America and West Indies
August 1712, 16-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1926

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31-56

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'America and West Indies: August 1712, 16-31', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 27: 1712-1714 (1926), pp. 31-56. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73908 Date accessed: 23 July 2014.


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August 1712, 16-31

Aug. 21.
Whitehall.
49. The Earl of Dartmouth to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The Queen is very much surprised to find that several of her subjects have been lately sent hither in custody from the Plantations without any evidence of their crimes, which as it is a practice very injurious to the particular persons who fall under the misfortune, it is likewise very derogatory to the honour of H.M. Government; I am therefore commanded to signify H.M. pleasure to you that the several Governours of her Colonys in America be ordered not to send any of her people hither as prisoners, without transmitting at the same time full proofs of their guilt. Signed, Dartmouth. Endorsed, Recd. 24th, Read 26th Augt., 1712. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 9. No. 69; and 138, 13. p. 397.]
Aug. 21.
Whitehall.
50. Circular letter from the Earl of Dartmouth to Governors Hunter, Dudley, Spotswood, Bennet, Lowther, Douglas, and the President of the Council of Maryland and the Commander in Chief at Newfoundland.
At the same time that I transmit to you H.M. Proclamation for observance of the truce she has thought fit to conclude with the French King, it is necessary I should acquaint you that it is not to take effect beyond the Line til six months to be computed from the 8th inst. It is hoped however that such a form of passes will soon be settled on both sides as may intirely remove that difficulty, and as the encouragement of commerce is the chief concern of the Plantacons you govern, I cannot doubt but you will take all imaginable care to see the cessation of hostilitys duely complyed with. H.M. has likewise commanded me to signify her pleasure to you that none of her subjects be hereafter sent prisoners from the Plantations to Great Britain unless sufficient proof of their crimes is sent at the same time. Signed, Dartmouth. Mem. The foregoing letters and that to Lord A. Hamilton were carryed to the Admiralty on Aug. 22, to be sent by a frigat bound to New York. [C.O. 324, 32. pp. 166, 167.]
Aug. 21.
Whitehall.
51. The Earl of Dartmouth to Governor Lord A. Hamilton. Circular letter as above. Concludes:—I have receiv'd your Lordship's letter concerning David Creagh, whom I have put into the custody of a messenger, but he is forthwith to be bailed out, for want of affidavits or other legal evidence against him. Signed, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. p. 168.]
Aug. 23.
Barcelona.
52. John Roope to Mr. Popple. I have much to say for the benefit of the Newfoundland trade etc. on my return, etc. Signed, John Roope. Endorsed, Recd. Dec. 6th, Read Jan. 21, 1712 (13). Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 5. No. 19.]
Aug. 23.53. Deposition of Edwd. Chester, Senr. On Dec. 6th, 1710, the day before Governor Parke was killed, Thomas Kerby late Secretary of Antego did in deponent's presence endeavour to dissuade Capt. John Pigott who was killed the same day with the Generall, from making any attempt to apprehend the said Generall in order to send him off the Island, etc. Copy. [C.O. 324, 32. p. 170.]
Aug. 23.54. Deposition of Edward Byam. Thomas Kerby attended deponent and some other members of the Council of Antego who mett Dec. 7, 1710, in order to prepare and sign an address to Genll. Parke before the conflict arose, and did stay with the Council and take a copy of the said address with what else he was directed to during their meeting, which continued untill the inhabitants began to march towards Gen. Parke's house. Deponent has known Kerby for many years and hath observed him upon all occasions to be zealously affected to H.M. Government, respectful to Governors, and never suspected of being a contriver of the late insurrection, etc. Copy. [C.O. 324, 32. pp. 171–173.]
Aug. 23.
Inner Temple.
55. Sir John St. Leger to Mr. Popple. Encloses following, "transmitted to me by Mr. Douglas." All the public papers of the Leeward Islands were lost in the Bristol galley etc. (v. July 25). In the said packet soe lost, there was a state of the Leeward Islands directed to the Council of Trade, etc. Signed, John St. Leger. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 24th, 1712, Read July 14, 1713. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
55. i. Account of negroes imported to Antegoa, May 1, 1711–1712. Total, 1008 in 4 ships. Signed, Richd. Buckeridge, Collr. Endorsed as preceding. 1 p.
55. ii.–vii. Account of powder and stores of war, Antigua, April 29, 1712. Signed, John Brett. Same endorsement. 8 pp.
55. viii. Proceedings in the Court of Chancery, Antigua, Jan. 14—June 2, 1712. Same endorsement. Copy. 18 pp.
55. ix. Proceedings of the Courts of Queen's Bench and Common Pleas, Antigua, 1712. Same endorsement. Copy. 41 pp.
55. x. Answer to several articles in Major Douglas' Instructions. (a) A complete digest of the laws in force through these Islands would prove a work of more trouble and charge in the present unsettled circumstances then could be speedily complyed withall, and of the more difficulty in regarde it is uncertaine what acts are in force, disputes frequently ariseing thereupon as well in the Courts of Common Pleas as other wayes. I doe not conceive it possible to be done untill I can prevail to have the Acts supervised by a Committee of able and discreet persons and a law made to declare those that are in force. (b) (No. 54). Relating to Courts, establishments, they are all the most plainly mentioned in the Act of 1698, for establishing of Courts, etc. (c) (No. 55). The established tables of fees (quoted) are those of the Chief Justice, settled Jan. 20, 1701 (v. Minutes of Council); and of the Marshall and Secretary, settled Jan. 31, 1703 (v. Minutes of Council). (d) List of inhabitants of Antigua, 1711 (by divisions). Totals, families 758; women 794; children, 1131; men fitt to bear arms, 929; negroes 11,838. (e) Christenings and burials, Antigua, March 25, 1711–1712. Parish of St. Johns, baptised 42, buried 32; St. Peters, baptised 21, buried 13; St. Pauls, baptised 15, buried 1; St. Marys, baptised 5, buried 3. (f) Several accounts of stores of war have been lately transmitted etc. (g) Since the late Act of Courts has had such very hapy results in encourageing all merchants etc., it's humbly hoped it will receive their Lordships' approbation, and that the supplementary Act may be dissalowed. Same endorsement. 12 pp.
55. xi. Abstract of exports and imports, Antigua, May 1st—Aug. 1st, 1712. Ships, Great Britain 23, Plantations, 11. Exports;—Brown Sugar; Great Britain, 2142 hhds., 2849 tierces, 521 barrels, 1080 kilderkins; Plantations, 6 hhds., 12 tierces, 3 barrels, 68 kilderkins. Cotton, Great Britain, 377 bags, 805 pockets; Plantations, 6 bags, 26 pockets. Lignum vita, Great Britain, 1439 sticks, 18 tuns; Plantations, 94 sticks, 2 tuns. Ginger, Great Britain, 445 bags, 2 tierces. Rum, Plantations, 12 pipes, 56 hhds., 70 tierces, 18 barrels, 11 kilderkins. Molosses, Great Britain, 147 hhds. 81 tierces; Plantations, 473 hhds., 215 tierces, 4 barrels, 18 kilderkins.
Imports are said to be dry goods, liquors, provisions, wines, lumber, horses, candles, bricks, flower, train oyle, fish, and sheep. Same endorsement. 1 p.
55. xii. Duplicate (with some variations) of No. viii. [C.O. 152, 10. Nos. 1, 1 i.–xii.; and (without enclosures), 153, 12. pp. 87–93.]
Aug. 24.
Dunkerque.
56. Brigadier-General Hill to the Earl of Dartmouth. I have received a letter from Mr. Vane, the Ingenier I appointed last year to the Garrison of Annapolis, concerning some unwarrantable practices of Col. Vetch, the present Governour of that Fort, of which letter I humbly conceived it for H.M. service to send you the inclosed copy. Signed, J. Hill. 1 p. Enclosed.
56. i. Extract of letter from Mr. Vane to Brigadier General Hill, Annapolis, May 5, 1712. A repetition of the charges v. Col. Vetch. v. C.S.P. 1711–12, No. 403. 1½ pp. [C.O. 217, 31. Nos. 8, 8 i.]
Aug. 25.
Antegoa.
