America and West Indies
June 1711, 16-30

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Cecil Headlam (editor)

Year published

1924

Pages

552-571

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'America and West Indies: June 1711, 16-30', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 25: 1710-1711 (1924), pp. 552-571. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73862 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

June 1711, 16-30

June 16.
Kensington.
885. H.M. Warrant appointing Richard Lightfoot to the Council of Antegoa. Countersigned, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. p. 92.]
June 18.
Office of Ordnance.
886. Board of Ordnance to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Enclose following. Signed, C. Musgrave, W. Bridges, Ja.Craggs. Endorsed, Recd. 21st., Read 22nd June, 1711. 1p. Enclosed,
886. i. Governor Hunter to the Duke of Marlborough. New York, May 7, 1711. Your Grace will perceive by the inclosed report of two of the gentlemen of the Councill, whome I appointed to view the stores in this garrison, what a miserable condition wee are in, without small arms, without byonetts, without swords, and without cartouch boxes, and of powder and everything so small a quantity, that I dread the thoughts of the approach of an enemy. I pray your Grace to order me by the first oppertunaty a sufficient supply, that for want of that wee may not become a prey to the enemy. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Copy. 1p.
886. ii. A list of the stores of war in H.M. Fort Anne, New York, May 8, 1711. Signed, R. Walter, R. Mompesson. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1050. Nos. 21, 21 i, ii; and (without enclosures) 5, 1122. p. 390.]
June 18.
Annapolis Royall.
887. Col. Vetch to Lord Dartmouth. Since my last ane unfortunate advanture oblidges mee to give your Lordships the trouble of another. I had in severalls of my former intimated the desturbance wee mett withall from sckulking partys of Indians with regard to wooding the fort (for which wee are oblidged to send two mile by water to the edge of the woods and run a con siderable risque from the lurking Indians) but especialy with regard to the sparrs and beams as well as plank and boards for which wee have contracted with the inhabitants and payd them one half for advance: their way was to cutt a considerable number and after forming them in a float to bring them down, the Indians had frequently cutt lose those floats and turned them adrift as well as t(h)reatned the inhabitants if they either cutt or brought us any more, but by sending up of partys to freighten the Indians and give a fair pretension to the inhabitants wee still found a way to make them furnish them fast enough to supply the works which were pretty farr advanced about the midle of this month Major Forbes (Engineer here and verry deserving of a better post) told mee thatt hee began to be in want of trees and planks for carrying on the fortifications, and that the inhabitants were so insulted and threatned by the Indians and French party that they neither could nor durst bring any more to us unless they were in a manner compelled by a party being sent up amongust them for that effect, accordingly as I had frequently formerly done, I sent along with Major Forbes a party consisting of a Captain, three subalterns and 60 good men in two flat boats and a whale boat, who going up with too much confidence (having never before hardly mett with any resistance) and by putting ashoar below made a rumor of their comming go before them, they were ambouscadoed by 150 Indians newly arived from Ponobscutt in a narrow place of the river through which passing two securely the whale boats crew only consisting of 5 more having contrary to their express orders gone before the rest were every man killed long before the heavy boats came in sight refusing as the Indians say any quarter, the two flatts who heard the noise of the musketts hastned up to their releif, who imprudently pulling ashoar one after another as they could row fastest went ashoar upon all the Indians fire whom they could not see for trees and rocks while they being thronged in the boats were such a mark as could not be missed, who notwithstanding pulled directly ashoar upon them and were all of them killed, wounded and taken save one man who escaped in the woods and returned after two dayes, thiss was about 4 leagues from the garison, the place where most of all the timber for the fort was cutt, in thiss action Major Forbes, William Elliott, fort major, were killed and 16 more, Captain Bartlett, Ensign Coxhedge and about 9 more wounded. I must own that the Indians have treated them better then ordinary, and offer to sell (as their manner is) all the wounded for about £150, who are 10 in all, one Captain, one Ensign, two serjants and six men, the others they refuse to ransome proposing to carry them to Canada. I would willingly give them £5 per man for the private men, £10 for a serjant, £20 for ane ensigne and £50 for the Captain, both because wee extreamly want them and because they press so hard for itt being to march 500 miles by land in which journey most of them must dy for want of provisions, there being not one house by the way, and all they have to depend upon is the produce of their hunting by the way, your Lordship will percive by the inclosed coppys of papers to the respective Governments what application I have made to them; as I expect but small if any assistance from any of them, so I hope your Lordship will advise H.M. to hasten over a reinforcement to me, for wee are so intirely blockt up by the Indians that wee cannot gett one stick of wood to burn all the inhabitants being flead whither to joyn them or not I cannot tell but if by good Providance three or four Boston vessels who had bein loading of coals about 40 leagues from hence had not arrived here whom I have caused all to unload for the use of the garison to the quantity of above 200 tunn, which will goe near to serve the garison in fire tweelve months, I cannot tell what wee should have done. I was necessitate to give them rebaiting the freight near the price att Boston where coals are extreamly dear, the which summ is included amongst the other expenses of this garison draun for now, which I hope will be honoured being for the pressing necessitys of reparations and stores, etc. The party of Indians and Canadians which now block us up by land are sayd to be near [? 16]00 men who by the best intelligence I cann learn were sent by the Governour of Canada to prevent the French inhabitants espousing the Brittish intrest to keep the Indians in heart by assuring them of a squadron from France to reduce the place and to obstruct the fortifications, but as I have no fear of them though the garison be both weak and sickly as the inclosed account to Governour Dudley will inform your Lordship, unless the desertion of the Marines many of whom are found to be Irish Papists proves our ruine, however (by God's assistance) I hope allways to act the part that is incumbent upon mee to the last degree both of bravery prudence and faithfulness and fear nothing of all my officers doing the same, etc. Signed, Sam. Vetch. P.S. Since writing the above I have advice of two vessells arived att the bay Vert a port just behind this neck of land wee are seated upon, they have brought ammunition provisions and some men to joyn the party that blocks us up by land. I have ransomed seven of our wounded men, one ensign and a serjant for about £70 value in shrouds and blankets. All the well prisoners save two officers they have sent to Canada. Wee have every day some Irish marines deserts us, and it deserves a severe reprimand to the officers who entertain'd so many Irish papists and French as were sent upon thiss detachment. Signed, Sam. Vetch. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 9. No. 99.]
