America and West Indies
June 1711, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1924

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540-552

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'America and West Indies: June 1711, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 25: 1710-1711 (1924), pp. 540-552. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73861 Date accessed: 23 August 2014.


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Contents

June 1711, 1-15

June 2.
Spanish Towne.
866. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers to letter of May 27. The Assembly has passed the following Bills; (1) A private Act to enable Commrs. to dispose of part of the estate of Wm. Burras, of the parish of Vere, minor (2) a Bill for regulating fees (3) a Bill for fitting out 2 sloops for guarding the coast (4) An Act for declaring what persons shall be qualify'd to sit in Assemblies (5) An Act for continuing an Act for raising an additional duty etc. from May 1st. to Aug 1st, 1711. (6) An Act for providing an additional sub sistence for H.M. Officers and Soldiers from May 1st to Aug 1st 1711. Which two last it was imposible to gett them to pass them for a long time, they pretending business of greater moment, and that they would take care to finish them for 12 months before that time was expired, but there hapning to be such a dispute between the House and the Councill this day about tacking a clause to a money bill to reimburce the Treary. with 2000l., which the Councill after desireing conferences with the House and was denyed, the Councill thought fitt-to throw out the bill, and this day with the advice and consent of the Councill, wee thought it convenient to prorogue them for 3 days to trye if it's posible to bring them to a better temper to do the Queen and the country service. As for my owne part, I must say I am very hardly us'd, since I am in arrear of my owne sallary a year and a half, which amounts to £3400 Jamaica money. All these disputes and misunderstandings in my oppinion is owing to Mr. Totterdall, who has been the same disturber in Sir W. Beeston's time and some time before that, and seems resolved still to continue in his wickedness. What our next meeting will produce a little time will shew; and at the time I prorogued them, I laid before them the ill consequences of such annamositys and divisions, with all the little eloquence I had to perswad them if posible to meet in a calm and sedate temper. Refers to enclosed Address, which wee request your Lordships will be pleased to cause to be laid before H.M. with the reasons annexed. Monsr. Du Case's squadron I am of oppinion if not already sayled will soon sayle with what money was on board the galloon, as also with what French Assiento money, belonging to the French merchants in those parts which is beleived is very considerable. Our Traders is returned from the costs and has brought with them 50 or 60,000 peices of eight, being affraid to stay any longer on that coast, since the enemy was so strong. I shall send the severall Acts so soon as they can be fare writt out by the first safe oppertunity of a man of war or otherwise, etc. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. July 28th, Read Sept. 12th, 1711. 2½ pp. Enclosed,
866. i. Address of the Governor, Council and Assembly of Jamaica to the Queen, June 2, 1711. Understanding that your Majesty has at this time under your Royall consideration the Trade to Affrica upon the establishment of which our estates in this your Majesty's Island and the wellfare of this your Coloney do intirely depend, and being assured your Majesty will alwayes have a tender regard to the prosperity of all your good subjects, presume to acquaint your Majesty that we have for many yeares past found very great advantages from an open and free trade to Affrica, which we are under apprehensions would not only be lost to us from an exclusive trade, but that we should thereby be involved in insuperable difficulties. Besides all other inconveniencyes of monopolyes we humbly conceive it will be plain to your Majesty what extreame hardships we are like to suffer if it be in the power of a few men to rate our comodityes as they think fitt, to furnish our marketts or suffer us to want as shall best suite their private gaine, to ingross entirely to themselves and their factors the Spanish Trade which alone can be carry'd on by a supply of negroes, and in all other particulars to render our interest in great measure dependent on their owne. And whither this will not have an ill consequence upon the trade of Great Britain in discourageing the exportation of its woollen manufactures and lessning the importation of bullion as well as of the comodityes of the growth of your Majesty's plantations, we humbly submitt to your Majesty's wisdom, etc. etc. Signed, Tho. Handasyd; Silvester Stuckley, Cl. Con.; Pe. Beckford. Speaker. Endorsed as preceding. 1 large p.
