America and West Indies
November 1711, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1925

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133-147

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'America and West Indies: November 1711, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 26: 1711-1712 (1925), pp. 133-147. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73883 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


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November 1711, 1-15

Nov. 2.
Whitehall.
151. Wm. Popple to Mr. Attorney General. Encloses, for his opinion thereon, two Acts of Barbados, (a) 1709, to render more effectual certain legacies bequeathed by Capt. Williams, and (b) 1710, to dock the intail of certain lands in the Parish of St. Philip etc., and to vest the same in Benjamin Chapman, planter, in fee simple. [C.O. 29, 12. pp. 372, 373.]
Nov. 2.
Whitehall.
152. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Dartmouth. Reply to letter of Sept. 22, (which was brought to us but three days ago), we do not find that there is at present any vacancy in the Council of Jamaica; when we are advised of any such, we shall humbly lay before H.M. the name of such person as shall appear well qualify'd for that trust. [C.O. 138, 13. p. 374; and (autograph signatures) 137, 46. No. 2.]
Nov. 5.
St. Johns.
153. Lt. Governor Collin to the Board of Ordnance. Encloses copy of letter June 18. I am still apointed to command H.M. Fort etc. In what lays in my power with the inhabitants shall contribute all I can for the sarvis. I hope there may be forcees cum over for the garrison itt being veary harde on the inhabitants etc. Signed, John Collin. Endorsed, Recd. Dec. 1st, 1711. 1 p. Enclosed,
153. i. Bill of Exchange for £132 10 drawn by John Collin on the Board of ordnance. Nov. 5, 1711. Copy. ½ p.
153. ii. Account of disbursement of provisions and munitions, Fort William, St. Johns, 1710—1711. Signed, John Collin. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 24. Nos. 4, 4 i., ii.]
Nov. 6.
Tidworth.
154. H. Boyle to the Earl of Dartmouth. Encloses following. Signed, H. Boyle. 1 p. Enclosed,
154. i. Governor Douglas to the Duke of Queensberry. Antigua, Aug. 27, 1711. Duplicate of letter of that date, q.v. Enclosed,
154. ii. Deposition of John Lindsay, taken before Isaac Royall and Herbert Pember, Justices of the Peace, Antigua, Aug. 23, 1711. Deponent was clerk to Lt. General Hamilton, who used to express himself with a great deal of venom and hatred against Genl. Parke, promising to provide for deponent when he succeeded his great enemy, Genl. Parke, in the Government etc. He often said he admired that the people of Antigua would suffer him to tyrannize over them. In his letters to his friends abroad, he termed him the Grand Monster, tyranniseing and tryumphing in Antigua, but that it could not hold long so, and that Genl. Parke was so puffed up since the Ministry in England was changed, that it was impossible for the inhabitants to endure him any longer, and that he expected by the next oportunity to hear that he was run or privately gon off said Island, or that a worse thing would befall him, and generally ended his discourses with his expectation of haveing the Government. When informed that Mr. Ayon and Lt. Worthington and some others who were General Parke's friends and assisted him when the assault was made, were not murthered, he expressed himselfe that he was glad they were preserved for the gallows, which they should certainly have if it lay in his power. He carryed deponent with him to St. Kitts and Mountserat before he went up to Antigua, at which Islands he encouraged and carressed all such persons whome he knew or declared themselves to be enemys to General Parke, whose friends were used with a great deal of indifferency and scorn by him, and few of them had any admittance to his person, or were used with common civility. Upon his arrival at Antigua, he had many private meetings with the enemys of General Parke, where what private papers and letters that came to his hands, that belonged to General Parke and that were taken out of the house where he was murthered, were exposed and handed about. Observing that deponent kept company with some of the Loyall party, the Lt. General often expressed himselfe to deponent his dislike thereof, by which means the enemys of General Parke became jealous of deponent, who was frequently reproved by the Lt. General for the same, soe that he was not employed in his private affairs, but one Thomas Kerby, Secretary of Antigua, a prime actor in the murther, and his Clerke wholy did the same, etc. Deponent being one day with the Lieut. Generall at the house of Dr. Daniell Mackinen, a principall actor in the murther, and where the Lt. General constantly resided, a certain common fellow came in and complained to him that his neighbour had called him one of the murthering doggs. The Lt. Generall in a passion directed him (tho' it was knowne he was one of the murtherers, and that he plundered severall goods out of the Generall's house) to prosecute the other, and that if he would come to him when he was in towne, he would do him justice. After this deponent being with the Lt. General at Nevis, and in a publick house expressing himselfe at the barbarity used to General Parke, so that he was left naked, the Lt. General haveing information of this, sharply reproved deponent for the same. Signed, Jno. Lindsay. 2½ pp.