June 19.
Whitehall.
888. Mr. Popple to Berkely Seymour. The Council of Trade and Plantations having under consideration your petition (v. Aug. 14, Sept. 19, 1710), desire you will get a clear account in writing of what the duty will amount to, etc. [C.O. 5, 727. p. 257.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
889. Mr. Popple to Mr. Attorney Generall. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire your opinion upon enclosed draught of a Representation upon Lord Baltimore's petition (v. Feb. 5 etc.) [C.O. 5, 727. p. 258.]
June 20.
Whitehal.
890. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord Dartmouth. Enclose Addresses from the Council and Assembly of Virginia, (v. March 6th), to be laid before H.M., Col. Blakeston having attended us with copies thereof, alledging that the originals were taken at sea, etc. [C.O. 5, 1363. p. 303; and (rough draft) 5, 1335. pp. 118–119.]
June 20.
Barbadoes.
891. Mr. Lillington to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses duplicates of June 13. Since which I have not wherewithall to trouble yr. Ldps. except the perusall of the other side, which I recd. (by the neglect of the officer) on Monday the 18th inst. att noon, many hours after the sailing hence of H.M.S. Guernsey and Sweepstakes, who came in on the Saturday before from their cruize, in which the latter took a French Guinea ship with 160 slaves; and both sail'd for the farther releife of H.M. Leward Islands on the 18th early in the morning. Soe that they now have all the succour we can send them hence; undoubtedly a greater force then the enemy can bring against them by sea; tho' I find their fears encreast by this late advice, I hope without any just grounds. For in the cruize of H.M.S. Guernsey and Sweepstakes, which has been for 3 weeks together about the French Islands, some of these ships of force must have been mett withall, as well as the sloops, three of which were chac't into Guadaloup Harbour by the Sweepstakes, from whom I cannot learn that he saw any ship of force in that Harbour; and my son who was in Martinique a month agoe with the Flagg of Truce, tells me he thinks it impossible that they should att that Island fitt out the Adventure for this expedition, she then lying neglected without masts or rigging. I doe not question but that I shall within a few days be able to give your Lordships a good account of the enimie, etc. Signed, G. Lillington. Endorsed, Recd. 1st, Read 12th Sept. 1711. 1 p. Enclosed,
891. i. Lt. Yeamans to the President of the Council of Barbados. Refers to letter of June 3 (v. June 13). Since which we have had fresh intelligence, which makes us to apprehend ourselves to be in a farr worse condition then was att that time imagined, we being now informed that their design is positively against this Island, and that they will attack us with att least 30 sail, of which 4 are ships, the Adventure man of war that was lately taken from us making one of that number. This advice we have from a prisoner that was left aboard a Guinea ship who arriv'd last week after engaging the Ruby just to windward of our Island. He att first denied his having any knowledge of the enemy's intentions, but being in a desperate condition by the wounds he had recd. in the engagement, and perceiving himself att the point of death, has yesterday declared to us that the enemy is positively designed to attempt this Island, and that they are to sail from Guadaloupe (the last place of their rendezvous) by the 14th inst. our stile att farthest, which oblidges me to send this second express, and to desire that you will afford us all the assistance you can by sending down all the men of warr that attend your station; and if Capt. Legg or any other accidentall ships are att your Island, I assure myself that you will use your utmost endeavours to prevail with them to accompany the others, it being highly for the interest and advantage of H.M. in regard this Her island is att stake. P.S. Three of the ships are of the following force, viz., one of 36 gunns, one of 20, and the third of about 18, besides the Adventure. Signed, John Yeamans. Copy. No date. 1p. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 62, 62 i; and (without enclosure) 29, 12. pp. 365, 366.]
June 20.
Barbados.
892. Mr. Lillington to [? Lord Dartmouth.] Duplicates of preceding and enclosure. [C.O. 28, 43. Nos. 58, 58 i.]
June 21.
New London.
893. Minutes of a Council of War held at New London by H.M. commands. The general Instructions to H.E. Col. Hunter were read. Agreable to a former porportioning of men from ye severall Governmts. it is now determined for ye present expedicon, that ye proportions following be supplyed; New York 600, Connecticut 360, East Jersey 180, West Jersey 180, Pensilvania 240. To march to Albany on July 2, or so soon after as is possible. Upon reading Mr. Commissary Belchers letter from Boston what can be had for ye supply of ye generall Expedicon, Col. Hunter declared that he should want ye following articles. Agreed that letters go from this Board to Mr. Commissary Belcher, that 50 butts of wine, 10, 000 gallons of rume, 150,000 of rice be taken up presently and disposed as Col. Hunter shall direct. It being represented at ye Board that Capt. Matthews in the Chester is not gon to Annapolis Royal for Col. Vetch as he was ordered, the necessity of ye service demanding ye comeing of Coll. Vetch imediately, Col. Dudley is desired to send away Capt. Carver to Annapolis to carry ye letters left with Mr. Secretary Addington and the letters now agreed on, and that Carver proceed immediately and that he keep ye shoar on board going and coming least he meet with any vessels of strength superior to himself and at ye last danger to throw away his letters, and that Carver and his company keep all secret of the expedition. Agreed that Sir Charles Hobby be Deputy Governor of Annapolis Royall during Col. Vetch's absence. It appeareing to the Board that it is impossible to provide pork and pease etc. sufficient for ye fleet and forces, proposed that there be two fish days in a week for ye forces coming from Great Brittain and that Col. Hunter provide fish accordingly. Col. Hunter representing at the Board ye necessity of ye coming of ye two transports ye Joseph and ye Neptune now at Boston to New York both to unliver their loading and to carry provisions back to Boston for ye service of ye fleet and forces, agreed that Capt. Cockburn be written to that one of H.M. ships ye Saphire or Leopard convoy ye sd. transport to York and return immediately to Boston. And if ye Admirall of H.M. Fleet be arrived that Capt. Cockburn wayt on ye Admirall, and if he see meet to make any other order for ye safety of ye said transports coming to York it is left to his direction, and if this method failes, that Col. Dudley write to Capt. Mathews to bring them round the Cape so as they be safe into ye Sound, and that Mr. Commissary Belcher provide each of ye transports as well as the frigot a pilot at H.M. Charge. Added to ye order to Capt. Cockburn or ye other frigot yt. Convoys ye transports to New York, after having taken on board of him such a quantity of provisions as he can well stow, and taking charge of such other ships or sloops loaded with provisions as shall in that time be ready. Order to Capt. Mathews as above.