866. ii. Council and Assembly of Jamaica to the Council of Trade and Plantations. June 2, 1711. Considerations offered in relation to the Affrican Company's obtaineing an exclusive trade to the coast of Guinea. (1) That an exclusive trade to the coast of Affrica will allwayes be carry'd on by the Company so as to underballance the trade of this Island, by which meanes the price of slaves must necessaryly be advanced and the price of the comodities of the produce of the Island beat downe. (2) That the Company haveing that trade entirely in their owne hands, unless the planters will pay the exorbitant prices demanded by the Company's factors they will not be furnished with negroes necessary to carry on their Plantations. (3) That the consequence of an exclusive trade to the coast of Guinea will in effect be the establishing in the Company an exclusive trade likewise to the Spanish Coast, nothing being more evident than that no advantageous trade can be carry'd on thither by the British and particularly the woollen manufactures without negroes to putt them off and to defray the charges of transporting them, the supplyeing or withholding whereof will depend intirely on the pleasure of the Company. (4) That thereby we shall likewise be barr'd of a most beneficiall trade from this Island to the coast of Affrica, which employes a vast number of our saylors and takes of severall comodities of the growth of this Island, which otherwise would be of little or no use to us, the advantage whereof in the end centers in Great Britain. (5) That trade being reduc'd within so narrow a compass as that of an exclusive Company, the Navigation which is the principall strength of this Island must necessarily suffer, our Country allready thin of people want encouragement and be rend'red incapable of defending its self either against a foreigne or domestic enemy, besides our being deprived for the future of the many oppertunities we have hitherto enjoyed of remitting great quantitys of bullion yearely to Great Britain. Signed, Silvester Stuckley, Cl. Counl., Jer. Collins, Cl. Assem. Same endorsement. 1 large p. [C.O. 137, 9. Nos. 43, 43 i, ii; and (without enclosures) 138, 13. pp. 344–347.]
June 2.
Spanish Towne.
867. Governor Handasyd to Lord Dartmouth. Duplicate of preceding letter. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 44.]
June 2.
Nevis.
868. Lt. Governor Hamilton to Lord Dartmouth. Herewith your Lordship will receive coppy of my last, [April 26th Ed.] in which I informed your Lordp. of the bad condition the man of warr was then in, the Capt. whereof since with his officers assured me that she was altogether unfitt for service except she was new rigged and had new sailes which could not be had anywhere but at Barbados, there being no storehouse of H.M. in any of these Islands, nor any undertakers for victualling, which proves vastly prejudiciall to H.M. service, for which reason I was oblidged to let Capt. Norbury saile for Barbados, he assureing me that otherwise his ship must be haled up, and layd by, where I hope he has by this time allmost fitted and victualled her, and that I may dayly expect him downe, for there was never more want of men of warr on this station, wee having constantly the privateers as thick as bees about and amongst these islands, of which Mr. Bermingham mentioned in my former is the chief. But haveing already wrote you at large about this, I humbly leave it to your Lordps. consideration. I reced. advice last week from the Governor of St. Eustatia, a Dutch Island, that his son was then just arrived in a flagg of truce from Martinique, where he heard that the French were prepareing vessells and raising of men in order to attack some of these H.M. Islands, and yesterday arrived the private man of warr sloop called the Francis and Mary, Capt. Wm. Coventry, Commr., who took up two dayes agoe under Domineco a cannoa wth. Brittish prisoners most of them belonging to St. Christophers, that had broke out of prison in Martineco, who confirmed the news, and for particulars informed me that they did see out of prison (which is just at the road) the provisions amunition and water put on board, and that the French Generall came himselfe in person from Fort Royall to Fort St. Pieres, and that they did see the men pass en review and that it was talked of that they had 1500 men there, besides what were at Guardalope where they were to make up their fleet and joine their forces. Upon which I immediately impressed a fine sayling Bermudas sloop and dispatched her this day, to the Govr. or Presidt. of the Councill of Barbados, as also a letter to the Commandore of H.M. ships there desireing them to send downe with all expedition the ships on that station or at least so many as can be spared for a time on this so urgent an occasion and H.M. interest, which the wellfare of the inhabitants so much depended upon. I have put this Island in alarm and have one third of all the inhabitants every night upon duty, the rest in a readiness if anything should happen. I have wrote to the Lt. Govr. of St. Christopher's and strictly charged him to take particular care of the two forts that he may not be surprized. The President of Mountserratt (att which place Capt. Coventry first touched) writes me that he has given an account to the Lt. Governor of Antigua so that all the Islands have notice and I hope wee shall with the help of God frustrate their designes. I shall to the uttmost of my power discharge my duty, and as soon as our owne or one of the Barbados men of warr come to me, transport myselfe to the place where I hear their designe is, or the place attacked. In the meantime must content myselfe to be a kind of a prisoner. Signed, W. Hamilton. 2 pp. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 45; and 152, 42. No. 63.]
