America and West Indies
October 1712, 16-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1926

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70-85

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'America and West Indies: October 1712, 16-31', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 27: 1712-1714 (1926), pp. 70-85. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73911 Date accessed: 24 September 2014.


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October 1712, 16-31

[Oct. 16.]100. Alexander Strahan, Agent to the 4 Independent Companys of Foot at New York, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following to be laid before H.M. Continues:— I would humbly offer it to your consideration, whether the accts. from those parts of the defection of the five nations of the Indians may not make this augmentation more requisite etc. Endorsed, Recd. 16th, Read 31st Oct. 1712. 1 p. Enclosed,
100. i. Extract from Brigadier Hunter's letter to Alexander Strahan, Jan. 1, 1711/12. Urges him strongly to sollicite the augumentation of the troops at New York, on account of the building of two new forts in the Indian countrys. "Another cogent reason is the tarr manufacture, for in time of peace I by these hands with a small allowance to the workers for the working days only can pursue it tho' the Palatines were not here, there is no doing with that turbulent race of men but a strong hand and severe discipline. I have found all other mesures ineffectual, and have been oblig'd to disarm them and keep them to their work by a small detachmt. in their neighbourhood, etc. Whether they would regiment them, or add 2 companys independant, I am indifferent, but for discipline sake, I wish they may be regimented. The Governor being Col. needs no pay, the Major's pay is a trifle, and the rest of the staff we have already." ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 1050. Nos. 53, 53 i.]
Oct. 18.
Jamaica.
101. Governor Lord A. Hamilton to [? the Earl of Dartmouth.] Acknowledges letter of June 24th in favour of Mr. Lewis Galdy. Signed, A. Hamilton. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 63.]
Oct. 20.
Windsor.
102. Order of Queen in Council. Approving representation of Sept. 8th, (q.v.) and granting H.M. royal pardon to Mars, a negroe, Hosea and John, two Spanish Indians. Signed, Edward Southwell. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 11. No. 87.]
Oct. 20.
Windsor.
103. Order of Queen in Council. Approving representation of Sept. 25, and confirming Act of Virginia to enable John and Frances Custis to sell part of Col. Parke's land entailed on the said Frances, etc. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. Read June 24, 1715. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 1316. No. 116; and 5, 1364. pp. 206, 207.]
Oct. 20.
Windsor.
104. Copy of H.M. Commission to Francis Nicholson to be General and Commander in Chief of the forces in Nova Scotia or Acadia, and in Newfoundland. Countersigned, Bolingbroke. Endorsed, Recd. Read Jan. 29, 17 12/13. 2 pp. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 4; and 218, 1. pp. 34–36.]
Oct. 20.
Windsor.
105. Copy of H.M. Commission to Francis Nicholson to be "Governor of our Province of Nova Scotia, or Acadia, in North America; and of our town and garrison of Annapolis Royal," etc. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 5; and 218, 1. pp. 36, 37.]
Oct. 20.
Barbados.
106. Governor Lowther to the Earl of Dartmouth. Captain Bungo Hardman, Commander of the Blenford man of war, arriv'd here with your Lordshipe's of Aug. 21st on the 10th inst., and on the 11th I published the proclamation your Lordship sent me in relation to the Truce. The line that's mentioned in the Queen's Proclamation, and your Lordshipe's letter, I take to be the equinoctial line, and not the Tropick of Cancer as some conjecture. I will do my utmost endeavour to see the cessation of hostility duely complyed with, and shall punctually observe H.M. commands in not sending any prisoners to Great Britain without sending at the same time sufficient proofes of their crimes. Signed, Rob. Lowther. Holograph. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 43. No. 79.]
Oct. 20.
Jamaica.
