America and West Indies
July 1711, 26-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1925

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50-66

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'America and West Indies: July 1711, 26-31', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 26: 1711-1712 (1925), pp. 50-66. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73878 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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July 1711, 26-31

July 26.47. Address of the General Assembly of New York to the Queen. Being sensible in the highest degree of the many blessings wee have enjoyed dureing your Majesties most happy and glorious reign, wee humbly take this occasion to tender your Majestie our due acknowledgments and hearty thanks for the same and in particular for your Majesties great grace and favour in the present Expedition to reduce Canada and Newfoundland entirely to your Majesties subjection and dominion, which as its grounded not only on the many wrongs, injuries and losses sustained by your Majesties good subjects from those French incroachments but in the vast advantages will acrew to the Brittish Empire on the success of the undertakeings is an undeniable proof of your Majesties great prudence and inimitable goodness to and care of all your subjects. Wee do not fail in useing our utmost endeavors in contributing towards attaineing the desired end (which with the favour of Allmighty God) seems indisputable and its our hearty prayers this and many other conquests may be added to your Majestie with a long and prosperous reign. Signed, W. Nicoll, Speaker. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1091. No. 40.]
July 26.48. Address of the General Assembly of New York to the Queen. Wee your Majesties most dutiful and loyall subjects of your Colony and Plantation of New York in America in Generall Assembly convein'd and mett, most humbly crave leave to offer to your Majesties most royall consideration. That not only during the whole course of the late and present warr with France this Colony has been greatly burthen'd with extraordinary levy's for it's defence against the common enemy, but the charges of the ordinary support of the Government has been very great and exorbitant in proportion wth. the Colonys adjacent. That this your Plantation (tho' one of the least in your Majesties Dominions in America) has long labour'd under many hardships and difficulties, by reason whereof our trade is decay'd, the rents of houses and lands decreased, the little wealth it possest and the best and most industrious of its inhabitants drein'd into the neighbouring Colonys, induced by the ease and indulgence of the Government in those parts. That in the last intended attempt on Canada, induc'd by the commands of your Majty. and the solid reason of the design, wee not only chearfully supplied our proporcon of men allotted, tho' very unequall to our neighbours (Connecticut having twice as many and New Jersey and equall number of people) but solely bore the charge of victualling the five Nations and all other Indians, your Majtie's. standing fforces, the building and making all the battoes and canoes, and many other incidentall charges too many to enumerate to your Majesty. That in the present expedition (to which Almighty God grant good success) altho' wee are very sencible of the vast disproportion of the men and money required of us compar'd with those in favour of our neighbours, yet with all alacrity wee are doing out utmost to obey your Royall commands, tho' our extream poverty and inability obstructs our inclinations to fulfill them as wee desire. The disadvantages wee sink under its our apprehension must proceed from the sinister insinuations made to our prejudice, the misrepresentation of the state and condicon of this Colony by such who find it their interest to be our enemys, and the want of a person fitly authorized and enabled to speak and act for us at your Majty's. Court and upon all occasions to appear in our behalf and answer to such matters and things as may concern this Colony. Wee therefore are most humble suitors to your most sacred Majestie that graciously weighing our present and past circumstances you will please to accept of our most hearty endeavours as farr as wee are able, and that wherein wee are deficient, your Majesties Royall commisseration, clemency and bounty will supply the defects, and grant us such farther releif as is agreeable to your Majesties great goodness and justice, etc. Signed, By order of the Genll. Assembly, W. Nicoll, Speaker. 1 large p. [C.O. 5, 1091. No. 42.]
July 26.
Whitehal.
49. Mr. Popple to the Secretaries of the Treasury. The Council of Trade and Plantations have examined into the matter of the Robinson frigate. It appears to their Lordships that the words have been rased as Mr. Spotswood observes. (v. July 17, and 20th). [C.O. 5, 1363. pp. 329, 330; and (rough draft) 5, 1335. p. 126.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
50. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Representation upon the petition of Lord Baltimore (v. Feb. 7, March 10, July 21). We have heard his Lordship by his Counsell, as also Mr. Solicitor Generall in behalf of your Majesty, whereupon we humbly represent, that it appears that in 1689 severall articles of complaints were exhibitted by the inhabitants of that Province against his Lordship and his officers. Quote preamble to Col. Copley's Commission 1691. v. July 21 supra. Whereupon we are humbly of oppinion that it will best conduce to the safety of that Province, and to the alaying the fears and quieting the minds of the people there, to continue the Government, as now it is, under a Governor of your Majestye's immediate appointmt., at leastwise during the present war, and till the dangers and inconveniencies which may arise from any new alteration be more fully removed. [C.O. 5, 727. pp. 291–293.]
July 26.
Whitehall.
51. Mr. Popple to Mr. Attorney General. The Council of Trade and Plantations concurr with you in your report upon the petition of Lord Baltimore, (v. July 21) and have this day signed a representation to H.M. conformable thereto. [C.O. 5, 727. p. 294.]