57. Governor Douglas to the Council of Trade and Plantations. When the French returned from Montserratt to Guardaloupe they had a man of warr of 40 guns, a brigantine and two sloops stranded. They continued there some time to divide their plunder (which was of very small value to them) and take care of their sick men, they afterwards sailed with eight large ships and six or seven sloops towards the windward of this Island and continued standing off and on untill the 17th inst., and we have been cantonned in little encampments untill the 24th inst. at which time the Act for encamping (not allowing Martial Law, nor the articles of warr to be in force) is expired, the Assembly taking upon them to intermeddle in several affairs where they can make out no priviledge nor precedent, yet the immediate defence of the Island oblidges me to condescend to some complyances, especially where the safety of the Island requires labour and expence, for the very least idle and false report is like to shake their constancy tho' their all is at stake; and affairs must needs continue unsettled untill some of the chief promoters of the late rebellion have suffered condign punishment and some others of the most guilty and seditious corrected and restrained. It is almost incredible to believe how small a number of white men there are in the island (and in great want of good small arms) which besides the effects of their heats and divisions is very much occasioned by their neglect of having their due proportion of white servants to the number of slaves, and their possessing larger tracts of land than they are perfectly able to improve; I am very sensible of the unlucky accident which hindered the sending arms, accoutrements and cloaths for H.M. Regiment in these parts, there was about 20 arms taken up for them on the country's account and still 12 or 14 men are unprovided of the 150 serviceable men belonging to the six companys in this Island, the private men suffering extreamly by their being turned out of quarters by every caprice of the Assembly, and no subsistance being remitted from Great Britain. By a Flagg of Truce which I sent with some prisoners and to gain some intelligence, to Martinique I find by publick and private advices that Monsieur du Guay is daily expected with 15 men of warr to attack Barbadoes and that Monsieur Cassaert still intends to try to destroy this and the other Leeward Islands and at present wee guess from our spy boats that he lyes in wait for the Fleet from Barbadoes of which reports I have sent advice to Barbadoes and to desire the Governor would again endeavour to get these six men of warr to our assistance and to joine our convoy of two men of warr to carry both the fleets from Barbadoes and these Islands with the greater safety. I am however in very good hopes these flourishing Colonys will never fall a prey to a barbarous French piraticall warr, and carryed on by the charge of private persons, while we are in daily expectation to have the happy news of a general Peace from Europe, and that if there are but 100 men left in this Island the sovereignty and possession will never be lost to H.M. etc. P.S. Tho' Monsr. Phelypeaux seems to disown his giving assistance or encouragement to these robbing private expeditions, yet considering ye manifold inconveniencies (which I have humbly represented to your Lordships on another occasion) and vast charges the cartell with Martinique has cost these Islands, I proposed in Councill to break it, which was opposed by a majority upon our hopes of a speedy Peace. Signed, Walter Douglas. Endorsed, Recd. 29th, Read 31st Oct., 1712. 3 pp. Enclosed,
57. i. Copies of Major Douglas' Proclamations and Orders, upon the occasion of the French invasion of Montserrat, Aug. 1712. Endorsed, Recd. 29th Oct. 1712. 8 pp.
57. ii. Journal of Major Douglas' attempt to relieve Montserrat, July 17—Aug. 13, 1712. v. supra. Endorsed as preceding. 1¾ pp.
57. iii. Copy of Minutes of Council of Barbados relating to assistance to be sent to the Leeward Islands, July 14, 1712. Same endorsement. 4 pp.
57. iv. Correspondence between Governor Lowther and the Captains of the men of war at Barbados relating to assistance for the Leeward Islands. Aug. 24, 1712. etc. Same endorsement. Copy. 2 pp.
57. v. Letters to Major Douglas from A. Hamilton and Charles Constable, Captains of the Barbados men of war, July 17th and 20th, 1712. Copy. Same endorsement. 2½ pp.
57. vi. Two Letters from the Governor and Council of the Leeward Islands to Capt. Constable, requesting him to stay for 15 days with the ships under his command, to protect the Leeward Islands, their preservation being of more importance than the delay of the trade he has to convoy from Barbados. (v. Oct. 10 etc.) Copy. Same endorsement. 2¾ pp.
57. vii. Edward Parson to Governor Douglas. Aug. 2, 1712. Returns thanks to H. E. for granting him the commission to be Commander in Chief of [Montserrat],—Continues:—though had rather much had been a commission to be Lt. Governor, because would entitle me to the Queen's pay. I have used all my endeavours hitherto to put our Island in a posture of defence, and mounted some great guns, some whereof are not spiked and those that are have given orders to be drilled and this day am mounting the guards through the Island. I am very sorry to hear that our Island has been misrepresented to your Excy. and that by our Commander in Chief Col. Daly, who ought to have blam'd his own conduct, than found fault with the courage of the men in generall of the Island etc. The Island in generall behaved themselves very well. Wee always annoyed the enemy in several parties, and whenever I had the honour to command myself or other officers; I did not find but a very willing forwardness. The enemy were so apprehensive of us, that wherever 300 men were capable of maintaining a pass against 3000, they never came but always surrounded us by taking distant passes and byways, which we could not fortify by reason had not men enough; which ways moreover we were the more unwilling to fortify, because we thought them unknown to the enemy, but found to the contrary, for our deserters headed their army and carried them through those unknown bypasses. Notwithstanding, when we were forc't to retreat to our last places of defence, we were so resolved to defend it to the last; that although the French General Cassaert. would give us extraordinary articles of capitulation, we answered him we were resolved to maintain H.M. Colony to the last extremity, by which means a few men to the number of 400 have preserved the sovereignty of H.M. Island from a powerfull enemy, etc. We want two sheets of lead and five barrills of powder, etc. P.S. If Capt. Marshall's company will be serviceable to you, your Excellency may remove them; for our people are unwilling to give them quarters, and men can't live upon the air. Signed, Edward Parson. Same endorsement. Copy. 2 pp. [C.O. 152, 9. Nos. 135, 135 i.–vii.; and (without enclosures) 153, 12. pp. 35–40.]
Aug. 25.
Antegoa.
58. Governor Douglas to [? the Earl of Dartmouth.] Duplicate of preceding covering letter. [C.O. 152, 42. No. 88.]
Aug. 26.
Whitehal.
59. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Dartmouth. In obedience to H.M. commands of 21st instant, we shal immediately write to all the Governors of the Plantations (v. Aug. 27). Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed,
59. i. Extract of letter from Governor Lord A. Hamilton, giving his reasons why the evidence against Mr. Creagh are not yet sent over, etc. [C.O. 5, 4. Nos. 4, 4 i.; and (without enclosure) 138, 13. p. 398.]
Aug. 26.
Whitehall.
60. Mr. Popple to Mr. Attorney General. The Council of Trade desire your opinion upon enclosed Act past in Virginia in 1711 to enable John Custis and Frances his wife to sell a mill etc. entailed on the said Frances by the will of Daniel Parke, for payment of his debts, etc. Encloses memorial from Micajah Perry praying that it may be passed. [C.O. 5, 1363. p. 412; and 5, 1335. No. 175.]
Aug. 27.
Whitehall.
61. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Recommend repeal of Act of Barbados enabling the executors of Christopher Estwick, etc. (v. April 26.) [C.O. 29, 12. p. 437.]
Aug. 27.
Whitehall.
62. Council of Trade and Plantations to Col. Lloyd, President of the Council of Maryland. H.M. is very much surpriz'd to find that several of her subjects have been lately sent hither in custody from the Plantations, without any evidence of their crimes, which as it is a practice very injurious to the particular persons who fall under the misfortune, it is likewise very derogatory to the honour of H.M. Government; and therefore we are commanded to signify H.M. pleasure that you do not upon any occasion send any of her subjects hither as prisoners, without good proof first made of the crime, and that proof transmitted along with the prisoner. [C.O. 5, 727. pp. 315, 316.]
Aug. 27.
Whitehall.
63. Similar letters to Lt. Governor Spotswood; Governor Dudley; Governor Hunter; Governor Douglas; Governor Lowther; Governor Lord A. Hamilton; the Lords Proprietors of Carolina; and Lt. Governor Bennett. [C.O. 5, 1363. p. 413; and 5, 1335. No. 176; 5, 913. p. 379; 5, 1123. p. 59; 153, 12. pp. 7, 8; 29, 12. p. 438; 138, 13. p. 399; 5, 1292. p. 374; and 37, 8. p. 37.]
Aug. 27.
Whitehall.
64. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Dartmouth. Enclose extract of Governor Hunter's letter of June 23, relating to the conspiracy of negroes at New York. We are of opinion that the Governor had good reason for his granting the reprieve, and humbly offer that H.M. be graciously pleased to grant a pardon to the negro and Spanish Indians. Enclose accounts of stores of war remaining and wanting in the Province of New York. We desire your Lordship will please to lay them before H.M., with our humble opinion, that H.M. be graciously pleased to direct, that a supply of the stores wanting there, be sent by the first opportunity, and the rather for that Col. Hunter informs us, that the war between North Carolina and the Tuscoruro Indians is like to embroil all the Continent, that the five Nations of New York Indians, by the instigation of the French, had threaten'd to joyn with the said Tuscoruro Indians. [C.O. 5, 1123. pp. 57, 58.]
Aug. 27.
Whitehall.
65. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Queen. Quote Governor Hunter's complaints against Wm. Pinhorn, Daniel Cox, Peter Sonmans, and Wm. Hall. Several of the most considerable of the Proprietors of that Province having also attended us with complaints against them, praying that they may be removed, we humbly offer that your Majesty dismiss them from the Council of New Jersey, and that John Anderson, William Morris, John Hamilton, and John Reading, recommended to us both by the Governor and the Proprietors, be appointed members thereof. There being besides two vacancies in that Councill, we humbly offer that your Majesty be pleas'd to constitute and appoint Elisha Parker, and Thomas Byerly members, they having been also recommended to us by the Governor and Proprietors. [C.O. 5, 995. pp. 163–166.]
Aug. 28.
Whitehall.
66. Circular letter from the Earl of Dartmouth to the Governors of Plantations. In my letter of the 21st inst. I enclosed the Queen's Proclamation for observance of the truce H.M. had concluded with the most Christian King, by the fourth article whereof it is agreed that Spain should be included in that agreement; I am now therefore to repeat to you H.M. commands that you give strict orders throughout all places under your Government, and notify likewise to the Commanders of H.M. ships or privateers who happen to come into your ports, that all hostilitys are to cease and the subjects of France and Spain not to be molested either in their persons or effects during the term the Treaty is in force, vizt. to the 21st Decr. next, but in regard it does not take place beyond the line till Feb. 21st, it is to enjoy its full effect in those parts till June 21st, 1713. I am farther to acquaint you that H.M. having thought fitt to grant her passes to severall French and Spanish ships, you are to take all imaginable care, as far as lies in you, that they be respected, H.M. not doubting but those which have been granted to her subjects by the Most Christian King, will be likewise duly observed. [C.O. 324, 32. pp. 173, 174.]
Aug. 28.
Whitehall.
67. Mr. Popple to Coll. Cuninghame. Acknowledges letters of April 30 and July 2. Continues:—The Council of Trade and Plantations have laid your complaint before H.M., and will not omit anything that lys in their power for your releif. [C.O. 153, 12. p. 9.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehal.
68. Lord Bolingbroke to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Mr. Prior being ordered by H.M. to continue some time at the Court of France, and having desired that Mr. Drift (v. Jan. 31) may attend him, I hope you will be pleased to dispence with his absence on this occasion. Signed, Bolingbroke. Endorsed, Recd. Aug. 30, 1712. 1 p. [C.O. 1388, 76. No. 137; and 389, 37. p. 50.]
Aug. 29.
Barbado.
69. Governor Lowther to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I am extreamly sorry to acquaint your Lordships yt. Monsieur Cassert landed about 3500 men at Montsieurat on the 8th and 9th of July last, and did carry away about 1200 negroes besides coppers, stills and other valuable things; his force in shipping as I am informed consisted of one ship of 64 guns, one of 56, one of 54, two of 44, one 38, and one of 28. This great misfortune in my opinion is owing in all probability to the conduct of some of the Commanders of H.M. ships. But in regard those gentlemen do in some measure excuse themselves by endeavouring to asperse and misrepresent that part I have acted in the matter, I therefore hope your Lordships will suffer me to give you a full and faithfull narrative of what concerns me and of what hath come within my knowledge, etc. Ye fleet from London arriv'd in Carlisle Bay June 22nd, under convoy of the Woolwich, Lime and Swallow, and there were then in Carlisle Bay H.M.S. Panther and Burlington. But Mr. Constable and Clark, the Commanders of the said ships did not continue long in the road after the arrival of the London fleet, for instead of staying to protect the fleet, and of fitting themselves in order to convoy back the sd. fleet to London, they left the Island without haveing my orders or without giving me any notice of it, and did not return to Barbados till July 14th. On ye 13th of July last between the hours of 9 and 10 in the morning I received a letter by an express boat from the Generall of the Leward Islands, dated the 9th of July, wherein he informed me yt. Antegoa was alarm'd on the 4th of July last by the appearance of a great number of ships from Guardeloope standing for Antegoa, and therefore desired that I would dispatch H.M. ships yt. were here to his assistance. This letter is entered at large in the Minutes of Council herewith sent. Upon the receipt of this letter, I immediatly sent for Capt. Hamilton, Commander of H.M.S. the Woolwich, and communicated to him the said letter, and then gave him orders to gett his own ship, as also those under his command in readiness forthwith, and to make the best of his way to the Island of Antegoa for the releif of that, and the rest of the Leward Islands. I also issued a warrant for the takeing up all deserters, and stragling sailors, to be put on board H.M. ships. I likewise laid an embargo upon all mercht. ships and other vessells. On the 14th of July last Capt. Constable and Clark arriv'd in Carlisle Bay with H.M.S. the Panther and Burlington, and about 10 a'clock in the morning Mr. Constable sent me a letter dated the 14th of July, wherein he informed me yt. on the 2nd of July last, he saw off of Guardeloope 10 ships, and that the Burlington and he chaced them till they found yt. five of them were larger than themselves, and yt. then the French ships chaced for about two hours, and yt. when they left them they saw four more, which the others went in order to joyne; he adds yt. on Sunday following a ship came directly towards him, wch. he chaced for some time, and then left off; but the boat happened to break from the stern of that ship wch. he chaced, and ye two persons yt. were in it informed him, yt. the ship they belonged to was the Valuer of 44 guns, as also yt. ye ships he had seen were seaven of them men of war, from 56 to 76 guns. This letter is incerted at large in the Minutes of Council, I therefore beg leave to refer yr. Lordships to it. Mr. Hamilton was as yet in the road. I therefore immediatly communicated the said letter to him, and desired him to hold a Council of war with the Commanders of H.M. ships upon the advice I had received from General Douglas, and the letter I reced. from Mr. Constable, and to signe their opinions, and to attend me in Council at four a clock in the afternoon being the 14th of July. I also upon the receipt of ye said letter from Mr. Constable caused an alarm to be put about; I also directed the Council to meet me at 4 a clock in ye afternoon of the same day, and ordered all the Masters of mercht. men to attend me at the same time. There was not a quorum of the Council till it was five a clock, but the Capts. of H.M. ships came to my house about four a clock the said afternoon, and Mr. Hamilton delivered me the opinion of the Councill of war, to wch. I refer, it being entered in the Minutes of Councill: before the Councill sat I had some conversation with the Commanders of H.M. ships concerning ye strength of the enemy, and abt. their goeing down to the relief of the Leeward Islands: upon wch. some Gentlemen very much magnified the enemy's strength, and talked much of the largeness of their ships, and of their being double mann'd: whereupon I told them that when they six were joyned with the four men of war yt. were at Antegoa, they would be strong enough to encounter the enemy; upon this Capt. Elford asked me if I knew what a seaventy gun ship was, and further said yt. he must tell me yt. one seaventy gun ship was better than two fifty gun ships. Upon this I asked him his reason for asking me that question, to wch. he answered because I had never been much at sea, to this I only replied yt. tho' a man had never been much at sea, yet he might easily know what a 70 gun ship was, whereupon he answered in a very disdainfull manner, yt. he knew what he said, for he was only talking to the Governor of Barbados; as he was proceeding in this kind of rude discourse yt. was nothing to the purpose, I bid him hold his tongue, and some smal time after I went into another room to discourse with some gentlemen I had sent for: whereupon Capt. Constable, Clarke and Elford went their ways without takeing any further notice of me, or staying to consult with the Councill and myself upon the relief of the Leward Islands. A quorum of the Council met according to summons abt. 5 a clock in the afternoon, and after I had acquainted them with the cause of their being summoned, I laid before them Generall Douglas's letter, Mr. Constable's letter, as likewise the opinion of the Council of war, etc. I also laid before the Council a letter I received from Generall Douglas at 4 a clock this afternoon (by a second advice boat) dated July 9th, 1712. Hereupon it was the unanimous opinion of