June 2.
Nevis.
869. Same to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Duplicate of preceding. Signed, W. Hamilton. Endorsed, Recd. 13th, Read 17th July, 1711. 5 pp. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 73; and 153, 11. pp. 348–350.]
June 2.
Kensington.
870. H.M. Warrant appointing Thomas Byerley Member of Council of New York, upon the first vacancy. Countersigned, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. pp. 84, 85.]
June 6.
Craven House.
871. Instructions to Charles Craven, Governor of South Carolina. (a) As to the observation of Acts of Trade and Navigation, etc. (b) To consider with the Council the promotion of trade, manufactures and the fishery. (3, 4) To send a copy of all Acts of Assembly that have been confirmed, and accounts of Revenue. (5) By and with the advice and consent of any four or more of our Deputies to adjourn, prorogue and dissolve the General Assembly as often as you shall think requisite. (6) To appoint successors to officers in the Courts of Judicature, untill you have our approbation of them or nomination of others. (7) You are with the assistance of Col. Wm. Rhet, our present Receiver General, and Commissioners appointed for that purpose, to inspect the accounts of John Ashby and Nathaniel Sale, our late Receivers, and transmit the balance due to us. (8) You are to take great care that the Indians be not abused, and that justice be duly administred to them in our Courts, and that you endeavour your utmost to create a firm friendship with them, and to bring them over to your part for your better protection and defence against the enemy, the neighbouring French and Spaniards, against whom you are to protect our said province, and we assure you of our utmost assistance for your security. (9) To transmit as soon as you can conveniently get it handsomly transcribed a full and exact account of our yearly rents etc. (10) You are to take care that all persons may be admitted to peruse the Publick Records of our Province, provided they make such perusal in the place where the same are constantly kept, and pay the customary and usual fees. (11) You shall immediatly upon the receipt of these presents issue out your warrant to four of the inhabitants of Colleton County and four of Granvill County to sound the River of Port Royal and to examine which is the fittest place to fix a town upon, and to return the same into the Notaries Office, which return you are to transmit to us as soon as you shall receive the same. (12) Whereas it was agreed at our Board that the office of Surveyor General of South Carolina would be better executed by the several Surveyors of the respective Counties, you are to direct such persons to be the several Surveyors of each county as to you shall seem most proper, etc. Signed, Craven, Beaufort. Carteret, M. Ashley. J. Colleton, J. Danson. [C.O. 5, 290. pp. 17–47.]
June 7.
New York.