Col. Cranston reported to ye Councill of Warr that ye Assembly of ye Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations had consented to ye raising of 160 men and no more. And that he desired that Mr. George Lee might be Lt. Colonel to Col. Nalton in ye regiment consisting of ye Massachusets and Newhamshire where he was Major ye last yeare. In pursuance of ye order for fish, Col. Hunter wrote to Mr. Commissary Belcher to procure 700 quintalls, and to Comadore Cockburn about ye convoying the two transports from Boston to York, etc. June 22. It being moved to ye Councill of Warr for their advise whethere it were not for ye serv[ic]e and safety of ye troops or ye land part going toward Mountreal to have a reserve of provisions sent with the Fleet to Quebeck and so to Mountreal, advised that Govr. Saltonstall do send 3 months subsistance and provisions necessary for his quota of men in two sloops to Boston to joyn ye fleet and to proceed to Canada and from thence find ye best and safest passage to ye Cap wheresoevere they bee, and the sloops to be at the disposall of the officers for the bringing back any sick or wounded or other service. For the supply of ship carpenters for ye building of battoes or flat bottom boats at Albany or elsewhere, Governour Saltonstall is desired to provide ten good able ship carpenters, and let them be sent forthwith to Albany to Col. Schuyler or such other officer as shall be appointed by Govr. Hunter for that service, who shall be paid by H.M. Advised that Govr. Saltonstall provide at the best hand and send to Albany 200 bevers and 600 sheep to be delivered to Col. Hunter or his order for his own quota. Col. Rednap attending was directed to proceed in the service, and in order thereunto to repair to York to receive Gov. Hunter's Commission for the present expedition, and he is allowed 1s. per diem for himselfe and his clerk during ye expedition for his extraordinary service. Major Levingstone attending ye Board with his Commission as Major and Commander of a Scout drawn out of ye forces by ye Commander in Chiefe of ye Expedition late to Port Royal, and his Journal in that service, the Councill were of opinion that ye office and service was very necessary, and Govr. Hunter was desired to give him commission accordingly and a letter to ye Generall of ye forces recommending him in ye name of ye Board, and that he forthwith attend ye Generall with a copy of this Journal and other observations, and be at his direction where to serve either in the expedition to Quebeck or with the land forces by the way of Albany. The Governours at the Board severally reported that in obedience to H.M. Instructions, they had made strict and generall embargoes in all their ports to prevent intilligence to be given to ye enemy of ye present expedition. Govr. Dudley acquainted ye Board that he desired Major Roberton might serve in ye Massachusets forces, and that he had a company for him as two years past, which was acceptable to ye Board. Advised that ye forces of Connecticut march from their head quarters at Newhaven towards Albany July 2nd, being as soon as possible they can be ready, and that Col. Hunter be desired to use all possible expedition with ye Assemblys of New York and ye Jerseys to hasten ye raysing and mounting of the severall quotas for those Governments. Major Generall Winthrop, Coll. Townsend, and Lt. Coll. — from Boston attended and gave account under Mr. Commissary Belcher's hand what wine, rum, rice all might be had in Boston for ye service of ye British forces, which was well excepted by H.E. Col. Hunter, and desired that there might be no delay or interruption in ye comeing down of their provisions from West Hampshire, which was recommended to Govr. Saltonstall; they also presented their challenge of debt from Connecticute and Rohode Island for ye joynt service and pray'd that ye accounts might be recommended to ye Generall Assembly of Connecticut and Rhode Island. In consideration of ye great charge and expence of ye travels by sea and land and attendence of H.M. Governours to the present Congress being the disdance of 100 miles and more, the Board are of opinion that there should be allowed to ye severall Governors the sumes following:—Govr. Hunter, £50; Govr. Dudley, £50; Govr. Saltonstall £20; Governour Cranston £25; Col. Schuyler £40 etc. H.M. in ye 11th Instruction to Govr. Hunter commanding the obteyning ye service of ye Maques, and their scouting, and service is recommended to ye officers at Albany and elswhere in ye service. And the 11th Instruction and ye second in ye additionall Instructions relating to ye raiseing of ye Militia be referred to ye severall Governours, ye circumstances of ye severall Colonys and provinces not being possible to be reduced to one form or direction from this Board, and that ye Governours are desired severally to give intilligence to each other of any appearance of an enemy, and to keep out armed sloops to discover the approach of an enemy. Governour Cranston desired that the vote of ye Assembly of Rhode Island for ye raising of 162 men might be excepted for the present expedition. The Board do agree thereunto provided ye said number do not includ officers nor saylors. Col. Hunter reported what he had done to provide rum and wine and rice for ye subsistance of ye British forces, which was accepted at ye Board, and he was farther desired to proceed. H.M. having commanded a publick Fast in all her provinces and Governments to implore ye favor and blessing of Almighty God upon ye Expedition, it is recommended to ye severall Governours to take care therein. Col. Hunter shewed ye list of officers sent by H.M., and offerd ye service of any number of them to the other Governours at the Board. Col. Cranston informed the Board he wanted none. Col. Dudley referr'd ye consideration of ye affair so far as concernd him till ye arrivall of Col. Vetch who was to comand his part of ye forces. Col. Hunter is desired to supply Col. Cranston with 162 fuzees for ye service of his quota with ye other accoutrements. Upon reading at the Board ye severall letters of ye Rt. Hon. Mr. Secretary St. John, they are satisfyed that all that can be done is proceeded as far as may be untill the arrivall of ye Generall of the forces and Col. Vetch. It is left with Col. Hunter and Col. Dudley to settle an express to pass between Boston and Albany every ten days, and Generall Nicholson is desired to give notice from Albany when ye express shall begin. Col. Hunter's express to come from Albany to Springfield to be performed at H.M. charge, and Govr. Dudley's from Springfield to Boston. Upon ye reading at the Board ye Addresses from Capt. Southack and Capt. Redgood the principell pilots to Quebeck, it is desired that Govr. Dudley will lay the papers before ye Generall