the board yt. all H.M. ships now in Carlisle Bay should forthwith go down to the relief of the Leeward Islands; after the Board had come to this resolution the Captains were desired to come into the Council Chamber, but none appeared but Capt. Hamilton, Gunman and Drake. I acquainted them with the Board's opinion, and then Mr. Hamilton laid before the Board a letter he had received from Mr. Constable dated July 14, 1712, wch. was read, and ordered to be entred in the Minutes of Council, after wch. Mr. Hamilton, Gunman, and Drake declared yt. it was their opinion if the six men of war here should joyne those at Antegoa with the addition of 400 seamen, they might divert the enemy, if not do better service; but that their three ships alone could not possibly do any good, but would be made a sacrifice: after this declaration they withdrew, and then I ordered all the masters of the mercht. men to be called in, and I informed them of the French's attacking Montsieurat, and wt. danger H.M. Leward Islands were in, and yt. it was the opinion of the Board, yt. all H.M. ships now in Carlisle Bay should go to the releif of the Leward Islands, and I desired yt. they would lend the said men of warr 400 seamen out of the 632 yt. were on board their ships; but most of them refused to lend any of their men; only Mr. Gill, commander of the John galley, and Capt. John Wilkinson, commander of the ship Sea-nymph offered to lend their ships for the service. When the Captains of the mercht. men were withdrawn, I told the Council I would go down in person to the assistance of ye Leward Islands, if I could gett a sufficient number of the gentlemen and inhabitants of this Island to attend me, and for that end I had caused an alarm to be put about the sooner to know the inclinations of the people touching this proposition, after this I ordered the several aide-decampes to be called in, and ordered them to repair forthwith to the severall forts where the forces were mett, and to acquaint them yt. H.M. Leward Islands were attacked by the French, and yt. unless they had speedy releif, they would be utterly ruined, and that therefore I would go in person agt. the enemy provided I could get a sufficient number of the gentlemen and other inhabitants of this Island to go with me, and yt. for this reason I had ordered an alarm to be put about this day, in order to communicate this matter to them, and to require their assistance, and yt. if any of them were inclinable to attend me, I should take it as a great favour, and that they must be ready by twelve a clock to-morrow in the forenoon at Needham's Fort, in order to embarque on board the six men of war in this road, and the two mercht. ships; after the several aide-de-campes were charged with these orders Capt. Hamilton was called into the Council Chamber, and I communicated to him my intentions of going to the Leward Islands, and acquainted him with the orders I had given the aid-de-campes, whereupon he told me he had no room to accomodate any such persons, for yt. his ship was very much pestered; I was therefore (upon this and the reluctancy the other Commanders of H.M. ships had shewen) obliged to recall the orders I had given the aid-de-campes and to content myself at that time with directing the Provost-Marshall to go early the next morning on board the severall mercht. ships and vessells and to desire the severall commanders thereof to give him in a list of what men they could spare, yt. he might carry the same to Capt. Hamilton to make a distribucon thereof on board the severall men of war; I likewise sent my Secretary Mr. Upton upon the same errand, and gave out warrts. to take up all stragling seamen; I also laid another embargo upon shipping. This was ye utmost I could possibly do, since I had no power to press seamen out of the mercht. ships; therefore on July 15th at 12 a clock at noon, I sent my Secretary with orders to Capt. Hamilton to gett his own ship, and all H.M. ships of war then rideing at anchor in Carlisle Bay forthwith in readiness to saile, and to proceed with all speed to ye Island of Antegoa, and there to joyne with H.M. ships of war attending yt. Govermt., and to do all they could to protect those Islands and destroy the enemy, and yt. after he apprehended those Islands were out of danger, then to return to Carlisle Bay and to lay before me a journall of his proceedings; I likewise directed him to give Capt. Constable a copy of those orders (entered in Minutes of Council). After Mr. Hamilton had received these orders, he putt on an air of alacrity of going to the assistance of the Leward Islands, but at the same time pretended he could not tell what measures to take till he knew whether I could supply H.M. ships with 400 seamen, hereby he would not only have suggested yt. he was ignorant of wt. power I had, but also of the endeavours I had used to procure the said men; as to the first of these I informed him but the Sunday before yt. I had no power to press seamen out of the merchts'. ships, as to the other part my actions were so publick yt. none in the Island was ignorant of them, another pertence of delay was that he wanted powder, arms and ammunition, but did not inform me wt. quantity he wanted. In answer to this I gave him to understand yt. he should be forthwith supplied with any stores he wanted so soon as I knew what quantity of each species he stood in need of, upon this he made a demand of fusees, swords, powder, smal shot etc. and I immediately gave Col. Lasley the store-keeper an order to supply him with the said arms, and stores. Col. Lasley immediately got the same ready, and sent Mr. Hamilton word thereof who returned answer yt. he would forthwith come and fetch them, but instead thereof caused him to waite a whole day, and made him beleive to the very last that he would have them (deposition enclosed). On the 17th of July the Panther, Burlington, Experiment, Woolwich, Swallow and Lyme took their departure from hence and came to an anchor off of St. Johns Harbour on the 20th July in the evening. On the 19th of July the enemy left Montsieurat, and went all to an anchor at Guardeloope. I now beg leave to remark that after the London fleet arrived in Carlisle Bay, it was no longer under the care of Mr. Hamilton, who brought it hither; but committed to the care and protection of Mr. Constable, who was to reconvoy it to London, and yt. he ought not to have exposed the fleet to the least hazard, or insults of an enemy, by leaving it, nor have run the risque of disabling the Queen's ships by ill weather, or any other accident, or of putting them in any danger of being taken by the enemy, without the Queen's service did absolutely require it. Now tho' no misfortune befell the fleet during the absence of Mr. Constable, and Clerk, and tho' they met with no storms or ill weather to disable the Queen's ships and tho' they had extraordinary good fortune to escape being taken by the enemy yet the misfortune yt. befell Montseiurat had been prevented if Mr. Constable and Clark had continued with the fleet at Barbados and had lost no time in fitting themselves with all necessaries for their voiage to great Brittain according to the instructions they received from the Lords of the Admiralty, for then all the six men of war might have gone from hence on the 13th of July, but they did not go till the 17th, by reason neither Mr. Constable, Clark or Elford were ready and therefor those pertences were made use of to delay ye time yt. I have already related, whereas if they had gone from hence the 13th, they had prevented in all probabilyty the misfortune that hath befell that unhappy Island, because the French did not go from Montsieurat till the 19th of July. How Mr. Constable and Hamilton behaved when they ariv'd, and continued at Antegoa, I beg leave to refer yr. Lordships to the accounts wch. Generall Douglas, and the other gentlemen there will give you: But I think it incumbent upon me to inform your Lordships, that Capt. Constable, Clark and Elford with H.M. ships under their commands, arrived here in Carlisle Bay the 3rd of Aug. last from Antegoa and yt. Mr. Constable writ me a letter dated Aug. 3rd, and ye chief reason he gave me for leaving Antegoa was yt. the Queen's ships he left there were capable to prevent any further designes the enemy might have upon the Leeward Islands: after I had read this letter (entered in Minutes of Council) I commanded one of my serts. to bid the person who brought it to acquaint Mr. Constable, that I should be glad to see him in order to discourse him upon the subject matter of his letter, but Mr. Constable did not think fitt to come to me or to take any further notice of it. On Aug. 7th, Capt. Hamilton, Gunman and Drake with H.M. ships under their commands did also arrive in Carlisle Bay from Antegoa, and on ye 8th Mr. Hamilton paid me a visit and informed me amongst other things yt. ye reason why he left Antegoa was because the enemy were so superior to him, and ye rest of H.M. ships Mr. Constable had left at Antegoa, that they could neither encounter them nor prevent any attempt the enemy might make upon any of H.M. Leward Islands, being the enemy consisted of one ship of 64 guns, one of 56, one of 54, two of 44, one of 38 and of 28. Mr. Slingsby, H.M. Attorney Generall and Mr. Upton were with me when Mr. Hamilton gave me this and some other informations, and they have given their depositions of it, wch. are also entered at large in the Councill Books, etc. So soon as Mr. Hamilton had left me I writt a letter to Mr. Constable dated Aug. 8, and did not only inform him of the reasons Mr. Hamilton had given me for his leaving of Antegoa, but did represent the danger H.M. Leward Islands were in, and did also tell him, that if Mr. Hamilton's information were true, yt. then nothing could prevent the loss and ruin of the Leward Islands, but a conjunction of all H.M. ships both here and at Antegoa, and yt. therefore I thought it absolutely necessary for H.M. service, and the preservation of those Islands, yt. all H.M. ships here