872. George Clarke, Secretary of New York, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The winds which has hindred the packet from sailing this week has however been favourable in giving me the opportunity of doing myself the honor to acquaint your Lordps. that the Palatins are now demonstrating their sincere repentance of their past transgressions in a manner which will be very pleasing to you. They are and have been for several days past at work on the trees of which by computation they prepare 15000 a day; the children are all likewise busy in gathering up the knots which will be burnt this year, and I doubt not a considerable quantity of tarr made of them. This is only on one side of the River, on the other they are likewise at work, but I have no particular account of their labours. By this your Lordps. may well believe the woods are full of this sort of trees, and easily gather from the number that is daily prepared that in due time this people will make such a quantity of tarr yearly as will not fall short of the expectation that was conceived; nor indeed is it hardly possible it should, when there are trees sufficient for many years on the spot they are imployed, and other tracts when this is done of very great extent commodiously scituated for transportation, and the people work with all the cheerfulness imaginable. It is almost the only satisfaction H.E. has in this Province, to see this great work go on with that promising success it does, for in other things he has met with all the opposition and discouragement which a people devoid of duty and ripe with defection could give him, nor is there any prospect of surmounting those difficulties by any measures on this side; he has however the pleasure of serving the best of Queens, etc. H.E. is not yet returned, so that your Lordps. are troubled with this imperfect relation from me, etc. Signed, Geo. Clarke. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 12th July, 1711. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 23; and 5, 1122. pp. 396–398.]
June 7.
New York.
873. Same to [? Lord Dartmouth.] Encloses copy of preceding. Signed, Geo. Clarke. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1091. Nos. 39, 39 i.]
June 13.874. Commission and Instructions to Nevill Low to be Secretary of North Carolina. [C.O. 5, 290. p. 45.]
June 13.875. Commission and Instructions to Arthur Middleton to be Naval Officer of South Carolina. [C.O. 5, 290. p. 45.]
June 13.
Craven House.
876. Warrant to the Governor of South Carolina to grant 600 acres of land to Edward Crisp, at a quit rent of 6 shillings. Signed, Craven, Beaufort, Carteret, M. Ashley, J. Colleton, J. Danson. [C.O. 5, 290. p. 48.]
June 13.
Barbados.
877. Mr. Lillington to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I am now to enclose for yr. Ldps'. perusall the several papers relateing to the settlement of an exchange of prisoners, or cartell, wth. Martineque, for perceiving under what difficulties the trade of this Island lay for want theirof, I advis'd with H.M. Councill, who were of opinion that the settlement of one would be very beneficiall to this place, and thereupon the Councill of April 10th did unanimously appoint my eldest son and Jonathan Siston for persons to manage that treatie, who were furnish'd wth. such instructions as yr. Ldps. will find inclos'd, and the success as in Monsr. Philipeaux's in answere to me, so that I shall leave those papers to speak for themselves, and trouble yr. Ldps. no further hereon than my duty oblidges me to lay before you the reasons induceing me to treat for a cartell. We have from this Isld. a vast trade with the Northern Engl. Colonies, who take from us the produce of our country of all sorts, especially rum and melasses, for wch. they supply us with all kind of provisions, with cask horses and many other commodities, this trade is so beneficiall that without the constant supplys from thence of flower, bisket, beef, pork, salt fish of all sorts etc. we could not subsist but must starve, the vessells bringing these goods are many, and mostly plantation built, and sail'd by the natives or inhabitants of these parts, who when they are taken into Martineque or any ye French Islands, are there kept in close and unwholesom prisons, very often for 6 months or a year endureing the many hardships allways attending such confinemts., and (it maybe) the more impos'd on them by the enimie to force them to a change of their religion or allegiance (too often effected) wch. if they have the constancy and resolution to retain they are at last (almost starv'd and naked) sent in some of their own vessels for old France, where they have the same melancholly sceen acted over again for 6 or more months, and then are sent from St. Mallows in exchange boat for Plymo. or Portshmouth, where H.M. ships press them, and from thence are not to be releiv'd, but at the conclusion of the warr, and their familys in the meantime left starveing. This is my Lds. one amongst the many reasons wch. may be urg'd for the settlement of a cartell, and wch. is particularly adapted to the circumstances of the inhabitants of H.M. Colonies, and in a great measure may be urg'd for those, who are bound hither from Europe have the misfortune to fall into the enimies' hands. Refers to enclosures (ii.) which I recd. on the 9th inst. about 2 a clock in the afternoon, and so order'd matters that the next day noon the Newcastle Capt. Sampson Bourn recd. my orders for sailing to their releif, wth. a complemt. upwards of 400 men, but did not sail till 7 the next morning. On Sunday 10th, about 4 p.m. I recd. enclosed from Lt. General Hamilton, by wch. 