America and West Indies
May 1711, 17-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1924

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521-540

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'America and West Indies: May 1711, 17-31', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 25: 1710-1711 (1924), pp. 521-540. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73860 Date accessed: 23 July 2014.


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Contents

May 1711, 17-31

May 17.
Whitehall.
841. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. Since what we have already transmitted to your Lordship, relating to the rebellion and murder of Col. Park at Antego, we have been attended by Mr. Michael Ayon, Provost Marshal General of the Leeward Islands, who was in the chamber at Col. Parke's house when he was killed, and Ayon having presented to us a letter from a member of the Council (? Mr. Morris, Feb. 27. Ed.) who signed the Address which was sent to your Lordship, and communicated to us several affidavits in relation thereto, and given us a verbal account of what pass'd in the action, and hath promised to put the same in writing, and to lay it before your Lordship with the said affidavits, we do in the meantime here inclose for yr. Lordship's information a copy of the said letter, etc. [C.O. 153, 11. p. 321.]
May 19.
Spanish Towne.
842. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have received H.M. Order in Council March 1st, 1710, for repealing a judgment given here in the Supream Court of Jamaica, in favour of Charles Long and Dame Jane, his wife. By which it is the oppinion of most of the learned men of the Law, and men of the best judgment here, that it strikes at the very foundation of the Laws, by which this Island has been governed and preserved for this 50 odd years last past. By H.M. King Charles' Royal Proclamacon, 1661, having thereby granted all the emunities and privilidges of his native subjects of England, to all those that would come and settle here, which was the main encouragement for the settling this Island, since which time all the English laws, (excepting some few that has been made for the better management of slaves etc.) has been constantly observed and followed in all Courts of Justice here, as also an Act passed in this Island for ye Statute Law and Common Laws of England to make them in force here: which was never repealled by a Privy Seal sent here as is usualy done in such cases, from H.M. or any of her predicessers. But on accot. of this Order all Judges and other Magistrates etc. are very fearfull to act in their several stations. I beg leave to accquaint your Lordships, it is my oppinion, that without H.M. is graciously pleased to give them some assurence of her gracious clemency and favour towards them being now in a very low condition, little or no trade, and surrounded with enemys both within the Island, and without; makes this seem a greater hardship to them. I only offer this as my owne private oppinion, for the honour of the Crown of Great Brittain, and the welfare of this Island, by what I have learnt I do beleive that the Council and Assembly (in the name of the whole Island) will offer an humble Address to H.M. in their behalf. I know your Lordships has goodness to pardon this, since I take it to be my duty to give your Lordships the best accot. I can. I have writt on the same subject to the Earl of Dartmouth, etc. Postscript. This day H.M. Order in Councill was read in Councill here, and the judgement that was given in favour of Cha. Long etc. is reversed etc. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. 23rd, Read 27th June, 1711. Addressed. 2 pp. [C.O. 137, 9. No. 38; and 138, 13. pp. 333–335.]
May 19.
Spanish Towne.
843. Same to same. Acknowledges letter of Feb. 19. There is since come into the West Indies Monsr. Du Cass with 8 men of war, as prisoners reported that was sent into the Madearas with a Flag of Truce it was a Portugees ship he had taken of 24 gunns, he lay off the Maderas 24 hours; something better then a month ago, and had no other ships with him; which made us suppose the rest was seperated from him in bad weather. He was in a ship of 74 brass guns and 650 men. I wish he may not be waiting for our Fleet coming to the West Indies, but by a letter from the Governour of Carthageen to the Vice-Roy of Mexico, bearing date the 1st of May, which I have intersepted, and inclosed to the Earl of Dartmouth, which says that he is only comed for the galloons an (d) further sayeth that there is but little money in them, and in the said letter he gives an account of their victory obtained over King Charles. I send you hear a coppy of the heads of the relation he gives as well as I can gett it translated here. Our traders and man of war is still at Porta Bella, and there has been a sloop dispatched from hence to give them notice of the enemy being in these parts, but by what I can learn by a turtler that came from thence, they had but very little trade when he came away. The Island since my last has been very much afflicted with sickness; which has proved mortall, and H.M. Regiment under my command has had their share, and we have lost a Counciller, by name Thomas Clarke, jr., his father and he dyed in one day, and in one hour of the day. The Assembly is now sitting and I hope to be able to send you an accot. of their proceedings by the next pacquett or man of war which sayls first. I could wish some method could be found out for recruiting H.M. Regiment under my command, but I beleive that must be left alone untill my arrival Comadore Littleton is very much indisposed, but I hope not in danger. As to other news here, wee have none, but I am of oppinion Monsr. Du Cass's Squadron will make all the hast back again they can, if they be come only upon the accot. of the galloons. Our men of war is not in a condition to oppose them if they were here, but at present they are all out, and not one man of war in the harbor. As to the poor sergant's pardon, I have heard nothing from Capt. Gardner, and am afraid he has forgott it, as he doth most things he ought to remember, etc. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. 23rd, Read 27th June, 1711. Addressed. Sealed. 2 pp. En closed,
843. i. Governor of Carthagena to the Duque de Linares, Governor of New Spain (Mexico) Cartagena. May 1, 1711. Translation referred to in preceding. Endorsed, Recd. June 23, 1711. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 137, 9. Nos. 39, 39 i; and (without enclosure) 138, 13. pp. 336–338.]
May 19.
Spanish Towne.
844. Same to Lord Dartmouth. Duplicates of preceding two letters with Spanish original, and translation in full of the Governor of Carthagena's letter No. 843 i. [C.O. 137, 51.Nos. 39–42.]
May 19.845. Mr. Attorney General to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Returns books connected with Lord Baltimore's petition. I am ready to attend your Lordships any time after the holidays. Signed, Edw. Northey. Endorsed, Recd. 19th, Read 24th May, 1711. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 33; and 5, 727. p. 256.]