should forthwith joyne those at Antegoa, and yt. after they were so united yt. they should continue together till the storm wch. so much threatned H.M. subjects was blown over. Mr. Upon delivered this letter to Mr. Constable on Aug. 8th, and I desired him to return an answer by him, but he bid the said Upton tell me yt. he would neither answer my letter nor would he go to the Leward Islands (letter and depositions entered in the Councill Books). Besides this, Mr. Hamilton informed me yt. there was a report yt. Monsieur de Guy was arrived from France at Martinique with five ships of war, and yt. they had some land forces on board; I therefore thought it absolutely necessary after Mr. Constable had refused to joyne H.M. ships at Leward to give Mr. Hamilton orders to cruise abt. this Island with the ships under his command to prevent any sudden surprise of this Island; these orders are dated Aug. 9th, and are entered at large in the Council Books, and Mr. Upton delivered these orders to Mr. Hamilton; upon wch. he told ye said Upton yt. he had as good a Governmt. as I had, and yt. he would not change with me, and as to those orders he did not look upon them as any orders at all, and would take no notice of them. Mr. Upton delivering me this message from Mr. Hamilton, and finding yt. no assistance was to be expected from the ships of war, I thought it absolutely necessary for the defence and security of this Island, to bring down some of the Militia to guard the severall forts, and batterys of this Island, and on the 13th of Aug. I required the Council to give me their opinion, whether it was not adviseable, considering the present posture of affairs (and yt. ye mattrosses did not do their dutys at the severall forts and batterys as they ought to do) yt. ye Militia should be continued to guard ye same, till we should receive some intelligence of the enemy's designes and what was become of them. Whereupon Mr. Pilgrim, Hallet, Frere, Barwick, and Maxwell were of opinion yt. ye Militia should be continued; but Mr. Walker, Alleyne, Beresford and Salter, were of a contrary opinion, notwithstanding wch. I gave orders for the Militia to continue. On the 21st Aug. about 11 a'clock at night I received a letter (entered in Council Book) by an express from ye General of the Leward Islands, dated 13th Aug., wherein he informed me yt. on the 12th and 13th Aug. their spy-boats had discovered the motions of the enemy, and from thence he did conclude yt. the enemy would attack them very suddenly, if not within the space of six hours, and therefore desired yt. I would send all H.M. ships here to his assistance. I immediately dispatched one William Tonstall a servt. of mine to Mr. Upton my Secretary with orders to waite upon Mr. Hamilton, and to acquaint him with the advice I had received from Generall Douglass, and to desire him to attend me immediately upon it at my house; but the said Hamilton sent me word by Mr. Upton yt. he would not come yt. night, but yt. he would in the morning, and yt. his ship, and the others under his command were ready, and yt. he had no excuse but could sail about eight or nine a clock in the morning; he said a good deal more as appears by Mr. Tonstall's deposition entered in ye Minutes of Council. On Aug. 22 between 7 and 8 a clock in ye morning I ordered Mr. Grace the Provost Marshall to go to Capt. Hamilton and Capt. Constable, and to acquaint them yt. I had received last night an express from General Douglas, yt. he was in dayly apprehensions of being attacqued by a very considerable French force, and intreated the assistance of all H.M. ships here, and yt. therefore I desired them to meet me in Councill with the Capts. under their commands at 12 a clock, to consult wt. was proper to be done for H.M. service, and ye protection of the Leward Islands, Mr. Hamilton bid the said Grace tell me yt. he would waite upon me if he could get convenience by coach, or horses for himself, and ye Captains under his command. But Mr. Constable bid the said Grace tell me yt. ye last time he with the Capts. under his command attended me on the like occasion, I used them so ill, yt. they thought they had no further business with me, and further yt. he was preparing every thing to go to England with the Fleet, who ought to have sailed this day; but upon the petition of severall merchants and ye masters of ships yt. he would stay four days longer, he had granted their petition for two days, and yt. on Sunday he would accordingly sail; the ill usuage yt. Mr. Constable hints at was my bidding Mr. Elford hold his tongue; but haveing already faithfully recited yt. matter I shall not here trouble yr. Lordships with a repetition of it. I summoned the Council to meet on the 22nd of Augt. at 12 a clock in the morning, and a little after 12 I sent ye Provost Marshall to the Council Chamber to see whether there was a quorum of the Council, and ye said Provost Marshal brought me word yt. there was not, but yt. Mr. Hamilton and the two Capts. under his command had been there, and ordered him to acquaint me yt. they would go to dinner, and return again abt. three a clock; abt. half an hour after two a quorum of the gentlemen of the Council mett, and I communicated to them Generall Douglas's letter, and examined upon oath Capt. John Green, Commander of the sloop William, and William Vanhurst, lately Commander of the sloop Rochell, what they knew concerning the enemy's strength, and of their designes (entered in the Council Book). The Board and I were unanimously of opinion yt. it was highly necessary for H.M. service, and the preservation of the Leward Islands, yt. all the men of war here should forthwith joyne those at Antegoa: after this I read to the Board some paragraphs out of Capt. Hamilton's letter of Aug. 13th, and then made some remarks upon them, all wch. is entered in the Council Books. About 5 a clock in the afternoon Mr. Hamilton, Constable and all the other Capts. came to the House where the Councill and I were sitting; but we being then very busy they were not imediately called in, but so soon as the said business was over, I enquired where the said Capts. were, and John Newland and Pat. Beacham deposed yt. they staid abt. 12 minutes, and then went away damning the Council and me. Refers to their depositions. About two hours after Mr. Hamilton and Constable had left the House where the Councill and I were sitting they sent the Councill, and me a letter, Aug. 22, wch. is entered in the Councill Books, wherein they sett forth yt. they and the other Commanders of H.M. ships upon my request by the Provost Marshall readily repaired to the Council Chamber at the hour appointed, and after staying a hour they at last saw the Provost Marshall, and desired him to acquaint me yt. they had stayed there so long in vain; but that they would be at Councill between the hours of 3 and 4 in the afternoon, and they assert yt. they came up again between the hours of 3 and 4 in the afternoon, and staid there half an hour, without so much as gentlemanlike usage, and therefore they thought themselves in honour obliged to resent it by returning to their dutys. In the first place I crave leave to take notice, yt. neither Mr. Constable, Clark, nor Elford were with Mr. Hamilton, Gunman and Drake at the House where the Council meets at 12 a clock, as they assert, nor did any of those three gent. at that time speak with the Provost Marshall as Mr. Constable alleadges. It is true I summoned the Council to meet at 12 a clock, and yt. they did not meet before half an hour after two, but that is not to be wondered at considering the great distance yt. some of them lives at, and the shortnes of the notice they had, wch. was however the soonest yt. could be given them upon that occasion, for I summoned them upon an express I had received from Generall Douglas on 21st Aug. between 10 and 11 at night, and the summons ran to meet me at twelve a clock at noon the next day, and this I did because the matter was of great importance, and required dispatch: as to Mr. Constable's and Hamilton's asserting yt. they stayed near half a hour, I was informed in Council (as appears by the Minutes) yt. they only staid 12 minutes. Mr. Hamilton in his letter of Aug. 13th, haveing desired a copy of what was then entered in the Council Books in relation to him, I not only ordered yt. he should have a copy of those Minutes, but that the Clerk of the Council should forthwith (after the Council was adjourned) waite on Capt. Hamilton, and Constable, and read to them the Minutes of Aug. 22, as also the letters, and advices I had received from the Generall of the Leeward Islands, a little while after the Councill broke up, I sent Mr. Hamilton orders dated Aug. 22 at nine a clock at night, to gett his own ship, and all H.M. ships then rideing at anchor in Carlisle Bay forthwith in readyness, and immediately to saile to Antegoa, and if possible to joyne with H.M. ships there, and to do all he could to protect the Leward Islands and destroy the enemy, and to return to Carlisle Bay so soon as he apprehended those Islands were out of danger. On Aug. 23, the Councill mett again, and Mr. Barron informed us yt. he had waited on Mr. Hamilton and Constable and read to them the Minutes of Councill of Aug. 22, etc. and deposed that Mr. Hamilton said yt. if he had me on board he would keele haul me, and that he called me a son of a whore, rascall, villain, and rogue (deposition enclosed). I was advised by several to resent this barbarous and vile usage in the manner it deserved, and to have immediately taken up Mr. Hamilton for it, but I did not think fitt at that time to follow their advice, least the Capts. of the Queen's ships (who had already shewed too great a reluctancy and had made soe many frivolous delays in goeing to the assistance of H.M. distressed subjects,) should even make that a pertence of not goeing to the relief of the Leward Islands, wch. were then in such eminent danger. On Aug. 24, Mr. William Walker, and Major Cogan delivered me a letter abt. 2 a clock in the afternoon