'tis confirm'd that the storm threttens Antegua the more suspicious from the late disturbances there. H.M. other two ships, the Guarnsey and Sweepstakes attending this Governmt. have been on a cruize these three weeks, but the two express sloops are gon in search of them in order to their joyning the N. Castle, who if he alone meets the enimie has no greater force to engage than a shipp of 30 gunns and a parcell sloops and briganteens, so that the same time I acquaint yr. Ldps. of our fellow-subjects' danger, I may assure yr. Ldps. they are rescu'd from it. This Expedition of the enimies has once already recd. a check, for being about 10 days ago come out from Martineque in their way to Guardaloop to joyn their forces they were met by Capt. Bourn, who engag'd for two hours and a halfe the ship of 30 guns who shot his foremast in two places and in small winds got clere and put back into Martineque, and two days after was again met by one of the express sloops in their way to Guardaloop. My Lords, I have since my administracon of the affairs of this Government recd. H.M. pleasure in relation to a suspected illegall trade carried on from this Island to Martineque. I have as much in me lay endeavour'd to prevent and discover such a traitorous commerce and have been so happy as within this fortnight to apprehend one Mr. Thomas Lynch, against whome the evidence of two sailers is very strong. He should have been try'd at ye Grand Sessions wch. was to have been held at this time, but that in two of the parishes none of the persons nominated in the Commission have taken the o'ths of a J.P., so that the writs for returning 6 freeholders in each parish, could not be legally executed by any persons of those parishes, for that and by reason of little or no business at that time the Legislature adjourned that Court till Xtmass next. The Lucitania, Capt. Holland, came in on the 11th inst. and tells us she left our London Fleet in lattitude of 38 stearing for Madera. I could have wisht for their arrivall at this juncture, for we might then justly expect the entire destruction of the enimies forces on their expedition to Leward, wch. would vastly weaken their power in these parts and destroy their privateering trade, those forces consisting of the inhabitants of Martineque or Guardaloop. By reason of a violent fit of sickness, wch. has confin'd me to my house, and often to my bed, within these 4 months past, I have not been able to hold ye Councill and Chancery Courts so often as agreed with my inclinations and practize when I was in a better state of helth, however when I have been able to crawl downstairs, I have held them at my own house, and if I was not able at those times to go through the business of those days, I entirely confide in yr. Ldps.' goodness to impute it to my weak condition, under wch. I then and still do labour, etc. Signed, George Lillington. Recd. 28th July, Read Aug 1st, 1711. 4 pp. Enclosed,
877. i. Copy of correspondence between M. Phelypeaux, Governor of Martinique, and George Lillington, President of the Council of Barbados, relating to a cartel for the exchange of prisoners, arranged by Geo. Lillington junr. and Jonathan Sissons, May 15, 1711. Endorsed, Recd. July 28, 1711. 3½ pp.
877. ii. (a) Lt. Governor Yeamans to the President of Barbados. Antigua, June 3, 1711. I am concerned to be under this present necessity of troubling yr. Honour in my owne name, ye Lt. Generall being att Nevis. Last night I recd. an express from ye President of Mountserratt (enclosed), wherein you will find ye reasonableness of this my request wch. followes, the Councill and Assembly joynes wth. me therein, wch. is that you'll be pleased to order a couple of men of warr or one wth. ours yt. are there immediately to be sent downe, wch. will undoubtedly frustrate all ye enemies designes. This Sr. is absolutely for H.M. service and in all probability may save these H.M. Islands. But expedition is wt. is most requisite, and delay will morally draw after it a great deal of evill, etc. Col. Thomas Morris, one of ye Councill, waits on yr. Honr. with this, who will further inform you of our present danger, wch. we conceive soe near yt. he this instant goes from ye Councill Board without seeing his famely or takeing any conveniencys wth. him, etc. Signed, John Yeamans.