154. iii. Deposition of Richard Buckeridge, Collector, Antigua, Aug. 23, 1711. At Dr. Daniel Mackinen's house, the Lt. General expressed himselfe in a passion to deponent, that some persons were about takeing affidavits in relation to ye death of Generall Parke, but that they had better lett it alone, and that he should resent it, etc. Signed, Richd. Buckeridge. 1p.
154. iv. Deposition of Dr. Goussé Bonnin, Antigua, Aug. 25, 1711. Summoned before the Generall Council at St. Johns, about March last, deponent was asked by the Lt. Generall if he knew which way Generall Parke came by his death. Deponent desired to be excused, for that it was not safe for him to answer, having already suffered very much, and had been lately threatend by severall on that account. The Lt. Generall said he should only put a few questions to him wch. should be no way prejudiciall to him, which questions being put, deponent answered the same. Mr. John Willett, one of the Council, desired deponent's answer to the first question should be minuted with his other answers, which was done after some debate. In the afternoon, deponent, being sent for again to answer something more fully, found the answer to the first question which was minuted to be quite raced out. When he returned his first answer, the Lt. Generall neither encouraged nor declared his protection to deponent, etc. Signed, Goussé Bonnin. 1¼ pp.
154. v. Deposition of Charles Bowes, Serjeant in the company whereof Capt. Thom. Newell is commander, in Col. James Jones' Regiment. Antigua, Aug. 25, 1711. Taken before Thomas Morris J.P. and Richard Oliver J.P. A few days after the murther of Governor Parke, when deponent was wounded, and having to the utmost of his ability stood by the General, he fled, for fear of his life, incognito to Nevis, where by order of Lt. General Hamilton he was seized and sent up to Antigua, where he languished with his wounds, notwithstanding which Col. Jones sent him up to Monks Hill fortifications, and put him in a dungeon where he could not stand up, and where he was above two weeks, at last let out, when Col. Jones would have had him swear that Generall Parke had sold the Island, which deponent refused, for that it was false, afterwards was had before the Lt. Generall and Generall Council in St. Johns, when an affidavitt was read to him, which he took, but having seen an affidavit recorded in the Generall Councill books as taken by him, he on his oath declares the same not to be the affidavit read to him and by him taken, for that he never heard General Parke tell him and others that if he would beat or insult the Gentlemen of the country, he would give for each of the persons so beaten a pistole, or anything like it, or of his promiseing a reward to whom should well thrash Perry and Scheurman, or his promiseing any indemnity to those that did it, or of his saying if he had but two companys which he knew in Flanders, he would soon drive half the Planters of the Island, or that they, the soldiers, were cowards for not beating the Planters, which he had so often ordered them. Deponent believes he might say that one Newgent soldier told him that the General said to him, why don't you thrash Edwd. Perry, it being spoken on a complt. made to the General by Newgent. Perry had grossly abused him. Deponent believes he might say that the General said that Scheurman ought to be well beaten, which was thus, Deponent going by a house where Scheurman was, Scheurman said to deponent (the General and Col. Newell going by at ye same time) There goes the General and that long dog your Captain. Deponent informing them of it, the General answered as aforesaid. When he was under confinement at Monkshill, Col. Jones told him that he must needs know what women came to the Generall, deponent being so long Serjeant of his Guard. He answered he knew not of any. Jones replyed, that if he did not, he should lye there untill he would rott. Signed, Charles Bowes. 2½ pp.
154. vi. Deposition of Cæsar Rodeney, trustee and executor of General Parke. Antigua, Aug. 27, 1711. Being informed that Edwd. Chester, senr., had broke open General Parke's storehouse, joyning to Mr. Saverett's tavern, the day he was murthered, and had taken from thence a great parcell of barrs of iron, coco, white sugar and browne ozenbriggs, then in the custody of deponent, he demanded the goods of him. He refused to deliver them, for that he had given the Lieut. Generall credit for them in his books. Signed, Cæsar Rodeney. 1 p.
154. vii. Deposition of Richard Oglethorp. Antigua, Aug. 22, 1711. The morning after Mr. Michael Ayon went to Leeward in order to goe for England in the pacquet, being about March 2nd, deponent, being then Deputy Marshal, went to the house of Dr. Daniel Mackenin. He found Lt. General Hamilton in a mighty passion, and he severely checked deponent for not having acquainted him therewith; and said he would give £500 to know who carried him off or had a hand in it, and withall talked of sending a boate after him, etc. Signed, Richd. Oglethorpe. ½ p. [C.O. 152, 42. Nos. 77, 77 i.–vii.]
