America and West Indies
October 1711

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Cecil Headlam (editor)

Year published

1925

Pages

110-133

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'America and West Indies: October 1711', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 26: 1711-1712 (1925), pp. 110-133. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73882 Date accessed: 03 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

October 1711

Oct. 1.
London.
115. James Blake to Mr. Secretary St. John. Replies to the complaints of several Colonels of regiments now employed in the expedition under General Hill relating to the cloathing and accouterments furnished by him. I was not acquainted to what place the expedition was designed, etc. I was directed to supply for the militia and H.M. forces, etc. The sergants surtout coates were made of the best Glocestershire cloaths, and 1396 of the centinells' coates, the rest of the centinells with whole thick kerseys, which are as dear as cloath, but allowed by everybody to wear much longer, and is what all the foreigners cloath withall. As to their not being lined H.M. saved largely thereby in what was given the militia. The breeches, hatts etc. were as good or better then is used by the Army. Mr. Nettmaker the Commissary was very nice in his inspection and returned great quantityes that did not come up fully to the pattern, though these were accepted by some of the regiments now upon the expedition. The complaints began at Portsmouth, altho' none of the cloathing was seen, and by that means the goods were tossed from vessell to vessell much to their damage, and several of them left behind etc. Signed, J. W. Blake. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
115. i. Certificate by Richard Hallam, Packer, corroborating preceding. London, Oct. 1, 1711. Signed, Richd. Hallam. 1 p. [C.O. 42, 13. Nos. 9, 10, (and duplicates) 10 (i.), 11, 11 i.]
Oct. 3.116. Presents made to the Chief Sachems of the Five Nations of the Iroquois Indians by Lt. Gen. Nicholson at the House of the honble. Col. Peter Schuyler in Albany, oct. 3, 1711. One Queen Anne's guinea in memory of H.M. One of ye Oxford Almanack's with ye cutt made upon their late sending the four embassadors for England, shewing H.M. tender regard for them. One kane with an amber head in memory of himselfe and in token that as ye said head when warme is of an attractive power, so his and their loves should be warme and attractive to draw each to other. One multiplying glass to represent to them ye fraud of the French in making a few things seem to be many. One pair of pocket brass musquetoons and one long gun to shew the French how well they are armed. And two barrills of bear to drink the Queen's health, all wch. they thankfully recd. and replied, Brother Anndegariax, we thank you and promise to keep your presents in ye Onondage Castle etc. You have shewn our belts of wampum formerly given you and desired that as you have kept them so we keep these things, which we promise to do, and that you shall see them whenever we have the honour of your company that way etc. Signed, P. Schuyler, Laurens Clase, Interpreter. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 9. No. 68.]
Oct. 5.
Treasury Chambers.
117. Mr. Harley to Mr. Popple. Encloses following for the opinion of the Council of Trade and Plantations thereon by Tuesday morning, Signed, T. Harley. Endorsed, Recd. 6th, Read 11th Oct., 1711. 1 p. Enclosed,
117. i. Petition of London merchants trading to Virginia and Maryland to Robert, Earl of Oxford, Lord High Treasurer. Protest against a new order of the Customs forbidding the passing of any entries of tobacco inwards until the bonds were discharged, for which the merchants have always hitherto been allowed a full eighteen months law, etc. Copy. 2¾ pp. [C.O.5, 1316. Nos. 69, 69 i.; and 5, 1363. pp. 332–339.]
Oct. 11.118. Mr. Perry to Mr. Popple. Encloses following. The Trade have agreed to be at Whitehall on fryday morning, the Queen is at a vast charge and so is the merchants: and time goes off hand: and the fame of this dispute (v. Oct. 5) runs to Virga. altogeather is a publique evile. Signed, Micajah Perry.En dorsed, Recd. 10th, Read 11th Oct., 1711. Addressed. Postmark. ¼ p. Enclosed,
118. i. Mr. Bayley to Mr. Perry. List of Acts laying duties upon tobacco. Signed, Arthur Bayley. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1316. Nos. 70, 70 i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 1363. p. 340.]
Oct. 11.
Whitehal.
119. Mr. Popple to the Secretaries of the Treasury. Reply to Oct. 5. The Council of Trade and Plantations do find by an Act pass'd II and III Anne, that the time for the exportation of tobacco etc. is inlarged to 18 months; but they do not find that the several times for the payment of the duties are altered; however in regard of the low state of the Tobacco trade, and that the merchants in case they do not export their tobacco in the time limitted do pay interest from the time the Customs are due, their Lordships are of opinion that if the merchants are indulg'd, as they affirm has been used, so far as to have an oppertunity to clear their bonds by debentures, it will at this time not only be a great ease to them, but an encouragement to the Virginia and Maryland trade which, as above limited, is at present in a low condition, and that the not permitting the merchants who are already in bonds to H.M. to make entries of their tobacco upon good and sufficient security till their former bonds be discharged, may prove a discouragement to that Trade, and in all probability will produce those ill consequences set forth by the merchants in their said Memorial, etc. [C.O. 5, 1363. pp. 340–342; and (rough draft) 5, 1335. pp. 134–136.]
Oct. 15.
Virginia.
