America and West Indies
July 1711, 11-20

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Cecil Headlam (editor)

Year published

1925

Pages

2-22

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'America and West Indies: July 1711, 11-20', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 26: 1711-1712 (1925), pp. 2-22. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73876 Date accessed: 26 November 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

July 1711, 11-20

July 11.
Whitehal.
11. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Reply to preceding. The Council of Trade and Plantations command me to acquaint you that there is no mention of any penalties in the Act to encourage the trade to Newfoundland, neither is there any in the Heads of Enquiry, and therefore the Commodore is directed upon his arrival in Newfoundland to take care as far as in him lyes, that the most effectual method be taken for remedying several irregularities that stil continue to be practis'd in those parts, and that others formerly complain'd of be not again practis'd. [C.O. 195, 5. p. 233.]
July 11.
Windsor.
12. H.M. Warrant to John Rayner, Attorney General of New York, extending his leave of absence for 12 months. Countersigned, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. pp. 99, 100.]
July 12.
Whitehal.
13. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. We have no objection why your Majesty may not approve Edward Hyde as Governor of North Carolina etc. (v. June 14), provided he qualify himself as the law requires and give good security for his observance of the Acts of Trade and Navigation etc. The security usually given by the Governors of other Proprieties is in a bond of £2000 ster., but in regards the trade in that part is inconsiderable, we humbly offer that the security to be given by him be in a bond of £1000 sterling. [C.O. 5, 1292. pp. 313–315.]
July 13.14. Mr. Dockwra to Mr. Popple. In reply to enquiry of July 5, explains that delay in receiving the second packet from New Jersey, of which he had received advice (v. enclosed), was due to the death at sea of Mr. Read who had been entrusted with it at New York, etc. Continues:—I have been ill and confined to my bed. I have in some intervals of my ills read over some of the many New Jersey Papers lying with me, and taken from some of the last letters an abstract of some such transactions as are so very extraordinary, and that come from one of my friends, an honest South Brittain, and obedient son of the Church, who is no insinuating hypocrite, but a man of probity, and the noble Lords and Honble. Gentlemen at the boord may depend upon the truth of what future reports and representations will appear transmitted by the same good hand, and two or three more of like character, etc. etc. Signed, Wm. Dockwra. Endorsed, Recd. July 13, Read Nov. 7, 1711. Addressed. Sealed. 2½ pp. Enclosed,
14. i. Extract of a letter to Mr. Dockwra in London from a Member of Council in New Jersey by Capt. Ball in the Bristoll Packet-boat, recd. June 14. My last two letters were by our good friend Col. Nicholson, and by Mr. Norton, to which narratives I referre you of our new Governour's surprising beginnings, falling in with the seditious faction of turbulent men, whose cheif ringleader has in his whole life time been Lewis Morris. The Assembly mett Dec. 4, etc. Mr. Sonmans will send over coppies of the Acts past, and of such as the Councill rejected, by which will be plainly perceived what our pollititians attempted to compass by the countenance and encouragement of H. E., who notwithstanding his repeated professions of his impartiallity and desire of peace and union, has entirely and passionately espoused the seditious party of Morris, Johnstone etc., and united with the Quakers; and little has been transacted during the sitting of the Assembly without his previous knowledge and connivance. His Cabinet Councill has been and is Lewis Morris, George Clark, John Johnstone, late Capt. now Coll. Farmer, Thomas Gordon, Tho. Gardiner, a Quaker, and Geo. Willokes, the three first chiefest managers. They began with entring into a strict league with the Quakers, and drew up and presented their Address, by which it is evident they act by the same principles and moved by the same spirit as formerly. And the Earl of Clarendon though absent and out of their reach, must be attacked, in order to open the way to ruin his friends. H.M. Councill of State was seldome consulted except about passing of Bills. The Gentlemen of the Councill might have taken just exception to the contents of their Address, but wee forbore, that the Governor might see wee were willing to joyn with him in accomplishing the great work of peace and union which he pretended to be so desirous of, how really the event will shew. Wee presented our Address to H.E. by which you will see our principles are the same as ever, and that wee did avoid whatever might look to be entring into the list of controversy. Our address was extreamly opposed by Mr. Morris, Tho. Gordon, George Deacon, and Thomas Gardiner, neither of whome would sign it, for what reason I never could learn, except that the first of those had not the penning it with reflections on the Lord Clarendon's Administration. But our peaceable address disappointed them extreamly; for they could from thence gather no matter for a quarrell with us, which wee found, they earnestly desired. They then fell on new measures, which were, to pass some bills, which they knew wee must reject; accordingly a bill for recording of deeds in the severall counties; another for destroying prosecutions by informations, and a third for quallifying Quakers to serve on all juries, give evidence in criminall causes, and a third, for quallifying Quakers to serve on all juries, give evidence in criminal causes, and hold and enjoy offices of profit and trust in the Government, which were accordingly sent up to us. The first took away the only valuable perquisite belonging to the Secretaries office, and was directly contrary to his patent, and indeed impracticable, the Clerks of many counties being scarce able to write, and having no particular offices, and on other accots. most incapeable of such a trust. It was moreover proved, that the records of severall counties have been lost or embezzled by the negligence or roguery of the clerks. The second was directly contrary to the Acts of Trade and Navigation, and indeed the prerogative of the Crown—but you have too well known what vallue this factious crew have ever had for that. The last bill was such a monster, that every part of it was terrible. It unhinged our very constitution of Government, was directly contrary to the 7th and 8th K. William, a great encouragement of Quakerism, or rather its establishment, at least in this Province; and of the most pernicious consequence to the Church of England. The Quakers in the Councill, and their two fast friends, Morris and Gordon, attempted the passing that with mighty warmth; the Governor himself extreamly press'd the same, at least the committing it, for fear of angring the Assembly, or putting them as was the pretence, out of humour. But wee considered, if it was committed some trick or other might be used to pass it, so wee resolved to reject it on the second reading, which being done and the Quakers disappointed of their Magna Charta, as it was termed, and indeed the very darling of their souls, and no doubt part of the prize promised them by Morris etc., they grew angry; on which