May 21.
Boston, New England.
846. Mr. Bridger to [? Lord Dartmouth.] The yearly wast and destruction made in H.M. woods continuing and cheifly by Mr. Collins' employer Mr. Mico here, who not only cutts all sorts of masts above his contract, but by his people here has given such boldness to the inhabitants the loggers, that this year they have cutt several masts and sold them to Mico's people in the woods, etc. Ware this Charter gone, H.M. prerogative would shine bright and influence the whole so that they would be more obedient to H.M. commands and civil to her intrest (and officers), and ware they more dependant, they would be much more servisable. I humbly pray your Lordshipp order for the masts that are cut above contract. I have seized several times his masts, but have not had the seizure confirmed at home, which has given birth to all his unwarrantable and prejudicial proceedings, etc. I have endeavoured by all ways possible to stop him, but all in vaine, for which he has allways informed against me as now before the Admiralty. I humbly pray your Lordshipp's favour, his information being false, malitious, etc. H.M. can never hope of any justice here, where judge and jury are offenders, for they plead their Charter no law, when I prosecuted them on it for cutting masts, and at other times they adore it, equal if not preferrable to theire schismatical doctrine, etc. Signed, J. Bridger. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 898. No. 7.]
May 21.
Boston.
847. Mr. Bridger to Mr. Popple. Acknowledges letters of Oct. 26 and April 23. I have apply'd to Col. Hunter, who refuses me travailing charges. I pray directions in this affaire. The yearly wast made in H.M. Woods by Mr. Mico has set the inhabitants at worke in the same manner; the loggers this year having cut many masts, and Mico's people has bought them, this gives great encouragement to them. Mr. Mico has also cutt this year 40 or more masts above his contract (wch. do not exceed 26 inches the largest diameter), he cuts to 36 in. Nothing will oblige him to rules; all I can doe is humbly to represent to their Lordships by you for redress, by strengthening my Instructions, allowing Depties etc. Repeats preceding. The reason is, the litle masts that are in contract his employers will loose by, and the large tho' out of contract he will cut to make that loose good, notwithstanding the Navy do not want them. Suggests returning to lay matters before the Board, etc. Signed, J. Bridger. Endorsed, Recd 11th, Read 13th July, 1711. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 66; and 5, 913. pp. 337–340.]
May 22.
Whitehall.
848. Lord Dartmouth to Governor Dudley. The Queen having been pleased to constitute Col. William Tailer Lt. Governor of the Massachusetts Bay, I recommend him to your favour and assistance, etc. Signed, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 31. pp. 12, 13; and 324, 32. p. 83.]
May 22.
London.
849. Mr. Dummer to Mr. Popple. The Frankland packetboat has been taken by 3 privateers and carried into Brest. The Captain threw all his letters overboard, etc. The Resolution is now ready to sail, etc. Signed, E. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. Read 24th May, 1711. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 7. No. 13.]
May 22.
Boston, New England.
850. Governor Dudley to [? Lord Dartmouth.] There are none of H.M. ships in these Provinces bound to Great Britain to make a safe conveyance for our papers returnable into the offices till the coming home of the next mast fleet, but I am willing by every opportunity to acquaint your Lordship with the s[t]ate of these Provinces. The reduction of Port Royall has happily cut off the receptacle of the privateers upon the coast and the nearest supply of cloths and ammunition to the Indian Rebels in our neighbourhood, but Canada yet remains their last refuge, which I am humbly of opinion would be easeily reduced wth. a proper strength of ships and troops as I have alwais humbly represented; but having no directions from your Lordship refering thereto I am fearfull this summer will pass over. Because if H.M. shall please to command any forces from hence, if we have not the advice in ten days more, it will be allmost impossible to be seasonably ready for so distant a descent and so difficult a river. In the meantime I have all the frontieers of both Provinces well guarded and marching partys everywhere in a long frontieer of 200 miles to meet and prevent their incursions and shall cut up their corn and visit their fishing places to put them to destress. and shall obey H.M. commands, if I may have the honour to receive them for any further or more distant service, and hope the people will cheerfully obey, having been hithertoo during the war equally drawn out of the files and well subsisted and justly paid tho' they are under some discouragement by the loss of above 100 men left at Anopolis-Royall to strengthen the garison there, being not used to live upon dry provisions, etc. Signed, J. Dudley. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 898. No. 8.]
May 24.
Kensington.
851. H.M. Warrant extending John Perrie's leave of absence for one year from Aug. 1st next, he appointing a deputy as Pro vost Marshal of the Leeward Islands, etc. Countersigned, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. pp. 83, 84.]
May 24.852. List of 27 licences of absence from their posts granted to Officers in America since H.M. reign (July, 1702–May, 1711.) Endorsed, July 6, 1711. 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 4. No. 3.]
May 25.
Woodcote.
853. Lord Baltimore to Mr. Popple. I will waite on you at your house Munday evening, in order to beg of theire Lordps. to fix Wednesday or Thursday next for ye hearing, etc. Your great favour herein I acknowledge as becomes, Sr., your obliged faithfull servt. Signed, C. Baltimore. Endorsed, Recd. 25th, Read 28th May, 1711. Holograph. Sealed. Addressed, To William Popple Esq., etc., at his house in Tibbolds Row (=Theobald's Road) nere Red Lyon Square. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 34.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
854. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. Reply to letter of April 2, which came not to hand till the 18th instant. We have examin'd our books, and do not find that there is at present any vacancy in the Councill of New York. However having had a good character of Mr. Byerley we have no objection why H.M. may not appoint him a Member of that Councill upon the first vacancy that shall happen. Autograph signatures. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1084. No. 46; and 5, 1122. pp. 326, 327.]
May 25.
New London.
