opinion to its being the interest of the privateers with which Martinico is setled rather to molest our trade, and take our shipping, than by destroying us to put themselves out of employment. (3) The surrendering their part of the Island hinders our well setling our own part, negros running away from their masters to the French in crop time, where its long before they are found or restored often spoils a crop, and they are frequently conveyed to some other of their islands, and are never found, which both discourages the Planters, makes them afraid to buy new negros for fear of loosing them; prevents the improvement of the Island, and is a proportionable damage to H.M. in her Revenue, and the trade of Her people. (4) The French being on the same Island 'twil be impossible to prevent such a clandestine prohibited trade as will be very detrimental to England, the consumption of the French wines will be considerable by reason of their cheapness when they avoid paying customs, and will sink the excise by drinking little or no mault drink or cyder, which comes now in great quantitys from Bristol and elsewhere, and are sold in bottles at a high rate, but will be no longer used when French wine can be bought at a lower price, and 'tis not the Leeward Islands only, but all the Colonys that will be from thence furnished with it; the same must be observed as well in relation to all French silks, stuffs, lutestrings, linnings, and whatsoever is of the manufacture of France to the utter ruin of all English commoditys of a like nature, and of the fair Trader, and will proportionably add to the wealth of France. (5) Barbados is already so worn out, and her soil so impoverisht, and therefore the charge of making sugars there so great, the French and Dutch who have new ground continually to work on, will undersell us in all ye markets of Europe. Whereas St. Christophers being the richest ground in the known world for its bigness will enable us to undersell them, at least to prevent their underselling us, till the West India affairs be so far looked into that its commoditys be made as totally English, as the Dutch have made spice theirs in the East Indies, and which much easier may be accomplished if attempted before it is too late. (6) It will encrease the Customs near £60,000 annually, the Island qt. near 30,000 plantable acres, of which 15,000 will soon be planted and will probably one acre with another produce 2 hhds. of 1000 lb. weight each when in London, which at about 3s. 6d. a hundred custome in London with the 4½ p.c. duty will amount to thereabouts. But as the whole produce is the effect of labour, it costs nothing but manufacturing and navigating, so the whole is profit, and so much clear gain to be annually added to the Capital Stock of England, which at 30s. a hundred, which is the price of a medium, is £450,000, a prodigious sum for such a spott, etc. I have purposely made an undercalculation both as to the quantity of plantable ground, and its produce, and have reckoned nothing for ginger or indigo, etc., or rhum and molasses, with which they pay commoditys brought them from the Continent. Which is the trade the Northern Colonys live by, and which enables them to pay for the English manufactures they would else be too poor to purchase and must otherwise wholly manufacture for themselves; and which is no inconsiderable branch of our trade. Endorsed, Recd. (with duplicate of a letter from Mr. Bolt, dated at Boston April 14, 1711) July 11th, Read Aug. 1st, 1711. 2¼ pp. [C.O. 152, 42. Nos. 45. 45 i.; and (enclosure only) 152, 9. No. 74; and 153, 11. pp. 351–354.]
April 14.
St. James's.
811. H.M. Warrant to Governor Lowther for restoring Samuel Berwick to the Council of Barbados. Countersigned, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. pp. 71, 72.]
April 14.
Whitehall.
812. Lord Dartmouth to Lt. Gov. Spotswood. I send you enclosed an Order of Councill for regulating the method of granting lands in the Colony of Virginia, etc. H.M. is graciously pleased to allow and permitt that the Instruction therein recited be passed into a law. Signed, Dartmouth. Annexed,
812. i. Copy of Order in Council, March 24, q.v. [C.O. 324, 32. pp. 80–82.]
April 17.
Whitehal.
813. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. Enclose following.
813. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Representation upon Capt. Walton's petition relating to the Virgin Islands. (v. Jan. 15 etc.) The said Islands lying between your Majesty's Leeward Islands and Porto Rico, are part of the Government of the said Leeward Islands, (except the Island of St. Thomas which has been for some time in possession of the King of Denmark) and accordingly the Governor of the said Leeward Islands is by his Instructions requir'd to assert your Majesty's undoubted right of Sovereignty in and over all the said Virgin Islands, under his Government, and to prevent the subjects of any foreign Prince or State whatsoever from setling in any of them. The Petitioner alledges that the said Islands, particularly Spanish Town, are capable of producing whatsoever is of the growth of any of your Majesty's Southern Colonies and that the situation of the Virgin Islands is such, as may give the inhabitants great opportunities and incouragement to carry on the illegal trade, if not prevented. The Petitioner in proof of his having been Lieut. Govt. of the said Islands has produc'd to us his Commissn. for that purpose, sign'd by Daniel Parke Esq. your Majesty's then Governor of the Leeward Islands, and dated Sept. 11th. 1707, and says he continued in that Government till abt. August 1709; but whether he has receiv'd any salary or other gratification for his service during that time, we are not able to inform your Majesty otherwise than that he affirms he never receiv'd any. We have likewise been attended by other persons that have been at the said Virgin Islands, who inform us, that only Spanish Town, one of the said Islands, has a good harbour, and that they believ'd the soil of that Island is good; that most of the rest of those Islands are little better than rocks; that if there were a settlement made on the said Islands, unless the same were secur'd by a fortification and a company of soldiers at least, the inhabitants wou'd be liable to be plunder'd and insulted by the French and Spaniards from Hispaniola and Porto Rico; that if such settlemt. was so secur'd as aforesaid those Islands wou'd nevertheless be a shelter for pirats and buckaniers; and that it wou'd be difficult without maintaining ships of war there, to prevent illegal trade between the inhabitants that shou'd be setled there, and the Island of St. Thomas, and that there being but very few people upon the Virgin Islands, if a settlemt. were made there it wou'd occasion the running away of servants and others from your Majesty's Leeward Islands to the great prejudice of the said Islands. This being the best information we have been able to get (no good account relating to the Virgin Islands having been transmitted to us from the Government of the Leeward Islands) we are of opinion that your Majesty's pleasure be signify'd to Governor Douglas upon his arrival, to lay this matter before the respective Councils of the Leeward Islands for their consideration, and thereupon to transmit to one of your Majesty's Principal Secretarys of State, and to the Commissioners of Trade and Plantations their opinion. whether it may be adviseable to make any settlement on the said Virgin Islands as propos'd, and that at the same time he send a particular account of the present state and condition of the said Virgin Islands, with respect to the soil, productions and conveniencies thereof for trade, as likewise to the numbers and condition of your Majesty's subjects inhabiting there; that your Majesty may then declare your further pleasure thereupon; and that in the meantime the Governor be directed to take care strictly to observe his Instructions for asserting your Majesty's right of sovereignty in and over the said Virgin Islands, and for preventing the subjects of any foreign Prince or State from setling in any of them (except the Island of St. Thomas) in such manner as in and by the said Instructions is directed. [C.O. 153, 11. pp. 285–289; and (autograph signatures) 314, 1. Nos. 1, 1 i.]
[April 17.]814. (1) Edward Buncombe to Governor Park. Petition for compensation (v. March 24). Copy. 1 p.
(2) Copy of Governor Parke's order for appraisement of Mr. Buncombe's losses. Signed, Daniel Parke. Aug. 17, 1709. Copy. 1 p.
(3) Appraisement of Mr. Buncombe's losses. Total: £1330 11s. 6d. Signed, Barth. Rees, Jno. Bramley, Geo. Milward. Aug. 29, 1709. Copy. ¾ p.
(4) Petition of Edward Buncombe to Governor Parke and the General Council and Assembly met at St. Christophers, with their opinion that reparation ought to be granted. (v. March 24). March 30, 1710. Copy. 2 pp.
(5) Affidavit by Jno. Buncombe that above copies are genuine, and that satisfaction has been made to others in the Leeward Islands who have been similarly plundered. Signed, Jno. Buncombe. April 17, 1711. ½ p. The whole endorsed, Recd. Read April 17, 1711. [C.O. 152, 9. Nos. 61–64, 64a, 65.]
April 17.
St. James's.
815. H.M. Instructions to Capt. Josias Crowe, C. in C. of the Convoy to Newfoundland. Following the Representation of the Council of Trade, we hereby authorize and empower you to redress and punish all such abuses or offences as shall be committed at Newfoundland contrary to the Act to encourage the trade to Newfoundland, in such manner as the same have formerly been, or lawfully may be redressed or punished, according to the known usage or custom of that place; and as to all other cases not to be redressed there, we do hereby strictly require you to inform yourself, whether the several directions and provisions in the said Act, particularly those relating to the complements of green men or freshmen, as likewise the keeping of journals by Admirals of harbours, be duly observed and comply'd with, and if you shall find they are not, you are then and in that case to transmitt to one of our principall Secretarys of State, and to our Commrs. of Trade and Plantations the names of the several persons so offending with a particular and exact account of their respective offences, and how proved to the end such offenders may be proceeded and punished against here. Signed, A.R. [C.O. 324, 32. pp. 74, 75.]
April 19.
St. James's.
816. Order of Queen in Council. Approving draught of Instructions to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina, (v. April 13). Signed, Christo. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. 12th, Read 15th May, 1711. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 116; and 5, 1292. p. 310.]
April 19.
Whitehal.
817. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Refer to documents relating to the case of Edward Buncombe given under March 24 and April 17th, q.v. We are humbly of opinion that petitioner is justly entitul'd to have reparation according to the Act of the Leeward Islands 1701 for the damage he has sustain'd. Propose that H.M. signify Her pleasure to Governor Douglas that upon his arrival he do in the most effectual manner recommend petitioner's case to the Council and Assembly of Mountserrat, or to the General Council and Assembly of the Leeward Islands, as occasion may require, that justice may be done to him therein. [C.O. 153, 11. pp. 289–293.]
April 19.
St. James's.
818. Order of Queen in Council. Approving preceding Representation and directing accordingly. Signed, Christo. Musgrave. Endorsed. Recd. 12th, Read 15th May, 1711. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 67; and 153, 11. pp. 309, 310; and 5, 11. No. 65.]
April 19.
St. James's.
819. Order of Queen in Council. Approving Draft of Instructions (v. April 13) to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina, which are to be prepared for H.M. signature. Signed, Christo. Musgrave. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 11. No. 64.]