120. Lt. Governor Spotswood to the Council of Trade and Plantations. After what I writt July 28th of the success of my endeavours in quietting the commotions in North Carolina, I was in hopes I should not have had occasion to trouble your Lordships again with the affairs of that unhappy country; but a more dismall and unexpected accident happening there lately, I think it my duty to give your Lordps. the following account of it, together with my proceedings thereupon. On the 22nd of the last month some towns of the Tuscaruro Indians and other Nations bordering on Carolina made an incursion upon the head of Neuse and Pam[plico] Rivers in that Province, without any previous declaration of war or show of discontent, and having divided themselves into partys, at sunrise (which was their signal) begun a barbarous massacre on the inhabitants of the frontier plantations, killing without distinction of age or sex about 60 English and upwards of that number of Swiss and Palatines, besides a great many left dangerously wounded. The Baron de Graffenried, Cheif of the Swiss and Palatine settlement there, is also fallen into their hands, and carryed away prisoner; since which [they] have continued their ravages, in burning those plantations, and others deserted by the inhabitants for fear of the like crueltys. The Governor, Mr. Hyde, has raised what men he can to oppose the further invasion of the heathen, and protect the rest of the country; but that spirit of disobedience, to which they have been long accustomed, still prevails so much, that he can hardly perswade them to unite for their common safety. I will not affirm that the invitation given those savages, some time ago by Coll. Cary and his party, to cutt off their fellow subjects (tho' that heavy charge is proved by divers testimonys and firmly beleived in Carolina) has been the only occasion of this tragedy; yet it appears very reasonable to beleive that the Indians have been greatly encouraged in this attempt, by the unnatural divisions and animositys among the inhabitants, and I very much fear their mutinous and cowardly behaviour in some late skirmishes will embolden the Indians to continue their insolencies. Upon the first advice of this unhappy event, I sent out detachments of our Militia to prevent our Tributary Indians from joining with those savages, and understanding that the greater part of the Tuscaruros had refused to be concerned with the rest of their Nation in this bloody execution, I have sent to them and the other neighbouring Indians to meet me next week on our frontiers, in order to a treaty. And as they stand in some awe of this Government, both from the opinion they have of our strength, and their apprehensions of the loss of our trade upon a rupture, I hope at this Conference to work so far on their fears and interests as at least to preserve their friendship, if not to engage their assistance for the destruction of those Assassines. There is very little temptation for any man to enter upon an Indian war, nor much honour to be got by encountering a people more like wild beasts than men: but if war be the only means left us to secure H.M. people and territorys from the Heathen, I don't doubt but our Assembly (which is to meet the 7th of the next month) will take such resolutions as become them to provide for the effectual prosecution of it. But whatever air I may give the matter, to the Indians, I must not conceal from your Lordps. the incapacity of this country for an offensive or defensive war. Our Militia are in a manner wholly destitute of ammunition, and as ill provided with arms that are usefull, and unless H.M. will be pleased to send in a supply of both to ly ready against an emergency, I fear I shall not be able to sustain any considerable attack of an enemy. Upon the apprehensions we had this summer of the French squadron (which is said to be now in the West Indies) I made a shift to raise four forts, and run some lines for the defence of our cheif rivers, and to mount about 70 peices of cannon, not finding at my arrival such a thing as either parapet, pallisade, or one single peice of ordnance mounted throughout the whole Government. I endeavour'd to make our last Assembly sensible of the naked condition of their country, but the expence appearing to them then, much more immediate than the danger, they were easily influenced by their low circumstances to deferr the consideration thereof, however I prevailed on them to revive in the meanwhile a former Law made for the defence of the country in times of danger, and by virtue of that law I have carryed on the abovementioned works during the late alarm. Notwithstanding I have been mightily embarassed by a sett of Quakers, who broach doctrines so monstrous as their brethren in England have never own'd, nor indeed can be suffer'd in any Government; they have not only refused to work themselves, or suffer any of their servants to be imployed in the fortifications; but affirm that their consciences will not permitt them to contribute in any manner of way to the defence of the country, even so much as trusting the Government for provisions to support those that do work, tho' at the same time they say, that being obliged by their religion to feed their enemys, if the French should come hither, and want provisions they must in conscience supply them. As this opinion of theirs is quite different from their practice in Carolina where they were the most active in taking arms to putt down that Government (tho' they now fly again to the pretence of conscience to be excused from assisting against the Indians) I have thought it necessary to put the laws of this country in execution against that sect of people, which impower me to imploy all persons as I shall see fitt, for the defence of the country in times of danger, and imposes fines and penaltys on their disobedience; I doubt not they will sufficiently exclaim against me on this occasion, and perhaps their brethren in England who keep a Joint Stock (as 'tis said) to prosecute the quarrells of all that sect, may think fitt to attack me: but I am perswaded I shall not incurr my Sovereign's displeasure so long as I act by the rule of law; and it is absolutely necessary to discourage such dangerous opinions, as would render the safety of the Government precarious, since everyone that is either lazy or cowardly would make use of the pretence of conscience to excuse himself from working or fighting when there is greatest need of his service. And I fear the Quakers would find too many proselytes on such occasions. As soon as I was informed of this fatal accident in Carolina, I prohibited all trade from this country with the Indians, finding they were better provided with ammunition than we ourselves, and had the Government of Carolina made the same stop when this country had a dispute with those very Indians, about a murder committed here some years ago, it is very probable they might have been more cautious of falling upon any of H.M. plantations, when they found we espoused one another's quarrells, but the tameness of the Government in passing over that affair, and the constant supplys they received from Carolina of powder shott and other necessarys, notwithstanding the representations of this Government, made them beleive we were under distinct Sovereigns as well as Governors, and that we would no more assist Carolina than they us. I have also sent to demand the releasment of the Baron of Graffenreid, who by our advices was still alive, but supposed only reserved for a more solemn execution, to be tommahawked and tortured at their first publick war dances. Upon persuing the rough drafts of my letters to your Lordships I fear there is ommitted in the transcribing a recommendation I intended to make to your Lordships some time agoe of Col. William Fitzhugh to be added to the Council. He is a gentleman of a plentiful estate, of good interest in his country, and of principles entirely loyal so far as I have been able to discover of him. This gentleman being added and Col. Bassett restored, according to my former request, will for the present compleat the number of the Council, and give me some more time to consider of proper persons or supplying future vacancys, which I assure your Lordps. is a matter of some difficulty among the little choice the country affords. If your Lordps. think fitt to recommend Mr. Fitzhugh to H.M. there is one Mr. Richard Lee Merchant in London, (who is his brother-in-law) will take out his warrant. Signed, A. Spotswood. Endorsed, Recd. Read Nov. 29, 1711. 5 pp. [C.O. 5, 1316. No. 72; and 5, 1363. pp. 374–381.]
Oct. 15.
Virginia.
121. Same to [? the Earl of Dartmouth]. Duplicate of preceding as far as "such occasions." [C.O. 5, 1337. No. 15.]
Oct. 15.
Windsor Castle.
122. Earl of Dartmouth to the Council of Trade and PlantaI desire you'l be pleas'd to acquaint me by what power's and authority's the Admiralty jurisdiction is now exercis'd in the Plantations, etc. Signed, Dartmouth. Endorsed, Recd. 16th, Read 23rd Oct., 1711. 1p. [C.O. 323, 7. No. 15; and 324, 9. p. 484.]
Oct. 17.
Boston.
123. Address of the Governour, Council and Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay to the Queen. It is with the deepest sorrow and abasement that we are humbly bold to prostrate ourselves at your Majesty's Royal feet under the very melancholy awful reflection upon the late sore disaster and unhappy frusrtration of that important Expedition undertaken by your Majesty at such vast cost and expence for the reduction of Canada etc., in the wished for success whereof we hoped by the favour of Almighty God to have obtained some respit and ease from the heavy pressures of a long calamitous war under which we are languishing and have suffered the loss of so much blood and treasure. We humbly adore the Divine wisdom and soveraignty in that surprizing disappointment being supported with the consideration of having done our duty in giving assistance thereto to the utmost of our power with a cheerful obedience to your Majestys Royal commands etc. We should have esteemed it a very great honour if we might have hapily been instrumental and serviceable for making Canada a glorious acquisition to your Majesty's Imperial Crown. We further humbly address your Sacred Majesty if in your princely wisdom you shall so think fit, that a new Expedition may be brought forward for the reduction of that country to your Majestys obedience withal most humbly praying your Majesty's most gracious consideration of the distressing circumstances of your Majesty's good subjects of this Province so greatly enfeebled and impoverished by the war and at a constant standing charge for the defence of the inland frontiers guarding of the sea coast and other incidental charge, little if anything short of £30,000 pr. annum communibus annis over and above the extraordinary advances for the preparations made in the two aforegoing years and for this years Expedition wherein we employ'd our utmost efforts. And that your Majesty would be graciously pleased, if it may be, to excuse us from furnishing a Quota of men for a new Expedition, or at least from the greatest part of the Quota directed for the former: dureing which, near one fifth part of your Majesty's subjects of this Province capable of bearing armes were actually retained in your Majesty's service and under pay vizt. at the Castle, forts, garrisons and in cruising on the coast including the souldiers and seamen on our part imployed in the Expedition several of which are dead of sickness and of those of your Majesty's Governmts. of this Province New Hampshire Connecticutt and Rhode Island to the number of some hundreds left the last year in the garrison of Annapolis Royal scarce one of five returned home, but dyed there and near one fifth of the recruites sent thither from hence this summer are since dead which with other mortalitys and many of the young men of this Province going abroad by sea few of them returning home again besides others who to avoid being called forth to the service or paying of taxes have removed into the neighbouring Governments, has very much diminished our numbers etc. Signed, J. Dudley, Isa. Addington, by order of the Council, John Burril, Speaker. Endorsed, R. 17th Jan. 17 11/12. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 10. No. 141.]