855. Major Livingston to General Nicholson. I was on my voyage for Brittain but stormy weather forced us to return for Boston, etc. It was thought adviseable for me to stay, having then a report of your Excellency's comeing to renew ye Expedition for Canada, and ye season of ye year being so far spent yt. I must of necessity miss of you in Great Brittain; which would have proved a disappointment to ye service, and me alsoe. I forwarded your pacquett from Coll. Vetch, with my Journall and observations for Great Brittain under ye care of Capt. John Dean, who went passenger in the Speedwell galley. I now send coppy per ye Royall Anne pacquett; shall follow myselfe per ye next oppertunity, (if I receive no orders to ye contrary) in order to give yr. Excellency a full account of my negotiation with ye Govr. of Canada (and my observations which I dare not committ to paper) I should have come with this pacquett, but am indisposed, being not as yett gott over ye fatigues of my journey. I have no news as yet from Canada, concerning my man Simon Burton, whom I left sick there, last winter in an Hospitall; have not heard from Annapolis Royall since April 4th, they have lost by sickness, as Col. Whiting informs me 130 men. I hope my case will have your smiles, in order to obtain my desires, wch. is to live and die under your command. Signed, Jno. Livingston. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 931. No. 9.]
May 25.
Whitehall.
856. Mr. Popple to Mr. Lillington. Encloses duplicate of letter of Jan. 19th sent by the Frankland pacquet-boat, (which having been taken and carryed into France, and the letters thrown overboard, I inclose another copy thereof). Acknowledges letters etc. of Jan. 27 and Feb. 16, which the Council of Trade and Plantations will take into consideration, and such directions will be given thereupon, as shall be found necessary. In the meanwhile, upon enquiry into that matter at the Lord Dartmouth's Office, it does appear that H.M. pleasure, concerning the nomination of a Treasurer, has been sent you by two different conveyances, and lest they both may have miscarryed a duplicate thereof will be sent by the packet boat, which brings you this. It being now about a month since Mr. Lowther went from hence, I doubt not but he will be arrived at Barbados before this can come to your hand. [C.O. 29, 12. pp. 350–352.]
May 27.
Spa. Towne.
857. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Since my last of the 19th inst. by the pacquett this comes to acquaint you that H.M.S. the Jersey, Capt. Vernon Commander, brought in here the 23rd inst. a French merchantship that had been trading on the Spanish coast; shee had mounted 30 gunns and 120 men. What was in her, I have not yett been informed; the Capt. of the French ship says that Monsr. Du Cass sayled from Port Lewis for Carthageen the 20th inst., and gives the following acct. of the shipps that are wth. him;—St. Michell, 74 guns; L' Hercule, 60; Le Griffin, 50; one frigot, 24; one frigot, 20. They likewise say that he will make no stay, but immediatly sail with the galloons, etc. I am apprehensive if our men of war were here they would not be in a condition to oppose them, but I hope care will be taken to intersept them before they gett home. There is not one man of war in the Harbor. Comadore Littleton has order'd the Jersey out again. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. July 28th, Read Sept. 12th, 1711. Addressed. Postmark. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 9. No. 42; and 138, 13. p. 343.]
May 27.
Spanish Towne.
858. Same to Lord Dartmouth. Duplicate of preceding. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 43.]
May 28.
New York.
859. George Clarke, Secretary of New York, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. H.E. Coll. Hunter being called on by the season of the year to set the Palatins to work on preparing the pine trees, left me his commands in case he should not return before this packet sailed to aquaint your Lordships that he is upon that service, desireous by his presence to encourage, and to be a witness to their first labours. He has also commanded me to inform your Lordships of some other things relating to this Government. The Assembly being dissolved (v. May 7), he did with the first convenience after, by the Council's advice issue writs for the election of another to meet June 10th; there's but little hopes of such alteration by this new choice as may make a majority of sober and considerate men, who weighing the circumstances of H.M. Governmt. with honest and dutifull minds may again setle the Revenue for its support, however H.E. is resolved to leave no means unattempted, and the country no excuse. Our affairs with the Indians have at this time likewise a very ill aspect. The Governour of Canada has lately sent to our Five Nations some officers and soldiers with a large present, who after having assembled and made several propositions to them gave them the present to the value of about £600 mostly in ammunition. Refers to enclosure. So soon as H.E. had notice that these French officers were at Onondago, he dispatcht Col. Schuyler thither with instructions, what to negotiate with the Indians, but has yet received no account from him. Your Lordps. will perceive the French are building a fortification at Onondago by their permission, which I fear is only a begining for more, the neutrality that has been observed between them this warr has given our enemy the opportunity of thus corrupting our Indians; and the country seem generally averse to a rupture between them, and rather then be at the expence of supplying them with amunition in such a case, and defending their frontiers, which must necessarily follow, choose to sit contented under this precarious security, without even so much as raising any money for presents to such of the Indians whose fidelity may deserve them, and the presents H.E. brought with [him] being almost all disposed of that way, and for spys last winter, (for whom the Assembly made no provision) there's now left to trust to but the faith of these salvages, and how much that is shaken already, is but too evident from these proceedings. H.E. having appointed a Committee of the Council to digest the table of fees of 1693, and the ordnance past by him in Council into such a method as the difference between them might be observed, they met upon it, but finding it impracticable by reason of the deficiency of so many necessary articles in the first, and besides never having had it under their consideration, and for that reason too, tho' they perused it, made their report to H.E., enclosed. The fees of all the officers, as well as the practicers of the Law are by this ordinance reduced too low, but the Council could not be brought to make them higher, so H.E. was obliged to establish them as they are or not at all. Signed, Geo. Clarke. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 12th July, 1711. 3 pp. Enclosed,
859. i. Copy of Report from a Committee of Council of New York, appointed to consider the table of fees, 1693 etc. May 15, 1711. Endorsed, Recd. July 11, 1711. 2¾ pp.