and Admiral that they may be considered for a just reward of their service. H.M. having directed that Col. Hunter Col. Dudley in concert with Col. Nicholson draw out what money is found in any of H.M. offices of receipt in ye severall Governments, Ordered that a copy of that Instruction with a warrant from ye sd. Governours severally in joynt with Coll. Nicholson and receipt thereupon shall be ye sufficient warrant for the drawing out the money accordingly. The Councill recommended it to ye Governments of New York, ye Jerseys, Connecticut and Rhode Island to make ye same orders to prevent ye assisting and harbouring deserters as is made in the Goverment of ye Massachusets. The Councill of Warr having proceeded in what as yet appear'd necessary for ye service, and it b(e)ing absolutely necessary that the severall Governors all take care in their particular provinces. What shall appear farther necessary for ye service of ye land Expedition and referd to H.E. Governour Hunter and General Nicholson, Coll. Schuyler or any other members of ye Board that can be present at any time to be there concluded and proceeded in from time to time. Ordered that the troops of Connecticut when they returne from ye present expedition shall deliver the arms the Queen shall furnish them with to ye Governor of Connecticut to be kept by him for H.E. Governour Hunter's order, unless H.M. shall order them to be a part of her Royall bounty to them. Col. Dudley is desired to adjust ye accounts of Mr. Borland, H.M. agent for ye contingent charges, from the time of Col. Nicholson's last departure to the Generall's arrivall, and direct Mr. Borland to draw them fair fitt to be signed by Col. Nicholson and Col. Dudley that they may be thereupon discharged either by money of H.M. drawn out of ye offices of receipt, or by bills of Exchange home. Payment of servants attending the Congress ordered. At ye breaking up of ye Congress, Col. Nicholson desired that Col. Dudley would imediately upon the arrivall of General Hill attend him with the minutes of the Congress, the proceedings of the Generall Assembly of the Massachusets, and that Col. Saltonstall and Col. Cranston will do ye same for their severall Governments, and that Coll. Hunter will likewise give him account of his proceedings on ye land service towards the Wood Creek, etc. Agreed in Councill that if ye buisness of the Governments of Connecticut will allow it, Govr. Saltonstall is desired to bring up his own troops to Albany his presence there being judged a good service to ye Expedition or in a short time after ye march of his forces from hence. Signed. Ro. Hunter, J. Dudley, Fr. Nicholson, G. Saltonstall, Saml. Cran(s)ton. [C.O. 5, 536. No. 13.]
June 21.894. Bishop of London to Mr. Popple. Col. Diggs and Col. Churchill, two of the Council of Virginia being dead, recommends Col. Edward Hill for Councillor, as was his father before him, he being a sober good man and having one of ye best Plantations in that Colony. Signed, H. London. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd, Read 25th June, 1711. Addressed, to Mr. Popple etc., at his office, at the Cockpit. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 1316. No. 63; and 5, 1363. p. 304.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
895. Lord Dartmouth to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses Order of Council June 14, in order to the preparation of the draught of Instruction therein mentioned. Signed, Dartmouth. Endorsed, Recd. 21st, Read 22nd June, 1711. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 36; and 5, 727. p. 259.]
June 22.
Whitehall.
896. Wm. Popple to the Secretaryes of the Treasury. Encloses extract from Governor Hunter's letter, May 7, relating to the subsisting of the Palatines. [C.O. 5, 1122. p. 389.]
June 22.
Bermuda.
897. Lt. Governor Bennett to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Your Lordps'. of Dec. 1st I have received, and laid that part of it before the Council relateing to James Briggs, and it was the opinion and order of the Board, that the said Briggs be brought to his triall, and if noe new matter appear agt. him, he will be the more regularly discharged. Your Lordps. are pleased to observe, that the Spanish mercht. who was on board the sloop St. James (which was seized, brought in here and condemned for illegal tradeing) and five more of the crew, were put on shoar on the south side of Hispaniola etc., which with submission seems to me, as if it was supposed there were noe men that belonged to the sloop brought in her hither sufficient to condemn her, or to prove she was without the limitts mentioned in the Act of Parliament for the encouragement of the trade to America; to which I humbly answer that there were five persons brought in here, that were on board the sloop St. James when seized, vizt., Capt. Barnett St. John, master, Tho. Bushell. passenger, Antho. Needle, boatswain, Nich. Fortune, and Alex. Berry, sailors, all whom were att the triall and gave evidence excepting the Master (who would remain silent) and acknowledged (as may appear by the triall) that they had been abt. Porto Rico and bound to St. Domingo; and as for proveing the sloop was not within the limitts where it was owned she was seized, the oath of Capt. Richd. Jennings (inserted in the triall) makes it appear, and my instructions to privateers obliges them to bring into port the master and two of the sailors att least in order to condemn their prizes; I hope my Lords by my answer I have not misconstrued yr. Lordps'. letter. As for the cruell and inhumain treatment of the Spanish mercht. it was directly contrary to my instructions given. But I never saw H.M. printed Instructions to privateers till they came inclosed in your Lordps'. of Dec. 1st ult. therefore must have miscarryed. When Capt. Richardson, Commander of the privateer, was served with H.M. writt of inhibition, which obliges him to appear before the Lords of Appeals in 100 dayes, I discharged him out of custody. But three others of the sailors that were said to be active in that cruelty I called to their trialls, one of them was acquitted, the other two I ordered to be whipt on board the same privateer being then in harbour, and to receive 69 lashes on their naked backs well laid on, and directed the Provost Marshall to be present to see justice done. By the inclosed affidavit of Capt. Roach, yr. Lordps. may percieve what dainger Antigua was att that time in: and since a sloop has arrived here, the master of which reports, that on the 14th inst. he mett a vessell att sea, and on hailing understood she came from Antigua, and knowing the Capt. went on board, who told him that on the 6th inst. he gott away from Antigua when the French Fleet was in sight and standing for that Island, and that the