107. Governor Lord A. Hamilton to [? the Earl of Dartmouth.] The Defyance by which I have now ye honour to write to your Lop. was first intended to saile the beginning of August, but ye accidents wch. have detain'd her, have likewise prevented my writting sooner. Refers to letters to Board of Trade re imbargo and martial law and the hurricane. People have pretty well refitted their houses, and by ye favourableness of ye wether since I hope their canes won't suffer so much as was at first expected. But there are two matters wch. have lately happen'd and wch. being national I have thought necessary to inform yr. Lop. of. Both have been done by ye privateers of this Island against what I presume was the intent of the American Act of Parliament, tho' they seem to have evaded the letter of it; one fact has been ye robbing ye Spaniards near Carthagena, in an intercourse of trade wth. ye Dutch, the other has been comitted on ye coast of Cuba by using some crueltyes on ye Spaniards to discover their effects and money in an intercourse of trade wth. English vessels. Of these I have recd. complaints from ye respective Spanish Govrs., and from ye Spanish and Dutch traders and from our own, and have endeavour'd to give ym. all possible assurances yt. such actions, as being highly disagreeable to H.M. inclinations towards ye Spaniards as well as ye Dutch, shall be strictly enquired into and discourag'd; I have order'd a prosecution on ye Stat. of H.6.c.4, against ye first, and am advis'd by H.M. Attorney General here that restitution may be thereupon decreed out of ye effects wch. I have ordered to be detain'd in ye Agent's hands belonging to that privateer. The second fact is not so well prooved nor seems so obnoxious to any statute, tho' in this too all shall be done yt. can by law. But my Lord it is from the difficulty I meet with in such prosecutions and my inability effectually to redress these disorders yt. more inclines me to give yr. Lop. this information, etc. Recommends for the Council, Mr. Brodrick (May 5), Coll. James Archbould and Col. John Sadler in the room of Cols. Long, Edlyn and Mumbee, the first having been off ye Island near 6, ye others above two years, without any of them having signify'd to me their intentions to return, etc. Prays his Lordship to present to the Queen an Address forwarded to the Board of Trade, "wherein the body of this Island have endeavour'd to express their duty to H.M. on this happy occasion," etc. Signed, A. Hamilton. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 137, 51. No. 64.]
Oct. 20.
Antigua.
108. Governor Douglas to [? the Earl of Dartmouth.] Acknowledges letter of Aug. 21st " with H.M. Proclamation for observance of the Truce, which I have published in all the four Islands with the usual ceremony and notifyed the same to the Governour of Martinique and all whom it might concern: I have also made some considerable progress in recovering the decayed trade and credit of this Island, wch. was chiefly occasion'd by the late confusions, and continued by ye present heats, and divisions, to which, it's humbly hoped a few examples of justice wou'd put a very speedy conclusion, the chief promoters of the many murders and rebellion being supposed to have reached London befor now. I shal take all imaginable care to see the cessation of hostilityes duely complyed with. Your Lordship's further orders, in the signification of H.M. pleasure, that none of her subjects be hereafter sent prisoners from the plantations to Great Britain, unless sufficient proof of their crimes is sent at the same time, shal be observed with all possible exactness," etc. Signed, Walter Douglas. 2 pp. [C.O. 152, 42. No. 93.]
Oct. 21.
Windsor Castle.
109. The Earl of Dartmouth to Governor Lowther. The enclosed petition of Richard Carter having been laid before the Queen, H.M. was pleased to referr it to the consideration of the Attorney Generall, whose report is annext. You will see it is his opinion the petitioner ought immediately to be restored to the exercise of his profession, and H.M. commands me to signify her pleasure to you, that he be restored accordingly. Signed, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. p. 178.]
Oct. 21.
St. Johns.
110. Archibald Cumings to the Council of Trade and Plantations. In complying with your Lordships' commands, I take leave humbly to represent to your Lordships the state of the trade of this country. This year abundance of ships came to load fish, but the bad fishery has obleidged a great many to goe away dead freighted here has been some quantities of tobacco pitch and tarr imported this year more then the country could expend so it is shiped off for the Straights and for Portugall and one whole sloop lading of logwood for the Straits contrary to the Acts of Trade here is also brought in from Portugall and Fyall brandy fruit oyl and bacon and sometimes linins and canvis of the produce of that country contrary to law and shiped off for the other Plantations. Also my Lords here came an English ship from Holland with canvis powder potts linnens and other merchdize of that country and cordage which is contrary to law and prejudiciall to the trade of Great Brittain. Refers to the prejudice to trade by ships coming hither from Spain under Spanish colours, etc. as April 22. Signed, Archd. Cumings. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 12, 1712. Addressed. ¾ p. [C.O. 194, 5. No. 17; and 195, 5. pp. 285, 286.]
Oct. 24.
Windsor Castle.
111. H.M. Warrant to Governor Lowther, directing him to permit Erasmus Lewis (v. Oct. 13, 15) to execute his office by Provost Marshal General by his deputy or deputys, "Wee having thought fitt in regard to his being employed in our service as Secretary to our right trusty and wel beloved cousin and Councellor, William Earl of Dartmouth, one of our principal Secretarys of State, and upon other considerations us thereunto moving, to give and grant unto him our leave and licence to continue and remain in this our Kingdom of Great Britain till further signification of our pleasure," etc. Countersigned, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. pp. 178–180.]