859. ii. Account of the fees taken in the Supreme Court at New York. Endorsed as preceding. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. Nos. 24, 24 i., ii; and (without enclosures) 5, 1122. pp. 398–402.]
[May 28.]860. Abstract of Col. Dudley's last letter to Mr. Newman. In May last I received the Order of Council appointing Mr. Waldron one of the Council of Piscataqua, with another of the same import and form for Capt. Hunkins, dated March 31, 1709, with that only difference that my Lord Sunderland should prepare that warrant as Sir C. Hedges was to prepare Mr. Waldron's. At the time of the arrival of these two Orders, I was reduced so low in Council, that I had only seven members, three of whom are incapacitated by age or gout. And the quorum of the Council to make a sitting number being five. I have been many days at Piscataqua without being able to hold a Council. The orders coming fresh to me from the Clerk of the Council's Office both signed by Mr. Southwell, I thought I might make use of those gentlemen and accordingly order'd them to be sworn, and since that, they have assisted only at one Assembly for the raising of money for the payment of the Port Royal Expedition, and without whome I could not have holden the Assembly nor obtain'd the money of the Province. I thought H.M. service required me to use all means to carry on the affairs, notwithstanding which Mr. Usher, Lt. Governour of that Province, a few days since just before the fleet sail'd, held a Council where he could get but four members present whereof Mr. Waldron was one, and finding that the Order of Councill was not followed by a warrant from Sr. Charles Hedges, there being a displeasure between Mr. Waldron and himself, has suspended Mr. Waldron, and to be sure by the mast fleet which sail'd before I knew it so as to write has represented that matter as a breach on my part. I desire you to visit Mr. Popple, who I suppose is yet Secretary, and pray him to assure their Lordships that I used those persons as being so allowed by H.M., and without whom I could not possibly have held a General Assembly to raise the money for the payment of the forces, and the Governmt. must have suffer'd, and the soldiers ready enough to mutiny if their money had not been rais'd and pay'd, and those Gentlemen do by this conveyance write to you, and their friends to attend my Lord Dartmouth for the necessary warrant, untill which time I shall direct Mr. Waldron not to attend in Councill, tho I shall want him being the first estate in the Province, a gentleman of good loyalty, and capacity, inferior to none. I have written to their Lordships as they have commanded a number of names to make up the Councill, twelve of the best men in the Province, and if I were to give twelve names more I must give the names of handycraftsmen and labourers, there being not that I know of in the province that number worth £20 a year in lands to support their figure. A true copy, signed, Henry Newman. Endorsed, Recd. 28th, Read 30th, May, 1711. 2¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 64.]
May 29.
New York.
861. Mr. Sharpas to [? Lord Dartmouth.] The inclosed came to my hands extreamly shatter'd and wett and lyable to the view of any person whose curiosity excited them to the knowledge of the contents, etc. Signed, Will. Sharpas. 1 p. (No enclosure). [C.O. 5, 1084. No. 47.]
May 30.
N. York.
862. George Clarke to [? Lord Dartmouth.] Encloses following, by which your Lordship will perceive to what a turbulent disposition these poor people are brought by the malice of ill designing men; one would have thought it had been the interest of every man in this Province to incourage them in the labour they were designed for, which in time may make this a very flourishing place, and so it is, as it respects the Publick, but some have their by-ends to pursue, to which they make all publick considerations subservient, those on the frontiers would have them posted between them and the enemy to be a frontier to them, others have large tracts of land to setle, and would have them abandon'd that they may become their slaves, and in short few are to be found, who do not wish differently, most as their interest is concerned, and some to gratify the rancour of their minds; But H.E. has yet good hopes of their reformation, etc. Repeats parts of following. Signed, Geo. Clarke. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1091. No. 36.]
May 30.
N. York.
863. George Clarke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Since I closed my other letter (May 28) I have received a full and particular account of the deportment of the Palatines, etc. About a fortnight agoe H.E. haveing received information from their overseers that these people had taken a resolution neither to work in makeing pitch and tarr nor to remain on the land they are settled upon for that purpose, but even by force if they could not otherwise effect it to remove to Schohary (a tract of resumed lands) and that they had actualy hindred the Surveyors from laying out more lots to them, strengthning each other in these resolutions by a secret association, H.E. was forced to send for a detachment of 60 men from the Garrison of Albany to meet him at the Manner of Levingston, which is about two miles from their settlement on the west side of the river, so soon as H.E. arrived there he sent to all the villages on that side of the river to know how they dared disobey his orders and hinder the Surveyors and other officers to doe their duty. By their deputys they return'd for answer, that when the Surveyors came to lay out the land, the people called them out, told them 'twas worth nothing, they would have no more, so 'twas needless to survey it, and that they would have the lands of Schohary, which the Queen had order'd them by their contract. H.E. replyed that he had often told them that if any man by chance had a bad lot, the Surveyors on application would lay him out another as they were ordered, that those who had clear'd what was given them, might upon application to the Surveyors have more, and if. what he had already purchas'd was not sufficient, he would purchase more, provided it lay on the river, and near the Pines that they might follow the manufacture they were destin'd for and oblig'd to by their contract; that as to the lands of Schohary its the malice of those who would have them for their slaves that put them on demanding it, for that those lands the Indians had not [not] yet parted with nor were they fit for their labour, no pine being within 20 miles of it, that 'twould be impossible to subsist them there or defend them against the French and French Indians, and besides they had obliged themselves to settle on such lands as he should assign them, and then desired their final answer which was that they would have the lands appointed them by the Queen, whereupon H.E. in writeing told them that since neither their duty, allegiance, or regard to H.M. unparallel'd charity and goodness in taking them up and provideing for them when they were starving and abandon'd by all the world besides had been of any force to keep them within the bounds of their duty, and since they had no regard to a solemn contract signed by them he was come to require and inforce the execution of it, copys and translations of which they had in their own