[Nov. 6.]155. Petition of Arthur Slingsby to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays to be appointed Attorney General of Barbados, he having been appointed by Governor Lowther to fulfill that office till H.M. pleasure be known, upon Thomas Hodges' return to England. Endorsed, Recd. 6th, Read 15th Nov., 1711. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 70.]
[Nov. 7.]156. Memorial of the Proprietors of New Jersey to the Council of Trade and Plantations. By severall letters they have received advices of the great disorders and confusions there amongst the people in breach of the peace and quiet of the Province and preventing the prosperity thereof. The causes and springs of these disorders are largely sett forth in a Representation of the Assembly, to which they referr. They have often laid before this Honble. Board (cf. Nov. 26, 1709) that the continuing Mr. Daniell Cox, Peter Sonmans and others in the Councill tended to promote those factions and divisions, and prayed that they might be left out, and men of justice and temper nominated to succeed them. Matters are now come to such a height that unless some speedy remedy be applyed, the Proprietors' interest will be lost, and the Province brought to utter ruine. Pray that Cox, Sonmans, Pinhorn, Hugh Huddy and Wm. Hall may be left out of the Councill, and Basse, who is notorious for many ill practises, may be dismissed etc. Signed, P. Docminique, E. Richier, Jno. Bridges, Cha. Michel, Fra. Michel, Jno. Norton, Joseph Ormston, for himself and George Willocks, Cha. Dunster, John Whiting, Robt. Michel. Endorsed, Recd. Read Nov. 7, 1711. 1 p. Enclosed,
156. i. Copy of Memorial of London Proprietors of New Jersey, Nov. 27, 1709. q.v. [C.O. 5, 970. Nos. 152, 153; and 5, 995. pp. 148–152.]
[Nov. 7.]157. Affidavit by Capt. John Evans as to his bona fide purchase for £500 of the lands granted him by Governor Fletcher, 1694, (v. Sept. 4 supra); of his expenditure of £350 in clearing part of them, and the offer of £10,000 for them. Signed, John Evans. Endorsed, Recd. Read Nov. 7, 1711. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 29.]
Nov. 7.
Whitehall.
158. Council of Trade and Plantations to George Granville, Secretary at War. Enclose extract from Governor Hunter's letter, Sept. 12, concerning invalid soldiers at New York, upon which you will please to receive H.M. pleasure, and communicate the same to us etc. [C.O. 5, 1122. pp. 444, 445.]
Nov. 8.
Whitehall.
159. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord High Treasurer. Request payment of Office expenses Christmas 1710—Michaelmas 1711, and for salaries of Secretary etc. 9 months, and of Commissioners 1¾ years overdue since Michaelmas. [C.O. 389, 37. pp. 24—26.]
Nov. 8.
Westminster.
160. Deposition of Michael Ayon. On Dec. 7 last Governor Parke sent for Capt. Joseph Rookeby of Col. Jones' Regiment and asked him why he was not at his post, seeing the country was in armes against him. Rookeby answered that he was not sent there to fight against the subject. Generall Parke replied, I hope you will support and defend the Queen's Representative when insulted, assureing Rookeby that he would not fire a shott against any person unless they first fired att him. Notwith standing which Capt. Rookeby ordered his company who were then in armes not to fire a shott against any person att their perrill. Upon which Generall Parke suspended him, but Capt. Rookeby took no notice and went out of towne. Henry Smith then an overseer of a plantation, but now an ensigne in Coll. Jones his Regiment was in armes that day. He told deponent, if the murther was to be done againe, he would goe upon his hands and head a mile to perfect itt. Col. Jones made him an ensign in his regiment knowing this, etc. Signed, Michael Ayon. ¾ p. [C.O. 152, 42. No. 107.]
Nov. 10.
Boston.
161. Lt. Governor Tailer to [? the Earl of Dartmouth. cf. Feb. 27]. I waited upon Coll. Dudley the first night of my arrivall and delivered him your Lordship's letter, wch. was very acceptable. H.E. ord'red a Council the next day and I was sworne. I have spoke to H.E. about the Castle, which my predecessor Coll. Povey had the command of, and which your Lordship writt in my favour about, but I have not the command of it as yet, but have H.E.s' prommiss. H.E. has allso recommended me to the Assembly. I make noe doubt but of a good agreement betwene us, for I shall in all respects be obedient to his commands. I begg to remind your Lordship of Mr. Secretary Granvell['s] report referring to my pay, etc. Signed, William Tailer. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 898. No. 17.]
Nov. 12.
New York.