Oct. 29.
Windsor Castle.
112. The Queen to the President of the Council of Maryland. No Governor having been sent thither since the death of Col. Seymour, our petitioner Sir T. Lawrence Secretary of Maryland still remains without redress, as ordered March 30, 1710 etc. Wee accordingly signify our will and pleasure to you that at the first Assembly which shall meet, after your receipt of these our Letters, you do in the strongest and most earnest manner represent to them that the several orders Wee have made in Council and letters Wee have been pleased to write in his behalf, after his case had been fully examined by Our Commissioners for Trade and Plantations and by Our Attorney General, who all agreed in representing the hardship thereof, have hitherto meet with no complyance, but that on the contrary because Wee had laid our commands upon Governor Seymour not to pass any law for the future whereby the advantage of the licences to ordinarys should be taken for the Secretary's Office the Council and Assembly at that time being did on Dec. 3, 1708, pass an ordinance directing and empowering the Justices of the County Courts to grant licences to ordinary keepers and to take recognizances for their keeping good rules and orders in their houses and settling the rates of liquors etc., which pretended ordinance being contrary to commission to our Governor wherein it is expressly declared that laws, statutes and ordinances shall be passed by him with the advice and consent of the Assembly is therefore null and void and this proceeding altogether unwarrantable and illegall. You are further to acquaint them that Wee expect they should forthwith pass a law for regulating ordinarys without limitation of time or at least for a longer duration than it has hitherto been made and that the benefit of the licences be thereby appropriated to the use of the Secretary for the time being as fully to all intents and purposes as the said Sir T. Lawrence or any other Secretary of that Province hath at any time heretofore had or lawfully enjoyed the same, and that Wee do further expect that they give to Sir. T. Lawrence an equitable consideration for the mean profit of the said office which he hath lost since 1704. And it is Our further will and pleasure that you use your utmost endeavour by pressing these matters home to them and by all other proper ways and methods (the choice whereof wee leave to your prudence and discretion) to procure a complyance with these Our commands. Countersigned, Dartmouth. [C.O. 324, 32. pp. 184–188.]
Oct. 29.
London.
113. G. Bonnin to the Earl of Dartmouth. I am sent here as an eye-witness and on(e) of the chief evidences of that unparalleled rebellion and murder of Antigoa by a special warrant of Col. Walter Douglas against Sam. Watkins and Dan. Makinen and others to come, as chief actors in that barbarous fact. Prays for maintenance if he must wait long, etc. Signed, G. Bonnin. Endorsed, R. Nov. 1. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 7, 1. No. 21.]
Oct. 29.
York, in St. Johns harbour.
114. Commodore Sir Nicholas Trevanion to [? the Earl of Dartmouth.] I writt you by Capt. Owen in the Solebay which brought me your letter and the Queen's Proclamation. Att the latter end of September the men of warr under my command had taken 5 prizes of considerable value three of which their men was sent to Placentia. I immediately sent an express to Monsr. Cost-De-Bel, the Governour, that if the officers and men would return their ships shou'd be restored; the other two I gave liberty that they might proceed on their intended voyage; now the men are return'd from Placentia with a letter from the Governour (enclosed). And I have restored their ships to their great satisfaction. I sent three expresses and this comes by the second, and I doubt the first is lost. I leave this Island in a very good condition and the people very well satisfied, etc. Prays to be appointed to settle affairs here in the spring, if Placentia is to be delivered up etc. Signed, N. Trevanion. 2 pp. Enclosed,
114. i. M. de Costebelle to Commodore Sir N. Trevanion. Plaisance, Nov. 3, 1712. Accepts his offer as above, and sends 4 dozen of wine, and begs to be allowed to purchase a box of soap and candles. I am told that some of our fulibustiers contrary to the laws of war and my orders, have committed outrages on your territory. If I can learn the names of these scoundrels, I will have them punished as they deserved, etc. Signed, De Costebelle. French. 3½ pp.
114. ii. Address of the inhabitants and merchants of Newfoundland to the Earl of Dartmouth. Return thanks for so early a notification of the cessation of arms, and pray that Sir N. Trevanion may be continued as Governour, etc. 97 signatures. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 24. Nos. 10, 10 i., 11.]