signed by the Commanders of H.M. ships here; wherein they sett forth yt. they had come to an unanimous resolution to proceed to Leward, to gain further intelligence of the enemy's motions; but that they wanted ten barrells of powder, and near 300 effective men to proceed on that service; they also desired two sloops to gain intelligence yt. they might not seperate their present strength, for yt. the enemy was too strong for them till they were joyned with the ships to Leward, and then add yt. nothing would contribute more to H.M. service, than my comeing to a speedy resolution to exert my power in granting their request, hereby they would excuse their not goeing to the assistance of the Leward Islands, on ye 22nd Augt. in pursuance of the orders I had given them, by suggesting that they wanted 300 effective men, and two sloops, and yt. it was in my power to supply them with the said men and sloops: whereas they very well knew yt. it was no more in my power to press men out of the mercht. ships than it was to take away the ships from the owners, nor yt. it was in my power to supply them with two sloops. I immediately returned them an answer, and sent it by the person yt. brought me theirs, wherein I told them amongst other things yt. I did admire they had been so long in comeing to a resolution of goeing to the assistance of the Leward Islands, especially after they had received my orders, as also yt. they did not acquaint me before, yt. they wanted men, for yt. if they had, all proper means would have been used to have got them, but as they had delayed the matter so long without any justifiable reason yt. I saw, and had then asked wt. was impossible for me to comply with on a sudden, they ought to go in the condition they were in, and not to loose any more time upon any pretence wt. ever, being the Leeward Islands were in such eminent danger. Their letter and my answer thereto are entered in the Minutes of Council. After I had writt this letter, I immediately ordered the storekeeper to supply them with 10 barrells of powder, and sent a warrt. to take up all deserters and stragling seamen. On Aug. 25th one John Airey a servt. of mine met Capt. Hamilton in the Bridge Town, in the morning, and Mr. Hamilton asked him if he had any commands from me to him, ye said Airey replied yt. he had not; whereupon Mr. Hamilton bid him tell me, yt. I was a French bastard, and yt. he did not think I would have given him so much trouble agt. the French; I likewise took no notice of this abuse least it should impeed the Queen's service, and be made a pertence by the other Commanders of the Queen's ships for not goeing to ye assistance of the Leward Islands. On Aug. 26th last between the hours of ten, and eleaven in the morning, Mr. Arthur Upton delivered me paper sealed up under a cover, and directed to me in the form of a letter, and at the same time informed me yt. his wife gave him the said letter, and yt. Mr. William Gordon, Minister of St. Georges, delivered it to her abt. seaven or eight a clock on Monday night last, and acquainted her yt. ye Capts. of the men of war would stay half an hour for an answer; I cannot but observe yt. if the said letter had been delivered to me at the same time Mr. Gordon gave it to Mr. Upton's wife, yet it had been impossible to have sent an answer to it, in so short a time as half an hour, being my residence is a mile from the harbour, and the ships were then under sail; Mr. Upton was examined in relation to this matter in Councill upon oath, as your Lordships will see by the Minutes. Upon breaking open the seal, I found under the cover a paper intituled A remonstrance of the severall Commanders of H.M. ships whose names are hereunto subscribed. The time, circumstance, and manner of sending it, and ye stile in wch. it is writ, are so very extraordinary, considering all the affronts and abuses they had before given me, yt. I shall humbly leave it to yr. Lordships to make what observations thereon you think fitt. But as to the severall facts yt. are there laid down, and the severall unjust reflections they make, I shall endeavour to give your Lordships full satisfaction. They first suggest yt. I obstructed and delayed their goeing to the assistance of the Leward Islands, and then by artfull insinuations laid the blame upon them, and in order to excuse their own conduct, and to make out those suggestions, and to fix the fault of their delay in not goeing immediately to the assistance of H.M. distressed subjects to Leward, they first represent that they attended at ye Council house on Aug. 22nd last at 12 a clock according to the message I sent them by Mr. Grace, the Provost Marshall; but yt. neither I nor any of the Councill being there, Mr. Hamilton bid ye said Grace tell me yt. they would return again abt. three a clock, and yt. in the afternoon they came to the Councill House; in a quarter of an hours time they sent up two messages waiteing all the while amongst the footmen, but did not receive any answer, and therefore they returned to town, and sent a very civill letter to lett me know the cause of their comeing away to wch. as my usuall manner was I did not return any answer. As to this part of their remonstrance, it is admitted yt. Mr. Hamilton, Gunman and Drake, did attend at the Council House at 12 a clock, and yt. Mr. Hamilton bid Mr. Grace inform me yt. he and those two gentlemen would be there again at three. But neither Mr. Constable, Clark nor Elford were there with Mr. Hamilton and the other gentlemen as is suggested in their remonstrance; it is true the Councill did not meet at 12 a clock according to the summons I sent them etc. as supra. As to their suggesting yt. they waited amongst the footmen and servts., to this I can say nothing; but if they did, it was their own fault, because there were two very good rooms in either of wch. they might have been as private as they pleased; as to the civill letter they mention, it is entered in the Council Books, and your Lordships will find it is directed to ye Council as well as me; however after it was read at the Board, I ordered Coll. Barwick yt. is one of the Council, to return an answer to it, wch. accordingly he did, and Mr. Grace the Provost Marshall delivered it to the said Gentlemen, as appears by his deposition. The Gentlemen in their remonstrance further sett forth yt. one Mr. Barron who executes the office of Secretary told them, yt. he was sent by me to them to read the minutes of yt. days proceeding, wch. he did in the hearing of severall gentlemen of the Island, and merchts. in town; they add yt. they are amazed at ye unparralleld insolence, of the treatment that I should averr facts in the minutes wch. they can so notoriously disprove, and should pick out that time, to send for them to Councill, to charge them with crimes to their faces yt. they were never guilty of, to rip up old differences, and stories invidiously contrived to excite their resentments agt. me, and to sett them at variance one agt. another, and then to send my Secretary into publick company to expose and insult them with reading them openly, thereby to surprise them into some extravigant passion, and resentmts., and then to gett my officers to inform and give depositions. This representation I hope to make to appear to your Lordships to be very dishonourable and unjust. It is very true Mr. Barron was ordered to waite upon Capt. Hamilton, and Constable forthwith after the Council was adjourned, and to read to them yt. day's minutes, as also the letter and advices I had received from General Douglas; this order was partly occasioned by their not staying to be called into Councill; but chiefly from Mr. Hamilton's complaining in his letter of Aug. 13 that I had caused a narrative of letters, orders and messages wch. had passed between him and me to be entered in the Councill Books, and yt. in such an unfair manner yt. he found himself under a necessity to ask a copy of what had been entered, and therefore to anticipate all extravagant and unreasonable murmurings and complaints of this kind, Mr. Barron was sent to read the Minutes of Council to Mr. Hamilton, and Constable without any of those ridiculous views, as is disingeniously and absurdly suggested; but I hope yr. Lordships will believe yt. it was high time to make them sensible (by all just means) of their delitoriness, and ill conduct when so many of the lives and fortunes of H.M. subjects depended in all probaility upon their expedition, courage and prudence; as to Mr. Barron's reading the minutes to them in publick company, it was both without my order and knowledge, and they have nobody to blame for it but themselves; for if they had desired to have them in private none can doubt but he must and would have attended them; As to the reflections they make of being informed agt. by my officers, yr. Lordships will be so farr from thinking that a fault, or the least imputation upon those persons, yt. you will judge it a matter both of duty, and meritt, especially since the persons they informed against reposed no trust or secrecy in them. As to the facts I have charged them with I do not only take upon me to aver yt. they are all true; but in some measure do appeal to their own Journalls concerning the veracity thereof, and in others to their letters and my answers thereto, in others to the Minutes of Councill, and to the severall informations and depositions of credible persons yt. are entered in the Minutes of Councill: I will be bold to say yt. there's no fact I have charged them with but what will thus be made appear, save only the interlocutory discourse I have related on the 14th July, when there was nobody with us, and it's so faithfully related yt. I cannot think they can possibly deny it. They say in their remonstrance yt. it was a happy thing they came away from the Councill, for had they staid to have heard those minutes read, they do not know what length of passion might have hurried some of them. I take upon me to assure yr. Lordships yt. there's none yt. sitts at Board yt. either