Oct. 18.
St. Jago de la Vega.
124. Governor Lord A. Hamilton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I herewith send a duplicate of Aug. 29, by the Salisbury bound for Bristol. The Council and Assembly having had under their consideration the subject matter of two several Addresses to H.M., and a Representation to your Lordships, did apply to me to give order for stopping the said ship and some others now bound for England, untill these Addresses and Representation could be got ready; which, upon their joint request, I did accordingly, for the space of 24 hours. And now the said Addresses and Representation being finish'd makes me write to your Lops. much shorter and in greater hurry than otherways I inclined to have done, lest the merchants concern'd may think they have any just cause of complaint. That one relating to me in particular is what I was not in the least solicitous about; as being truly beyond my expectation, merit, or desire; tho' I could not but give way to what the Council and Assembly thought fit in that matter. But as to the other relating to bonds for the duties on prize goods, and the state of these bonds, as set forth in the said Representation, (all herewith transmitted to your Lops.) tis what the people here have very much at heart; and therefore I must take the liberty earnestly to recommend the consideration thereof to your Lops, hoping that you will concurr in promoting the design thereof, for obtaining relief to the several persons aggrieved by these Bonds. By the first man of war or packetboat, I'll do myself the honour to write to your Lops. fully of all particulars that may occurr etc. Signed, A. Hamilton. Endorsed, Recd. 10th, Read 15th Jan., 17 11/12. 1¾ pp. Enclosed,
124. i. Address of the Governor, Council and Assembly of Jamaica to the Queen. Oct. 18, 1711. Return thanks for relief from the duties on the American Act, which were so insupportable, etc. We beseech your Majesty to extend your bountiful compassion likewise to many poor families and a great number of seafareing men belonging to this your Island, who have been captors and owners of several prizes long since taken, and who are become lyable to the payment of those duties upon bonds already entered into, and which if your Majesty is not graciously pleased to remit to them, must not only be their inevetable undoing, but will prove a great discouragement to the settlement of this your Colony. And in regard that several of the Agents for prizes to counter-secure themselves against the bonds they had entered into have kept in their hands out of such prizes as they were concerned for as much if not more than what the real duties amounted to which Agents if your Majesty should be graciously pleased to remit the said bonds would take the intire benefit to themselves of the shares of such owners and captors as shall never come to demand the same, we therefore humbly beg, that such Agents may be obliged to account in such manner as your Majesty shall think fitting for what was so deposited or detained in their hands, which will be a great incouragement to several seafaring men to return to this Island and partake of your Royal favour, and that the parts and shares of such as shall not return by a time to be prefixed by your Majesty and your Parliament may be thereby secured for (and we humbly hope apply'd to) the support of the Government of this your Island, which at present in many parts thereof labours under many great and real wants. Pray for H.M. preservation etc. Signed, A. Hamilton, Rod. Mackenzie, Cl. Counll., William Brodrick, Speaker. Copy. Same endorsement. 3 pp.
124. ii. A state of the case of the bonds for duties on prize goods (referred to in preceding). Totals, £12,023 4s. 6d. Same endorsement. 4pp. [C.O. 137, 9. Nos. 60, 60 i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 138, 13. pp. 380–382.]
Oct. 18.
St. Jago de la Vega.
125. Governor Lord A. Hamilton to the Earl of Dartmouth. Repeats part of preceding letter. A privateer of this Island having taken a vessel bound for the Havannah, wherein the President Governor and Capt. Genll. of the Spanish Coast of St. Domingo happen'd to be passenger; I detain him upon account of H.M. subjects that are kept prisoners at Lima, concerning whom I had your Lordship's directions. I take this to be a favourable occasion for reclaiming them; and in order thereto I have caus'd him write to the Vice-Roy of Peru, that he is detain'd for them by way of reprizal, till I am assured that they are set at liberty. However I think of sending him soon for England at his own request, etc. Signed, A. Hamilton. 2 pp. Enclosed,
125. i. Address of the Council and Assembly of Jamaica to the Queen. Return thanks for the appointment of Lord A. Hamilton as Governor, etc. Oct. 18, 1711. Signed, Rod. Mackenzie, Cl. of Counll., William Brodrick, Speaker. 1p.
125. ii. Duplicate of No. 124 i. [C.O. 137, 51. Nos. 55, 56, 57.]
Oct. 20.126. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Dartmouth. Reply to 15th Oct. Refer to correspondence relating to Admiralty Jurisdiction in the Plantations, 18th Dec., 1701 ff. (v. C.S.P. 1701, 1702) and give list of Commissions etc. [C.O. 324, 9. pp. 484–488.]
Oct. 22.
Hampton Court.
127. H.M. Warrants appointing Samuell Shirlock, Wm. Outerbridge, Leonard White, John Peasly and Saml. Smith to the Council of New York. Countersigned, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. p. 106.]
Oct. 23.
Whitehall.
128. Mr. Popple to the Secretaries of the Treasury. Encloses draught of a bond for Mr. Hyde (v. June 14). Annexed,
128. i. Draught of bond referred to in preceding. [C.O. 5, 1292. pp. 323–326.]
Oct. 23.
Whitehall.
129. Mr. Popple to Mr. Hulston. Refers to preceding. So soon as you shall have brought a certificate from H.M. Remembrance Office, that security has accordingly been given there, their Lordships will make their final report. [C.O. 5, 1292. p. 327.]
[Oct. 23.]130. (a.) Journal of Committee of Accounts, Maryland. 28 pp.
(b.) Journal of Council in Assembly of Maryland, Oct. 23—Nov. 3, 1711. 28 pp.
(c.) Journal of House of Delegates of Maryland, Oct. 23— Nov. 3, 1711. 82 pp. Copies. May 29, 1712. [C.O. 5, 720. Nos. 10—12.]