July 27.
Whitehall.
52. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lt. Governor Bennet. Enclosed warrant of July 10 relating to Day's house, with instructions to proceed accordingly. [C.O. 38, 7. p. 20.]
July 27.
Boston.
53. Brigadier General Hill to Lord Dartmouth. Encloses and recommends following. Signed, J. Hill. Enclosed,
53. i. Memorial of Col. Whitney, Capt. Bartlett and Ensign Cocksedge to General Hill. The above were wounded and taken prisoner in the fighting about Annapolis Royal. Pray for relief in the matter of ransom etc. Signed, Willm. Whiting, John Bartlett, John Cocksedge. The truth of the above testified by Sam. Vetch. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 9. Nos. 7, 8.]
July 28.
Nevis.
54. Lt. General Hamilton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The great hurry and fatague I have had whilst I was at the head of this Government by frequently pursuing the enemy, whilst I had the man of war to attend me, has bin the occasion I could not send home the severall acts past for the sundry Islands in my time, which as soon as I had any leasure I sent to the sundry Deputy Secretarys for and now transmit them to your Lordships for H.M. royal approbation etc. I have sent the coppy of your letter relateing St. Christophers to the Lt. Governour of that Island. I am but just arrived at this Island, so have nothing to ad at present. Signed, W. Hamilton. Endorsed, Recd., Sept. 28, Read Nov. 27, 1711. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 9. No. 90; and 153, 11. pp. 403, 404.]
July 28.
Virginia.
55. Lt. Governor Spotswood to Lord Dartmouth. Repeats concluding portions of July 25 q.v. Upon advice that some of the chief of Mr. Cary's factions were come into this countrey, the Council advis'd the issuing a Proclamation for apprehending them till they should give security for their good behaviour, for no Governmt. can be safe that has in it such dangerous incendiarys etc. Signed, A. Spotswood. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1337. No. 12.]
July 30.
Windsor.
56. Order of Queen in Council. Appointing John Carver to the Council of Jamaica. Signed, John Povey. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 11. No. 67.]
July 30.
Windsor.
57. Order of Queen in Council. Approving of Edward Hyde as Governor of North Carolina, provided he qualify himself and give security as proposed July 12. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 25, Read Oct. 23, 1711. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1264. No. 121; and 5, 1292. pp. 321, 322.]
July 30.
Windsor.
58. Order of Queen in Council. Referring enclosed to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their opinion. Signed, John Povey. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 10, Read Sept. 12, 1711. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
58. i. Address of the Minister, Churchwardens and Vestry of the Church of St. Mary in Bridlington, New Jersey, to the Queen. Most dread Sovereign, The transcendent affection to and care of the Protestant Religion and Church of England that your Majty. hath at all times and on all occasions given the greatest assurance of and more especially in your late speech to your Parliamt. emboldens us your Majty's. dutyfull and loyall subjects to lay in the most humble manner the following Address at your Majty's. feet. We have by too fatall experience found that the admission of Quakers into offices of the highest trust in the Governmt. such as the Councill and Assembly hath very much retarded your Majty's. service, obstructed the peace of the Province, and above all extreamly dampt the increase and progress of the doctrine and discipline of the best of Churches, the Church of England. But what can hinder the intire ruin of our Church and State, if these enemys of both, who never want the will when they have the opportunity to hurt us be empowered by a law to destroy our religion, lives, libertys, reputations and estates at their pleasure. The danger of wch. has of late been but too apparent from the cunning address and interest of the Quakers of this present Assembly, who procured a Bill to be passed in the house of Representatives (ten of that perswasion being then sitting members there) to enable them to give evidence in criminall causes, serve on any jurys, and enjoy places of profit and trust in the Governmt., wch. being so contrary to the laws and statutes of your Majty's. Kingdom of Great Britain, was to the great satisfaction of your Majty's. good and loyall subjects the members of the Church of England rejected by your Majty's. Councill here. And tho' we should not presume to intermeddle in the affairs of another Province, especially in their making of Laws, if they had not too great an influence on the temper, humour, and inclinations of a great number of the inhabitants of this your Majty's. Colony, yet our common safety requiring our utmost opposition to whatsoever may endanger those things we justly think most dear and valuable to ourselves and our posterity, we further crave leave to acquaint your Majty that the Quakers have lately past an Act in our neighbouring Colony of Pensylvania constituting a new form of protestation repugnant to the afirmation enjoyned them by Act of Parliamt. in Great Britain in which the name of God is entirely omitted thereby slighting the indulgence the laws have allowed them and setting up for themselves, doing whatsoever seems good in their own eyes. How far such dangerous and pernicious practices may tend to the destruction of the very being of our constitution of Government, and what security we have for the enjoyment of our undoubted rights and priviledges either ecclesiasticall or civill we most humbly submitt to your Majty's. most wise and just determination, not in the least doubting but the rays of your Royal benignity will equally shine on us in this distant wilderness with the rest of your Majt's. subjects to our great satisfaction and comfort, etc. etc. Signed, Hu. Huddy, Dan. Coxe, Tho. Revell, J. Bass, John Talbot, Alexander Griffith, Daniell Leeds, George Willis, John Lammell. Copy. 3½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1264. Nos. 118, 118 i.; and 5, 1292. pp. 315–319.]