Doctor Johnstone reported from a Committee of the whole House, that notwithstanding it was of the utmost consequence to the Proprietors and inhabitants of this Province, that a Bill should be brought in for settling their rights to their lands, yet it was to no purpose to do it at this time, because there was no likelyhood that the Councill would pass it. This was designed to throw a slurr on the Councill and to imprint an ill opinion of them in the minds of the ignorant, unthinking multitude, as men who opposed anything that was of benefit and advantage to them. He reported likewise that they had passed a Bill in that House conformable to H.M. injunctions in relation to the ease of the people called Quakers, but that the Councill without committing it had rejected it, designing thereby to magnifie their obedience, and our disobedience to H.M. instructions, when the case is really thus, H.M. orders her Governor to take care that, in order to the ease of the Quakers in what they conceive to be matter of conscience, so far as may be consistent with good order and Government, an act be passed in the Genll. Assembly to the like effect as that passed in England for the solemn affirmation of Quakers etc. Now this Act of theirs being directly contrary to what the Queen recommends, and to the abovementioned Acts of Parliament, mankind must wonder how any set of men could have assurance enough to make so false and scandalous a report etc. They resolved also to have a new clerk to their Assembly, presuming that Mr. Pinhorne being formerly of the Earl of Clarendon's appointment, would not be a tool to them; they addrest the Govr. agt. him, and though everything they alleged was false in fact, or no crime, yet the Governor appointed one Bradford the Printer at New York in his room, who had been waiting in this town about a week before in expectation of that place. Thus you will plainly percieve N. York and the Party supply N. Jersey with instruments requisite to accomplish its destruction. And having in this been successfull, they next attack the Secretary and Clerk of the Councill, Mr. Basse, first by complaints, afterwards with petitions and addresses (v. May 7). The Councill finding so great an inconvenience in the loss of one honest man, the Clerk of the Assembly, and understanding Mr. Farmer was designed to succeed Mr. Basse if they could remove him, resolved, if possible, to prevent that, therefore by advice of Col. Quary, they drew up an address to the Governor in the Secretaries behalf, which I believe broke their measures by the unpleasant answer the Councill recieved, which, together with the Address, the Governor ordered to be enter'd in the Minutes, and therein condemning Mr. Bass, as if positive proof agt. him, tho' at that time he was intirely a stranger to the particulars of the charge, having had no sight of it, much less required to answer it. Mr. Birchfield having suspended Mr. (now called Collonel) Farmer for severall misdemeanors in his office of Collector of Amboy, though the Governor made interest to keep him in, it was resolved by the faction, that Gentleman should be recompenced with the Secretaries Office. It is reported that H.E. sends over the charge agt. Mr. Basse to Brittaine, and recommends Mr. Farmer in his place; I hope you and all our friends will at least endeavour to prevent that party man being topt upon us, or any of that party, which would be equally mischievous. Mr. Willokes was all this while busy in drawing complaints against Mr. Sonmans, which were much of the same nature, with those in my Lord Lovelace's time, with this addition, that at the Midlesex election he clapt his hand behind, declaring agt. a North Brittain Government, which was urged as a designed affront agt. H.E. and all of that Nation, but Mr. Sonmans answered all very largely (v. May 7). Mr. Hall of Salem was at the same time addrest agt. by the Assembly for making a wrong taxation of a bill of costs and selling a servant of his, whome they alleged was then a prisoner, but he presented the Governor with an answer in writing, as was thought to his satisfaction; however it did not prevent his being turned out from being chief Judge of the place, and since the Grand Jury have found an indictment agt. Benja. Wright of Philadelphia for taking a false oath against Mr. Hall about the servant. You may be informed, that Mr. Hall being a reputed Quaker, that Party depended on him for their tool, and he was at first highly caressed by the Governor who (as Mr. Hall affirmed to me and most of the Councill) told him as a secrett that he had resolved in a month's time to have settled the Governmt. in another manner than it was, had not the surprizing alteration of the Ministry in Great Brittain intervened. However Mr. Hall could not be prevailed with to joyn with Morris, Johnstone etc., but vigorously opposed their proceedings both in and out of Councill,—the Quakers have now given him a surfeit, so that he went constantly to Church during his stay in this town; and some talk as if that was the chief reason why he was removed from being Judge, and one Middleton, a Quaker (who came into the country in such a poor condition, he was forced to sell himself a servant to pay for his passage) appointed Judge instead of Mr. Hall. The Assembly could now no longer dissemble their designs, but at once pluckt off the mask by falling on Major Sandford, a Representative for the County of Bergen, because he had formerly, when of H.M. Councill, joyned with the Lt. Governor and seaven more of that body in signeing an Address to H.M. agt. the proceedings of the Assembly in vindication of Earl Clarendon, for this they expelled him the House, making at the same time a vote, that that Address was false, scandalous, etc., and that no Member of H.M. Councill that signed it should be ever capeable of sitting in that House, till he had publickly acknowledged his fault in so doing. Major Sandford was afterwards elected a Representative a second time for the same County, not one opposing him, with a present of money to bear his charges, and a declaration that if they refused to admit him or expelled him again, he should be as often chosen; the Sheriff returned the writt, but the House would not admitt him. Mr. Mott, one of the Representatives for Monmouth County, a Gentleman who warmly opposed their extravagant proceedings, was in like manner expelled the House because he and Mr. Lawrence had formerly petitioned the Governor and Councill to have some reasons about the Bill for the Canada Expedition, which they had presented to Col. Nicholson, enter'd into the Journall, though the true reason was his dissenting from them; he soon after was returned again by the County with a genll. concurrence, but not allowed by the Assembly to sitt, some in the House declaring it was impudence in the county to return any man they had expelled. Mr. Trotwell was the next they designed for the same fate with Major Sandford and Mr. Mott; but what they had done in relation to those two members had so incenced the counties for which they were chosen, with the generality of the Province (that were not Quakers) that it was thought adviseable to proceed no further in expulsions. From the time the Councill rejected the three Bills abovementioned there was a whispering that shortly something would appear so frightfully to severall of the Councill as to oblige them to abandon the Province, and then it would be in the Govr's. power to appoint a number of new Counsellors, sufficient to carry all