162. Governor Hunter to [? the Earl of Dartmouth]. On Tuesday last a French fisherman brought in to this harbour the poor remains of H.M.S. the Feversham's crew, which with the three transports loaded with provisions for the Expedition was east away upon Cape Britton on Oct. 7th in the night. All the officers except the Lutenant and Master perisht, and only 48 of 150 sailors sav'd. Since the fatal miscarriage of the intended expedition our frontiers have been infested and two familys cutt off by the French Indians. I have putt them into the best posture I can in such poor circumstances as the Govt. at present is and shall do my best in that and every thing else for H.M. service. Encloses Address of the Council and Assembly for renewing the Expedition. If H.M. so pleases God grant it better successe, but it is necessary we have here more timely notice if anything is to be provided on this side. I know the winds prevented our last advices, for the Fleet arriv'd much about the time H.M. orders came to my hands. Sending this by an uncertain conveyance I shall trouble your Lordp. no further then to let you know that the affaires of H.M. Government go on at the same rate in the Assembly here as formerly and not the least glimpse of hopes of a Revenue or their ever being on a better foot by any means here. I shall indeavour to maintain H.M. right, let my sufferings increase never so much, etc. P.S. The men of the Joseph and Mary transport's are all sav'd. The Master and 5 of the Neptune transport's men lost. Signed, Ro. Hunter. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 1091. No. 27; and (duplicate) 28.]
Nov. 12.
Boston.
163. Mr. Bridger to [? the Earl of Dartmouth]. Mr. Mico, factor to Mr. Francis Collins, has every year cut the full number of masts according to the contract with the Navy Board and has delivered only 3 shipps' loads. He has cut a great number of masts every year exceeding the number and dementions of the contract etc. There are 9 shipps' loadings due or 576 masts wch. should have been delivered yearly according to contract, wch. is a great disappointment to the service. All these masts are rotting in the River of Piscataqua, and it is to H.M. damage more than £17,000 at £30 per mast, and by Mr. Mico's workmen's impudent and unwarrantable proceedings has let everyone into H.M. woods, where they have cut many hundreds of masts, and this has been a long time practised, but hope by the due proceeding of the late Act of Parliament in that case made and provided [hope] I shall be able to give your Lordp. a good account thereof in a year or two etc. I begg that an order may be granted for my seizing all masts that shall be found cut above contract, and that such care be taken of those masts in contract that are good, as your Lordp. shall think most convenient, etc. Signed, J. Bridger. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 898. No. 18.]
Nov. 13.
Boston, New England.
164. Governor Dudley to Mr. Secretary St. John. Refers to letters of July 11 and Sept. 3. Since which by H.M.S. the Squirrel I have a letter from your Honour's office, accompanying certain goods with envoyce dated Aug. 2nd which were left behind at Portsmouth, to be sent to Mr. Nutmaker, Comissary of the Stores, etc. which I have disposed in store for H.M. further order. On Oct. 1st I received your Honour's letter of May 29 by Capt. Wade in H.M.S. the Adventure, on board of wch. were 100 soldiers that were on board the transports separated from the Fleet in their passage hither and returned to Ireland, the Fleet being gone home before her arrivall here, she is supplyed with what Capt. Wade desires, and is returning home, upon whom Lt. Generall Nicholson returns. I most humbly pray your Honour to allow mee to represent my obedience to H.M. Instructions. The first commands 1000 able men from these Provinces, which I raysed to a man etc., and with them were three score officers the best that could be found, besides Col. Vetch in command of the whole. The second Instruction requires the providing transports, provisions etc., in obedience to which 20 vessels, brigantines and others were provided with four months and half full allowance of provisions (the instructions directing onely three months), and the vessells were in all poynts fitted, and beds for every two men, and a large Hospital for the sick, and all the carpenters in the adjacent towns impressed to rayse the flattbottomed boats to the satisfaction of the Admirall. In obedience to the third article referring to Pilots, letters to all the gentlemen in the severall parts of both Provinces were sent to examine what persons saylors had been up Canada River and orders to the Sheriffs to summons and bring them before the Admiral, with charts and mapps of the River, their Journalls and soundings in their passage thither, and I know of no man that was a sayler that had by watere seen Quebeck but what were delivered to him and proceeded to the number of 14 or 15 (except Capt. Southack) most of which were examined at their return, and the accounts they gave severally will be humbly layd before your Honour. The fourth commands a number of artificers, masons, carpenters, and smiths with all tools etc., there were accordingly master workmen of all trades above impressed and delivered to Col. King, H.M. Engineer, and all the smiths near employed to make the axes, spades etc. from the receipt of the orders to the week the fleet sayled, and were sent aboard and the account taken by the engineers and I suppose sent home. In obedience to the fifth article, so much was sayd to the severall Councills and Assemblys that they readily came into ye service, and charge, nothwithstanding the heavy burthen of the defence of the frontiers at the same time, and all imaginable care to conceal the design. In obedience to the sixth I alwayes kept good intilligence with the garrison of Port