language. Then H.E. desired that what past between them, copys whereof were then given them, might be communicated to the people, and their last resolution and final answer the next day at four in the evening. A few minutes after the Deputys were gon, H.E. was informed that a body of three or four hundred of them were then passing the brook the Deputys among whom were the Captains returned to him and in appearance seem'd softned and then went to the people who were drawn up on the hill above the house towards whom H.E. marching with the detachment one of the Commissarys who had been with them told him they wanted to pay their compliment to him, so H.E. walk'd up to them and ask'd them what they meant by appearing in arms, they told him what they had told the commissarys. whereupon H.E. order'd them home to their habitations, and being gone about a mile they discharg'd all their firelocks, but their saying they came to pay their compliments was only a pretence for they told two of their officers as they were going home that they came to releive their deputys in case they had been confin'd. The next day the Deputys came according to order with their answer, which begins indeed with a desire that H.E. would assist them that they may be settled in the lands of Scohary, but they soon forgot that humble stile and told H.E. they had rather lose their lives immediately than remain where they are, that they are cheated by the contract, it not being the same that was read to them in England, there they say it run thus, that 7 years after they had had 40 acres a head given them they were to repay the Queen by hemp mast trees tarr and pitch or anything else, so that it may be no damage to any man in his family; upon these terms they will perform the contract, but to be forc'd by another contract to remain on these lands all their lives, and work for H.M. for the ships' use, that they will never doe. What does it signify, they say, to promise them this land that they shall make pitch and tarr ? They will be obedient to the Queen, but they will have the promise kept that Mr. Cast read to them in High Dutch in England and upon that land which was promised them (they will be there) and if they cannot they desire three or four men may goe for England and lay their case before the Queen. They say likewise there are a great many things promised them, as clothing, household goods, working tools, which they desire to have. They say further their people dye for want of care, and proper remedys, and desire money to subsist themselves, and lastly yt. Mr. Cast told them he'd make them slaves, and therefore desire H.E. to appoint another in his room. Whilst H.E. was talking with the Deputys, he received information that there was a great body of men in arms on the other side of the brook, and haveing by that time a reinforcement of 70 men more, he march'd the detachment immediately, and pass'd the brook, the Palatines were run home to their houses, H.E. march'd to the first village, and order'd them to bring in all their arms, which they did immediately except a few, he could goe no farther that night but the next morning march'd to the other three villages on the same side of the river and disarm'd them all, and then returning to Mr. Levingston's sent orders to the villages on the other side to bring in their arms that day to the storehouse to be transported to him, which I beleive they have done, if they refus'd H.E. had in case of necessity [had] sloops ready to transport the detachment thither. It's hardly credible that men who reap so great a benefit as they doe by these people not only by the consumption of their provisions, but by the increase of strength should yet be so malicious to possess them with notions so injurious to themselves and prejudicial to H.M. interest, but yet it's so, and I beleive almost the only cause of their present discontents. The land they live on is generally good, producing so great a crop, that those farmers and men of skill in husbandry, who are honest enough to wish success to these people's labours, wonder how they could be wrought upon to complain of it, but great pains have been taken to magnify the goodness of that at Scohary above this, and to persuade them that if they once settle where they are, there is no prospect of their ever removeing, but if they refuse to doe that, and insist on their being planted on the other, ye Governour must give way to it, and by these means it is that they are arrived to this pitch of disobedience, which I hope will wear of now they are disarm'd of their firelocks, the power by which they hoped to force a compliance to their unreasonable humour. H.E. has published a declaration revokeing all military commissions and putting them intirely under the command of their overseers and directors as the Queen's hired servants, and all the good people amongst them who have been meerly misled and frightned by the turbulent to join in these tumults are better satisfyed with that rule of Government. Whatsoever else they complain of, I dare be bold to affirm there are not many Planters in the Province so happy, so healthfull and so well cloth'd as they; nor could it well be otherwise considering how well they have been used, they have by their own choice three flesh and four flower days a week, a pound of beef a head or equivalent in pork and pease as long as they liked them, besides three quarters of a pound of the finest, or a pound of a courser sort of bread, which they please, and as good beer as any man in the Province drinks of at his table, of flower they have a pound a head with bread and beer, there is not one of their houses that is not hung round with provisions, and as to their c[l]othing everyone has had of shoes stocking kerseys shaggs and other sort of woollen such a quantity last winter as their occasions required, and now against the summer a sufficient quantity of linnen, the remainder is kept for their use to supply them as they want, which by such management will goe twice as far as by makeing one general distribution of the whole; of tools they have had as many as they want, and a great many more have been made for them here, as particularly 200 barking irons. As to their dyeing indeed many did at their first comeing tho' none for want of care or proper applications, but by diseases contracted on board, since they have been planted in the country, they have had as good a share of health as any people in the world, but all sicknes was likewise provided against there by doctors and medicines; the want of anything I am sure is no cause of their turbulent behaviour, whatever the ease and plenty they have lived in is. The 24th instant Mr. Sacket who has been acquainted with the methods of prepareing the trees, was to visit the woods in order to divide the work amongst the people, and then to teach the overseers how to bark the trees that they may instruct the people, so that now I suppose they are all at work and H.E. has great hopes of a thorough reformation. Mr. Bridger has given over all thoughts of attending this work on any other consideration then that of being hired to it, H.E. wrote to him to tell him the season of the year approached, and that it was high time he should be here, he answer'd if H.E. would defray his expenses he would. The Governour little expected such an answer