July 30.
Windsor.
59. H.M. Warrant, granting to George Clarke, Secretary of New York, leave of absence for one year, etc. Countersigned, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. p. 101.]
[? July 31.]60. Lt. Governor Spotswood to [? Lord Dartmouth.] Since my letter of 28th current, I received information that Col. Cary and some of the principal ringleaders in the late disturbances in Carolina were come to this place: whereupon not judging it consistent with the peace of this Governmt. to suffer such incendiarys to remain here, I thought fitt to examine them touching their intentions in coming into this Government. They alledged they came hither to gett a passage for England, that they might justify themselves before the Lords Proprietors for what they had done; but withall refused to give any security to answer there; and finding so much shuffling and evasion in all their discourses, as plainly show'd they intended nothing less than to stand a tryal; I have thought fitt to send them home by the men of war of this convoy, that they may be made accountable for their actions either before the Lords Proprietors of Carolina or in such other manner as H.M. shal think fitt. I have directed the Commodore upon his arrival in England to give your Lordp. immediate notice, and wait your directions for the disposal of the prisoners. And I must humbly offer my opinion, that if measures are not taken to discourage such mutinous spirits, especially when they are so audacious as to take up arms, and even to confederate with savages, it may prove a dangerous example to the rest of H.M. Plantations. Signed, A. Spotswood. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1337. No. 13.]
July 31.
From on board the Windsor at sea.
61. Brig. General Hill to Lord Dartmouth. Sir Hovenden Walker having thought fitt to send home the Devonshire and Humber from this place, I take that occasion to acquaint you with our safe arrivall in Nantaskett Road June 24th with all the men of warr and transports, except one which had two companys of Col. Desneys Regiment and their cloathing on board, that lost company with the fleet before wee gott the length of Scilly. The troops landed in much better condition then wee expected, after a voyage of eight weeks, and those which had been embarqued the longest were in as good health as the others; I refer you to the Admirall for a particular account of our passage, and to the inclosed copy of that part of my Journall which relates to our transactions with the Government, and inhabitants of Boston, concerning provisions etc., which have been attended with more difficultys and disappointments than are proper to transmitt to you at this distance. It was unlucky that Mr. Nicholson did not arrive in North America, with notice of the intended Expedition before June 8th last, which would not only have been a great advantage in the timely preparation of provisions, but also put H.M. affairs into such a posture as would have secured them from the present necessity of being a prey to the marchants of North America. Refers to Journal. The first offer the marchants of Boston made was £120 of their country money for £100 sterling, and in severall dayes distance between whiles, came up, by ten pounds at a time to £140, after they found nobody would conive at or share with them in their exorbitant gain on the publick's necessity; which the Assembly established by regulating the exchange on that foot, and voting a loane of £40,000 to be struck in their paper money, to be advanced for subsisting the troops etc. as there should be occasion; this was the effect of many days solicitation, and I had the good fortune to carry the point, but few hours before Col. Hunter informed me from New York, that the Councill of that Colony would not come up to above 130 p.c., which he was obliged to close with, or leave the service undone. But this 10 p.c. which wee have gained upon the New England people, more than the exchange settled at New York, wee are obliged to part with to the troops, in that share of the loane which goes to the payment of their subsistance, who, according to the practice at home and in Holland, are payd their full pay, without discount of tallys or deduction of exchange, so are obliged to pay them at the rate of £150 p.c., which could in no wise be avoided, for upon paying their subsistance in English money, when they landed, before wee could gett paper money from the country, they found an English shilling, which specie they had a right to be payd in, went currantly for 18 pence, and I thought it intirely for the service to reserve the little English money I brought from England with me for the many necessary uses we should have for it in a siege, in so distant a country, in case wee should not be so happy as to be supply'd from home with specie, or find some expedient to answer the want of coin'd money at Quebeck. Many letters have pass'd between Col. Hunter and myself during my stay at Boston touching the levys and procurement of provisions in his and the neighbouring Governments, ordered by our Instructions for three months for the Brittish troops, but I finding that wee must expect the greatest part of the pork from Virginia and Maryland, and only flower, biskett and butter from New York, all which he could only bespeak after he had notice of the Expedition, was of opinion it could not possibly be sent time enough to us at Boston, or before it would, it would be too late to go to Quebeck, therefore considering this and the many rubbs he mett with and the great uncertainty of his getting the other species of victualls, made me resolve to gett all the provision I could in New England, at the most reasonable price the Government would establish, and to make the best of my way to Canada, choosing rather to leave our future supply to Providence and the care of Col. Hunter (who on all occasions, to do him justice, has shewn an uncommon zeal and indefatigable application for the service of the expedition) than to be a day too late in putting to sea. You will agree with me that