Oct. 29.
York, in St. Johns harbour.
115. Commodore Sir Nicholas Trevanion to the Council of Trade and Plantations. In complyance with the orders that I recd. from your office, this brings you an acct. of the condition and state of Newfoundland. 'Twas the 18th Sept. before I arrived; I have done what lies in my power for to settle the inhabitants; and to decide all matters relateing to the affairs of the country; Monsr. Cost-de-Bel Governour of Placentia has given me his word, he will nott make them uneasie till he hears farther from France. I have writt to the Principal Secretary of State, and to Lords of the Admiralty; that I may come hear the next year to settle this country if it be a peace; I desire the interest of your honble. Board. Signed, N. Trevanion. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 10, 1712. 1 p. Enclosed,
115. i. By Sir Nicholas Trevanion, Knt., Commander of H.M. ships and garrisons and Governour in Chief att Newfoundland. A record of several Courts held att St. Johns for the better discipline and good order of the people, and correcting the irregularities by them committed, contrary to good laws and Acts of Parliament, all which was debated att severall Courts held; wherein was present the Admirall and Vice-Admirall, merchants, and cheif inhabitants, and witnesses being examined, it was brought to the following conclusion—
Article (i) That orders be put up att publick houses, and other convenient places, for the suppressing drunkenness, cursing, and swearing, and other irregularities. (ii) Whereas it was confirmed last year by Capt. Josiah Crow, that Mr. Jacob Rice, minister of St. Johns, was to have from the shallops 3, the two-men boat 2, and the skiff one quintals of dry merchandable fish, and I find that the planters are very backward in paying him though they gave from under their hands; he informs me he gott but 100 quintalls of fish, this fishing season; I do confirm what Commandore Crow, and the Court with the inhabitants did agree to, for the minister's subsistence and to encourage the Minister to remain in this country. (iii) I do confirm John Collyns Esq. Governor of Fort William of St. Johns, and that it is appointed, during the cessation, that 20 able men lies in the Fort every night. (iv) I granted a warrant to call Mr. Benger before me, relating to Sir William Hopkins' plantation att Ferriland, which is now in the possession of the Widow Clapp, and the tenement that was formerly in the possession of Sir David Kirk, but Mr. Benger did not appear in Court. (v) Mrs. Benger, wife of James Benger did appear relating to a tenement formerly in the possession of William Bennett decd., and Mrs. Benger is willing to allow to the heirs of Bennett, to one Tomson Reeve £10 per annum till it is further decided. (vi) As to what has happened to other matters between the merchts. and masters of ships, and planters and boatkeepers, relating to debts, I don't mention the parties being satisfied.
(Replies to Enquiries. v. Aug. 2.) (i) As to the numbers of English planters etc. v. scheme annexed. (ii) The planters receive sustenance from the countries, and kill but very few beavers, and other wild beasts. (iii) The inhabitants have most part of their salt provisions from Ireland; the fresh provisions as bread, pease and other necessaryes, from New England and Pensylvania, they have their salt from Lisbon, and the Isle of May; and in war time from prizes brought in here. (iv) I have given strict orders, that no trees should be cutt down or rinded, nor woods sett on fire, but what is necessary for the building of the stages and other uses, which I hope will be duly complyed with, and that there is no trees cutt down upon the account of making oyle. (v) I have took all the care I could; to settle all matters between the fishing ships, and planters; to possess the fishing ships with what was their right, and the planters with theirs, there has been severall complaints of that nature, and I have done what lies in my power, to settle it for the little time I have been here, not arriving till Sept. 17th. (vi) I have had no complaints of the fishing ships; that the inhabitants, or by-boat keepers, have possessed their stages, cookrooms, or train-fatts, or other conveniences, but att the arrivall of the ships they have had quiett possession. (vii) I have took all the care that I could that the by-boat keepers and fishing ships do carry such number of freshmen and greenmen in proportion to their respective companies as the Act directs me. (viii) I have had no complaints from any persons that there is any expunging, cutting out, or altering, any marks of any boats or trainfatts, or converting them to their use, or removing the same from the places where they have been left by the owners. (ix) I have had no complaints from any persons that there is any person leaving the country; or any other time, that they do not destroy, deface or do any detriment, to the stages, cookrooms, etc.; or to the materialls thereunto belonging which had been possessed either by himself or others, and that all persons during their stay here, does content themselves with what is necessary for their own use, and repair the defects that may be in their stages or other conveniences by timber fetched out of the woods, and that they do not committ any spoil upon