[Oct. 25.]131. W. Johnstone, of London, Merchant, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Recommends James Aynsworth to be Councillor of Barbados in the room of G. Lillington, decd., he having served under the late Governor during the suspension of the three Councillors, etc. In view of Alexander Skene's petition (v. Sept. 28), encloses copy of order in Council, Aug. 18, 1708, dismissing him from the office of Secretary, q.v. Endorsed, Recd. Oct. 25, Read Nov. 2, 1711. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 67.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
132. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Lowther. Acknowledge letter of June 24. We are glad to hear of your safe arrival at Barbados, where we hope by your prudent administration the heats and animosities that have too long continued there, will be wholly composed, since nothing can conduce more to the welfare and prosperity of that Island. We doubt not but you have received advise from the Leeward Islands of the repulse the French met with when they landed at Montserrat, which in a great measure as we are informed is owing to the conduct and bravery of the Commander of H.M.S. the Newcastle, and therefore we shall not add anything more on that head. Whereas there are several articles in the Instructions to all the Governors of America which have not punctually been comply'd with, and which are necessary for our information in order to our laying a state of each respective Government before H.M. from time to time as the nature of the thing may require, and tho we do not doubt of your observance thereof, yet we find ourselves obliged to mention some of the said articles to you, as we do to all the rest of the Governors, that answers may be returned thereunto vizt., accounts of public money, patent places, courts, tables of fees, numbers of inhabitants, arms, ammunition, negroes imported, and wants and defects of your Government. We shall be glad to hear frequently from you, and to receive an account of the present state of your Government etc. P.S. An Act having been passed the last session of Parliament for the encouragement of the trade to America, we send you the said Act here inclosed, which you will cause to be published and duly observed in your Government. [C.O. 29, 12. pp. 369–371.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
133. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Hunter. We have received letters from Mr. Clarke, May 28, 30, 31, and June 7, and shall return particular answers on the first occasion. Require answers to clauses in Instructions as No. 132. Enclose Acts passed last session for the encouragement of trade to America, and for the preservation of white and other pine-trees. [C.O. 5, 1122. pp. 426, 427.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
134. Council of Trade and Plantations to Edward Lloyd, President of the Councill of Maryland. Acknowledge letter of Nov. 4, 1710. Require answers to clauses in Instructions as in preceding. Conclude: H.M. having referred to us the Address from you, the Councill and Assembly relating to ye Governor's keeping of the seal of Maryland, and we having laid the whole state of that matter before H.M., she has been pleased by her Order in Council, June 14, 1711, to declare her royal pleasure therein etc., which Order we send you here enclosed, that you may cause the same to be published and entred in the Councill books and punctually complyed with. P.S. Repeat last paragraph of No. 133. [C.O. 5, 727. pp. 305–308.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
135. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Dudley. Since our letter of Jan. 29, a duplicate whereof has been sent you, we have received none from you, and only one from Mr. Addington etc. Require answers to clauses in Instructions as in preceding. [C.O. 5, 913. pp. 352, 353.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
136. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Lord A. Hamilton. We have received your Lordship's letter of July 17, and at present have only to acquaint your Lordship, that we are glad to hear of your safe arrival, as also of the repulse given the French at Montserrat, which we understand from Mr. Hamilton, Lieut. General of the Leeward Islands, was in a great measure owing to the conduct and bravery of the Commander of H.M.S. the Newcastle. We hope that Commodore Littleton, whom your Lordship mentions to be gone in quest of Monsr. Du Casse, will, if he is so lucky to meet with the Fleet under his convoy, be able to give a good account of his Expedition. Require replies to certain Articles in Instructions as in preceding.
We hope that your Lordship will find the new Assembly disposed to do everything that you may recommend to them for H.M. service and the good of the Island. We shall be glad to hear frequently from your Lordship, and to receive an accot. of the present state of your Government, and such other accounts as are required by your Instructions. P.S. An Act having been pass'd the last Session of Parliament, for the encouragement of the trade to America, we send you the said Act here inclosed, which you will cause to be published and duly observed in the Island under your Government. [C.O. 138, 13. pp. 361—363.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
137. Mr. Popple to Mr. Attorney and Mr. Solicitor General. The Council of Trade and Plantations send you the enclosed clauses of an Act past the last Sessions of Parliament relating to the issuing of debentures to such of the sufferers of Nevis and St. Christophers as have resettled or shall resettle their plantations and thereupon desire your opinion upon the following queries. (1) What is to be deemed a resettlement ? (2) What will be a sufficient proof of such a resettlement ? (3) Whether the inhabitants, vizt. merchts., shopkeepers etc., who had no plantations, and whose losses are inserted in ye returns made by the Commrs. appointed to state the same, are to be relieved by the above clause ? [C.O. 153, 11. p. 376.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
138. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Douglas. We have had from Lt. Genll. Hamilton an account of your safe arrival, and should have been glad to have received. it from yourself. However we hope to receive shortly from you an accot. of the present state thereof, and of what you have done in relation to the late Rebellion at Antegoa. We doubt not but by your prudent interposition, you will be able to allay the heats and divisions that have too long disturbed the peace of that Island, and that the Councill and Assembly as well of Antego, as the other Islands under your care, will act in concert with you to H. M. service, and their own good. H. M. having been pleased by her Order in Council, March 1st, 1711, to repeal an Act of St. Kitts for the Treasurer's paying the publick stock, etc., we send you the said Order here inclosed, which you are to cause to be published and entred in the Councill books of that Island as usual. Require answers to several clauses in his Instructions as No. 132. P.S. An Act having been passed the last Session of Parliament for the encouragement of the trade to America, we send you the said Act here inclosed, which you will cause to be publish'd and duly observed in the Leeward Islands under your Government. [C.O. 153, 11. pp. 377–379.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
139. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lt. Governor Bennett. Acknowledge letters of Dec. 26, 1710 and June 22, 1711. We should have been glad to have received the account of the fortifications you mention therein. But whereas there are other clauses in your Instructions that have not been complyed with, conclude as preceding with request for answers. [C.O. 38, 7. pp. 29–31.]
Oct. 26.
Secretary's Office in Barbados.
140. Mr. Skene to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses the last quarter's Minutes in Mr. Lillington's time, etc. Signed, A. Skene. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 13, 1711. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 77; and 29, 12. p. 395.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
141. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Dartmouth. In reply to your Lordship's letter of 15th instant, desiring to know by what power and authorities the Admiralty Jurisdiction is exercised in the Plantations, quote Order of Council Dec. 18, 1701, and replies from Governors to circular letter written to them. (v. C.S.P. 1701. No. 1094, 1702, Nos. 197, 504, 570, 743, 1005, etc.). We have likewise examined the copy of the Commn. for Vice-Admiral given to the late Sir Bevil Granville under the Seal of the Admiralty (and we are inform'd that Commns. to the like purpose are given to all H.M. Governors in America) whereby he was impowered to appoint a Deputy or Deputies for determining all maritime affairs, as also all other fit and necessary officers under him, for the execution of his office of Vice-Admiral. And as the returns from Jamaica and the Leeward Islands mention a clause in the Governor's Commn. under the Great Seal of this Kingdom, impowering them to constitute Courts, we inclose a copy of that clause in the Lord A. Hamilton's Commn., which is the same to all the other Governors in America. Autograph signatures. 5 pp. Enclosed,
141. i. Copy of Clause in Governor Lord A. Hamilton's Commn., impowering him to constitute Courts etc. [C.O. 137, 46. Nos. 1, 1 i.]