this was the only expedient wee could find to retrieve the misfortune of Mr. Nicholson's late arrivall in these parts, especially when I tell you that Col. Hunter acquainted me not many dayes before wee sayled from Boston, which was the 30th of this month, that the Colony of Maryland had baulked him, the Councill refusing to order the Receivers to part wth. the money in their hands, and wee had only eight small sloops loads, which came from New London two days before wee sayled, of all the provisions wee expected from Col. Hunter, the rest being to follow, so if extraordinary means had not been used to find out hidden provisions at Boston, wee must have stay'd for Col. Hunter's, and the season being already farr advanced, the consequence might have been fatall. When I came from Boston I left it in charge with the Governour, to procure a certain quantity of beef, pork and pease in lieu of that wch. should have been bought up in Maryland, to send after us in all the month of October which is the longest time of the year that the River of St. Laurence is open, and I have desired Col. Hunter to correspond with and assist him in it, I having left an officer to solicite the matter at Boston. In obedience to the 4th Art. of my Instructions, I detached the Mary transport, and the Admirall sent the Kingston with her to New York, where she arrived very late, (v. Journal enclosed), but I hope not too late to supply the New York people with arms etc., nor the Indians with H.M. presents, the compleat number of the former being raised, and Col. Hunter having made up the 4 independent companys with Palatines into a Regiment, they will be marching from Albany towards the Wood Creek, much about the time that wee gett to the mouth of the River, as Col. Nicholson and I have concerted it. Col. Vetch being at Annapolis when I arrived at Boston, I gott the Admirall to send the Saphire with two companys of New England men to relieve the marines, who are reduced to a small number, by reason of the French and Indians having killed and taken a party of the garrison lately, and therefore I desired but 100, tho' the 8th Article of my Instructions enjoyns me not only to take all the marines, but such other men as may be proper for service, putting others leveyd in New England to serve in the garrison in their stead. I desired likewise that such Cahorne mortars and ordnance stores as could be spared might be sent at the same time; but Coll. Vetch was come away in the country sloop before the Saphire arrived at Annapolis, and Sir Charles Hobby, who was appointed Deputy Governour, has thought fitt to disobey my orders, in not sending the marines, Cohorne mortars or ordnance stores, aledging many groundless reasons, which Col. Vetch says are every one false, for excuse; so I have thought it for the service to repeat my orders to him, for sending the marines etc., by another of the country vessells. Refers to enclosure ii. q.v. I have for the present consented to this method, till H.M. pleasure be further known, since the Government can be no loser thereby. You will also receive a prented declaration by way of manifesto in favour of the French and Indians in Canada and Nova Scotia, who shall peaceably submitt to H.M. Wee have lost some men by death since our landing, and the people of the country by favouring and concealing the escape of deserters, have, for their own advantage, in spite of all the care that could be taken, seduced too many of our men, which could not be recruited because of the great price of labour in the Colonys: and as for restraining the men in their dyet according to the 5th Article of my Instructions, there was no need of it, because their pay was but just sufficient to afford them common refreshment, meat being raised to 3d. in the pound, and every thing else in proportion, for the people of the country could by no perswasion be brought to settle a markett. I may venture to say one thing more in relation to that Art., that troops were never guilty of less disorders than these have been in New England, for I heard of none in prejudice of the country; some negroes indeed listed themselves voluntarily to serve, which the officers were willing to entertain in lieu of the men that had been stol'n from them, but upon application I imediately ordered them to be discharged. Wee sayl'd yesterday morning with a favourable wind from Nantaskett Road, towards the River St. Lawrence, where wee hope to be in a few dayes. I pray leave to referr you to Admirall Walker for an account of the navigation of that River, and all other matters relating to his element. And the accounts wee have had of the strength and scituation of the town of Quebeck, differing so much from one another, I leave it to Coll. King who can give you the best information. I have directed the Deputy Paymaster to draw on the Paymaster of the forreigne troops for £23,889 15s. 1d. sterl. P.S. I fear it will be so late in the year before Quebeck is over that wee can attempt nothing on Placentia. Signed, J. Hill. 12 pp. Enclosed,
61. i. General Hill's Journal, June 25—July 29. June 25, 1711. The fleet and transports under command of Sr. Hovenden Walker having come to an anchor over night in Nantaskett Bay, within two leagues of Boston, the Secretary of the Province of New England with a Committee of the Councill in the absence of ye Governor came this morning on board the Devonshire, and invited the Brigadier to the town of Boston, were he and the Admirall we[re] received with the ceremonys usuall on such occasions, this day no Councill was held but the Brigadier was informed that Francis Nicholson, Lt. General of the Forces raising in America arrived here with the Leopard and Saphire and the Joseph and Neptune transports ye 8th of this month and that all those ships were here as yett, and no order given for their sailling to New York, the Leopard being now a cleaning and the Saphire but just clean'd, was thought to be a great part of the reason of this unaccountable delay, which was attended with the ill circumstance of the Brigadr. hearing