considering the salary of £200 a year sterling allowed him as Surveyor of the Queen's woods, that by H.M. royal letter under her signet and sign manual, he is expresly commanded to attend that work, and that no salary is propos'd to be allow'd him for it by yr. Ldsps.' representation; this put him upon makeing some farther enquiry after some who had been in the Eastern country, and acquainted themselves with their method of prepareing pine trees, and at length he met with this Mr. Sacket, who undertakes it, and I have very good hopes he will be able to effect it, for he talks more reasonably on that head then any man I have yet met with. however H.E. was willing to have Mr. Bridger too, because he was assigned to that work, and for that purpose wrote him two positive orders in each mentioning H.M. commands to him, but he still refuses unless on the abovementioned consideration. Had he come, H.E. would have reposed but little trust in him, for the method which he formerly proposed to bark the trees (as he published it in print) would not doe, it has been tryed in Jersey without effect and to the considerable damage of some men there, nor had he himself better success in Connecticut. Had he been unacquainted with the method of this work he ought to have been ingenuous in confessing it, that H.E. might sooner have inquired after some who are acquainted with it, and not have laid hold on that frivolous pretence to conceal his ignorance, which however is more excusable than his disobedience to the commands of so gracious a Queen, whose bread he has so long and as it appears so unworthily eaten etc. Refers to enclosure. H.E. designs to be at Albany the first of June to meet the Sachems. Signed, Geo. Clarke. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 12th July, 1711. 9 pp. Enclosed,
863. i. Col. Schuyler to Governor Hunter. Albany, May 27, 1711. In obedience to your Excellency's Instructions, dated 29th past, I repaired towards Onondage the first of this instant, being accompanied by Capt. Johannis Roseboom and Joh(a)nnis Bleeker, Nicholas Schuyler, John Baptist van Eps, Interpreter, and four other men together with nine Indians, some from hence and others hyred by ye way. These doe accompany the Journall of my proceedings, which has been attended with a deal of pains and dificulties before I could overcome what is done; nay more then that I was obliged to promise to severall Indians a present of about 2 cwt., 30 shirts and 2 peices of strouds, that I desire your Excy. will be pleased to order up hither for them by the first opportunity, here being no such goods in store. I should be looth to give it of my owne haveing already to my sorry advanced so much for ye Governmt. Ye Sachims have desired me by seven hands of wampum to acquaint your Excellency that they are desirous to meet your Excellcy. at Albany by ye first of ye next month, they make a generall complaint of ye dearness of pow(d)er, so that if your Excy. designs anything for them powder will be most acceptable. Monsieur Longuil it was said has made them a present valued about £600. I have as your Excy. directed sent out from Onondage two spys to Canada who will return by this Citty, have agreed with them for two stroud water blankets and one pair dito stockings to each. Wee return'd hither ye 15th, the account of expences etc. I shall take another time to lay before yor. Excellency. Signed, P. Schuyler. Same endorsement. 1¼ pp.
863. ii. Commissioners for Indian Affairs to Governor Hunter. Albany, May 4, 1711. By the enclosed extract out of our Minutes your Excellency will see what ye French design to do at Onondage, how they are resolv'd to take possession there, if not prevented; we hope that Col. Schuyler will have that influence over the Indians to disswade them from allowing such dangerous practices, etc. If we had not had some things in store wch. your Excy. brought over it would have been a hard task to fitted them out, so bare are ye fronteers now of either money or creditt, we see that our enemy who are always vigilant spare neither cost nor trouble to effect their ends, and we are almost rendred incabable to do anything for ye publick good, if there be not effectuall means taken to defeat ye french designs it will prove extream dangerous, not only to us but all ye Brittish Plantacons in North America, etc. Signed, Hend. Hanlen, John Schuler, Mynder Schuyler, Peter Van Brugh. Same endorsement. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1050. Nos. 25, 25 i., ii; and (without enclosures) 5, 1122. pp. 402–415.]
May 31.
N. York.
864. George Clarke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have just now received some further intelligence from H.E. concerning the Palatins, of a very different nature etc. After H.E. had disarmed them, he sent back the detachment to Albany, and the sober and better sort of people who are likewise the majority, being secured from the rage of the hot-headed, unthinking, and misguided, met together to debate on their former proceedings, and with a general consent came to this resolution, to acknowledge their faults, ask H.E. pardon, and signify their hearty repentance. Accordingly all the villages by their deputys waited on him and, some of them on their knees, asked his pardon, and promised a thorrough reformation of their behaviour, and an entire resignation to his orders for the future, whereupon H.E. pardon'd them, with this certification, that the first disobedience shall be punished with the utmost rigor the Law will allow, which they received with great joy, and now they begin to demonstrate their sincerity by inquiring when they shall be set to work, and shew a great desire to make a good beginning on it. Mr. Sacket has visited the woods, and finding them perfectly to his mind, resolved to set them to work in barking the trees on Monday last, so that by the next packet I doubt not H.E. will be able to give your Lordps. a relation of their labour, as will be very satisfactory to you. However perplexing this tumult has been to H.E., it will have very good effects as to H.M. interest, for he will put them under a new and more exact method of obedience, which the good express a great inclination for, for tho' they are more numerous then the bad, yet the latter by their noise and heats have drawn or forced in the rest, which now their arms are taken from them they want the power to do, if they had the will, but I hope and believe they will not attempt it again, their repentance appearing very hearty. The submissions of the respective villages being in High Dutch cannot now be laid before your Lordps., but by the next packet they shall. Refers to enclosure. Signed, Geo. Clarke. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 12th July, 1711. 3 pp. Enclosed,