Royal, and at the Generall's direction sent a detachment of 100 men, the first of the forces raysed, who stayed there untill they were relieved by a garrison of British soldiers sent thither by the General from Spanish River where he last anchored, and Col. Vetch commanded the forces of these Provinces with officers under him to his satisfaction. In answer to the seventh, in peace we have no trade with the French at Quebeck, nor elswhere, being forbidden by both the Crowns, much less in warr, however being long in hopes for such a day as this, I sent twice up the River of St. Lawrence to Quebeck for the exchange of prisoners to make pilots, and see the place, till Mr. Voderil forbid my coming that way about 5 years since. In one of those vessels Col. Vetch and my son William Dudley, who now served as a Lt. Colonel to Col. Vetch, were brought thither and tarryed there 20 days, and made all the advantageous observations they could, and were now ready to do their duty in all things. In obedience to the eigt(h), I had 120 Indians in the files, good marksmen and that had been in the service as scouts during all the present war. In obedience to the ninth, to put everything in order, all H.M. Governours concerned mett and unanimously agreed all necessary articles, etc. I humbly thank H.M. in the name of both the Provinces for her princely compassion to her good subjects in easing their charge as much as may be, and intimating the granting of lands and benefits there, upon the hoped success (articles x, xi, xii). The 13th commanded an embargo which was strictly enjoyed from Col. Nicholson's arrival till the fleet had been gone 20 dayes, and besides the staying our own shiping, I stay'd Mr. Le Ronde, an officer of Mr. Costabell, Governour of Placentia, who was with me upon exchange of prisoners, who is yet here. And besides all the Generall Assembly stamped £50,000 in bills of credit, and lent them for two years without interest to enable the merchants to supply the Generall with provisions and necessaryes and set a rate on all victualls below the ordinary price that H.M. forces might be reasonabely supplyed. Mr. Dummer, Agent, for this Province, will attend your Honour with accounts etc. I was alwayes a witness of General Hill's, and the Admirall's application and dispatch while the Fleet lay here, and humbly submit to the Divine Providence that orders all things, and onely pray, agreable to the Addresses from all the Governments, that H.M. will renew the Expedition the next year, to preserve us from the continuall insults of the enemy upon a long frontier of these Provinces of 200 miles consisting of open villages which demand 500 men for their defence, as well as to assert H.M. just right set forth in the Royal Instructions for the Expedition. I hope if Col. Nicholson depart not too soon some of the Pilotts will attend him to give your Honour satisfaction in their ability to serve in the River of St. Lawrence, where they have often been. I humbly pray your Honour's favour to these poor distressed Provinces, and that my service here may be acceptable to H.M. Signed, J. Dudley. 3¾ pp. Enclosed,
164. i. Proceedings by Governor Dudley etc. (v. preceding) for obtaining pilots, June 13—July 23, 1711, concluding with a list of 13 that sailed with the fleet. These were recommended as skilful experienced mariners and having knowledge in the navigation of the River, having been trayned up to sea, and most of them masters of good ships for many years past, and have sailed up and down the River of Canada once at least, are men of estates and good livers in the Province; e.g. Capt. Thomas Gilbert commanded a ship of war in the expedition to Quebeck by Sir W. Phipps in 1690 in a more difficult season of the year. Capt. Richard Harris, John Carlile and John Jenkins served in the same expedition. Jeffrey Bedgood was master of a sloop on a voyage to Quebeck in 1705, John Bonner of a flag of truce in 1706. There is no intercourse of trade between this place and Quebeck in peace, all the knowledge the people of this country have been capable of gaining of the navigation of that river is from draughts and the aforementioned Expedition. The Admiral whilest here was entertained at Capt. Southack's house, who by H.M. especial command was to attend the service of the Expedition in order to pilot them in the Massachusetts Province galley up the River Canada, and had his advice and nomination of persons most capable to serve as pilots, he having the best knowledge of such, and those named by him or others were commanded to attend the Admiral at his lodgings de die in diem, to the intent he might examine and enquire of their knowledge and to receive his commands for the service. Others besides those who proceeded thought capable of any pretence to the knowledge of the River were commanded also to attend the Admiral and accordingly did so, particularly Grant, Furgason etc., and were supposed to have their stations assigned them, the Governour refusing to discharge any. It appears by the Honble. General Hill's letter that at the Council of War after the disaster befalling the Fleet in the River, there were but six of thirteen pilots called and examined. Capt. Gilburt and Capt. Harris, two of the upper rate, accounted by all among the chief both for knowledge and experience not being present or enquired of tho' near at hand, nor any of the pilots on board the transports, some of which are reputed very skilful. Upon a survey made by Captain Southack and the chief of the pilots of all the maps and charts of the coast and river that could be obtained after amendments and reformes by them made a number were imprinted off a plate the most correct and exact. Fifty of them were presented to the Admiral for the service of H.M. ships of war and the British transports and others of them disposed to the masters of the several transports of this Province.