things as they had projected, this was a Bill enacting thatt all the statutes agt. Bankrupts made in England should be in force in this Province. And it was past and sent up, where, after long debates and reasonings it was found the most pernicious bill imaginable; for besides that Mr. Edward Billing, and Mr. John Fenwick, under whome all persons in West Jersey held their lands, so that no man could be secure of his estate, but the credrs. of those two gentlemen might come and take from us our settlements, and hundreds of the inhabitants have purchased lands of other Proprietors who are likewise bankrupts; so that to pass such a bill were to depopulate and ruin the Province. But there will be many other unanswerable reasons shown why such a destructive bill ought not to pass and wee doubt not to satisfie H.M. and the Honble. Comrs. of the Board of Trade and Planta. why some other Bills were refused, hoping in few days more to recover the packet sent over by Peter Sonmans from the Councill in N. Jersey, which by the death of the Gentleman to whose hands it was intrusted to be delivered to Mr. Dockwra, the Proprietors' Secretary, has occasioned this loss of time. Another Bill is passed for support of H.M. Government to the vallue of £944 and £300 for the Assembly for one year, new currency; and the same for the next year if the Governor shall continue so long among us. But in case he should die, or be recalled before that time, then he or his execrs. and the other officers of the Government are to recieve their salary only to the time of his death or removall, and what remains is to be lodged in the Treasurer's hands to be disposed of by Act of Generall Assembly; which is contrived to make all Governors and other officers tools to the Assembly, or else they shall have no salarys, for, say they, wee know not who may be Govr. next, perhaps one that is no friend to the Quakers and Dr. Johnstone etc., whether this can be called a Revenue, or something else, I care not to name, but you will easily judge. The Governor assured the Assembly that Col. Morris was Presidt. of H.M. Councill by her particular letter; and they soon after order'd all their bills to be delivered to Mr. Morris as President, who brought them afterwards to the Governor, this was opposed by the majority of the Councill but to no purpose, the Governor declaring the Assembly must be humoured. Indeed the greatest care imaginable was taken not to displease them, but to allow them their head in everything. As for the Councill, as little regard was had for them (except Morris, Gordon, Gardiner, and Deacon) as possible, nay less than during my Lord Lovelace's administration; howsoever, notwithstanding all the affronts wee met with, all the hardship wee lay under, wee lost not a jot of our courage, but did what was our duty to our Queen and Country here. It is true the Quakers and their adhærents in the Assembly revile us, but the greater part of the country thank and commend us, and wee are not out of hopes of H.M. countenance and protection, for without it wee must all be crusht, and sink under the weight of a Quaker-arbitrary Assembly, than which nothing can be more intolerable to English men, and true members of the Church of England by law established. Mr. Gardiner is to be our Surveyor Generall, if he is not already. Mr. Gordon is Deputy Treasurer under Johnston, Billop, and Bradford. Billop has a commission to be Escheator Generall. Capt. Farmer is made a Collonel and Judge of the Pleas in Middlesex and Somersett, in the room of Mr. Sonmans, where there is likewise an intire new sett of Justices. Col. Pinhorne is removed from being Judge in Bergen, and Herry Morris in his place. Capt. Bown is out in Monmouth, and Col. Morris first judge in his stead. Dr. Johnstone is second Judge. Major Spicer, who went on the expedition to Canada, is superseded by Justice Tomlinson in Gloster County, and one Townsend a Quaker made Judge in Cape May County. In short the greatest part of those put in by Earl Clarendon and Col. Ingoldesby are turned out of commission, and severall Quakers, and men recommended by Quakers, put in. Col. Townley is lately dead, in whome the honest part of the Council have sustained a great loss. Col. Huddy is no more my Lt. Col., he is so uneasy at a prosecution order'd agt. him for a monopoly on account of the patent E. of Clarendon granted him about setting up his invention of carriages for conveying goods through the Province, that I believe, if it is not speedily stopt, he will leave the Province, which I should heartily regret, he having been at a vast expence in bringing matters to such a perfection. As to myself, I have dropt some words since the rising of the Assembly, as if I designed for Brittain, which has occasioned not a little uneasiness to some people. The evening before the Assembly was prorogued, they delivered the Governor a representation of the State of the Province, (as they call it) containing 32 pages close writt, penn'd by Col. Morris and the non-juror, George Willokes; Dr. Johnstone read it to him, the Assembly and severall other people being present, but not one of the Councill except Mr. Morris; and as I am told by some of the Assembly, his answer was he would represent matters to the Queen, and doubted not but she would take such measures as would give a genll. satisfaction. It contains (as some honest Assembly Anti-Quakers assure me) the most scandalous and villainous reflections on the Earl of Clarendon and his Ldp.'s administration that could be invented, so bad, they avoided nameing many of them. Severall pages are writt agt. his Ldp., and Col. Ingoldesby is likewise miserably traduced, and the late Chief Justice Mompesson, Col. Pinhorne, Townley and Huddy, Mr. Sonmans, Mr. Hall and myself, if you'll believe 'em, are some of the worst of men. Two hundred coppies I hear have been printed, but since the news of the happy change of the Ministry and the good agreemt. betwixt H.M. and the Parliament, they were ordered out of Bradford, the Printer's hands, and I understand wee here are not like to have a sight of them. It is talkt abroad, as if something like scandalum magnatum against his Lordship in that Representation had terribly scared some people; and I believe the fear of that, joined with the change of the Ministry etc. keep it so private; some here are of opinion it will be sent for Great Britain by the Governor to some of his friends, if not more publickly; the first part I believe, though scarce the last: yet nobody doubts but Col. Morris and Dr. Johnstone will send coppies to Sir Wm. Ashurst, Micaiah Perry, my Lady Lovelace, and the Jersey Society. I just now hear a report (but how well-grounded I know not) that what concerns the Lord Clarendon is to be omitted, and the remainder agt. Col. Ingoldesby, and the Councill to be exposed. I cannot forbear mentioning one thing more, which a gentleman assures me to be true, and is as great a piece of knavery as can be imagined. The Assembly in their Representation say, that when Col. Quary signed that Address (meaning that agt. Morris, Jennings etc.) wee believe he was misled, and depended too much on the credit of others; for he has since (they say) very much declined from joyning with them, in many of their hott and rash humours, and doth at present behave himself like a man, that doth intend the service of the Queen and the good of the country. This was to make the Councill suspicious of Col. Quary, and to compliment him out of his design of exposing their proceedings