864. i. Journal of Col. Schuyler's negotiations with the Indians at Onondage (v. No. 863 i.) May 2nd we left Schinnechtady and came to the first Castle of the Mohoggs, where I receiv'd intelligence that the French Gentm. Monsr. Longuil had been 14 days come to Onnondage and busie building a house, and had sent a canoe back to Cadarachque. The 3rd do. we gott to Canojoharrie, the second Castle of that country and in a meeting of the Sachims and convien'd, desired two of them and some of their young men to goe with us in company to Onnondage, and presented them with the Queen's arms to be sett up in their Castle as a token from H.M., which they gratefully accepted, but appointed none to goe with me. The 4th do. we came about 30 miles beyond the Mohoggs Castles towards Oneyde Castle. The 5th do. we proceeded on our journey to Oneyde and mett with an Indian who gave us intelligence that Lawrence Clase, our Interpreter, had left Onnondage two days agoe, and that Monsr. Longuil was still there, and design'd to tarry four days longer, and that Tagtagguisera, one of the cheiff Sachims of Caguawage in Canada was at Oneyde to delude that nation if possible. The 6th do. we came to Oneyde, the Sachims being convein'd, I presented to them the Queen's arms, and told them that at their request, and by H.E. Order I was now come, and goeing to the meeting in Onnondage, and desired them to send with me some Sachims and men thither, which they readily consented to, and directed 3 Sachims and a number of their young men to accompany us to Onnondage. The 7th do. on my journey to Onnondage we mett severall Indians design'd for Albany, they told us that as soon as Mons. Longuil heard I was by the way [he] ceased building up the blockhouse and made the best of his way from thence to a place called Canenda by the Lake where his canoes were, and left word if I were min[ded ?] to speak to him, he would tarry there for me, in the evening about 7 o'clock we came to Onnondage, where the Sachims frindly received us. The 8th do. the Sachims of the Five Nations convein'd and desired my presence with the other Gentm., Capt. Roseboom and Capt. Bleeker there, when come they made the following propositions, vizt.—Brother Corlaer and Quieder. [? We shall in] the first place beginn and tell the evill news, [? we have] heard from some of our people that have lately been with that Nacon of Indians called the Minquase, who told them that Corlaer and Onnondio, the latter the Governor of Canada, are now agreed to distroy the five Nations, and that this contrivance has been long on foot between them, but now resolved upon on purpose to gett our land, being land is scarse to be gott at home, and it is beleived the more because the French men were admitted to pass freely through Albany the last winter, and now take upon them to build in our Castle, there is also added to that news that Corlaer and Quider are to invite the Sachims of the five Nations to Albanie with a design when come there to kill them and to take possession of our lands and divide it with the French, this we have also told to Monsr. Longuiel who answer'd that the French would not be concern'd in any such doeing, but that the English would doe it, which makes us jealous of it is because powder is so very dear. We have heard likewise of such a design by Oriojadricko now here from Canada, who was told this by a prisoner taken the last spring from N. England near the sea side. We shall now repeat to you what Monsieur Longuiel from Governor of Canada has been telling us, vizt., Children, I shall now speake to you not only from myself but on behalf of all other Nations of Indians in alligance with me, what is past and done by us heretofore you must forgett and forgive, and lett us now renew our Covenant and take no notice of evill insinuacons from your neighbours, wee mean Corlaer. It may happen that Corlaer and Quieder in a short time will give you the hatchett in hand agt. us. We desire you not to accept or take it, for it is the English and French warr, and at the end thereof they will become friends, but you are a dead people if you accept the hatchet otherwise you shall live, therefore lett English and French fight it out, and be not concern'd either on one side or the other, doe you not observe yourselves like prisoners or slaves whatever you have a mind should be done for you by Corlaer or Quidier that noe notice is taken thereof, or doe you not see that they and we have a dayly conversacon with one another and goe to and thro Albany without your knowledge? O Children, I pity you and could wish that Corlaer and Quider were here to hear me. I have abundance to say in your behalf, is it not plain to be seen that they take no care of you nor of your country. It is the beavers they only aim at and want to have and your assistance when they want it, but seldom return you any. It is I that have compassion over the Five Nations and esteem you valuable (giving a hard stamp on the ground) therefore hold peace with me and so you with your brother. It is I that commiserate your young men, your wives and children and all that belong to you. There is Corlaer and Quieder has given the hatchett into the hands of the River Indians, I shall watch their mocon though I value them but litle for with the fyring of one great gun, I can soon scare them away, now perhaps Corlaer will send out towards our parts, may be we shall send towards his parts for a sckalp or prisoner, when it so happens we desire you to sitt quiett in peace and concern you not in warr for so doeing you'ill preserve your lives. You soldiers and young men hearken to the Sachims for they are men of knowledge and understand to govern yr. Country, [thus ?] long will you hold a peaceable life. I know you are warlike men, yet it becomes you to give ear to the old and forbear drunkenness. You women be sure to diswade your soldiers from fighting that losse of them is towards the losse of yr. land, and will bring forth much griefe to you. I have sent for the Waganhaes, some of them have committed murther at Cadarachque, and also for all the upper nacons whom I have given the hatchett. And from you I desire two Sachims of each Nacon to goe with me to Ca[nada ?] to hear what I shall propose to the Waganhaes.
Answer from the Five Nations to Monsr. Longuil in Onnondage:—We have the same compassion with the Governor of Canada as he hath with us. You desire us not to take the hatchett in hand [?] not to doe it, but as to what you tell us that Corlaer and Quieder have given the [? hatchet] to the River Indians, that we cannot beleive, it may be to the Boston [? Indians] or them more to the Eastward under the English Govermt. which if so is w[ith a ?] great deal of reason, since you have given the hatchett to all your Indians [? against] them. You seem to be commiserated with us even as if our Brother Corlaer and Quieder used us uncivilly, which they do not, but have severall times [? been] used so by you, and often times had warr with you occasion'd first from [you. The ?] like has not yett happen'd with our Brethren Corlaer and Quieder, and hope [never ?] shall, but have allways agreed in love and frindship together. Our young [men are ?] generally obedient to us and observe our commands, altho the Waganhaes have [now?] twelf times fallen upon us and kill'd of our men we suppose through your [? means] for the sake of the Beavers, which we cannot so easily forgett, and are appre[hensive?] that you have some evill design by sending for the Waganhaes perhaps to [fall ?] upon us, for we know you are deceitfull and not to be trusted, you desire us not to accept of the hatchett when offer'd to us, we likewise desire you to take the hatchett from your Indians, and lett Christians fight Christians, only otherwise you cannot expect that we shall sitt quiett while you send out your Indians whom you must pay well for their pains. Give one belt of wampum.