Oct. 26.
Whitehall.
142. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lt. Governor Spotswood. Acknowledge letter of July 25, etc. Request replies to Instructions and enclose Acts as No. 133. [C.O. 5, 1363. pp. 342–345; and (rough draft) 5, 1335. pp. 138–140.]
Oct. 26.
Bermuda.
143. Lt. Governor Bennett to [? Lord Dartmouth]. Refers to letter etc. of June 22. The three soldiers I reprieved att the gallows were soe penitent, that the Council made applycation they might be pardoned, as did the Assembly by an Address, soe that I found none were apprehensive of any second attempt, or that the Island was in any dainger by them: I therefore pursuant (as I conceived) to H.M. most gratious goodness and intention of mercy pardoned them, and are now soldiers again in the Company: I hope I have not varied anything from the dictates of your Lordps.' letter, etc. This country in generall is afficted with the measles, but does not prove mortall altho' infectious, none escapeing in a ffamily it seized that has not had them. Repeats part of June 22. This coast has been lately infested by a French privateer of 10 guns and 120 men, and has taken severall vessells: whereupon I fitted out two sloops, and sent them to cruse round the Island att a convenient distance, which they accordingly did for five days, but the privateer was gone: I wish more in company doe not visit us, and that the want (in case they should land) of an augmentation to H.M. independt. Company of Foot (mentioned in mine of June 22nd) be of noe inconveniency. As for my part I shall doe all that's possible for me to demonstrate faithfull discharge of my duty, and the trust reposed in me, etc. Signed, Ben. Bennett. Holograph. 4 pp. [C.O. 37, 28. Nos. 8; and (duplicate) 9.]
Oct. 27.
Barbados.
144. Governor Lowther to Mr. Popple. Encloses duplicates of Minutes and Acts sent Aug. 20 etc. Signed, Rob. Lowther. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 13, 1711. Holograph. ¾ p. [C.O. 28,13. No. 76; and 29, 12. p. 394.]
Oct. 27.
Barbados.
145. Dudley Woodbridge, Judge of H.M. Court of Admiralty, Barbados, to the Earl of Dartmouth. When I did myself the honour of addressing your Lordship on the 24th instant, I was under noe apprehention I should have this occation of laying before your Lordship an account of an appeal from my judgement here to H.M. in Privy Council, which I granted in pursuance to the Act for the encouragement of the trade to America. But soe it is, may it please your Lordship, Capt. Thomas Legge and Capt. Robert Chadwick, Commanders of H.M.S. Anglesea and Joy having taken ye shipp Camwood Merchant from the subjects of the French King on the coast of Affrica brought her into this port and libell'd her in the Admiralty here. Messrs. Bate and Stewart Agents to the Royal Affrican Company put in a claim to the said ship in behalf of the Company, on hearing ye arguments of ye Council on both sides, and inasmuch as it plainly appeared to me that the ship was in ye possession of the subjects of the French King at the time of her caption, had been soe for the proceeding 28 days, had been carryed in and anchored in several ports, or rivers on the coa(s)t of Affrica, where the French usually trade, and there unloded her English cargo, and was reladed by the subjects and with the effects of the subjects of the French King, and bound with the same on voyage to Martineco, an island (belonging to the French King) in America, but was by such caption of the Anglesea and Joy prevented and compel'd into this island, it was my opinion and I did accordingly sentence the said shipp to be lawfull prize to the said Legge and Chadwick and their ships' companys etc., which reasons etc. I humbly begg leave to lay before H.M. in Privy Council, thro' the hands of your Lordship. Capt. Legg and Capt. Chadwick having sail'd from this place for Jamaica on the 23rd instant are noe ways apprais'd of this appeal, nor being under any expectation of the same, did take care to leave attorneys or fee Council to state and transmit the case and proceedings thereof. For the petition for said appeal, the order thereon, and ye security given was not till the 25th and 26th instant, which were the last days within the limitation of the Act of Parliament for granting the same. I humbly hope and flatter myself your Lordship's goodness will pardon the plainness and freedom of this address, when I tell your Lordship I am wholy unfit and unaccustomed to applications of this nature, this being the only appeal from any judgement of mine, and the first that ever was from this Island on the aforesaid Act, etc. Signed, Dudley Woodbridge. 4 pp. Enclosed,
145. i. (a) Raynes Bate and Thomas Stewart to Dudley Woodbridge. Petition for leave to appeal against judgment in the case of the Camwood Merchant, on the grounds that she belonged to the Royal African Company before being taken by the French, and was not carried into any French port etc., before being recaptured. The Company therefore claim restitution of the ship on payment of salvage etc. Oct. 24, 1711.
(b) Leave to appeal granted, provided security be given Oct. 25, 1711. Signed, Dudley Woodbridge.
(c) Security of £1000 given as above Oct. 26, 1711, by Raynes Bate and Thomas Stewart. Copy. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 43. Nos. 66, 66 i.]
[Oct. 28.]146. Copy of Order in Council, Feb. 27, 1709, (v. C.S.P. 1708, 9, No. 482) restoring Alexander Skeen to the office of Secretary of Barbados, etc. (v. Oct. 25, Nov. 15 etc.) Endorsed, Recd. Oct. 28, Read Nov. 15, 1711. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 68; and 29, 12. pp. 374, 375.]
Oct. 30.
Portsmouth in New Hampshire.
147. Address of the Governour, Council and Representatives of New Hampshire to the Queen. Return thanks for H.M. favour in the late Expedition etc. But whereas the Divine Soveraigntye was pleased to disappoint that noble design to which wee yeilded a chearful obedience to your Majesties Royal commands, would humbly crave that notwithstanding the disappointment your Majestie would gratiously accept of our sincere design and endeavours therein. Att same time most humbly pray, if in your princely wisdom you see meet, that your Majestie would gratiously please to renew the Expedition in the Spring for the reduceing of that Countrey unto your Majesties obedience. And whereas one halfe of our men, are imployed against the daily insults of a barbarous enemy, which renders us very poor and feeble; And considering that at least one third of our young men yearly goe abroad, very few of whom returne again; Wee humbly begg your Majesties most gratious favour respecting our Quota of men, under our present distressing circumstances, and humbly prostrate ourselves at your Royal feet, etc. Signed, By Order of the Council, Cha. Story, Secretary. By order of the Representatives, Richard Gerrish, Speaker. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 10. No. 6.]
Oct. 30.
Whitehall.
148. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord High Treasurer. Report upon the petition of George Lyddel and Robert Clayton of St. Kitts (v. Aug. 22). Petitioners having been at great expense in improving the sd. plantations, and sustained considerable losses by the late invasion and dreadfull hurricane; and as such improvements are an addition to H.M. Revenue, we see no objection why H.M. may not renew the said grant for 2½ years (according to H.M. order of Nov. 13, 1705) to commence from expiration of Col. Parke's grant, provided there be a reservation of the usual quit-rent, as in Mrs. Bowden's grant of Aug. 14, 1707. [C.O. 153, 11. pp. 388, 389.]