at home. Col. Quary thinks himself highly affronted and injured on this occasion, their intentions (as he imagins) being to make him both knave and fool, and he has often declared to me, this Assembly was one of the worst he ever knew; that, as far as he could percieve, there was nothing so bad but they would attempt, if they thought it would-injure any of the Councill that were not their tools, declaring he was sick of them, and resolved never to see 'em again. Mr. Sonmans has lately procured some heads of this famous Representation, which he will transmitt to you; what I have seen are intirely false, or miserably misrepresented. Judge Mompesson is turned out, and one Jemmison, a North Brittain, who lives at N. York is Chief Justice in his stead in this Colony of N. Jersey; the man and his morals are too well known. Mr. Regnier in imitation of the Assembly forbears not according to his usuall custome to make out writts agt. the Gentlemen of the Councill; and but a few dayes since sent one to the Sheriffe of this county to arrest Mr. Huddy for £20, which he pretends is due to one Gomez a Jew in N. York, though in November term he had filed a declaration agt. him for the very same money, and Mr. Huddy had put in his plea to it; and wee are told by some people that the Gentlemen of the Councill have no privilege at all tho' an Assemblyman or an attorney of the Court has. Col. Morris is made second Judge of the Supream Court, and Thomas Gardiner and George Deacon both Quakers, Assistant Judges. The Governor of Pensylvania having passed an Act of Assembly, whereby a solemn protestation is to be taken (the name of God being omitted) instead of the solemn affirmation appointed by Act of Parliament, has occasioned Addresses from severall of the Ministers and Vestrys in that Colony to the Queen agt. passing yt. Bill, and our Minister and Vestry of Burlington have done the same. Wee are now in a much worse condition than if immediately under the Governmt. of N. York, for most of our officers live in, and belong to that Province, yet wee must pay them. Mr. Morris, the President of our Councill, who is also Judge of the Pleas in the County of Monmouth, lives an inhabitant of New York. Our Chief Justice, who has not one farthing interest in the whole Province, our Reciever Generall, our Treasurer and their securities, our Escheator Generall, Mr. Joseph Billop, who has likewise no manner of estate here; our Auditor Generall the like; and Col. Farmer the Judge of this county, Dr Johnstone, second Judge of Monmouth County; Bradford, the Clerk and Printer of the Assembly, all live in New York Government; and, of those that reside in the Province, all the North Brittains that can be found, though never so scandalous, are preferred, and next to them the Quakers; so that the few tolerable officers will not act, or be concerned with them. You will by this easily percieve the miserable condition of this poor Province, how far wee are from being reconciled or agreed, and I see no prospect of amendmt. while the Governor of New York is Governor of New Jersey, and wee labour under the dead weight of the Quakers. Now, if the Councill was purged of Mr. Morris, who has ever been Ringleader of the seditious, Mr. Deacon, Mr. Gordon and Mr. Gardiner, and the Quakers kept close to the indulgence the Laws allow them, but not permitted to bear any offices, much less to sit either in Councill or Assembly, and then the vacancies in the Councill filled up with honest, wellmeaning men, such as John Bown, Cornelius Longfield, and Charles Duncan for the Eastern; and Danish Leeds, Jacob Spicer etc. for the Western Division, I believe this Province might be easily settled. But if the two vacancies now in the Council, vizt. Major Sandford and Col. Townley are supplied with Quakers or others of the confederacy in their interest, as at the last time, and such I have no doubt the Governor will recommend, I doubt the country will be ruined. Endorsed, Recd. July 13, Read Nov. 7, 1711. 8½ pp. [C.O. 5, 970. Nos. 149, 149 i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 995. pp. 153–155.]
July 13.
Antigua.
15. Lt. Governor Hamilton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges duplicate of March 16 by Governor Douglas, "who arrived here on Sunday last being the 8th instant, by which your Lordships seem to charge me with neglect in not sending home an express immediately to give an account of the death of the late Generall, of which I hope I have cleared myselfe before H.E. in Council, as your Lordships may perceive by the inclosed coppyes of the Minites taken from the Council Book, to which I referr, as I do likewise to the Minites both of the Generall and private Councill of all my conduct and proceedings since my haveing had the honour to be at the head of this so disjointed a Government, and do hope that upon the strictest examination, I have with honour discharged my duty (in the most difficult of times) to her most sacred Majesty, the generall preservation of the Islands and mutuall satisfaction of most of the inhabitants, but it is my hard fate and for these eight years past I have constantly had the misfortune to come at the head of the most disordered and ruptured Governements that ever were. First to that of St. Christophers in 1703, some time after the French part was delivered me, which Island afterwards in 1705/6 I preserved for H.M. and defended it with onely 470 men good and bad, of which but 60 were regular troops, the rest all militia, against 3200 effective men under the command of Monsieur Le Chevalier de Chavaniat, and after the takeing of Nevis I was removed to that Island when a great many of the inhabitants were dayly deserting the place I prevailed with the wavering part to stay and gave all the incouragement immaginable for others to returne, which most of them did, which with H.M. benevolence and encouragemt. has put the Island (God be praised) in a very flourishing condition againe, and will I hope now in a little time by what the Parliament have so generously given H.M. for the releife and resettleing the people of that Island, and St. Christophers put them in a way to improve their severall plantations, so that in a little time they will encrease the revenue of the Crowne to what it was before those Islands were destroyed, for the people seem to be much more industrious now then they were before their misfortunes. And lastly I came at the head of a most distracted Governemt. throughout all the Islands, and have been ever since harrassed from place to place, as your Lordship has from time to time observed by my severall letters, all which and the great expences I have been at the hazard I have constantly undergone with the great losses I did sustaine both in Nevis and St. Christophers with the long service and faithfull discharge of my duty gave me some hopes of H.M. favour to have obtained and continued at the head of this Governemt., but since the Royall pleasure is otherwise I do readily submitt, etc. P.S. The originall of your Lordpps.' letter never came to my hands, so have not the order you mention therein. Signed, W. Hamilton. Endorsed, Recd. 10th, Read 12th Sept., 1711. 2 pp. Enclosed,
15. i. Minutes of Council of Antigua, Jan. 26, 17 10/11, showing that the Lt. General Hamilton, proposed, the Assembly agreed, but the Council refused to hire a vessel to take the news of Governor Parke's death to England. Endorsed as preceding. Copy. 2 pp. [C.O. 152, 9. Nos. 77, 77 i.; and (without enclosure) 153, 11. pp. 367–370.]