stages already built. (x) I have had no complaint that any Admirall, ViceAdmirall, and Rear-Admirall of any Harbour do ingross any more beach or flakes then they pitch upon at their arrivall. (xi) Att my arrivall here I sent proper orders to all the Admiralls of the harbours, to give me an account as my Instructions directs me, and likewise to the cheif planters of every little cove, to give me an account of what boats, and fish, and of the inhabitants living in that port, (annexed). (xii) Att my arrivall here, I held a Generall Court twice a week, the Admirall and Vice-Admirall att my assistance, and whatever differences happened, we endeavoured to settle it, relating to planters and boatkeepers, servants, etc. (xiii) I took care to send to all the Captains of the men of war and Admiralls of the Harbours; that no ballast should be thrown out of any ship to the prejudice of that harbour, which they have assured me they have complyed with. (xiv) There has been due care taken that the inhabitants, boat keepers and fishing ships, and all others concerned in fishing, that their offalls, has not been any ways offensive; their stages being so near the water, they throw it in, so that it's presently washed away. (xv) I took all possible care that the Lord's day should be duely observed, by the inhabitants and ships' companies, by sending a watch att sermon time, and setting up of strict orders, and where I have found any so offending, I took due care to give them corrections, both housekeepers and the agressors. (xvi) There is none but H.M. subjects that fishes or takes bait in these ports that are inhabited by the English. (xvii) There is great care taken that the fish is preserved with good salt, and sent to markett in a very good condition. (xviii) There is no wine nor brandy brought from New England; only rum and molossus, which is the liquor the servants drinke in this country; it has proved a very bad year of fishing, so that the planters are in debt for themselves and servants, to the masters of ships and merchants, wch. they are to pay the year ensuing, if they are able. (xix) It was Sept. 17th before I arrived here, so that I could not gett the masters' names; for most of them were gone before my arrivall, but you will find by the scheme there was 20 sail belonging to America, they brought bread, pease, rice, rum, tobacco, molossus, and cattle, and other necessaryes to supply the inhabitants of this country. (xx) The provisions brought here is from England, Ireland, and New England, and it is disposed of here to the planters and inhabitants, for their subsistence; the New Englandmen return home in their ballast. (xxi) I gave you an account in the former article of the provisions brought hither, there is sugar and tobacco, but I can't find any cotton-wool, indico, ginger, fustick, or any dying wood that is brought here, nor any put on board of any ship bound for Spaine, Portugall, or any other forreign part. (xxii) and (xxiii) v. No. 115, ii. The food and sustenance for the men is beef, fish, pease and other provisions, what they can gett, their beer is brewed with molossus and spruce. They goe out of the harbours in shollops 7 men and 5 men in a boat.: They catch their fish with hook and line. The first part of the year their bait is muscles and lances, and about the middle of June, their bait is capleing, squid and fresh herring; and the end of the year they fish with herring only, which they have nets purposely for taking the sort of bait. (xxiv) The price of fish this year is from 30 to 36 ryalls per quintall, good merchanable fish; the broken fish which they call refuge fish is sold for 20 ryalls per quintel, and carried to Spain and Portugall, and the oyle that is made of the livers of the fish, is carried to England: the value of the oyle is £16 per tun. (xxv) v. No. ii. They load with dry fish, bound to severall ports, as Spain and Portugall; but there is 8 ships this year that could not gett their loadeing, and was forced to go in their ballast to Virginia to seek freight. (xxvi) I have given strickt charge to take care not to discharge any men but to carry back what they brought from England. (xxvii) I have made the best enquiry I can to know what inhabitants there are att Placentia; there are 500 men and 200 women and children. There has been great quantities of fish catched there this year and sold for 22 ryals a quintal. (xxviii) There is a fort and platform consisting of 60 guns; ammunition and victualls they have from France and Canada, what quantities of ammunition I can't be informed with, and provisions there is no want. (xxix) As to the number of ships from Placentia this year was about 30 sail, which most of them came to make a fishing voyage, and some to buy fish in order to carry to markett, which came there with necessaries for their subsistence: the ships that fish upon the banks, is taking of codd and salting of them, and carrying of them in bulk to France, and in the Bay; they fish upon the coast of Canada, and salt their fish after the same manner. (xxx) There is no other nation besides England and France, except the Spaniards come by stealth, into harbours where they are not discovered. (xxxi) As to the New Englandmen, I have took care to see them all out of port, so that they may not carry away any of H.M. subjects. 7 pp.