Note. Capt. Southack is a skilful experienced mariner, very ingenious in the drawing of maps, has for many year(s). had the command of the Province galley in H.M. service, a guardship for the coast wherewith he is well acquainted especially in the Eastern parts and the entrance into the River of St. Lawrence. And the Governour directed lodging to be taken at Capt. Southack's house for the Admiral that he might be the more constantly attended by him and the other pilots. However upon the Fleet's sayling, Capt. Southack was left behind to put in execution orders given him by the Admiral. And was not with the Fleet at the time of the disaster. Also the Admiral at his arrival at Boston dispatched an order to the Captain of the Province galley then coming in from a cruise to be dressed and equip'd for the service of the expedition to convoy two of the British transports to New Yorke, from whence she returned but a few days before the sayling of the Fleet. In which time she could not be fitted to accompany them But Captain Southack being on board the Flagg when the Fleet were under sayle, received a Commission from the Admiral for the Province galley with orders to have her fitted to sayle to Annapolis Royall, there to take in some British officers marines and stores of war, and so to follow the Fleet which service demanded so long time to performe that off of Port Rosaway, Sept.—, he met the transports of this Province on their voyage homeward by whome he had intelligence that the fleet were come out of the River Canada, had lyen some time at Spanish River, and were returned back to Great Britain, which hindered his proceeding with a vessell of provisions under his care, and hapily prevented his runing into danger of being exposed to the enemy. Boston, Oct. 31, 1711. Read and approved by the Council and Assembly to be sent to Whitehall. Signed, Is. Addington. Secry. 12 pp. [C.O. 5, 898. Nos. 19, 16.]
Nov. 13.
Boston, New England.
165. Governor Dudley to Lord Dartmouth. Before this can come to your Lordship's hands, Generall Hill and the Fleet, and the Forces, late here and in Canada River, will be returned with the sorrowfull news of the-disapoyntment of that Expedition. I am senseble that these Provinces of New York, Conecticut, Road Island, the Masschusets, and New Hampshire, have in all things obeyed H.M. commands for the service, and perticularly in the article of pilots, which is objected, from the first arrivall of Lt. Generall Nicholson the country was searched for every saylour that had gone up the River, etc. (v. preceding). They have since giveen accounts upon oath, which are convered to Mr. Dummer, who I have directed to attend upon your Lordship with them, etc. The disapoyntment will leave these Provinces in a very sorrowfull posture by the dayly insults of the partyes of the French Indians, which run in upon the inland frontiers, and do us mischief, and put us to continuall guards, and scouts, for the discovery of them. Upon which, as well as the unspeakable benefit that will accrew to the Crown of great Britayn, in the Naval stores, lumber, fishery, of all the North America, these Provinces are all humble petitioners, to H.M. that she will please to revive the Expedition the next year, as by their Addressess, humbly representing their distress and poverty, which are sent by this conveyance. Lt. Generall Nicholson comes home with this shipp, who has the knowledge of everything relating to these Provinces, etc. Col. Tayler is well arrived here with H.M. Commission for Lt. Governour, he is very acceptable to mee, and he shall want nothing in my power for his support, but upon this occasion I shall humbly acquaint your Lordship, that at my comeing hither H.M. commanded the Assembly to provide a house in Boston for the Governour, and a salary to be established for his support, but all the industry and "application I could use, I never obtayned either, nor at this time is there any establishment for a Governour, Lt. Governour, or Secretary, which are the only officers reserved to H.M. nomination and appoyntment, but they do annually make their present to the Governour of £300 sterl. and no more, and if my own house and estate were not near to support me, what I have of this Province would not find me house and bread to eat. I hope when greater hurreys are over, H.M. will be pleased to have a gratious consideration for the establishment of a propper support for her servants here; in the mean time we will do our duty in H.M. service. I desired the Assembly to consider of a propper support for Col. Tayler, which is now before them, etc. I most humbly pray your Lordship's favour to these distressed Provinces, which their Agent and papers will remonstrate. Signed, J. Dudley. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 898. No. 20.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
166. Mr. Popple to Mr. Bridger. Reply to July 23 and Aug. 31. The Council of Trade and Plantations command me acquaint you that when their Lordships represented to H.M. their opinion that you should have an encrease of salary, it was upon account of your being assisting in instructing the Palatines in the method of manufacturing tar. But their Lordships are very much surprised to find you have declined that work, and refused to go to New York upon Col. Hunter's directions to you, pursuant to H.M. letter in that behalf. Whether the Palatines went upon the expedition to Canada or no does not appear to their Lordships, but by the progress their Lordships are informed the Palatines have made in preparing of trees, they are in hopes they will succeed in the undertaking they are employed in. [C.O. 5, 913. p. 361.]