nothing from New York of the arrivall of the Kingston and Mary transport laden with stores etc. for the use of the forces to be raised in that and the neighbouring Governments, however that no more time might be lost it was imediately agreed that the Sunderland should forthwith saile with the two transports to New York, which transports were to bring back as much of the provissions furnisht by that Province as they could carry. The Brigadr. was likewise informed that the flat-bottom'd boats and other things, mention'd in Col. Dudley's Instructions necessary for disembarking the troops and carrying on a seige we[re] getting ready at Boston, etc., and he ordered the Coll. of ye Train, Mr. King, to take upon him ye direction of that work. This above-mentioned Comittee told the Brigadr. that they had received an account, that a considerable number of the Garrison of Annopolis Royall was lately killed, and taken prisoners by the French and Indians, and that of two sloops lately sent thither with letters and provissions one was return'd for want of convoy, upon wch. the Comittee who in the afternoon attended the Brigadr., desired that a man of war might be imediately sent, with such of the New England forces as were design'd to relieve the marines of that Garrison, which forces they say'd would be ready to parade on Satturday next, the Brigadr. agreed thereto, and the Admirall being present say'd he would order the Saphire being a clean ship to perform this service, and when shee had taken the marines on board, her Capt. should be directed to meet the Fleet off Cape Brittain in its way to the River of St. Lawrence. The Brigadr. was told that one Monsr. Larone, being sent from Placentia with a flagg of Truce to this Government, was confin'd a close prisoner to the Castle on the Island. June 26. The Secretary of the Province and a Comittee of Councill attended the Brigadr. this morning, who told him it was absolutely necessary that Col. Vetch and Col. Whiten now at Annopolis should be forthwith sent for, they being very much wanted here, and they having no other way to bring them but by a man of warr, they desired one might be sent. Accordingly the Brigadr. writt to ye Admirall on that subject, they also represented the danger that Annapolis was in, by reason a French man of war had lately gon into an adjacent port to clean, and that one of our men of warr would on that occasion give great countenance to the Garrison, which they apprehended had not as yett any account of the arrivall of the fleet and land forces in America. June 27. Governor Dudley attended the Brigr. this day with the Minutes of the Councill of Warr lately held at New London in pursuance of H.M. Instructions, and the troops were this afternoon landed and encamped on Nodles Island. June 28. The Brigr. and the Admill. were present at a Councill called by Coll. Dudley to whom it was represented that the Brittish troops being landed, they would be in want of fresh provissions, as well for their refreshment, as to save the salt provissions, which was found at present very scarce in these provinces, and the Brigadr. having spoke to some merchants to furnish ready money for carrying on this service, had found them so unreasonable in their demands that he was obliged to have recourse to the Government for redress; after some debate it was agreed that £3000 should be lent for the use of the forces out of the Treasury of the Province, to suply the present necessity, till such time as proper measures could be taken, either to bring the merchants to reason, or to suply the troops, by such methods as the Genll. Assembly could fall upon, they being sumoned to sett in a few days. June 29. This day the Brigadeer din'd with the Governour at his house at Roxborough, and he presented to him one Mr. Harman, a Lieutenant in the American troops, who was just come from Canada, and gave a pretty distinct account of the scituation and strength of Quebeck, where he had been a prisoner for— months. June 30. This morning the Governour visited the Brigadr., who represented to him the fatall consequence that might attend the delay wee meet with here, and if some sudden course was not taken to curbe the avarice and underhand practices of some perticular persons who had since our arrivall clogg'd the procurement of provissions and money, which should have been taken care of before, he had reason to apprehend the troops would not gett away from hence before it was too late to put H.M. comands in execution at Quebeck. This day the merchants of the town, who ever since our arrivall had insisted upon the hard terms of giving but £120 of this country money for £100 sterl., sent a message to the Brigadier, that they would give £130. July 1. The Governour attended the Brigadier and told him that the forces to be raised in this Province were drawing toward their radezvous at this place, upon wch. the Coll. of the train and Comissary of the stores and provissions were severally dirrected to issue ye arms, accoutrements, and cloathing for the officers and soldiers, as of H.M. free gift, but that no person might share of the Queen's bounty, that was not quallified for it, all the arms and cloathing were to be delivered to the Governour, or such person as he should direct to receive them, and not to be deliver'd to the forces but upon producing certificate from Col. Twiszleton of each Capts. effective men after a strickt review, and if any of the arm, accoutremt. and cloathing remained after the forces were equipped, they were to be accounted for by ye Governour. This day Major Livingston, who was recomanded to the Brigadier by Coll. Hunter for a very usefull person, attended, and Coll. King being sent for with a map of the River St. Lawrence and Quebeck, the said Livingston was asked severall questions about the scituation and works of Quebeck, and was thought to give a very good account of it. July 2. The Brigadr. ordered Col. King and Mr. Gordon to acquaint the Councill that he had information given him, that some merchants and others had provissions in store, which