(b) Thomas Lee, President of the Council of Montserrat, to Lt. Governor Yeamans. Mountserratt, May 30, 1711. This morning arrived Capt. Coventry from cruizeing under Martinique who about 14 days past sent his canow on shoar att Martinique wth. about 10 men, who were all surprized and put in prison, where they had oppurtunity of discourseing with ye Gent. who went as hostages from Nevis, who told them yt. ye French were designed with one ship called ye Rowland and severall sloops to take on board 1500 men att Martinique, and from thence to goe to Guardaloope where they were to meet severall other sloops and take on board more men in order to attack Mountserratt or Antegua or both and shewed ye prisoners who were to command in cheife and severall other officers, and yt. if they attacked Antegua they would land at Falmouth, and yt. they were to part Martinique on Satturday or Sunday next; these men made their escape out of prison on Munday last att night and tooke a canow in order to come to some of ye Islands, but in ye morning saw Capt. Coventry made to him and gott on board, who proceeded directly to this Island etc. He is gon downe this day wth. ye newes to ye Lt. Generall. P.S.—The prisoners say ye Rowland hath about 36 gunns. Signed, Thomas Lee. Copies. 1 p.
877. iii. Lt. Governor Hamilton to the President of the Council of Barbados. Nevis, June 2, 1711. I having certain information by way of St. Eustatias from a Dutch flagg of truce yt. arrived there some time last week from Martinique as also by severall Englishmen (v. supra), yt. ye French have a design for attacking some of these H.M. Islands (etc. as supra), I therefore desire and recommend to you as very much for H.M. service yt. you will order ye men of warr attending on yr. station or soe many of them as can be spared, forthwith to come downe in company with Capt. Norbury, H.M.S. Larke. (who I hope is now at your Island, whither he went for sayles etc.) to these Islands, and yt. they touch first att Antigua for intelligence, soe proceed to ye place where they hear ye enemy is, wch. I hope will not only prove or releife or protection to these Islands, for ye present, but deterr ye enemy for ye time to come from makeing any ye like attempts when they shall see ye readiness yt. each Government is in to assist ye other. All these things I recommend to your consideration, and begg yt. you will give it all dispatch etc., haveing no man of warr here att all, or other vessells of force, not soe much as one yt. I dare trust myself in to be transported from one Island to ye other as you see ye present service soe much requires, etc. Signed, W. Hamilton. Copy. 1 p.
877. iv. Mr. Lillington to a Relation in London, June 12, 1711. Refers to preceding. According to their desire, I sent them down immediatly, the Newcastle, Capt. Bourn of 50 odd guns, the only man of warr then in our Road, crowded with upwards of 400 men, who must destroy them if they have no other ship of force but that of 30 guns; who Capt. Bourn in his cruize, about 10 dayes agoe, engaged within pistol shot for 2½ hours; which put the Expedition backward for two dayes, as we have advice. But how shee came not to bring her in, or sink her, the Lord knows. Endorsed, Recd. July 8, 1711. Copy. ¾ p. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 61, 61 i.–iv.; and (without enclosures) 29, 12. pp. 355–363.]
June 13.
Barbados.
878. Mr. Lillington to [? Lord Dartmouth.] Repeats preceding. Signed, G. Lillington. 2 pp. Enclosed,
878. i., ii. Duplicates of enclosures Nos. i.–iii. preceding. [C.O. 28, 43. Nos. 56, 57, 61.]
June 14.
Annapolis Royall.