Nov. 13.
Boston, New England.
167. Governor Dudley to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have endeavoured these 9 years last past while by H.M. favour I have had the honour to command these Provinces, at all times to lay before the Lords Commissioners the state of these Provinces, etc. We have in ordinary but one safe conveyance for letters etc., which is by the convoy of the mast fleet, who are well arriv'd here, and will proceed from hence in about six weeks, by who I shall cover to your Lordships the Acts and accounts etc. Since my last accounts I received one letter from the Board, wherein their Lordships acquaint me they have written to H.M. Commissioners of the Customes, referring to a scout-boat to meet our merchant-shipps upon the coast, etc. The Commissioners of the Customes have well provided Collectors in all the Provinces, whom I shall alwayes assist in their duty, this further provision of a scout-boat is only wanting in my opinion. The Act of Parlament referring to white pine trees I have received and published in due form, and I hope Mr. Bridger will do his duty therein. The present state of H.M. Castle and Forts, and the expenditure of powder and stores I shall cover to your Lordships, as well as to the Board of Ordnance by the mast fleet, and humbly hope your Lordships will obtayn H.M. favour for a further supply of powder and balls for small armes, the expence of which is constantly very great in the inland frontiers as well as in the Castle and Forts, tho' I take all the methods of good husbandry in my power. All is done here referring to the regulation of ye coyn that I have at any time been commanded in trade, and Courts of Justice, and truly we are so far reduced by returns for Great Britayn, that we have no money left but the bills of credit of these Provinces, which are so well established that they are a medium of all trade exchange, and purchase everything as well as piecès of eight, or any other forreign coyn in use amongst us. The warr is the onely hindrance, to the getting of tarr and other naval stores, which yet in quantity and quality is reformed and advanced to a great degree since my comeing hither, and will be to a perfect supply of great Britayn if peace be restored. I humbly propose Mr. John Wentworth a man of estate and loyalty, to be added to the Councill of H.M. Province of New Hampshire, the fees and dutyes for his warrant being taken care for by his correspondents in London as their Lordships directed me. The inhabitants of this Province of the Massachusetts have been disturbed in their tenure and improvement of lands by the inhabitants of Conecticut and Road Island Colonys, upon pretence of the division line between us, and they have acquainted me that they have represented to your Lordships the reasons of their chalenge. I humbly pray your Lordships that when any Representation is made thereupon, this Goverment may be advised and directed to answer before any commands be given therein from H.M. Your Lordships have before this time the sorrowfull account of the disaster of H.M. fleet in their entrance into Canada River. I am well assured that the papers sent home, and which will be offer'd to your Lordships by Mr. Newman, the Agent for this Province, will demonstrate that there was nothing commanded here but what was with all readiness obeyed, and the Goverments are unanimously humble petitioners to H.M. to revive that just and honorable resolution last year taken by H.M. for the reduction of Canada, thereby to make H.M. the sole possessor of all the North America. Lt. Generall Nicholson comes home in this conveyance, to whom everything is well known, that referrs to these Goverments and to the Expedition, to whose account I desire humbly to be referred. The article of Pilotts, is the great objection. I know not how the pilots behaved themselves, but am well assured that the thirteen persons, that were sent were master saylors men of sobriety, and artists, who had all been up that river in services, and expeditions, and that there are no more nor other in these Provinces, and attended a month before the fleet sayled to be examined and further instructed with charts, and platts of those coasts and the River of St. Lawrence, etc. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed, Recd. Dec. 28, 1711. Read Jan. 14, 17 11/12. 3 pp. Enclosed,
167. i. Abstract of Journal of proceedings of the Governor, Council and Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay in obedience to H.M. commands for assisting the Expedition against Canada, June 8—July 24. Endorsed, Recd. Dec. 28, 1711. 13 pp.