is, or would have been deterred (by any airs they could have given themselves) either from not doeing their duty, or representing the truth. However, I humbly leave it to your Lordships to consider, the height, the quality and consequence of such a menacing, and do not doubt but your Lordships will so represent it to H.M. as to prevent the like for the future. They further say in their remonstrance yt. they were in hopes to have found in the minutes some resolutions relateing to the relief of the Leward Islands, as also mine and the Council's opinion wt. were the properest measures to take, what assistance the Island would give, that the Assembly would have been suffered to sitt to raise money to hire men and sloops for intelligence, wch. they are informed they are ready to do, if I would give them leave to sitt, but instead of all this they had nothing read to them but calumnies, accusations, and scandalous reflections; they add that this procedure is so very surprizeing, yt. they cannot forbear again exclaiming with a just indignation. As to their suggesting that we came to no resolutions in relation to the relief of the Leward Islands; I do aver the contrary and do appeal to the Minutes, wch. they own Mr. Barron read to them; your Lordships will see that both the Councill and I were of opinion yt. all H.M. ships here should forthwith go to their assistance. This was with submission the best resolution we could come to in the present posture of affairs; for General Douglass in his letter to me of Aug. 13th said, yt. he expected yt. the enemy would attack him in six hours, and Capt. John Green who brought the said letter deposed amongst other things, yt. a little after he left Antegoa, he heard the alarm gun fired from Monk's Hill, where the chief fortification of Antegoa is, by wch. he believed yt. the French were then in sight of the said Island, we therefore not only thought it expedient beyond all other things yt. H.M. ships here should go to the relief of Antegoa; but that they should proceed thither with all imaginable expedition, yt. they might not only come in time to save Antegoa, but to prevent in some measure the damage H.M. subjects might otherwise have sustained: we made no doubt but that the six men of war (tho not joyned with those at Antegoa) were of sufficient strength to give a good account of the enemy, and we were the more sanguin in our hopes of their success, because Mr. Constable in his letter, Aug. 3, said yt. he then knew the enemys strength and thought yt. the ships he left at Antegoa were capable to prevent any further designes of the enemy: now those ships everybody must own were much inferiour to the six men of war yt. were here. As to the reflections they make about ye Assembly, we wanted no intelligence at that time, for Capt. Green gave us as good, and as fresh intelligence, as was possible to be had: as to what men they wanted of their complement, I can say nothing to: but I must again observe yt. Mr. Upton did on Aug. 21st acquaint Mr. Hamilton by my order of the danger Antegoa was in, and yt. he bid Upton tell me yt. he could or would not waite upon me yt. night, but yt. he would in the morning, and further yt. his ship and those under his command were ready, and yt. he had no excuse but could sail by eight or nine a clock in the morning. I would further observe yt. it was not easy to suppose yt. the ships under Capt. Constables command wanted either men or anything yt. was necessary; because they returned from Antegoa Aug. 3rd, and were to have gone from hence on Aug. 22 as convoy to the London fleet; therefore if they had not their full complement of men or wanted anything, yt. this place could have accommodated them with, they should have made a representacon thereof to me, and if I had not done all yt. lay in my power to have supplied them, then the fault had laid at my door: but since Mr. Hamilton sent me word by Mr. Upton yt. his ship, and those under his command were ready, and yt. he had no excuse for not sailing, and since yt. Mr. Constable, and the ships under his command made no application for men: I hope yr. Lordships won't wonder yt. not consideration of yt. was had in Council, especially since all long considerations and dilatory proceedings appeared then to be as fatall to Antegoa, as the not sending them any relief at all, etc. I further take the liberty to say in answer to that reflection they make yt. the Assembly should have been suffered to have sat to raise money to hire men, and sloops, yt. there were severall persons in the Assembly, at that time, yt. would have perplexed, and baffled, any such proposition, and refer your Lordships to the Minutes of Councill on Aug. 31st last, wherein your Lordships will see yt. they would not come into those measures wch. at that time seemed absolutely necessary for the preservation of their own country. The next paragraph in their remonstrance runs, On the Thursday night the Genl. and merchts. of the Island presented us with a petition to go down: whereupon we called a consultation the next morning, and unanimously resolved we thought it Capt. Constable's duty to break thro' his orders, and go in conjunction with the rest, wch. we imediately acquainted you with in a letter, as also yt. our ships wanted 300 effective men, some of our ships having now about 40 sick, and we flattered ourselves yt. you would have exerted the prerogative upon this so emergent occasion, since you are so tender of preserving it upon others, but to our great surprise we received in answer yt. it was impossible for you now to do it, tho' you own in the same letter yt. it was possible two days agoe, and yt. you admire we have not obeyed the orders you sent us, whereas we admire more yt. you should take upon you to issue orders, wch. you have no authority to give, or yt. you should fancy we would obey them, when the Capts. of the Stations have so often told you they would not receive any orders without being consulted with, when we are so expressly directed by our Instructions first to advise and consult with you, and then to receive orders, and you know yt. you have no authority, or power over Capt. Constable or the ships under his command. In answer to this paragraph, your Lordships will give me leave to say yt. I know nothing of the consultations they mention; but I do own they did send me a letter by Wm. Walker and Major Cogan on Aug. 24th about two a clock in the afternoon, and both their letter and my answer thereto are entered in the Minutes of Council, but since they endeavour to reflect upon me by misreciteing it, I lay it here verbatim before yr. Lordships:—"I have just received yours, and I do wonder you have been so long in comeing to a resolution of goeing to the assistance of the Leward Islands espescialy after you received my orders wch. I sent you by and with the advice of H.M. Councill to go thither. I also admire yt. you did not acquaint me before now yt. you wanted men to proceed on yt. service, if you had, all proper means would have been used to have got you them, before this, but as you have delayed the matter thus long without any justifiable reason yt. I can see, and have now asked wt. is impossible for me to comply with on a sudden, I must therefore tell you yt. the Leward Islands are in such eminent danger, yt. you ought to go in the condition you are in, and not to loose any more time upon any pertence wt. ever, but obey the orders I have given you; I have directed Mr. Faucet to supply the Experiment with 10 barrells of powder." I shall now take notice yt. they say yt. I to their great surprise told them in answer to their demand for men, yt. it was impossible for me now to do it, tho' they say I own yt. it was possible two days ago, your Lordships will easily perceive the occasion of this incongruity; for if they had not left out these words (on a sudden) they had been baulked of their satisfaction, of being greatly surprized: yr. Lordpps. cannot but take notice yt. they say they admire yt. I should take upon me to issue orders, etc. In answer to this I must remind yr. Lordships, yt. ye Gent. of the station have in severall important cases refused to consult, and advise with me, and sometimes upon very frivolous pretences, and sometimes without assigning any reason at all. Repeats story of July 14 and Aug. 8, 22 etc. I had much rather they should thus clamour agt. my giving them proper orders without consulting, and adviseing with them, than they should excuse their not doeing their duty, or any part of their ill conduct, by pretending they wanted my orders, but under the pretence of their not being obliged to receive orders without first being advised and consulted with, they have found out a way to evade the receiving any orders at all; for if they are not humoured like children, if everything is not exactly complied with according to their mind, and if they are not suffered to stay as long in the road as they please, they either give out yt. they are ill-treated, or used with ill manners, and therefore absolved from comeing any more to advise and consult with me. Mr. Constable's Journals will sufficiently convince your Lordships yt. he hath gone from hence a great many times without my orders, and I must assure your Lordpps. without so much as letting me know where he went or when he would return: But your Lordships wont wonder at these libertys, after I have taken upon me to tell you that Mr. Hamilton hath not scrupled even to disobey orders yt. have been issued for H.M. espescial service, and ye preservation of her Colonies, even tho' he had been consulted thereupon, and yt. they were issued by and with the advice of H.M. Councill here. Refers again to the orders of July 15, and Messrs. Constable and Hamilton leaving Antigua. Continues:—Though the inhabitants of Antegoa were under most terrible apprehensions, of being invaded by the enemy, and therefore made all the pressing instances and kind offers yt. was possible to engage them to stay a few days with them, yet nothing would prevail upon them, notwithstanding