Governour and Council expected the enemy would land that night. Capt. Roach acquaints me that the man of warr appointed for the Leeward Islands went up to Barbados the 1st inst., soe that he can be of noe service, and that there were not above 600 white men in Antigua capable of carrying arms, soe that I fear that Island has been plundered, and wish the French may goe noe further. This news comeing early to me gave me the thoughts of giveing notice to Curisoa, which I did by ordering a sloop to be imediately fitted out att noe charge to the publick, and only allowing a small cargo to be put on board to defray wages etc., which consisted of 750 bushells of Indian corne, 30 barlls. of porke, and 10 barlls. of train-oyle, as appears by inclosed, and hope I have comitted no fault in permitting the same. I have precautioned the master and sailors that they take care that they bring nothing back with them that ought not to be imported, for that the vessell according to custome shall not be only strictly searched. but that masters and men shall be sworn to the due performance of that injunction. I have severall times been told by prisoners that have been carryed into Martinique, that whilst there they were examined by the Governour into the nature of our fortifications, numbers of inhabitants, how furnished with ammunition, and what part of the Island was most dangerous as to rocks, and such-like questions, and was informed that there has been a resolution of attempting this Island. which fell for want of pilotts. But what startled me most is: a Bermuda vessell being taken amongst the Bahama Islands about 3 months since, by a Spanish privateer belonging to Barico on the Island of Cuba, and dureing the master's confinement there, (whose name is Xtopher Luther) the Capt. of the privateer would often be discoursing him abt. Bermuda, and asking questions relateing to the strength of the Island: and att last told him he knew this country as well as he, and that he did not doubt but with five vessells well man'd he could take or plunder the greatest part of the Island, and added that he very well knew the new fishing ground or ledge, that the inhabitants dureing the sommer season daily frequent, and that it was just out of sight of land, and seldome less than thirty boats there, which he said he would take, secure, and put on board [on] his men, and in the evening stand for the shoar as if the boats were comeing home from fishing, and soe unsuspected would land 500 men or more according to the number of boats (which generally one with another will carry 30 men each) whilst the other privateer vessells and boats were makeing the best of their way after them: Now my Lords everything the Capt. told Luther was a directly truth in all its particulars, and the way he proposed to surprise us must have taken place, and noe doubt but there has been some designe and consultations about takeing this country, and that was the way prescribed. Upon this information I issued out a proclamation forbiding all persons goeing a fishing on the new ledge till leave from me granted, thereby to prevent that designe: and will take all possible care that we be in a readiness least we should be invaded. This country now is much weaker as to men than it has been, a great many haveing died within these two years, and being in generall seafareingmen, one half are always abroad, and should this Island be taken it lies soe much in the way to intercept all trade both goeing into and out of the West Indies that the loss would be of very evill consequence, and doe pray yr. Lordps'. consideration. What I would humbly propose is (but hope it will not be thought I mean it only for my own advantage, but sincerely for the service) that H.M. Independt. Company here (which now consists of but 50 private sentinells) may be made up 100 with allowance of three serjts. and three corplls. (now but two), and then with the troop I shall always have abt. 160 granideers in a very little time together, which may entertain and prevent an enemys landing till the Militia regiment of foot can gett together and come to our assistance. Mr. Noden can informe yr. Lordps. of the weakness of the town and how easy it is to land. If it should be thought fitt to make that addition to the Company, I presume it will be done by drawing soe many men out of a company from regimts. att Portsmouth or Plymouth, and embarke them in some man of war bound for the West Indies: if soe I pray the officers may not send what men they please, but that young fellows that are handycrafts and tradesmen may be chose, which would prove of great advantage to this country. Encloses papers relating to the St. James. I have been disappointed of haveing the acct. of fortifycations and stores transcribed, the person whom I depended on has not been in a condition these severall months, and we have been soe much put to it for want of clarks, and the chief (Mr. Milburne) being likewise sick, that I have been obliged to take minutes and read papers in Council. I have ordered the Capts. of the Castle and forts to bring in their accts. of the last year's expence of stores, soe that the accts. I shall send as soon as can be done, will come compleat to the 1st. Signed, Ben. Bennett. Endorsed, Recd. 28th July, Read Aug. 1st, 1711. Holograph. 4 pp. Enclosed,
897. i. Certificate of the clearing of the sloop Anne for Anguilla, June 25, 1711. Referred to in preceding. Endorsed, Recd. July 30, 1711. 1 p.
897. ii. Copy of deposition of George Roach, merchant, of Philadelphia, June 19, 1711. At Antigua deponent saw the affidavit of some privateersmen who had landed at Martinique and observed the French to be very busy upon some design. On June 2nd one Capt. Paine in a ship from Guiny with about 28 sailors was attacked by a French privateer sloop with 130 men, to windward of Antigua, whom he fought from 10 in the morning till 4 in the afternoon, in sight of the Island, and then the Frenchman sheered off, leaving three men wounded on the ship's deck, one of which, examined at Antigua, and finding death approaching, declared that there were four ships and fifteen sloopes fitting out at Martinique with 2000 men with designe to attack Antigua, and were to rendezvous at Grommorne, the northernmost part of Guardalupa, and that the attempt was to be made on the 14th or 15th inst. etc. Signed, George Roach. Endorsed, Recd. July 30th, 1711. 1½ pp. [C.O. 37, 9. Nos. 20, 20 i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 38, 7. pp. 21–29.]
June 22.
Bermuda.
898. Lt. Governor Bennett to [? Lord Dartmouth.] Refers to previous letters and repeats part of preceding. Signed, Ben. Bennett. Holograph. 4 pp. Enclosed.
898. i. Duplicate of No. 566 ix.
898. ii. Duplicate of No. 897 ii. [C.O. 37, 28, Nos. 7, 7 i., ii.]
June 22.
Antigua.