they concealled for the present to put him under a necessity of takeing them off their hands at any rate, that he was very uneasy under so many disappointments, and that no care was taken neither for supplying the troops upon Nodles Island with fresh provissions, nor making any provission for their future subsistance, and it was now high time to tell them plainly, that if any thing miscarryd for want of their assistance which they in their repeated memorialls had offered to the Queen, and wch. H.M. now expected, it must be layd to their charge that had not exerted themselves in their stations, upon this extraordinary occasion the Councill not sitting they deliver'd this message to the Secretary of the Province, who said he would get them sumon'd as soon as possible. It was proposed yt. Proclamation should be made for all persons to bring in their fresh provissions and that a strict search should be made throughout the Province for salt provissions; especially pork, with a penalty on all persons that should directly or indirectly conceall what provissions they had in store; accordingly the Governr. issued a Proclamation next day, directing Wm. Clark and Francis Clark, two merchants of Boston, with such officers as the Brigadier should think fitt, to make search for provissions, but there was no penalty for any person endeavouring to make a monopoly, as was proposed. July 3. The Brigadier ordered Mr. Nutmaker, the Comissary of the Stores, and Major Allen to accompany the two Mr. Clarks, and accordingly they found the severall quantity and species afloat and ashore mentioned in the account annexed to ye Brigadier's Memoriall to the Governour and Councill of the 6th inst., and that they should from time to time make report to Mr. Gordon, who had the direction of what quantity of provissions could be gott together ashore or afloat and the care of getting it into one great magazin, in order to its being shipt off with all possible expedition for the use of the ships of warr, land forces and New England troops all under one, and upon shipping off the distribution to be made of the whole aboard the transports, ships of warr etc., according to the proposition allowed for each service. July 4. The Brigadier was invited to a Commencement at the College at Cambridge, near Boston, where he assisted for no other reason than to put the people of the Colony in humour to comply with the present necessary demands of the troops, and they seemed to show a generall satisfaction, for in spite of the false reports that were spread of the small-pox being in the camp, it was observed they brought in sufficient quantitys of all sorts of provissions after this, which in some measure put a stop to so many soldiers coming to Boston to by provissions as had done formerly, and consequently they had not so many opportunitys of drinking rhum to excess, which had thrown severall of them into violent feavours, that were now the only distempers which appeared to be in the hospitall. July 5. This day Coll. Twizelton review'd Capt. Lyon and Capt. Brown's Companyes of New England men of 50 each and they were cloathed, and arm'd in order to be sent in the Saphire to relieve the marines in Annapolis, and Coll. Dudley, who had receiv'd the cloaths accoutrements and arms for the New England forces, gave the charge of them to Coll. Townsend and Mr. —, and the officers' cloaths were given to Mr. Mines to make, the Brigadier haveing order'd one of the remaining suitts to be delivered to Major Livingston. Mr. Nutmaker, and Major Allen reported to Mr. Gordon that they had found severall quantitys of provissions concealed in town, and had been on board some ships lately come from the other Collonys wth. corn etc., and Mr. Gordon desired a perticular accot. in whose custody it was and the quantity, that application might be made to the Government to secure it for ye Queen's use. July 6. This day the Brigadier and the Admirall presented a joynt memoriall annexing the account of provissions found on shore and afloat, the entry of both is made in the Brigadier's books. Whereupon the Governour in Councill order'd that the exchange should be regulated at 40 per cent and settled the price of severall species of provissions as appears by their Minute. July 7. Mr. Nutmaker and Major Allen reported to Mr. Gordon that severall of the townspeople were so enraged at the order of the Governour and Councill for settling the price of provissions that they threatned to stave it and that they had of themselves layd 3d. per gallon more on rhum than the said order directed, etc. However they had made such a disposition as they hoped with the assistance of packers and coopers they could gett it on board in a few days. This day Mr. Gordon waited on the Governour in Councill and it was agreed, since no price could be putt upon wine, that sworn teasters might be employed to come as near as they could to the present value of the quantity, which the Queen should have occasion for, and that Mr. Lilly's warehouse should be the generall magazine for the provissions after they were visited and repacked. And whereas considerable quantitys of each specie would be still wanting it was thought adviseable to buy three vessells loaden with corn and carry them with us, the said vessells to be prized by some masters of ships and the boatswain of the Edgar whom the Admirall had made Master Attendant, with their hulls, apparell, and furniture and cargos, according to the settled price upon corn. July 8. This being Sunday, nobody would do any work, tho' the troops were in want of bread. July 9. Major Allen and Mr. Nutmaker acquainted Mr. Gordon that the Admirall had appointed Mr. Horton and Mr. Watson, two pursers, his agent-victuallers to contract for the 3 months' provissions for the land forces as well as an equall proportion for the sea, that those Agents were going on in the method formerly prescribed, and bills were to be drawn on the Commrs. for Victualling the Navy in England, but since all species of provissions could not be compleated, the Brigadier gave orders