they were obliged to do it by their orders, their honour and common humanity; so Mr. Constable on Aug. 26th and Mr. Hamilton on the 27th left the distressed Antegonians to bewail their misfortunes, and to expect the greatest harm the enemy could do them, this in my poor opinion, is the most indiscreet, the most inhumane and dishonourable act yt. ever was committed by persons of their station. It is said in ye remonstrance yt. I know yt. I have no manner of power over Capt. Constable, etc. All yt. I can say to this is yt. I have not seen Capt. Constable's last Instructions, nor know nothing of them more than wt. is menconed in a paper yt. contains the opinion of a Councill of war, yt. was held on board the Woolwich on July 14th last, and is entered in the Minutes of Council, the Gent. who signed that paper sett forth, yt. Mr. Constable was of opinion yt. he could not enter into any consultation with them yt. might cause any alterations in his proceedings contrary to what he had this day acquainted me with, without my application to him, for so doeing, he beleiving he could not be safe otherwise; from hence I concluded yt. I had a power to give him orders, for if I had no such power then my application or orders could have been of no manner of safety or benefit to him. The next paragraph in ye remonstrance runs: "On the afternoon of the same day haveing been offered by Mr. Walker, Mr. Newport and Major Cogan £600 for the encouragemt. of 300 men at 40s. a man to go with us, we sent up Mr. Chaplin of H.M.S. the Lyme with a message to you to desire leave to beat up for volunteers, in hopes yt. he being a Gent. of good esteem in this Island might have mollified you into a compliance but as he informed us under his hand upon his return when he sent your servt. whom he saw speak to you to acquaint you yt. he was come from us on H.M. speciall and imediate service, with a message relateing to the relief of the Leward Islands, the servt. returned in answer yt. you were busy and would not be spooke with, or receive any message, and yt. afterwards he desired the same servt. to call your private Secrey. to have spooke with him, and yt. he returned the same answer." As to the offer they say they had made of £600 I can say nothing to, not knowing whether it was so, or not, nor whether Parson Gordon is chaplin of the Lyme, or whether anybody here hath power to make him so, or to make a sinecure of the place of chaplin to a man of war; but I do submitt it to your Lordships whether such things are not very great abuses upon the publick, and very great hardships upon the poor seamen; as to the esteem and character Mr. Gordon hath in the island, I am unwilling to speak much of it, but it is so very bad, yt. I never shewed him any countenance, or cared yt. he should come within my doors, this severall of the Capts. of the men of war knew, and therefore very innocently sent this pious man to mollifie me into a compliance, they had never proposed to me, nor wt. I could have had no objection to, if they had been sincere in it and would not even have made it a pretence for delay. When Mr. Gordon came to my house he sent one Lancelot Bainbridge a servt. of mine into the garden to tell me yt. he desired to speak with me, I ordered the servt. to acquaint him yt. I was busy, he then sent the same message by the said servt. to Mr. Upton, and the like answer was returned, and this is all yt. I knew of his business, as appears by the depositions of Mr. Upton and Lancelot Bainbridge wch. are entered in the Minutes of Councill herewith sent. The next paragraph setts forth yt. in the evening I sent Capt. Hamilton one single order directed to the Constables to take up deserters, and stragling sailors; but would not make use of my authority to press or give us leave to beat up for volunteers upon ye aforementioned encouragement. In answer to this I must desire your Lordships to call to mind yt. it was but on the 24th of Augt. in the afternoon, yt. they informed me that they wanted seamen, and in the evening, I sent Mr. Hamilton a warrt. to take up all deserters, and stragling seamen wch. was sufficient for the town of St. Michael; for the danger the Leward Islands were in, was so great, and the Capts. of the men of war had industriously lost so much time, yt. I did not think it proper to send warrts. into the severall parishes of the Island, to take up seamen, and to keep the ships here from goeing to the assistance of the Leward Islands, till returns were made thereof. As to my not pressing seamen out of the mercht. ships, I must again say I have no power to do it, and as to my not suffering them to beat up for volunteers, I deny yt. they desired any such thing of me, or anybody in behalf of them. In the next paragraph they say yt. upon the whole affair they shall submitt it to the world, whether it is not plain even to a demonstration yt. all my aim and design hath been to retard and prevent their goeing, and then they add yt. the first step I took was to slight and affront them, to rip up old differences, throw dirt, abuse and endeavour to devide us, to issue insulting, peremptory orders, wch. you have no authority to give; to deny supplying us with men, not to suffer the Assembly to sitt to raise money for their encouragement, not to lett us have a tender even tho' there was one ready, and at last not to admit our officers, and refuse to receive any message from us, the naturall conclusion from all wch. is yt. so you could lay the blame upon us, you would be glad the Leward Islands perished. The first step they assert I took was to slight and affront them, and endeavouring to divide them. I do utterly deny it unless they do hereby mean the facts yt. are incerted in the Minutes of Councill to demonstrate their ill conduct, and I hope your Lordships will see there was an absolute necessity of doeing this, since one of the Queen's Islands was destroyed, and many others exposed to the mercy of the enemy. As to their asserting yt. I sent them insulting peremptory orders, wch. I had no authority to give, I must refer yr. Lordships to those orders, and do hope you will not think there's anything rude, insulting or improper in them, but adapted to the then circumstances of affairs. I do also humbly submitt it to your Lordships, whether I had not power to issue them, but I must take the liberty to say that I veryly beleive if I had not issued them, that they would have not gone to the relief of the Leward Islands, and would have afterwards thrown the blame upon me, for not giving them orders. I have already given my reasons for the Assembly's not sitting, and have made it appear yt. I have neither denyed the Capts. men, nor anything else for the service of the Queen and the Leward Islands yt. laid in my power to grant, nor do I know they have been treated with the least disrespect or incivility, and I am sure I have been far from giving them any reason to say, yt. so I could lay the blame upon them I should be glad the Leward Islands perished. This is so very severe a charge yt. if it could but be probably made out I should be so far from thinking myself entituled to any share of the Queen's favour, or the friendship of any good man, yt. I freely own there's no punishment upon earth too great for me, etc. I cannot conclude this long letter without once more observing yt. upon my sending Mr. Grace the Provost Marshall to Capt. Constable on Aug. 22 last, to acquaint him in what eminent danger the Leward Islands were in, and to desire him to meet me in Councill att twelve a clock the same day, to consult about their preservation yt. he sent me word by the said Grace yt., he had no business with me, and yt. he would sail on Sunday (being the 24th Aug.) with the fleet, to prevent wch. I directed the severall officers not to clear the mercht. ships. So from this single instance, I submit it to your Lordships, whether Mr. Constable or I had the intrest of the Leward Islands most at heart. I hope yr. Lordships will pardon this crude and prolix account, and beleive I would have put it into better method, and language, if time and the business of the Govermt. would have allowed it, but I have been so streightened in the one, and taken up with the other, yt. I have had only leisure thus to relate the facts and circumstances thereto belonging. I have only to add yt. the members of H.M. Council here did unanimously desire me on Aug. 25th last upon reading the remonstrance of the Capts. of H.M. ships yt. I would lay before H.M. the insolent and outragious behaviour of the sd. Capts. as also the many unjust, and scandalous reflections they have thrown upon the Council and me without any colour of reason, and yt. I would humbly desire her most sacred Majesty to grant us such relief herein as to her great wisdom shall seem most meet: from hence I humbly intreat yr. Lordships to lay the contents of this letter before H.M. Signed, Rob. Lowther. Endorsed, Recd. 26th, Read 27th Nov. 1712. 24½ pp. Enclosed,
69. i. Copy of Orders issued by Governor Lowther to the Captains of the men of war attending Barbados about assisting the Leeward Islands. June 28—Aug. 22, 1712. As described in preceding. 17 pp. [C.O. 28, 13. Nos. 97, 97 i.; and (without enclosure), 29, 12. pp. 449–503.]
Aug. 29.70. Capts. Taylor, Holland and Arnold to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Being advised that your Lordships would willingly be informed respecting Cape Bretton, on the coast of Nova Scotia, we being masters of ships and inhabitants in that part of the world, knowing well the said Cape, are ready to attend your honours, etc. P.S.—Please to give us a line at ye New England Coffee-house behind the Royall Exchange. Signed, Chr. Taylor, Tho. Holland, Wm. Arnold. Endorsed, Recd. Read Aug. 30th, 1712. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 86; and 5, 913. p. 380.]
Aug. 29.
Whitehall.
71. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Dartmouth. Enclose Mr. Cuninghame's complaints against Governor Douglas. (April 30, July 2.) [C.O. 153, 12. pp. 10–12.]