899. Isaac Royall to Mr. Ayonn. I had sent you copies of my last per this opportunity but cannot come att them att present, having putt them underground five weeks since, and dare not take them up as yett. The Loyalists since my last have been under dismall apprehensions of their being all murdered, and not without sufficient grounds for their fears, it so alarmed us that Col. Thomas Newell, Mr. John Wright, and Leonard Burroughs gott off privately for Barbadoes and severall for the Island of St. Christophers, and severall more were designed off with myself, but the 2nd of this instant att night just as we were going to embarque, Capt. Peter Buer came up with an express from Mountserratt, that the French with 2 shipps, a brigantine and 20 sloops were preparing to invade this Island, att which we resolved to stay and see the event, the 3rd there was an alarm made, and two expresses sent to Barbadoes for the Larke which was gone there, who carried 40 souldiers with her, and the Barbadoes mann of warr; the Barbadoes men of warr being all on their cruise, and Norbury unrigged in the Road. The Newcastle on her cruise mett with two of the French shipps and 5 sloops under Dominico, and engaged them, one of the ships had 36 guns, the Newcastle fired 9 rounds, his Lieutnt. and 9 of his men were wounded, the head of his foremast splitt, what damage he did the French as yett unknown, after his return to Barbadoes he immediately refitted and took on board our souldiers, and 100 of the best of Norbury's men, and came down and arrived att Falmouth the 13th, and went immediately to visitt the Leeward Islands, and as yett we have no newes of him, nor from the Leeward Islands. Wee have great reason to fear the French have been att some of them; yesterday ye Guernsey and Sweepstakes arrived from Barbadoes and went immediately to Leeward, the Virgin Queen was sent out to look into the French harbours, as yett not returned, 'tis feared she is taken, there were two expresses sent to Nevis to the Lt. Generall to desire him to come up, but as yett not arrived here. We have been encamped ever since the 3rd instant, and so were all the Lwd. Islands when we had the last advice., Capt. Whaley has been gone for Martinico in a truce 24 dayes and as yett no news of him; Bermingham has putt the French on this attempt—by the men of warr yesterday from Barbadoes we recd. advice that one of the London fleett was arrived there, that he left the fleett att Maderas, but that our Genl. was not with them, which gives us a great concern, and when he does come, if he does not bring a sufficient number of souldiers with him, his coming I fear will be of little service to H.M., or her faithfull subjects here, as you may judge by the following discourse, and hope you'l lay the whole matter before H.M., most humbly imploring her most gracious and speedy protection for our lives and estates, all persons are in fear if they should write, and the knowledge of it come to any of the Rebells' ears before a protection should come from H.M., 'twould prove fatall to them. Justice Gateward dyed two dayes since, having never recovered the bruises he recd. the 7th of Dec., as he declared just before his death. Capt. John Duer since his arrivall from England is a mighty man in the interest of the Rebells, speaks largely in their behalfs, and 'twas reported he was to head the windwd. rebells, att which report his sister Major Blizard's wife went the latter end of May to him, and told him of it and many other reports. Duer told her 'twould be necessary that some of the Loyalists should be taken off. Mr. Richard Cochran, one of their old faction, who lately came from Barbados, has given himself a great deal of liberty on this occasion; he told Cp. John Wickham att Parham after some discourse, that ye devill was in them (meaning the Rebells) that they did not cutt all the Loyalists' throats, when they murthered the Generall. On the 1st inst. they made a great feast att Barnacle point, where were most of the heads of the Rebells, att which feast they invited all the poor people farr and near, the vilest and most despicable fellows were there to the number of 80 odd, which strangely alarmed us; and att that meeting Archibald Cochran and Fra. Carlisle made a speech, and told them, they were glad to see so many hearty brave fellowes together, that they would fain know what force could make them prisoners, if they stood by one another, and invited them to another feast att Barry Tankerd's where there were to be killed 2 oxen, and the next att Dickinson's bay, a treat of Jacob Morgon's, and the next att Willoughby bay to be Capt. John Duer's, all just after the old manner, which was done some time before they murthered the Generall, wch. you know perfectly well.
The deposition of Mrs. Jane Dixon, widow. taken the 19th inst.:—On the 2nd inst. Edwd. Chester Senr., one of the Assembly, came to her house, she, seeing him under a great concern, asked what was the matter with him, if there were any new plotts on foott again, as she believed there were. Chester replyed he had that day received a very severe check, because he was nott att the fish feast at Barnacle point, the day before, and that he saw nothing but hell and villainy in every place amongst them, and that he did not know what to think. Dixon replyed that she hoped, if there were a plott to cutt off some families, he would not joyn with them in so horrid and hellish a piece of wickedness. Chester replyed, No, he would rather be drawn to pieces with horses than joyn with them. Dixon replyed, Suppose you should murther 20 or 30 families, as she supposed was their design, what would become of them, where would they goe, to Madagascar? Chester replyed smiling, nearer home to Monsieur, att wch. Dixon, I apprehend you very well,—but you may depend that the French King on this occasion will not protect one of them, for the French in generall detest the action, Mr. Chester replyed, sd. Dixon, if there be such a design on foott and you doe not joyn with them, you must expect to be murthered. Chester replyed, who questions that? I know it, and expect no other, and farther said that if something extraordinary did not prevent it, she would see within some months, nay weeks, more blood and murther in this place than had been known in a thousand years in any place of the like bigness; farther replyed sd. Chester, the next Tuesday there is to be another hellish meeting, where he was summoned to be, but he would not goe near them, and that everyone was to carry their armes under a pretence of firing att a mark. Farther Mrs. Dixon deposeth, that one Mark Biggs, Chester's bookkeeper, told her that he knew most of their secretts, and that their design att the next meeting was to swear all they could to their secretts and then to divulge their design, and that they were resolved to receive the new Generall with sword and pistoll, farther that they had sent Col. Perry, the Surveyor Genl., to Barbadoes on purpose to learn the first advice from England, and that if they understood that the Queen had given orders to take up the heads or to punish any of them, they would destroy all they supposed to be against them, and leave the Island with what they could carry off with them, etc. Signed, Isaac Royall, 2¾ pp. [C.O. 152, 42. No. 65.]
June 24.900. Petty expences of the Board of Trade, postage, stationery, coal etc. Lady-day to Midsummer. 1711. v. Journal of Council. 6 pp. [C.O. 388, 76. Nos. 118–121.]
June 24.
Barbados.
901. Governor Lowther to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I arrived the 22nd instant, etc. Here is advise that the French were making great preparations at Martinique and Guardaloup to invade some of H.M. Leward Islands. I have sent my Lord Dartmouth all the particulars I can learn, etc. P.S. I will lay before your Lordships the state of this Island as soon as may be. Signed, Rob. Lowther. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 6, Read Sept. 12, 1711. Addressed. Sealed. Postmark. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 63; and 29, 12. p. 367.]
June 24.
Barbados.
902. Same to [? Lord Dartmouth.] Repeats part of preceding and Nos. 877 ii. and iii., and 891 i. The Jamaica convoy which came in company with me went from hence 23rd inst. for Antegoa; it consists of one third-rate, and two fourth-rates, and I sent the Burlington a fourth-rate along with them; this I judged was for H.M. interest because on May 17th when I was at Medera, I was there informed that M. du Cass had been there about a month before in a ship of 70 guns that had 500 men on board and a great number of officers, but I could not learn to what part of West-Indies he was bound, nor have I since heard anything of him: I hope H.M. will have a very good account of that invasion, if the men of warr have the good fortune to arrive in time, etc. Signed, Rob. Lowther. Holograph. 4 pp. [C.O. 28, 43. No. 59.]