July 13.
Antigua.
16. Lt. General Hamilton to Lord Dartmouth. Duplicate of preceding letter. [C.O. 152, 42. No. 68.]
July 15.
Virginia.
17. Lt. Governor Spotswood to Lord Dartmouth. Repeats parts of July 25 following, relating to the disturbances in North Carolina. I shal reserve the further account of these commotions till the departure of our Fleet, now under an embargo (pursuant to H.M. commands signifyed to me by Governor Hunter) wch. will expire with this moneth. Had I found the assistance I expected from the men of war, my next might have brought your Lordp. the news of the total extinction of this flame, wch. now may spread much farther; but this is not the only disappointment the obstinacy of the Commodore has occasioned to H.M. service, etc. v. July 25. I have only been able to purchase about 700 barrells of pork in this Colony, which yet is three times as much as all the Revenue H.M. has here in bank will discharge: for the rest I have engaged my own credit, rather than H.M. service should suffer, and I hope your Lordp. will be pleased to interpose your interest, that the bills for it be answer'd at the Treasury. Signed, A. Spotswood. 5½ pp. Enclosed,
17. i. Duplicate of No. 42 v. [C.O. 5, 1337. Nos. 11, 11 i.]
July 16.
Spanish Towne.
18. Governor Handasyd to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Since my last of May 19th, there is past the four following Acts, vizt., (1) An Act to enable H.M. Treasury of this Island to support and discharge 'tis [?-its] extraordinary occasions by appropriating 3000l. out of the Additional Duty; (2) to prevent any one person from holding two or more offices of proffit in this Island, (3) for the maintenance of prisoners of war, (4) for vesting the estate of Thomas Finch of the parish of Kingston Esq. in trustees the better to enable his security to pay £3800 due from him to the publick. Some disputes hapning between the Council and Assembly in relation to a tack made to the bill to enable H.M. Treasury, etc., which they refused a conference upon, as your Lordpps. will see by the Minutes etc. I shall take care to send by H.M.S. the Nonsuch, which will sayle the latter end of this month. I designe to imbarke in her myself. But the greatest misfortune was the assumeing to themselves a right to adjourne for a longer time then de die in diem, as by their Minutes of ye 5 June, which has been twice attempted before dureing my Goverment, but they could never carry their point; since it was so much contrary to H.M. royal prorogative and Instructions, upon which I commanded the Speaker and the House to attend me in Council, and haveing passed the above mentioned, and then useing all the little Rhethorick I had to induce them to returne to the business that was not done, vizt. the Quartring Act, the Additional Duty Act; and what others they might think necessary for the well governing this Island. But instead of that they went about drawing up a message to desire leave to adjourn for a month, wch. was within 20 days of the aforesaid Acts expireing. And being informed that their resolutions was that if the time was not granted them they would adjourn themselves, myself and Councill finding their obstinancy, their opinion was unanimus to disolve the Assembly, (wch. was accordingly done the 8th June) and to call another, and the Council farther promissed to use their best endeavours that such persons should be chosen in their several parishes as should shew their duty and loyalty to H.M. and their zeal for the good and welfare of this Island. And according to the several returnes already made they have chosen such persons as will answer the end of calling a new Assembly; for it's my oppinion the least inclined to faction of any Assembly that has been hitherto since my being here. Capt. Vernon, Commander of H.M.S. the Jersey returned from Carthageen the 4th or 5th of this instant with an accot. that there was 8 or 9 sayle of large ships, besides other smal vessells in the Harbour, and seemed to make all the dispatch posible for sayling. My Lord Hamilton, Governor of Jamaica, arrived here 11th instant, and was waited on by myself and Council at Port Royal where H.M. Commission was produced and proclaimed, and the usual oaths administered to the Governor as is customary, after which I delivered him up my stewardship, and at my return I hope I shall have the good fortune to demonstrate that dureing my governing here I have done everything to the best of my judgement for the honour of H.M. and trust reposed in me, as well as for the interest and good goverment of the inhabitants here, which I hope will be to H.M. satisfaction as well as your Lordps., and at my arrivall shall not fail to pay my respects to your Lordpps. Yesterday Comadore Littleton sayled with 5 men of war for Carthageen in hopes to intercept Mons. Du Case pray God send him good success notwithstanding he is hardly strong enough. Yet I assure myself he will do all that a gallant man can do for the service of our Queen and Country. I have put so many men of H.M. Regt. under my command as he desired to help to man them, etc. Postscript. Since my writing of this a New Englandman is come in here, and says that Capt. Padon, Commander of the Windsor and the Waymouth has taken a French man of war of 40 od gunns and two French merchantmen all very rich and of an extraordinary value, and that they arrived at Boston in New England nine dayes before he came from thence. And a privateer of this place, Capt. Tempest commander, has also taken four prizes of a considerable value as the Capt. reports, and has brought them into Boston also, so that we expect them here in a very short time, the Capt. being come from thence 33 days. Signed, Tho. Handasyd. Endorsed, Recd. 10th, Read 12th Sept., 1711. 2⅓ pp. [C.O. 137, 9. No. 44; and 138, 13. pp. 348–352.]
July 16.19. Governor Handasyd to Lord Dartmouth. Duplicate of preceding. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 47.]
July 16.
Barbados.