Oct. 31.
Warspight, St. Johns, Newfoundland.
149. Commodore Crowe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following replies to Heads of Enquiry April 17. Severall abuses that had been committed I have regulated, and some others which are esteem'd as abuses, cannot be otherways order'd, but perticularly about the rynding of trees, which cannot be avoided except the fishing ships and inhabitants doe cover their stages and houses with board, and as to New England vessells etc. supplying the people with provisions which is allso esteem'd an abuse, I cannot see my way to avoid unless they were supply'd with greater quantitys from Great Brittain, the people are pretty numerous, and would want in the winter season both bread and flower if not supply'd from New England etc. The Fort in this place considering the late destruction is in very good posture of defence against any attempt of the enemy from these parts, for Mr. John Collins, the deputed Governor in absence of H.M. ships has by his industery and som charge repaired a great part of the damages, and somthing that is still wanting is now in hand a repairing, soe that by the methods I have taken by forming the inhabitants into bodys in severall places proper for defence, and divideing those bodys into companies with proper officers, I hope in god the inhabitants will be capable of defending themselves and effects this winter, but what is wanting is 200 reguler troops, 150 for this place and 50 for Ferryland, all under a Governor resideing here, who should have full power to determine causes between man and man, and by whoes determination (with consent of some of the principall people) they should stand, but the Officer soe sent must be an impartiall man prefering the publique before his own private interest, and who will not doe unjustice for gaine, it is such a man that must prevent irregularitys and abuses in this place, and continue to keep the people under good orders, for they are natureally inclined to be ledd by the person who has power to drive them. The reasons I propose for 150 men for this place and but 50 for Ferryland is the conveniencies of the Fort and harbour, which is very commodious for 200 or 250 saile of ships, it being the metropolis of this Island and lying just in the center of trade and most resorted too; soe that whatever occasion may be for assistance to any part it is sooner sent hence than from any other place. Ferryland and its adjacent places being the Sothermost part of our Fishery, the Fort and harbour small, which won't containe above 50 sail, altho' a place very fitt and commodious for a small fort and fewer forces will defend it, yet St. Johns exceeds it abundantly, by the conveniencies of the people's building under command of the cannon, whoes number is now within the fort, and mounted, including 4 that I have order'd on shore, 14 with ammunition, I hope sufficient for this winter. If the troops abovementioned were sent thither early in the spring to arrive here in the begining of Aprill next, and three men of warr of 50 and 40 guns to cruize off Placentia would intercept all their provisions and soon starve that place, the reduceing of which as it is the shurest soe it is the easiest and cheapest way to fortifie and make this Island flourish, etc. Signed, Jos. Crowe. Endorsed, Recd. Nov. 28th, Read Dec. 4th and 14th, 1711. 2½ pp. Enclosed,
149. i. List of bodies of inhabitants drawn from several places Total: 1925 men. ¾ p.
149. ii. Commodore Crowe's Replies to Heads of Enquiry (v. April 17). Articles 1, 3, 20, 21. Number of English planters, men, women, children and servants, amounts to 2281; the greatest part being fishermen or boatekeepers in the summer season, are wholy imployed in catching and curing fish, or in making train, the former of which they vend to the sack ships coming for that purpose, or to merchants and factors residing among them, of which they have some, both from Great Britain, Ireland and New England, the latter to British ships only. In the winter, the planters both to the northward and southward of St. Johns hunt for deer, beaver, otter, bear, martin, fox and seales, on whose flesh they feed for the greatest part of that season and of their furrs drive some small trade with the ships at their return into the country, but at St. John's the inhabitants have little or no benefit of this; these beasts generally retiring to the woods frightned by the greater number of people that resorts there more than to other places; besides the danger they are expos'd too by the neighbourhood of the French at Placentia makes that much neglected, as it does many other improvements the country is capable off, as building, breeding of cattle, planting many Europian grains, fruits, plants etc., necessary for their more comfortable subsistence. Their provisions they have in part from Great Brittain and Ireland, the remainder from New England, New York, Pensylvania, and Carolina which is brought in their tradeing sloops in good quantitys; particularly flower, briskett, pork, some sheep and black cattle, without which the Planters would starve, planting nothing themselves for the reasons before mentioned, and a sufficient quantity not being brought from great Brittain; their salt they have from Portugall, the Azores and Canary Islands with some French salt taken in prizes, but I do not finde that they have any supply of cloath, neets, tackle, or fishing necessarys, but from Great Brittain, excepting what is brought in prizes. Article 4. I do not find that they make any waste of the woods by setting fire too or burning them any otherways than for their necessary occasions, but they continue to rynde the trees as without which they cannot (as they pretend) carry on their fishing trade, and much waste is made of the woods so rynded, for being at a greater distance than smaller woods which is of easier carriage and more usefull for building their stages, flakes etc., it is left in the woods till the weather and length of time decays it; for which there is no remedy, unless they are oblidged to cover their stages and fishing houses with board. Articles 5 and 6. Great complaint was made of many and great incroachments and daily makeing upon beaches, stages and ships roomes, where the planters and by-boate keepers build dwelling-houses, storehouses and stages, and exacted exorbitant rates from such ships as had occasion for them to their prejudice, and the discouragement of the fishing-trade, all which I ordered to be dispossesed according to the intent of the Act of Parliament, and they are accordingly dispossesed. Article 7. The byboate keepers and fishing ships have generally more fresh men then their proportion to their respective companys of seamen, but very few have certificates thereof! from great Brittain, and I finde the inhabitants doe allso imploy a proportinable number of green men, as the Act directs. Articles 8 and 9 are wholy comply'd with. (10) I doe not finde that the fishing ships or others when they are ready to saile or at other times do destroy or deface or doe any detrement to the stages or cookroomes etc., or to the materialls thereto belonging, but I finde most of the fishing ships and by-boate keepers when their fish is cured remove their fleaks and put them into houses with severall other things which can be moved in order (as they say) for their preservation, and so to be imploy'd on the same roome by them that take it the next year, and I finde all fishing ships and by-boate keepers do content themselves with what is necessary for their own use, and do repair the defects of stages etc. by timber etc. fetched out of the woods, and I have been informed that the planters in the winter's season does deface and destroy the stages etc. belonging to the fishing ships for the repairing their own, but nothing prov'd against particular persons. Article 11 is wholy comply'd with. (12) I do not finde the Admiralls of harbours take that care as they should aboute the rules and orders in regulateing the fishery, for they don't keep jornals and accounts, or the number of all ships, boates, stages, etc., nor of the seamen in each harbour, as the Act directs, for I have demanded them here from Capt. Hayden Admirall, and Capt. Dorrell Vice-Admirall of Carbinear and could not have