879. Col. Vetch to Lord Dartmouth. Refers to previous letters and enclosures, and prays for punctual payment of bills, since H.M. Agent att Boston hath already advanced the money; the ruinous and neglected condition I found this Fort in having had no supplys from France for 3 years before, which facilitated its reduction, proves the reason why it will be so expensive in its reparation, though all possible (nay more then reasonable) frugality is used. As to the civill state of affairs, the inhabitants in generall as well French as Indians continue still in a great ferment and uneassiness, those within the Banliue (who are but few) that have taken the oath of alledgance are threatned by all the others who call them traytors and make them belive the French will soon recover the place and then they will all be ruined; the Priests likewise who are numerous among them, and whom I cannott catch (save one sent to Boston) threaten them with their Ecclesiasticall vengeance for their subjection to Hereticks, so that untill H.M. shall be pleased both to give me orders and afford me a sufficient force to reduce the whole country to such terms as shee shall see meet to give them, wee cant expect any peaceable possession of this place. Wee have been much alarm'd all winter with designs of the Indians and French from Canada makeing ane attempt upon us, while the fortifications were so ruinous, which oblidged us to verry servere duty, which with the cold weather and new climate made the Garison verry sickly these last two months, so that wee have lost since the Garison was modeld by death mostly and desertion about 116 men, severall of the marines who are Irish Papists having been prevailed upon by the French to desert, and are by theirs and the Indians' assistance conveyed to Canada and Placentia, the nighbourhood of which two places will prove verry dangerous to this Government unless the Garison be allways keept att least 500 good effective men and besides the brigantine that now attends there. Likwise a man of warr of 40 or 50 gunns constantly to guard this coast, which is now much infested with privateers, while I am under a necessity to keep the brigantine constantly employed to keep the communication open betwixt us and Boston: and for whom I am in fear every day least shee should meet with something too strong for her, and then wee are in a manner blockt up. So that I must entreat your Lordship and the Ministry (if there be not one allready ordred) to direct the Lords of the Admiralty to send a friggatt of good force of 40 gunns att least to attend this station, togither with the small brigantine wee have to be continued as a convoy for our victuallers betwixt this and Boston, thiss is what in my humble opinion will be absolutely necessary for the security of thiss Government untill the reduction of Canada and Placentia. I waite with impatience H.M. orders with relation to the inhabitants as well as the modouling of the Garison, the uncertainty of both which creates me a great deall of trouble, for the former uncertain of their fate are verry uneasy, and the latter being composed of so many different detachments uncertain of their stay fall verry often into disputes about command precedency and other nicietys, which creates a great many heats amongst both officers and souldiers, which their being form'd into a Regiment (as was proposed most humbly to H.M. by the Councell of Warr) would intirely remedy, which I begg your Lordshipp to second, togither with the rest of the inclosed establishment, which are all absolutly necessary in so frontier and exposed a garison. I would have by the former opportunitys transmitted this proposeall of ane establishment, had not the hopes of the Expedition against Canada as being revived hindred me, etc. Prays for speedy and particular directions, etc. Signed, Sam. Vetch. Postscript. Since writting the above wee find ourselves every day more and more infested with the sckulking Indians, who have pilaged and robb'd severall of the French inhabitants within the Banliu because they were employed in cutting of trees and other necessarys for the fortifications, which none but the French are capable of doeing (not dairing to venture [?ou]r men in the woods but in a considerable body) but their being so frighted by the Indians who told them they were ordred by their Preists to plunder the French that helped the English to repair the fortifications doth verry much retard our work; and as it is impossible for us to prevent these sckulking partys which so plague us but by a party of Indians who are equal to them in the woods, so I cann forsee no way to procure us any safety without the Fort but if possible by obtaining ane hundred of the Indians of the Five Nations under the Government of New York, and as wee want above that number of what was and allways must be the compliment of the Garison untill Canada is reduced, so have wrote to the Governour of New York to countinance and permitt Major Livingston to raise such a number in the said Indians' country, who will cost H.M. litle more then what the other souldiers who are now dead or deserted would have done, unless it be some present to the Sachems, who shall bring them here along with Major Livingston, who hath a great intrest among them. But as I fear the aversness of that Government to allow or countinance the same without a positive order from H.M., so I would earnestly intreat your Lordship's for obtaining and transemitting the same as soon as possible, and in case that does not prove effectuall, I begg your Lordship will obtain H.M. order for 100 of the best men out of four companys in Garison there to reinforce thiss place, they being in perfect peace there and in a well peopled country who cann reinforce them upon any occasion; whereas wee have not one person to befrind us save what are within the garison and those including the sick near 200 men short of what allways should be, as well as a friggatt to attend here etc. Signed, Sam. Vetch. Endorsed, R. Sept. 20, 1711. 3½ pp. Enclosed,
879. i. State of H.M. Garrison of Annapolis Royal, June 1, 1711. Total, 449, (including 194 marines, and 87 officers, gunners etc., upon the British establishment and 168 country troops that remained voluntarily.) Signed, Sam. Vetch. 1 large p. [C.O. 5, 9. Nos. 97, 98.]