115. ii. Scheme of the Fishery of Newfoundland. Fishing ships, 66; Sack ships, 17; ships from America, 20. Burthen of fishing ships, 8000 tuns. Men belonging to the ships, 1423. Fishing ships' boats, 198. By-boats, 70. Inhabitants' boats, 300. By-boatmen, masters, 75, servants, 520. Quintals of fish, made by fishing ships, 20,030; by-boats, 13,900; inhabitants' boats, 30,500; Total, 64, 430. Quintals of fish carried to market, 57,550. Quantity of train made by fishing ships, 180 tuns; by-boats 150 tuns, inhabitants' boats 336 tuns; Total, 666. Number of stages, 389. Number of inhabitants; men, 1509; women, 185; children, 323; Total, 2017. Signed, N. Trevanion. York, in St. Johns Habr. Oct. 29, 1712. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 5. Nos. 16, 16 i., ii.; and 195, 5. pp. 271–284.]
Oct. 29.
Boston, New England.
116. Governor Dudley to Lord Bolingbroke [my Lord Bullenbrook]. I humbly congratulate your Lordship's advancement, and since my Lord Dartmouth's removal, pray to be allow'd to represent the present state of affayres in H.M. provinces where I have the honour to command. I have had a hard summer to prevent the inroads of my French and Indian neighbours from Quebeck. Early in the spring I sent a party of 60 men 250 miles into the deseart between us and Quebeck, where they cut of a small factory of Indians, of whom they destroyed tenn of their best men, and the rest fled towards Mountreal, and left their beaver and pelts in the English hands. This party gave notice and alarm to M. Vodriel, who supposing us to be more then we were, raised 200 Indians and French who come upon our frontiers of this Province and Newhampshire for 7 or 8 weeks flying from place to place, which obliged me to keep out 300 foot and two troopes of horse the most part of the summer, which prevented their falling upon any village of our frontiers. At length they march'd of, carrying with them only the heads of two little girles, and since the middle of September I have been at quiet. A few dayes since I have receiv'd from Sir Nicholas Trevanion H.M. proclamation for a cessation of armes, which I have made publique, the gentlemen of H.M. Councill and the Representatives of the Province and the first regiment of this town in armes attending. And the articles which H.M. in her princely wisdom has procured demonstrate her care for all her good subjects, especially those of North America, as well as her superior interist in the disposation of the affayres of Europe, to the satisfaction of all good men that love the Government and their own interest. I have obeyed H.M. commands in the Instructions to return bills of exchange for the expences here, which are humbly laid before my Lord Treasurer. The great affayres before H.M. relating to the warr must content everybody in the delay of lesser matters, and the merchants concern'd must have patience, but I most humbly pray of your Lordship that they may not be forgotton least it be a discouragement to any future service from them as well as the undoing those that made those supplyes and depend on their bills. I am sensible that expedition ended very unfortunately, but I beseech your Lordship to believe me there was nothing left undone in the power of these Governments that it might have succeeded, and I humbly pray they may be satisfyed in their just expectations. I am inform'd that some Clerks and Accountants were intended to be sent to examine those accounts, nothing shall be more acceptable to me then to receive them here, and yeild them all assistance for H.M. satisfaction. I am not personally concern'd one farthing in all those accounts. And if they can be shortned by any examination, I will approve myself to H.M. and my Lord Treasurer by assisting in it with all application. But if after all my sincere endeavours in that affayr, I should lose my reputation with the people here, and H.M. favour I should be the most unfortunate man liveing, etc. Signed, J. Dudley. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 751. No. 82.]
Oct. 29.
New England, Boston.