The 9th do. I desired a meeting of the Sachims of the Five Nations to whom when convien'd I told them, Brethren, upon the seven hands of wampum which you sent desiring me here, H.E. the Govr. yr. Brother Corlaer has forthwith directed me to repair to you and to thank you for the notice given to this Govermt. of the arrivall of the French in yr. Castles, and that yr. Brother Corlaer expects yr. alligance to H.M. and yr. former promises that you will not permit any armed men, priest or emissarys from the French to come among you, and also that he expects you will have no private consults with any of those that were late among you, and that if any attempt be made agt. you from Canada you may assure yourselves of all the assistance this Govermt. can give you, the evill news you told me yesterday of the Minquase is altogether false, and not worth to make answer to, the seven belts of wampum which the French has layd before you, you have already answer'd so that I need not say any more of them, but Brethren what's the meaning hereof, why is this suffer'd that the French (who ever have been wrongfull to you) have now the liberty not only to come into yr. Castles but to build a defensive house in the midst of you, how are you now so blind or where are your thoughts that you can never see nor think of the ill consequence of this they have been doeing here. I am resolved not to part from hence before it be broake clear down and distroy'd. Brethren, I have brought with me H.M. coat of arms, which I desire you to sett up here as a token that the French have no jurisdiction in your country, the like I have also here to be sent to Cayouge and the Sinnekis.
After this the meeting adjourned into a private consultation by themselves. In the mean time I was inform'd that Monsr. Longuil had given the sd. house to the care of an Sachim that was then gone out about 16 miles farr from the Castle, so that I thought necessary to goe to the expence to send for him, who came in at 6 a clock in the evening. I made it my intrest to gaine his consent as likewise of many others that were well affected yet not without the promise of suitable returns for their pains. The 10th do. the Sachims came to my lodgeing in the morning, and told me they had forgott an Article in Monsr. Longuil's proposicon, that was if in case the five Nations would not stay home they had other nacons besides the Waganhaes at their command, the sd. Sachims reply of more nations we know also of many in Covenant with us, so that such threatnings shall never be a means to break our allegiance to H.M. or the Covenant with her Govermts. in America. And moreover told me that they had concluded to leave in my choice whether to destroy the blockhouse built by Monsr. Longuile or not, but that if I resolved to break it down, they in the mean time would send a messenger to him being at Cannende but 12 miles off to give him notice thereof. I return'd them answer that I was very glade they comply'd with my resolucon, and if they thought fitt to send word to Monsr. Longuil they might tell him that I was now busie in pulling it down, so that I immediately order'd those that accompanied me to breake it downe and was quickly done and the Sachims sent forthwith such word to Monsr. Longuile and to the Cayouges and Sinnekes country of my proceedings, th[at?] Longuil sent an Indian messenger to the Sachims that they should w[ell?] inform him what I have proposed and done there, and withall if I would allow the Sachims to send him such answer. The 11th they proposed as followeth, Brother Corlaer and Quieder, we are now convien'd again, and you see wee have consented to all yr. de[? sires], so hope you'ill comply with ours, first we find the prise of merchan[dise ?] so extraordinary dear especially powder, without that we are quite [? undone], therefore since our returns are so invaluable, we desire powder above all [? may] be afforded cheaper, and we likewise desire that the selling of strong drink [to] our people may be prohibited, whilst that layes in your power to doe. You have often given us the hatchet in hand to fight the French, you know wee have allwayes fought them as we did with you once [ ] in Canada, and did there good service, tho' we have had but litle assistance [? from] when we have been attacqu'd. You have told us to diswade our soldiers from goeing out [? against the] far Nations, they often fall out upon us, yet you are unwilling [we shall] goe out agt. them, how shall we defend ourselves agt. them, with arrows we cannot and powder and lead is extraordinary dear with you, and now you have broak down this house which seem'd a defence to us, pray [? let us] not want powder and lead, so that we may supply ourselves to be in a readiness upon occasion. I reply'd that I should give yr. Excell. an account thereof, but they must be carefull for the future, and not admitt any French into their Castles, much less to erect any buildings, this Blockhouse was 24½ long and 18 foot broad cover'd with boards and nail'd, there was other wood ready to build a chappell, which I also destroy'd, and so took my leave and bid them farewell, presenting them with one kagg of rum 20g. was very acceptable, after I went about 3 or 400 yards D'kanasore came after me and desired to know the meaning of the Queen's coat of arms. I told him that that signify'd H.M. autority there, and that the French ought not to be permitted amongst them, on any account whatsoever, and so departed from Onnondage to Oneyde. The 12th do. we left Oneyde and mett a Sinnek that told me that the French Interpreter named Jounkeur being in the Sinnekes Country and hearing of our arrivall in Onnondage imediately departed from thence. The 13th and 14th do. continued on our journey and came the 15th to Albany. Signed, Pr. Schuyler. A true copy examind pr. Robt. Livingston, Secy. for ye Indn. Affares. Endorsed as preceding. Edges torn. 6 pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. Nos. 26, 26 i: and (without enclosure) 5, 1122. pp. 415–418.]
May 31.
N. York.
865. George Clarke to [? Lord Dartmouth.] Encloses copy of preceding, and repeats part. Signed, Geo. Clarke. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1091. Nos. 37, 38.]