June 25.
Whitehall.
903. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. Enclose draught of Instructions for the Governor of Maryland relating to the guage of tobacco hogsheads and an Agent, (v. No. 906.) Annexed,
903. i. Draught of Instructions referred to supra. [C.O. 5, 727. pp. 264–272; and (without enclosure) 5, 721. No. 12.]
June 25.
Antigua.
904. Lt. Governor Hamilton to Lord Dartmouth. Since my last the French landed at Mountseratt on the 14th instant with 1200 men by the best information I can gain from their prisoners that are taken (being two Captains and six men belonging to privateer sloops). They likewise acquaint me that their first designe was for this Island, but the Newcastle man of warr on the 3rd inst. haveing mett with their fleet consisting of two ships, a brigantine and severall sloops off of Martinico did engage and so disable the ships that they could not proceed on the intended expedition, after which the Captain of the Newcastle made the best of his way to Barbados, where meeting on the 9th instant with the express I sent, and one from the Lt. Governor of this Island, he made all the dispatch he possibly could, and came downe so seasonably that he left Mountseratt in order to come to me (haveing first called here) about 12 a clock at night when the enemy landed about four in the morneing at a place called Carr's Bay, the North part of the Island, marching in the morneing to the southward, where they were mett and stop'd at a pass or gutt by a party of the inhabitants consisting at first of about 60 men under the command of one Capt. George Wyke; our number increasing every moment at said pass hindered the enemy from comeing forward, upon which the President of the Councill sent immediately a sloop as an express to give me an acct., which no sooner reached the Island but the man of warr went under sayle, so that I could not get to towne before she was gone. I would have followed in a sloop, but that the Councill and as many officers as were present came in a body and desired that I would not runn so great a risque, the enemy haveing their privateers everywhere, which I submitted to after haveing well considered the consequence that would attend it should I be taken, and then wrote immediately to the Captain of the Newcastle that it would be very much for H.M. service that he should fetch me up and carry me to the place I thought might be most in danger (which I take to be this Island) who thereupon returned the 18th inst. giveing an account that the enemy was gone before he could get thither, however not knowing the damage the enemy had done the Island, and what further attempt they might make thereon I immediately embarked and proceeded to the said Island, where wee arrived the 20th and sayled the day following for this place least the enemy might make any attack here, and in our voyage mett off of the old Road H.M.S. the Guernsey and Sweepstakes all belonging to the Barbados station; the Lark the only ship belonging to this station not being fitted I desired the Captain of the Newcastle to let one of the said ships of warr remain with me till the returne of the Larke, wch. he has readily granted ordering the Sweepstakes to stay. Since my arrivall wee have not seen or heard of any privateer and the Governor of Martinico, I have reason to believe has stopp'd two flaggs of Truce which I sent with prisoners to be exchanged. The first has been gone from this Island 28 days, and the other from Nevis 18, which is the usuall time allowed for the returne of Truces, so I am doubtfull they design to make a second attempt on some Island or other, haveing had time by this to refitt their two disabled ships, and are reinforced by another ship of 30 guns that arrived there on the 4th instant from the coast of Guinia as wee are informed by the prisoners that were taken that day in another ship of 18 gunns comeing from the same coast in sight of Fort St. Peirre, and the other ship by the Sweepstakes man of warr, her cargoe being slaves, upon which I have again intreated the captain of the Newcastle to leave an order likewise with the captain of the Guernsey (who is now at St. Christopher's watering his ship) to remaine for some few days amongst these Islands, and to observe such orders and directions as he shall from time to time (whilst he stays) receive from me, till the returne of one of the Truces or such time that I have an acct. that their designe is frustrated and quite over, which he has not only granted, but in all other respects plainly demonstrated his zeal and regard for H.M. service and the defence and protection of these Her Islands, especially by his expedition in comeing to the relief thereof, which I do assure your Lordship has been a most signall peice of service to these Islands, they being in a great measure thereby secured, particularly Mountseratt which I doubt the enemy would not have quitted so easily had they not feared the loss of their vessells by his geting amongst them, which I cannot but remark to yor. Lordship in justice to Capt. Bourne. The Island of Mountseratt has suffered but little by the enemy's descente, having lost only 50 or 60 negroes that went into them, neither was there more than two of the inhabitants and one malato slave killed, nor was there more than one house burnt or damaged. The enemy lost at least 60 or 70 men by what wee can apprehend from the prisoners that were taken, of which number 19 were found dead at the place where they engaged, so that whether this will discourage them from makeing any further attempt is uncertain, but nevertheless I shall prepare for their reception, from which your Lordship may plainly perceive that these Collonys cannot be protected or the trade to and from the same secured without there be a greater number of men of warr appointed to attend this station, as I intimated in my former letters, etc. Signed, W. Hamilton. 4 pp. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 46; and 152, 42. No. 66.]
June 25.
Antigua.
905. Same to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Duplicate of preceding. Signed, W. Hamilton. Endorsed, Recd. 5th, Read 12th Sept., 1711. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 76; and 153, 11. pp. 362–366.]
June 26.
Kensington.
906. H.M. Additional Instructions to the Governor of Maryland. Quote Representation, No. 903, which is approved of. Conclude:—It is out will and pleasure, that after the receipt hereof, you recommend to the next General Assembly the passing an Act or Acts for preventing the cropping of tobacco hogsheads, and for reducing the Maryland hogsheads to the size of those made in Virginia, and that you take care the penalty for the breach of either of the said Laws be the same. Our further will and pleasure is, that some fitt person residing here be appointed Agent for that Province, who being fully impowered and instructed, may from time to time as occasion shall require, take care of and negociate all such matters as may concern the said Province. Signed, A.R. [C.O. 324, 32. pp. 94–98.]
June 27.
Barbados.