them, therefore what jornall they deliver in Great Brittain I know not, for offten people yt. were never in the country before are Admills., therefore it would be very necessary yt. none who has not used ye trade five years at least should have that previlidge. (Article 13). I doe not finde by the complaints made to me that the Admirall of this harbour gave himselfe much concern for the determination of any differances among the Planters or others, but they wholy depended on me, coming with their greivances and complaints farr and near for me to determine, and I finde they do the like in other harbours where any man of warr is, and depend little on the Admiralls, who have so much business of their own that they cannot finde time to do justice for others. Articles 14 and 19 are wholy comply'd with. (15) Before my arriveall the Lords Day was nothing at all reguarded neither by the inhabitants or comon saylers, who spent it generally in the houses of entertainment in drinking, swareing and the most disorderly actions, liveing without any sense of religion; and profaneing the day to that degree that a stranger could never beleive they had heard of Christianity nor indeed of god except by the oathes, curses, blasphemous expressions and horried imprecations; at my first meeting with the commanders of ships and the Planters of St. Johns, I represented this to them and proposed that they should by vollunterry contribution repair their Church and do something for the maintainance of the Minester sent by the bishop of London, who arrived at the same time with me; when the Church was repaired, and upon my publishing by beat of drum and affixing to the most publique places the laws established in England against immorality and profaneness, and punishing those that were found guilty accordingly, their swareing and riateouse liveing was in a great measure left off, and the Church upon that day generally frequented; had they a man amongst them impowered to put the laws in execution, who would do it impartially and prefer the publique before his own private interest, religion would soon be effectually established, the people would becom orderly, and deal fairly; and this Island by its trade add very much to H.M. Revinue, and the riches of the Nation; to this purpose till other provision is made, I have given the Governor I deputed Instructions annexed to his Commission, and hope it will have success accordingly. (16) There is no resort of any strangers to fish or trade in any part of the Island, except the French who fish and hunt both to the northward and southward of our plantations, and some few Spanyards, who come with passes to buy fish. (17 and 19) Due care is taken by those that catch fish for the well salting and cureing the same, and preparing it fitt for markitt, which if they neglected to do, it is of such a nature that it would be quite spoyled before ship'd for at any time that they are overtaken with raine the fish is green on the flakes, or if by the neglect of a salter the fish be over or under salted, it becomes damnified and called refuge fish, and tho' as good for present spending as the best, yet will sell but for halfe price on the spott, and ship'd off for the West Indias. (22) At present neither wine, brandy nor rum is brought hither from New England, there being sufficient quantitys brought from the Azores and the West Indias, and som quantity taken in prizes, by which some of the fishery grow debauched and run in debt; and, great part of the year's wages is gon before it be well earned, to the great hinderance of their business, and then they hire themselves to the Planters for another year, but since my arriveall here, I have supress'd in som measure by threats, punishments, and other necessary means both to the vender and criminall. (23 and 24) Som small quantitys of wine and oyle are brought here from Lisbon, Liverhorn or other places in the Mediteranion by most ships that come thence, and is expended among the fishermen and inhabitants, and I don't finde any trade driven by selling the same to New England or other Plantations, excepting som masters of small vessells buys a hogs head or two of prize wine for their own use. (25) I don't finde that any Plantation commodities excepting sugar, mollasses, rum and tobacco are exported hither, and no more of those then what is used by the seamen, planters, and fishermen of this country, and none to be shipp'd off for any part of Europe. (26) v. infra. The price this year is 15s. per quintoll, fish being scarce, but other years when more plenty, it is sold for eleven shillings, but I don't know how it can be sold in great Brittain. (27) v. infra. They feed their men in the summer season mostly with fresh codds, with som salt pork and a little beefe and biskett, they catch all their codd with hooks and line, but som of their baites with netts, and other with hookes, by bobbing; they are at about £150 charges for wages, victualls and craft for each boat, and have catched not above 200 quintolls per boat and som a great deale less by reason of the scarsness of fish this year, (28, 29) which has rais'd the price to 15s. per quintoll, and yet I beleive som of them will be loosers this year, for other years they catch from 350 to 400 quintolls per boate, and their fish is worth 11s. per quintoll. Train oyle is worth £16 per tunn, which is most part or all carry'd to great Britton, but the fish is sent to Portugall, Spaine and Ittialy. (29) v. infra. (30) I don't finde any masters of ships encourage their men to stay behinde, but most that does stay seek it themselves by hireing themselves to planters for another year; others run away from ships and stay in the woods to meet opportunity to gett for New England, which I have in great measure prevented, since I came into the country, but others gett on board the privateers, therefore cannot learn what number is left behinde yearly, but finde as som does stay, others as their affairs call them goe hence to great Brittain, and I finde the best methods for preventing there staying here, is the dilligence of the officers guarding the severall harbours, to prevent their goeing for New England. (31, 32). By the best information I can gett here, there is not above 600 French inhabitants att Placentia and the places adjacent, but they have now with two companys, brought lately over, five companys of soldiers; and but small encouragement given to settle, or plant anywhere, for som times they send great ships a fishing in harbours to the northward of us as farr as 50 and 51 degrees of Lattitude, and as soone as their voyage is made, they all retire and leave the place, but there has been orders given this year, that no ships shall fish there; they have no fort or places of strength but Placentia, where in the Fort on the Hill are 16 gunns, 6 iron and 10 brass, which were carryed from St. Johns, that fort is square, haveing only four guns in front in two teere; in a small bay under this Castle are planted 12 guns with a brest work on the East side of the bay; 2 miles from the Fort are 4 gunns in the west side of the harbour; the grand Fort of 40 guns, 20 of which are at the goeing in of the harbour, 10 fronting the bay and 2 to the land. They have a small trade from Quebeck for furrs and flower, but most of their provisions comes from France, and if 3 men of warr of 50 and 40 gunns were here early in the spring, and to cruize off that place by the midle of Aprill, it would intercept their provisions and soone starve that place, the reduceing of which, as it is the surest, so it is the easiest and cheapest way to fortifie and make this Island flourish. 7 pp.
149. iii. Scheme of the Fishery of Newfoundland. Number of fishing ships, 62; sack ships, 55; ships from America, 10;=6880 tuns burthen, and 3137 men. Number of fishing ships boates, 168; by boates, 93; inhabitants' boates, 346; by boat masters 76; men 558. Quintals of fish made by fishing ships, 33988, by by-boats 13950, inhabitants boats, 72608;=120546 quintals. Quintals carried to market, 118900. Quantity of train made by fishing ships, 234; by boates, 85; inhabitants, 410;= 729 tunns. Number of stages, 123. Number of inhabitants, men, 1925, women, 190 and children 278= 2393. Signed, Jas. Crowe. Warspight. St. Johns, Newfoundland. Oct. 31, 1711. 1 p.