for buying up the 3 small ships loaden with wheat, rye, Indian corn, and flower to make up what should be wanting. July 10. This day the Brittish troops were review'd on Nodles Island and the Brigadier found them in good order and pretty healthy, there not being above 100 in the hospitall, who were most of them in a good way of recovery. The Colonells of some of the regiments began to complain that the people of the country had debauched severall of their soldiers and favoured their disertion, and therefore to make up their loss they were obliged to list their negroes who had volluntarely entered themselves to serve the Queen. July 11. This day nothing matteriall hapened, only the Brigadier pickt on the 3 ships laden with wheat etc., which were to be bought (viz.) the Adventure of 90 tun, Barbadoes of 93, and Content of 90, but the Boatswain of the men of warr could not be found, so we lost three or four days, Mr. Gordon not being able to gett all the Apprizers together till 13th inst. in order to take an oath before a magistrate after a survey to do justice in the sale of these ships and their cargos between the Queen and the owners and merchants, which was the only expedient that could be found to bring them to reasonable terms. July 12. This day little or nothing was done, except removing some difficultys in relation to the dispatch of our provissions. July 13. This day the 3 ships with their cargos were agreed for at £4872 1s. 2d., and Mr. Gordon writt to the Admirall to put a trusty midshipman into each of them for a master, and to allow them men out of the Queen's ships, to saile them to Quebeck, for saveing ye charge of hireing others, but he could not obtain this request, so others were hyred, some part of the cargo of provissions aboard the Prince Eugene was ordered to be bought up and put on board the Content, our men continued to desart by the help of the people of the Country, and the Governour could not as yett agree on a remedy, in the mean time the Brigadier gave order for discharging all the negroes that had been listed since our coming, tho' they had taken party volluntarily, in hopes to bring the country to some reasonable measures concerning our own deserters. The 96 hhds. of salt wh. Mr. Gordon bought of Mr. Prout was now payd for, amounting to £162 15s. 4d. July 14. This day two regiments of the New England forces were review'd by the Brigadier and the Governour. Lt. Genll. Nicholson arriv'd this night at Boston from New York and Col. Vetch from Annopolis, the former being asked why the Leopard and Saphire or either of them had not been imediately sent away to New York, with the Joseph and Neptune storeships which were so much wanted, he sayd he had no directions over ye Capts. of those ships, and they had prevailed with the Governour and Councill to clean here, the Admirall being present, sayd he would make inquiry into this matter when Capt. Cockburn of the Saphire return'd from Annopolis. This day the wells on ye Island of Nodles were all dry'd up, and the Brigadier ordered the transports to go up the River to fetch water for the troops. Severall men deserted this day. July 15. Mr. Gordon being informed by the Admirall's Agents, that he had procured the Government's direction for the packers etc. to work this day on our provissions, they possitively refused to doe it; upon which Lt. Genl. Nicholson and he procured warrants from a J.P. for takeing severall of them up, and then they went heartily to work, and we got most of the wine which was bought for the use of the troops aboard the transports that tyde. July 16 and 17. Nothing matteriall hapned. July 18. This day a Sachem of the New York Indians came to Boston to inform himself of the certainty of the arrivall of the Brittish troops and ships of warr, he attended the Brigadier, and received his present of cloaths etc., he said by his Interpreter that he had allways been true to the English, and was glad the Queen had taken so much care of them, to send a fleet and army against the French, the Brigadr. ordered him to be carryed over to Nodles Island to see the troops and to be very well entertained. The Windsor, Capt. Arris, Comndr., being the ship appointed to receive ye Brigadr. and his retinue was this day order'd to be hove down, but some of the careening geer broke, and we were apprehensive that she and a transport which was fitting in lieu of another that proved leaky for 300 of Coll. Kirk's regimt. would prove a hindrance to our sayling now our provissions were on board. This night Capt. Harrison, the Brigadier's aid du camp, who was detatched with the Kingston and the Mary transports for New York arriv'd at Boston with ye wellcom news that those ships were got safe to New York, but they had had a very tedious and troublesome passage by reason of foggs, calms and currents. Coll. Hunter sent a letter by Mr. Harrison acquainting the Brigadier that the Province galley with the Joseph and Neptune transports were likewise arrived at New York, and that he was in hopes to overcome some difficultys (in relation to provissions) which had stood in his way, that the Sachams had received the news of this Expedition with great joy and sung the Warr-song, which lasted all night long, and some French Indians in league with us had promiss'd upon approach of our troops to retire, and by no persuation, be induced to joyn ye French. July 19. Major Allen and Mr. Nuttmaker brought in the accounts of the Adventure, Barbadoes, and Content, with the cargoes and the cost of 96 hhds. of salt and the charge of manning the said ships, for which the Brigadier ordered payment to be made since it was for ye use of the land forces ashore, and could not properly be supplyed from the Navy or Victualling the soldiers being to pay for the same. This day Tho. Henley a diserter from Major Culliford's Company in Col. Kirk's regiment was try'd and condemn'd by a Generall Court Martiall to be hanged on Nodles Island in sight of all the troops, and the case of Joseph Bennett, a soldier in the same Regiment accused of mutiny was referred to the