20. Governor Lowther to the Council of Trade and Plantations. All the publick affairs of this Island are in a very bad condition, but I hope by your Lordshipes' kind advice and assistance to see this place once more flourish, etc. Encloses Minutes of Council and Assembly. Signed, Rob. Lowther. Endorsed, Recd. Sept. 26th, Read Nov. 15th., 1711. Holograph. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 71; and 29, 12. p. 376.]
July 16.21. Address of the General Assembly of New Jersey to the Queen. The great preparations your Majesty has made for the reduction of Canada is a demonstration that the remotest of your Dominions are not exempted from your Royall care; and that the benefit, ease and safety of your subjects wherever they are, as they are the good effects of your Administration, so they are what your Majesty most cheifly studies to promote, which cannot fail of engaging the favour and assistance of heaven to make you always victorious, and will procure you a just Fame as lasting and as glorious as the Trophies gain'd by your triumphant arms can entitle you to. Our duty and the share we shall have in the common security of North America engages our thankfull acknowledgmt. for your Majesties' favours. And as we have with great chearfulness contributed to the very utmost of our abilities to it, so wee shall most readily and most willingly support your Majesties Government and study to do it in such a manner as shall be most agreeable to you, espetially now wee feel the happy effects of it in the prudent conduct of your Majesties faithful servant H.E. Robert Hunter, etc. Signed, By order of the House, John Kay, Speaker. Parchment. 1 large p. [C.O. 5, 1091. No. 41.]
July 16.22. Memorial of Planters and Traders to Jamaica to the Queen. We do think it our duty to lay before your Majesty the apprehensions we are under of the great danger that all the British Colonies of ye West Indies, especially the Island of Jamaica, are now in from the French. It is notorious that Mons. du Casse was dispatcht in March last with a squadron of large men of war for the Spanish Indies, and it is now made publick in all the foreign advices that Monsr. du Guay hath been lately fitted out with a very considerable Fleet, and that he hath with him a great number of land forces, and it is said positively in some letters from France that their chief design is to attack ye Island of Jamaica, and wt. induceth us not to doubt thereof is ye certain advice we have that there is a body of 1500 made ready at Martinico to be embarked. The vast advantages that the French would have by possessing themselves of that Island make it probable, and the irreperable damage that the British Nation must for ever labour under besides ye utter ruin of all that are concern'd in the Island and Trade thereof justly alarms. Pray that speedy and effectual means be taken for the security thereof. Signed, Cha. Long, and 19 others. 2 pp. Enclosed,
22. i. A proposal for the better defence of Jamaica, July 16, 1711. There being but 500 regular soldiers there, it is proposed that three or four 4th rates be sent forthwith carrying 250 marines each, etc. 1¼ pp. The whole endorsed, Recd. Read July 17, 1711. [C.O. 137, 9. Nos. 40, 41; and 137, 51. Nos. 50, 51; and (without enclosure) 138, 13. pp. 339, 340.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
23. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. Enclose preceding to be laid before H.M. [C.O. 138, 13. p. 341; and (with autograph signatures) 137, 51. No. 49.]
July 17.
Treasury Chambers.
24. Mr. Lowndes to Mr. Popple. Encloses following correspondence relating to a complaint by Lt. Governor Spotswood that Mr. Corbin, Naval Officer of Rapahannock River, had cleared the Robinson frigate, by which the Governor intended to send letters and public papers, without his knowledge, Mr. Corbin being part owner of that ship and having, by a notorious piece of forgery, altered the date of H.M. sign manual exempting her from being embargoed. The Lord Treasurer desires the Council of Trade and Plantations to examine into the matter with all convenient speed. Signed, Wm. Lowndes. Endorsed, Recd. 18th, Read 19th July, 1711. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
24. i. Extract of letter from Lt. Governor Spotswood to [? Lord Dartmouth] May 5, 1711. As above. 2¼ pp.
24. ii. Copy of H.M. permit for the Robinson to sail without convoy within 12 months from Feb. 18, 1709, in the eigth year of our reign, etc. Signed, Sunderland. Mem. The word February, the figure 9 and the word eighth appear plainly to have been razed and are written with a different ink. The date in the books in the Lord Dartmouth's Office is Sept. 18, 1708. 1¾ p.
24. iii. Lord Dartmouth to the Lord High Treasurer. Encloses i. and ii. preceding. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1316. Nos. 66, 66 i.–iii.; and (without enclosures) 5, 1363. p. 326.]
July 17.
St. Jago de la Vega.
25. Governor Lord A. Hamilton to Lord Dartmouth. Repeats and refers to parts of No. 28 infra. Continues:—I found the Marquis de Suere had been some time gone to Carthagena, as I suppose, upon his parol; and I have endeavour'd by the opportunity of Commodore Littleton's going over thither with five ships of his squadron to intercept (if possible) Mons. du Casse, to notify H.M. commands in relation to the Marquis's exchange signified to me by your Lop. in such manner as I hope due regard will be had to them. What your Lop. has been pleased to command me touching the prisoners at Lima, must be transacted at Panama, by the way of Portobello, and which I will be sure to take due care in, as soon as possibly I can, etc. Signed, A. Hamilton. 3 pp. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 48.]
July 17.
Antigua.