June 14.
Kensington.
880. Order of Queen in Council. An Instruction is to be prepared for the Governor of Maryland in accordance with the report of the Council of Trade relating to the Tobacco trade, May 8. q.v. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. 20th, Read 22nd June, 1711. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 37; and 5, 727. pp. 260, 261; and 5, 721. No. 11.]
June 14.
Kensington.
881. Order of Queen in Council. Repealing two Acts of Maryland, for appeals etc., as proposed May 8. q.v. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 38; and 5, 727. pp. 262–264.]
June 14.
Kensington.
882. Order of Queen in Council. A warrant is to be prepared for constituting Richard Lightfoot (v. April 13) a Member of Council of Antegoa. Signed, John Povey. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 11. No. 48.]
June 14.
Kensington.
883. Order of Queen in Council. Referring the following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their opinion. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. 9th, Read 11th July, 1711. 1p. Enclosed,
883. i. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to the Queen. We have always given Instructions to our Governour of Carolina to appoint a Deputy Governor of that part of the Province that lies N. and W. of Cape Feare by reason that the great extent of that country and the necessity of corresponding and trafficking with the severall nations of the Indians there, does require such a distinct Government. The inhabitants of that part of the Province have lately apply'd themselves to us on that behalf. We therefore desire your Majesty's approbation for Edward Hyde to be Depty. Governor of North Carolina. Signed, Craven, Beaufort, Carteret, M. Ashley, J. Colleton, J. Danson. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 1264. Nos. 117, 117 i; and 5, 1292. pp. 311–313.]
June 15.
Annapolis Royal in Nova Scotia.
884. Col. Vetch to Mr. Popple. Returns thanks for letter of Nov. 18th etc. I caused to cutt 20 masts [for a] tryall from 18 to 25 inches, which now ly reddy here, but when an oppertunity will present to send them home, to be made tryall of, I cannot tell, there are some of much larger sise, but they being more remote from the water would occasion a greater expense then I am willing to venture without positive orders and directions wh[ere to] be reimbursed: there are here likewise in severall places copper mines of which I shall send home to their Lordships a specimen by the first vessell to great Brittan from hence. Marable wee have here in verry great plenty verry fine and of all colours, wee make all our lime of the white which is extreamly fine, in short thiss country wants nothing but people and cultivation to make it a verry great place: wee are verry much infested by sculking partys of Indians, who are sent against us by the French of Canada and Placentia, who being elevated mightily with the pretended successes att home threaten the reduction of thiss place agains befor winter; but these are French bravadoes. Indeed their privateers are verry troublesome and numerous upon our coast: and wee extreamly want a friggatt, which I dayly expect etc. Signed, Sam. Vetch. Endorsed, Recd. Sept. 21, Read Nov. 1, 1711. 1p. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 70; and 5, 913. pp. 354–356; and 218, 1. pp. 20–22.]