907. Mr. Lillington to Lord Dartmouth. The illness under which I have laboured for these last six months prevented me from delivering up the Seal and other Regalia of this Government to H.E. Rob. Lowther etc.; yet I cannot but express my great satisfaction that a person of his judgement, experience and integrity succeeds to accomplish and improve that Union which all my endeavours have been towards cultivating amongst a people soe dismally divided when I came first to the Government. If my actions have been without private designs and interest (the chief occasions of the distractions of this Island), if I have not been or can charge myself with oppression in retaliation of the many barbarities I have suffer'd under colour of H.M. authority from many of this place, etc., I flatter myself I shall meet with such an approbation of my administration from your Lordship, as will be the most acceptable to me of anything in this world. My age and present sickness (if I ever gett over it) will render me unable any more to attend the publick servis, which I hope your Lordship will think a reasonable excuse for my desiring to be discharg'd therefrom, since I have bore the honour of being a member of H.M. Councill of this Island for 25 years, in which time I never enjoyed a post or office of profitt; and if your Lordship will give me leave to recommend my eldest son George to be a Member of the Councill in my stead, I shall willingly resign, etc. Signed, G. Lillington. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 43. No. 60.]
June 27.908. Mr. Seymour to the Council of Trade and Plantations. In reply to June 19, encloses following. I am very certain if any one could inform me particularly, it must be Capt. Hyde, who knows the Governours revenue pretty perfectly, having been correspondent to Coll. Blackiston and my father. But all accounts of that Province have been of late so neglected, that it is impossible for anyone to make a computation but by guess. Signed, Ber. Seymour. Endorsed, Recd. Read June 27, 1711. 1 p. Enclosed,
908. i. Capt. Hyde to Berkeley Seymour. I have made a farther enquiry at the Custome-house and of the Lord Baltemore. But neither of them hath any accot. of the shipps cleared at Maryland since the decease of your good father. I can only guess by what I have recd. from the President of the Councel of Maryland that from July, 1709 to the date of Coll. Corbett's Commission the halfe of 9d. per hhd. may amount unto about £400 to £450 etc. Signed, John Hyde. Endorsed, Recd. Read June 27, 1711. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 717. Nos. 39, 40; and 5, 727. pp. 272–274.]
June 28.
Treasury Chambers.
909. Mr. Lowndes to Mr. Popple. My Lord Treasurer desires to know upon what termes the Palatines were sent to New York. I have his Lordp's. commands to acquaint you that the printer shall have orders to send to the Office of Trade the Acts desired by you in your letter of yesterday's date, as soon as I am informed what number it is you want of them. Signed, Wm. Lowndes. Endorsed, Recd. June 28, Read July 2, 1711. Addressed. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 22; and 5, 1122. p. 394.]
June 28.
Whitehall.
910. Lord Dartmouth to the Governor of Maryland. Encloses Instructions of June 26th, to be communicated to the General Assembly, etc. Signed, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. p. 99.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
911. Mr. Popple to Lt. Governor Spotswood. Acknowledges letters etc. of Dec. 15, 1710, March 6th and 20th, 1711, all which the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations will take into consideration, and then lay before H.M. what is requisite, for her pleasure thereupon. In the mean while the two Addresses you mention, March 6, to have transmitted to Col. Blakeston from the Council and from the Assembly of Virginia have been presented to her. As to what you write in relation to the sending of your dispatches by the packet boats or by other conveyances, you will perceive by the enclosed Proclamation how the conveyance of letters throughout all H.M. Dominions is at present regulated, which will be a guide to you in all future occasions. You will perceive by my letter of Jan. 29 what their Lordships' opinion was in relation to the passing of a law for raising of a fund to be imploy'd in the iron manufacture, to which I have only to add that their Lordships are not sorry the last Assembly did nothing in that matter, for unless there be other reasons than what do occur to their Lordships at present, they do not see it will be for the advantage of this Kingdom, that such an undertaking should be incouraged in the Plantations. [C.O. 5, 1363. pp. 324, 325; and (rough draft) 5, 1335. pp. 122, 123.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
912. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Hunter. We have at present your letters etc. of May 7 under our consideration, in order to our laying before H.M. what shall appear necessary in relation to both your Governments, so that till we have gone through the whole, and H.M. pleasure be declared thereupon, we shall not be able to give you particular answers etc. We have laid before my Lord High Treasurer what you write in relation to the Palatines, and shall do what further lies in our power, that may promote the imploying of those people in the production of Naval Stores. As to your desire that your Salary and other expenses may be paid out of the money in the Collector's hands, we must refer you to what was writ you, Jan. 29, to which we have only to add, that all money levyed in the Plantations, by virtue of the Act for encouraging the trade to America, as duties on prize goods, is appropriated and made a fund for loans and cannot be otherwise disposed of. We have received from the Board of Ordinance the extract of a letter from you to the Duke of Marlbro' (v. June 18.), upon which we must take notice, that you ought to have sent to us a copy of the said account as you are required to do by your Instructions. You ought at the same time to have transmitted an estimate of each particular species of arms or ordinance stores that are wanting, and also to have explained whether this account comprehends the remains of stores that are at Albany and Schenectady, as well as at New York, otherwise it is very difficult to apportion what is necessary to be sent. We transmitted to you, March 16, H.M. Order in Council confirming the Act for ascertaining the place of sitting of the General Assembly of New Jersey, so that that matter is now at an end. As to what you write in relation to the Court of Chancery, and to the Members of the Council being Judge Assistants in the Supream Court, and to the inconveniencies that arise thereby, we can only observe that by your Commissn. you are empower'd and authorized to erect, with the advice and consent of the Council, such Courts of Judicature as you and they shall think fit, and to appoint Judges, Justices etc. So that if you find any inconvenience by the present constitution of the Supream Court, your Commission and Instructions in that behalf will be your best guide. We desire that you would send us by the first conveyance, a complete collection of all the laws of New York since ye year 1691. We have only to add that hereafter in your correspondence with us it will be more easy and proper, that what you write relating to each of your Governments, be in separate and distinct letters. [C.O. 5, 1122. pp. 391–394.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
913. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. Enclose extract from Lt. General Hamilton's letter of April 5, relating to the need of stores of war. [C.O. 153, 11. p. 346.]
June 29.
Whitehall.
914. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Encloses extracts from Lt. General Hamilton's letters (April 5 etc.) relating to the need of ships of war for the protection of the Leeward Islands, to be laid before the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty. I am to desire you will move their Lordships that the Lords Commrs. of Trade may be informed of the number and rates of the ships of war or sloops appointed for the service of each of the Government(s) in America, whereby their Lordships may be better enabled to return answers to such letters as shall be writ to them from time to time by the Governors of ye said Plantations. [C.O. 153, 11. p. 347.]