26. Lt. General Hamilton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Since my last of the 13th inst. the Lt. Governor of this Island has rose a dispute between him and myselfe, he alledging that as I am not named in H.E.'s instructions to be of the Council, but only for the Island of Nevis, where I have the honour to bear H.M. Commission as Lt. Governour, so I ought not to sitt or precide in any of the Councills of the other Islands, but only in that of Nevis, which seems somewhat strange, and may prove very prejudiciall to H.M. service; as to the first it seems very od that I should one day bee at the head of the whole Government, and deliver that Government up by H.M. order to a superior by her appoynted, and by that means immediatly loose my place in Councill, or bee quite out of that Councill where I was but just before the head, and bear still the same Commission, by which I satt there, then which I think nothing can be more strange, which dispute was refer'd to H.E. who tould me he would write your Lordships about it. As to the second, of its proveing prejudiciall to H.M. servis, it may be of vast consequence; for should H.E. at any time bee to Leeward, and I in this Island, Mountserratt attack'd, had I whole command, both civill and military, I might on any such occasion releive said Island, before H.E. probably could have any notice of it, and the like by other Islands, for its seldome that the Generall and Lt. Generall are in one Island long together, now on the other hand, if the civill power is seperate, and lodged in Lt. Governour, when the Lt. Generall is in place, the said Lt. Generall may command and have men reddy for the releife of any Island, or other service, but cannot take up vessels, provisions etc. for transporting said forces, without applying himselfe to an inferiour officer, and then perhaps meet with twenty difficultys, of which I shall give your Lordships but one instance, and that was in 1702, the first year of the war, when I had a commission, the honour for Major Generall from Col. Codrington, the then Captain Generall and Governour in chiefe, who sent me a letter that the war was proclaim'd and inclosed an order to make all the dispatch that possibly I could with the Queen's troops from Nevis, and those from Mountseratt who he had ordered to joyne me, to go and secure St. Christophers, which order I received the 28th day of June about 2 a clock in the morning. I immediately applyed myselfe to the then President of Nevis (for there was no Governour there at that time) to furnish me with vessels for transporting myselfe and men, but met with a great many difficultys, and at last had a brigantine lent me by one of my friends, without which I could not have made the dispatch I did, for I was with the forces aforesaid upon St. Christophers that night before sunsett and secured all the passes, by which means I had the French part of that Island delivered me upon the 4th of July following. Therefore I beg your Lordships to remove the same by ordering the premisses as in your great wisdome seems meet and just; I haveing nothing so much in view as H.M. service, the preservation of the Islands, the good and wellfare of the people therein, etc. Signed, W. Hamilton. Endorsed, Recd. Sept. 28th, Read Oct. 27th, 1711. 2½ pp. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 89; and 153, 11. pp. 399–402.]
July 17/28.
Fort Kykoverall.
Rio Essequebo.
27. Commandant Vanderheyden Rezen to the Dutch West India Company. Dutch. 4 pp. Signed, P. Vanderheyden Rezen. Endorsed, Read Nov. 30 (O.S.), 1711. Enclosed,
27. i.–xxix. Letters, inventories, clearances etc. Dutch. 52 pp. [C.O. 116, 21. Nos. 6, 6 i.–xxix.]
July 17.
St. Jago de la Vega.
28. Governor Lord A. Hamilton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. After many disappointments, I at last arrived here the 11th instant etc. Your Lops. will not expect many particulars from me in so short a time, etc. As we came to Barbados the 22nd of June, we were allarm'd with the danger Antegoa was suppos'd to be in from the enemy; and as we thought it our duty to give them what assistance we could, we sail'd the same evening, taking our course between the Sanctos, close by Guardalupe, in order the better to have intercepted the enemy, had they been on their return. Arriving the 27th at Antegoa we found that the enemy had only made a faint on that Island, but had attack't Mountserrat, from which they had been bravely repulsed, etc. Since Commodore Littleton's departure (v. No. 18), the Medway's prize is come in from Pensilvania, which brings the confirmation of the Windsor and Weymouth's having taken the Thetis, a French man of war of 56 guns off the Havana etc. The prize is said to be very rich, to have Monsr. the Count of Choiseul, late Governour of Petit Guavas on board, who was kill'd with all the officers and above 100 men, having very bravely defended themselves. The loss in the Queen's ships is said to be inconsiderable. The Medway's prize, my Lords, I find was ordered to Providence with Ingenier Hawkins for a survey of that Island; He arrived here yesterday, and gives a very sad account of that place: But I must suspend saying any more of his expedition, untill I have time to examin into his orders and instructions, etc. The usual ceremony and hurry on the like occasion has prevented as yet my near inspection into the civil affairs and circumstances of my Government. The Island, they tell me, is pretty healthy; the Assembly I find dissolv'd, and a new one call'd, which is to meet the 23rd instant, and several material laws expire on Aug. 1st., so that there is a necessity of their meeting then, and indeed they seem somewhat straitned for time, etc. Signed, A. Hamilton. Endorsed, Recd. 10th, Read 12th Sept., 1711. 3 pp. [C.O. 137, 9. No. 45; and 138, 13. pp. 353–355.]
July 17.
Whitehall.
29. Mr. Popple to the Secretaries of the Treasury. Encloses extract of letters from Mr. George Clarke, May 30, 31, and June 7, relating to the Palatines. [C.O. 5, 1122. pp. 419–423.]
July 17.
Newcastle in Carlisle Bay att Barbadoes.
30. Capt. Bourn to [? Secretary of the Admiralty]. I send this for the information of the Lords Commrs. of the Admlty., that on Sunday the 10th of June last off port St. Piers in Martineco about two miles from the shore, I mett a French ship of 36 gunns, a hagboat built ship of 24, a two mast vessell and nine privatier sloopes having (as I have been since informed) 2000 men on board, and bound to make a decent upon Antegoa, by that time I gott within pistoll shott of the ships, it fell starke calme, and they lay soe upon my quarter, that I could not bring a broad side to bear, however after about three houers engagement with them, I shatter'd them soe, that with the very first breese, they endeavour'd to gett into the harbour again, which they succeeded in, for I had two nine pound shott through my foremast, soe that I could not venture to carry sayle upon it, and all my rigging and sayles very much shattered. I lost but one man, and had nine wounded besides my Lieut. who was shott in four places, but hope all will recover. I returned to Barbadoes the Friday following, and on Saterday two expresses arrived from the Leeward Islands desireing assistance (the Larke their guardship being then refitting at Barbadoes) and the Guernsey and Sweepstakes out a cruizeing; I refitted my mast and ship with what expedition I could, and on Sunday night sayled for Antegoa, and perceiving by signalls made from the shore, that the enemy were not there, I continued my course for Monseratt, where I arrived on Wednesday evening, and upon consulting with the President and Councell of that Island, I was advised by them to proceed to Nevis as the place the enemy are most probably at, and accordingly I sayl'd at 12 a clock at night, and was scarce gone three hours, when sixteen privatiers landed 1500 men on Monseratt, but they hearing of my being at Nevis, and seeing a sloope escape from them with intelligence of their being there to me, imediately embark'd again without doeing any damage to the Island, they gott away before my return, having left severall men prisoners behind them, who upon examination informed us that their first designe was against Antegoa, but that their ships were soe shattered, that they could not goe to sea, and therefore they attempted Monseratt, they having 64 men killed and a great many wounded, as they give an account. Signed, L. Bourn. Endorsed, Recd. from Mr. Fawlers of the Admty. Sept. 27, 1711. Copy. 2½ pp. [C.O. 28, 43. No. 62.]