167. ii. A memorial of proceedings for obtaining pilots for the expedition. A version of part of No. 164 i. Endorsed, Recd. Dec. 28, 1711. 10½ pp. [C.O. 5, 865. Nos. 73, 73 i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 5, 913. pp. 363–368.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
168. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lord High Treasurer. Quote Governor Hunter's letter (Sept. 12) concerning Palatines and trees prepared for tar etc., and bills drawn by him therefor, etc. [C.O. 5, 1122. pp. 446, 447.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
169. Same to Governor Hunter. We are now to answer your letters of Nov. 28, 1710, May 7 and Sept. 12, 1711. We laid the last year before H.M. what you then writ in relation to the obstinacy of the Assembly of New York in not setling a Revenue for the support of that Government, whereupon a bill was then ordered to be brought in to the Parliament here, for raising and appropriating such a Revenue, but the Parliament rising before that bill could be perfected, nothing was then done in that matter. We have now again laid before H.M. what you write upon the same subject (Sept. 12), and since the Assembly of New York persist in refusing to grant such a revenue as usual, for the support of that Government, we doubt not but proper measures will be taken here for fixing that matter for the future. As to the Assembly's pretence that the Council cannot amend a money bill, it is groundless and will not be allowed of here, the Council having an equal right with them in granting of money, there being nothing in H. M. Commission to you, under the Great Seal of this Kingdom, to the contrary, by virtue of which Commission they only sit as an Assembly, and therefore you will do well to acquaint them herewith, that they may no longer insist upon what is so ill grounded. It was a wrong step in the Assembly which to make a bill for the disposing of the stores at Albany, which they had no right to, for when any money is given to H. M., and appropriated for buying of stores, and the money accordingly applyed, they ought not by a subsequent Act to pretend to divert it to another use. This was never done by the Parliament here, much less ought the Assembly to assume the power of disposing of such stores as had been sent over by H.M., which is such a presumption as is unpresedented in any other Assembly in America, and therefore the Council were very much in the right not to agree to the same. You have done well in endeavouring what in you lies to heal the divisions and to reconcile the animosities between the parties there. And we hope that by your prudent behaviour, you will in a great measure effect so good a work. We have laid before my Lord High Treasurer what you write in relation to the progress made by the Palatines in preparing of trees for the production of tar, and when we know what shall be ordered thereupon, we shall not fail of giving you timely notice thereof. And as you take notice that besides the tar already made, there are kilns ready to set on fire, so soon as casks can be provided for it, we desire you to inform us how and out of what funds those casks are provided. We are glad to perceive that the Fort the French were building in the onandage country is demolished, and we hope that by your conferences with and prudent management of those Indians, you will be able to keep them so steady in H.M. interest that they will not permit the French to attempt the building of another Fort, or to reside amongst them. The want of presents for the Indians will, we doubt not, have been fully supply'd by those Col. Nicholson carry'd over with him. We have laid before H.M. what you write in relation to the Invalides at New York, and shall give you notice of H.M. pleasure thereupon, as soon as it is communicated to us. We have had under consideration what you write relating to the Jerseys, and are endeavouring to remedy the inconveniencies you complain off from the obstinacy of some of the Council. P.S. We desire to know where the staves and hoops for the tar barrells are provided, and what those barrells cost when made. [C.O. 5, 1122. pp. 448–451.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
170. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Quote those passages in Governor Hunter's letters of May 7 and Sept. 12 which describe the proceedings of the Assembly of New York and their refusal to raise money for the support of that Government. Conclude: This being the state of the difficulties the Governor has met with in relation to the procuring a Revenue for the support of that Government, and we having reason to beleive from their proceedings that they are not likely to settle such a Revenue, we humbly offer that provision be made by Parliament for that purpose. Autograph signatures. 4 pp. [C.O. 5, 1084. No. 49; and 5, 1122. pp. 452–456.]
Nov. 13.
Whitehall.
171. Council of Trade and Plantations to Charles Whitworth. H.M. having been at great expence in sending over to New York and subsisting there a considerable number of Palatines in order to their being employ'd in the production of naval stores, and we having thereupon endeavour'd to get the best information we could of the method of making tar, we have received two accounts of the manner how the same is done, which differing in some particulars, we send you copies, and desire you will give directions to some proper person to inform himself in the most particular manner he is capable of the methods used in Russia, particularly how the trees are prepared, and how long they stand after they are prepared, etc. [C.O. 5, 1122. p. 457.]
Nov. 15.
Lyme Street.
172. R. Tryon to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays for report upon Mr. Skeen's petition (Sept. 28). I hope no attempts against his character can have any wait with your Lordships till you have heard what can be offered in his justification, etc. Signed, Rowld. Tryon. Endorsed, Recd. Read Nov. 15, 1711. 2 pp. [C.O. 28, 13. No. 68; and 29, 12. p. 375.]