149. iv. (a) By Capt. Jos. Crow, C. in C. of H.M. ships, forts, and garrisons in Newfoundland. A record of severall laws and orders made at St. Johns for the better disipline and good order of the people and correcting irregulariteys by them committed contrary to good laws and acts of Parliament, all which is debated at severall Courts held wherein was present the Commanders of mercht. ships, merchts. and cheif inhabitants and wittnesses being examined, it was brought to the following conclusion, Aug. 23—Oct. 23, 1711. (1) That a sume of mony should be collected by a voluntary gift from the commanders of ships, merchants, masters of famillies and others tradeing to St. Johns and those resideing there for this winter season for repairing and refitting the Church which was demollisht in order for the due worship of Allmighty god therein, and the remainer for the Minister's subsistance. (2) That orders be put up att publick houses and other convenient places for the suppressing drunkeness cursing and swearing, and other irregularties with fines and punishment according to annexed copy. (3) That a body of seamen or others should keep guard in the night and patroull along the backsides of the harbour of St. Johns to prevent the mischeiffs frequently committed by the spyes of the enimiey and others upon the inhabitants, to be raised from the complements of the ship in ye harbour one man for every 15 and by one man for every three boats of the inhabitants and by boatkeepers, a commander of a ship and a mercht. to command them each night. (4) That the tenements, store-houses and stages, etc., now in posestion of persons mentioned, being proved formerly belonging to fishing ships and engros'd since 1685 contrary to Actt of Parliament to the prejudice of the said ships etc.; I do therefore hearby disposses them of the same in right of the fishing ships for the next season. (5) That the inhabitants, fishermen, and servants of the severall places in Newfoundland are to repair to their winter quarters allotted them (enumerated) by Oct. 1st and be under command of their severall Governers for the better security of themselves and effectts against the assaults of the enimiey. (6) That the houses in Fort William of St. Johns is not to be sould or lett for hire but in case ye person that builltt or otherwise purchased the same for time past does not inhabitt therein themselves the said houses are att the disposall of Governor Collins to put therein such persons that are destitute of habitation in the said fortt. (7) That the owners of such houses which shall themselves inhabit therein, and have not a preportion of people to the said house, it is at the discretion of the Governer Collins to put to cohabitt with them such a number of people as he shall see convenient. (8) That in case there may not be sufficientt ground in the said fortt to builld habitations for the number of inhabitants that are to reside there for this winter season is to be left to the discreetion of Governor Collins to give leave for the buillding such habitations as will be proper for them under the gunns without the work of the fortt. (9) That servants in this country frequently hier themselves to one or two or three masters at one time not only to their disappointment butt much to their prejudices and hinderance thereof for the preventing such irregularities for the future, I doe hearby impower the Governor over such persons so offending to oblidge them to pay for every such offence £2 10. for the publique good or otherways cause them to [be] whipt three times forward and backward along some publique place. (10) That five men for each ship in the harbour shall goe into the woods and cutt 20 stockadoes and pallasades to repair the works of the Fortt of St. Johns, and the boatkeepers for every boat they keep in the season use to fetch as maney. (11) That the plantation wherein John Drue of St. Johns has posestion being proved to be ship's room yet in regard to his age and thereby past labour, he has free liberty to enjoy the same dureing life, butt after his decease to return to ye right of the ships. (12) That Mr. Furss is confirmed at a second application to lose the upper stage adjoyning to his own two boats room that he now houlds in behalf of Mrs. Anne Earll. (13) That whosoever at any time shall demolish, deface or brake downe any stage, cooke-room, house or flakes, by removeing any raffters, rinds, floreing, shores, stakes or layers, any other way than with a designe to imploy them on the same room the next year, shall forfeit £10 for repairing the same to the posseser of the said stage and roome. (14) The house in possion of Capt. Arthor Holdsworth, that formerly belonged to Mr. Juitt, I have confirmed to Capt. Holdsworth, this right being assigned to him by Mr. Richard Colesworthy. (15) That the minister have for his subsistance a subscription for the insuing year from the shollups three, the two men boats two, and the skiff one quintoll of dry merchandable fish, to be leavied one from the owner of the stage, one from the boat-keeper, and one from the servants. (16) That a plantation of three boats rooms in possesion of Abraham Barrott and Richard Lutton in Torbay being ships' rooms, they are disposses'd thereof in right of the ships that have occasion for them the next year. Signed, Jos. Crowe.
(b) Proclamation by Commodore Crowe, Warspight, St. John's harbour, Aug. 28, 1711. I doe hearby strictly forbid any tavern or publick house to entertaine any seamen or others upon the Sabbath day except strangers come from other harbours in boats with effectts, to whom as well as to others you are not to sell any strong liquers whereby they may be debauched by drunkeness to the dishonour of Allmighty god, neither are you at any time to suffer any company to keep disorderly hours in the night, or to lett them have so much liquers as may make them drunk upon the penalty or forfeiture of 40s., and for the second double that summe with the loss of the licence, and each person so taken in any house disorderly shall forfeitt one shilling, or otherwise be punished according to my direction and the mony so forfeitted shall be put for repaireing the Church, and if any person above the rank of a common seaman be convicted of swearing or curseing shall pay for such an offence 2s., and a common seaman or servant 1s., or to receive such punishment as I shall think fitt, and the mony so collected shall be for the use above-mentioned. The whole, 5 pp.
149. v. Since the writeing the foregoing; I have mett one Martin Kellogg who lives at Dearfield in New England, and was taken twice by the Canada Indians, the first time after liveing with them 15 months made his escape, the second time of his being taken is three years the 14th 7ber. last, and has been in Canada ever since, liveing 9 months near Mount Royall, and six with the Indians, and three with a French preist before he was discovered to be a man taken before, but then remov'd to Quebeck, where he continued 2 years and 3 months, and after that when they heard of the English Fleet coming they sent him away prisoner to Placentia, but was taken by the way by the Ambuscade privateer. He sayeth Quebeck is the principal place, and about half a mile square with pallasadoes and mudd walls hove up against them, haveing near 100 guns, but don't exceed 5 or 600 men in it fit to carry arms. Mount Royall is the second place and more then halfe as big as Quebeck pallasaded round, but not mudd walls, has in it about 200 familys and about 350 men includeing soldiers fitt to bear arms, and is about 60 leagues S.W. from Quebeck. Three Rivers is the third place which is about 30 leagues from Quebeck all by the river side, and in it not above 50 houses with severall small Indian Forts, along the river side, wherein is an officer and guards, the river lies nearest S.W. and N.E., and inhabited by French and Indians on both sides the river and may be near 6 or 7000 French in all Canada besides Indians whom they don't suffer to live in their towns, only in small places distance from them and can gett in 15 or 20 day's warning near 2000 Indians to their assistance. The country is very fruitfull for grain and produceth very large horses and sheep with a great many other cattle, and sends abundance of furrs to France; but that all their cloathing, stores, necessarys and liquors etc. come from thence. Signed, Jos. Crowe. ¾ p. [C.O. 194, 5. Nos. 8, 8 i.–v.; and 195, 5. pp. 234–263; and 194, 24. Nos. 2, 2 i.–v.]
[Oct. 31.]
Boston.
150. Abstract of Journal of proceedings of the Governour, Council and Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay for assisting the Expedition for the reduction of Canada and Newfoundland, June 8–24th, 1711. With a note as to the steps taken to provide supplies, and General Nicholson's uncommon zeal and indefatigable pains for the preparations for the Expedition etc. 12 pp. [C.O. 5, 10. No. 142.]