July 19.
Whitehal.
31. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Recommend that John Carver be appointed to the Council of Jamaica in place of Thomas Clark, decd. [C.O. 138, 13. p. 342.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
32. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. We have received letters from Mr. George Clarke (v. May 28, 30, 31 and June 7th) wherein he informed us that the Governor of Canada had lately sent to the Five Nations of Indians some officers and soldiers with a large present, etc., consisting cheifly in ammunition, of which they are in great want. By the influence whereof the French had by permission of the said Indians, begun to build a small fortification in the Onnondage country. That the neutrality that has been observed between the English Indians and French Indians this war, has given our enemy the opportunity of thus corrupting our Indians, and the people of New York seem generally averse to a rupture between the said Indians, and rather than be at the expence of supplying them with ammunition in such a case, and defending their frontiers, which must neccessarily follow, choose to sit contented under this precarious security; without even so much as raising any money for presents to such of the Indians, whose fidelity may deserve them. And the presents Col. Hunter carried with him being almost all disposed of that way, and for spies last winter (for whom the Assembly made no provision) there's nothing now left to trust to, but the faith of those Indians, and how much that is shaken already, is but too evident from their proceedings. That so soon as Col. Hunter had notice that these French officers were at Onondage, he dispatched Col. Schuyler thither, with Instructions how to behave himself with the Indians on this occasion. Copy of his Journal inclosed. v. C. S. P. 1710, 1711. No. 864 i. [C.O. 5, 1122. pp. 424, 425.]
July 19.
Whitehall.
33. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Dartmouth. Enclose following.
33. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Representation on the petition of Berkeley Seymour (v. C. S. P. 1710, 1711. No. 343 i.). In consideration of Col. Seymour's long and faithfull services to the Crown, he having serv'd your Majesty and your Royal predecessors in a military post above 30 years before his going to that province; and in consideration that he had clear'd several ships from Maryland, and would have clear'd the remainder had he lived some few days longer, whereby he had been entituled to the 12d. per hhd., we humbly offer that, to enable the petitioner to support his father's widow and his other children, and to pay his debts and legacies, your Majesty be graciously pleased to grant the petitioner a moiety of the 9d. per hhd. arrising from the ships then in Maryland (as granted by his Commission) the amounts whereof, as we are informed, will not exceed 4 or £500. We further offer that your Majesty's pleasure be signifyed to the President of the Councill, that he account with the petitioner's Attorney for the moiety of the 9d. per hhd. accordingly. [C.O. 5, 727. pp. 277–280.]
July 19.
Whitehal.
34. Wm. Popple to Josiah Burchett. Asks for a copy of the report of the Lord High Admiral upon which H.M. letter of exemption for the Robinson frigate was founded (v. July 17). [C.O. 5, 1363. p. 327.]
July 20.
Admiralty Office.
35. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Encloses following in reply to preceding. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. 21st., Read 25th July, 1711. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
35. i. Report of H.R.H. the Lord High Admiral, Sept. 10, 1708. I have noe objection to the Robinson frigate being permitted to sayle without convoy, etc. Signed, George. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1316. Nos. 67, 67 i.; and 5, 1363. pp. 327, 328.]
July 20.
Antigua.
36. Governor Douglas to the Rt. Hon. Robert Monckton, one of the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations. I arrived here ye 10th inst. where the People expressed a great satisfaction in H.M. goodness for dispatching a new Governor to remedy their late disorders, and being alarmed by the French since ye time they were repulsed at Montserrat, I have been oblidged to spend most of my time as yet in putting the Island in the best posture of defence, the Regiment being in so weak a condition as to men, and so ill armed that little service can be expected from them while they are suffered to continue in this disorder. I am by all opportunitys endeavouring to inform myself of the cases of the persons concerned in the late rebellion according to H.M. order. I found all the General Assembly with some of the Council deeply concern'd in it, and the same persons being the men of the best estates are again chosen, except one or two. I hope therefore I shall be allowed to proceed according to H.M. directions with all necessary precaution, believing it were much the same thing to lose a thriving Colony to the publick enemy or by a civil war, hopeing in a little time to be able to prevent both and to do all Justice to the authority of our Soveraign Lady the Queen. They seem very unanimous in carrying on the publick works and fortifications of ye Island, they express their duty in a most sorrowful sence and detestation of the desperate fact, their most intollerable oppressions harried them into, so many hundreds being involved in the same guilt but how far ye sufferings of this unhappy people who seem disposed to a more strict obedience and subjection may mitigate H.M. just resentments, I hope every day to receive the honour of being acquainted with. I humbly begg the Lords Commissioners of Trade forgiveness for not having had a possibility as yet of giving a further account of this affair by this pacquet: begging leave to recommend Capt. Mathews to be of the Council in this Island. P.S. I shall readily obey your commands relating to Mr. Parke with the very first possibility. There being something of a dispute between Lt. General Hamilton and the Lieut. Governor of this Island about their taking place, I must desire their Lordships' opinion whether the said Lt. Genl. ought not to take place of the Lt. Governors in their respective Islands at the Council board, and in all civil matters, as well as by his Commission he of right doth in military affairs, he being only mentioned in my Instructions for the Island of Nevis, where he is Lt. Governor, begging their Lordships will let me have their advice thereon by first opportunity, that I may the better know how to proceed upon this or the like dispute. Signed, Wa. Douglas. Endorsed, Recd. Read Oct. 30, 1711. Addressed. Postmark. Sealed. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 86; and 153, 11. pp. 390, 391.]