examination of a Regimentall Court Martiall. That night order was given for reinbarquing all the troops the next day. July 20. All the troops were reinbarqued on board their proper transportts, except 300 of Coll. Kirk's regiment, whose transport was exchanged, being leaky, for one call'd the Queen Ann, which was not yett fitted, but the Brigadier had thought of putting those men on board the men. of war, that nothing relating to him might stop our sayling, since Mr. Gorden had assured him all the provissions were aboard except the Windsor's, which ship was not ready, but the provissions were. Coll. Kirk readily agreed to the distribution of his men on board the men of war, to save time, as the Admirall did after some debate. This day the Genll. Court or Assembly passed an additionall act against harbouring diserters, which could not be obtained before the troops were reinbarked. July 21. Nothing happen'd of moment, only the Brigadier and Sr. Hovenden Walker made publication of pardon to every deserter, seaman or soldier or marine that would return to the service. July 22. The Governour brought severall Mohagues, which, he said were heads of the Five Nations, to attend the Brigadier, who received them well and encouraged them to joyn our troops at the Wood Creek etc. This day the troops were victualled with fresh provissions on board the transports. July 23. Six soldiers of Lt. Generall Seamour's regiment were tryed at a Court Martiall for mutiny, two were condemned to be shott, three to be whipt, and one acquitted. This day ye Mohagues made their speeches, presented their wampum etc. to the Brigadier, and he gave order to shew them the troops and men of warr, and being well entertained, and satisfied with their presents, after 4 or 5 days stay they returned to New York. July 24. The ship with the troops from Rhode Island arrived at Nantaskett, the said troops had been furnished with cloaths and musketts but wanted byonetts swords and cartouch boxes, which we had not in store for them because there was no provission made for them in England, either because that Island was not mention'd or not thought to be a distinct Government, when the Expedition was first thought of, however since cloaths and musketts were order'd for them out of the Queen's Magazine the Brigadier order'd them to accompany the fleet to Canada. This day we were told the Windsor has gott almost all her provisions on board, and most of the Brigadrs. equipage and provissions were gott on board her and his tender. An additionall loane of £10,000 New England money was voted in case the service shall require more than the £40,000 formerly struck in ye country bills. July 25. The Brigadier being inform'd that the Chester had taken a prize going in company with 3 other merchant ships to Quebeck from France, sent Capt. Harrison to the Admirall to know upon perusall of the papers which might be on board her, whether there were any intelligence that was proper for his knowledge. Capt. Harrison returned with a list of ships mentioned in the margin which he said came from France and parted with the prize off of Cape Finistere as also a newspaper between —1710 and—1711. July 26. This day being sett apart for a day of fasting in pursuance of H.M. Instructions it was religiou[s]ly observed by the Brigadier himself, and the officers and soldiers; the Province galley arrived with severall victuallers from New York, and Mr. Gorden delivered the severall bills of lading and invoyces of their cargoes to Mr. Nutmaker the proper officer, giving it in charge to Capt. Forster Agent of the transports to be assisting to him in getting the provissions shifted into such of the transports as could best stow it and if there should not be room enough in the transports to apply to the Admirall to order the men of warr to receive what remained. July 27. All the Brigadiers retinue and bagage haveing been shipt for some days on board his tender, he went this day himself on board the Windsor in hopes to saile the next morning, but severall transports having lost men by disertion could not saile without being supply'd with others. The men of warr had a great loss likewise which made it hard to supply them, and this last and worst difficulty was in a manner without remedy since both the Governour and Admirall thought themselves so restrained by the late Act of Parliament against pressing in the Plantations that they could not by any means think they could justifie pressing seamen for recruiting the Brittish ships of warr or transports while that Act was in being. July 28. The Brigadier dined ashore and imediately went on board the Windsor againe. July 29. The Province galley being unman'd for supply of the transports and some other matters adjusted, the wind coming up fair, the signall for unmooring was made this afternoon but it was not thought fitt to saile till next morning. Endorsed, Br. Hill's Journal, Rd. at Windsor Sept. 17, 1711. 19 pp.
61. ii. Officers of Regiments to General Hill. Proposals as to payment of subsistance according to the monthly muster-rolls, there having always been great confusion in the accounts in former expeditions. July 25, 1711. 6 signatures. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 9. Nos. 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11; and (duplicate of enclosure i.) 5, 898. No. 12; and (duplicate of enclosure ii.) 43, 13. No. 12.]
[July ?]62. Proclamation by General Hill. The Queen of England is about to re-assert her incontestable right over all North America. French inhabitants of Canada and its neighbourhood, who remain peaceably in their homes and wish to place themselves under H.M. protection, will be favourably treated and allowed to remain in peaceable possession of their property, and share the liberty enjoyed by H.M. other subjects, with the free exercise of their religion. Those who do not resist, but prefer to return to France, will be allowed to do so and transport etc. will be provided, etc. Printed by Green, Boston, 1711. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 868. No. 13.]