117. Governor Dudley to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers to letter of April 8th and acknowledges receipt of letter of Feb. 1st requiring an account of stores of war etc. All these stores left by Generall Hill could not be in the year's account ending June 24, 1711 already sent but are now making ready to come in the mast fleet, wherein the thousand small armes will be contayned, of which I am advised by the Rt. Hon. the Lord Dartmouth, Feb. 13. That supply and a happy peace by H.M. most gracious provision for us, I hope will secure us and prevent our being further chargable to H.M. on that head. I humbly thank your Lordships' favour to Mr. Wentworth, whose warrant to serve in H.M. Councill is receiv'd and he is sworn, and serves very well being a man of good estate and loyalty. In the article of that letter referring to the division line between H.M. Province of the Massachusets and the Colonyes of Conecticut and Road Island, I had no reference to the petition of Wayt Winthrop and others referring to land in the Narraganset country, but only to the division line between the Massachusets and the two other Colonyes. That matter stands thus, in 1628 the Massachusets Charter [was] granted by King Charles I to severall gentlemen, and the bounds [of] the grant therein exprest and set down and the south bounds of the said grant were to be three miles southard of Charles River, or any branch of it, etc., by an east and west line, which was accordingly run by skilfull artists and markt out in 1642, and the Surveyors' returns upon record, etc. In 1662 Conecticut and Road Island obtayn'd their charters, and were both bounded by the south line of the Massachusets, which lines they have since pretended to examine, and alledge that it comes too far southward, and so deprives them of lands belonging to those Colonyes. The Government of Road Island two years since sent some members of their Generall Assembly to treat about it, and upon a conference of two or three dayes were better informed and submitted to that antient line, run before the grant of their Charter, which agreement was accordingly signed by them, and is of record in both the Goverments, but the Colony of Conecticut remayn unsatisfyed and there has been suits at law for damages thereabout, and I have been often told that they had layd their complaint before H.M., which was the reason I wrote thereupon to your Lordships, as I am commanded in the Instructions for this H.M. Goverment. The inhabitants of this Goverment adjoyning to Conecticut are at a tolerable quiet at present, but the chalange will hardly be ended untill H.M. upon a full hearing shall please to determine the controversie, which will demand time when H.M. more important affayres will allow. I have passed the summer with my French and Indian neighbours tollerably without any considerable loss, and have now received from Sir Nicholas Trevanion at Newfoundland, H.M. proclamation for a cessation of armes, which every good man here hopes will be followed by a happy peace agreeable to those articles wherein H.M. has shew'd her princely wisdom and care for all her subjects in North America, and will give them leave to return to their imployments for their own benefit, and the supply of Great Britain with naval stores, and what else they may be directed to for H.M. service, which I shall put forward with all dilligence while I have the honour to serve H.M. here. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed, Recd. Dec. 29, 1712, Read July 6th, 1713. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 93; and 5, 913. pp. 422–426.]
Oct. 29.
New England, Boston.
118. Governor Dudley to Mr. Popple. Acknowledges letters of June 1st and 13th. I am surprised to read the death of the Earl of Winchelsea, etc., etc. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 865. No. 94; and 5, 913. p. 427.]
Oct. 29.
Boston.
119. Governor Dudley to the Earl of Dartmouth. Acknowledges letters of Feb. 13, and July 2nd and 8th. Repeats parts of No. 117. Concludes:—I have served H.M. here faithfully these ten years, and the country has been well defended to the observation of my enemyes, if I have any, and I have left nothing undone to the observation of the Ministry in all things, and have had but a mean support, and yet am not willing to lose my station, if I may have H.M. favour to continue in it, etc. Signed, J. Dudley. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 898. No. 24.]
Oct. 30.
Boston in New England.
120. George Lee to the honble. Sir Stephen Fox att his lodgeings in Whitehall. A letter on private affairs. Thanks for care of his family, etc. and endeavours to procure him a captain's commission, which he hopes will be done when the establishment of Annapolis and Placentia is settled, etc. Signed, George Lee. Endorsed, Rd. Jan. 1st, 1712 (13). 2½ pp. [C.O. 5, 751. No. 83.]
Oct. 31.
Whitehall.
121. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Dartmouth. Enclose Mr. Cunynghame's letter of Aug. 12 (cf. Aug. 29th). [C.O. 153, 12. p. 21.]
Oct. 31.
New York.
122. Governor Hunter to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I had ye honour of your Lordps.' letter of June 12th by the hands of Mr. Dupré, who arrived here on ye 18th inst. having left ye Sorlings man of warr when she touched at Rhode Island. Since ye arrival of that ship Capt. Graves in the Dullidge brought me H.M. Orders and Proclamation for a cessation of arms by sea and land, who being in hast to proceed to Boston with the like dispatches and from thence straight for Brittain, I have not time to give your Lordps. soe exact and perticular accounts of ye affaires on this side as is requisite, but shall supply that defect by the Hector and Shoreham who are now prepareing for their returne. I most humbly and heartilly thank your Lordps. for the honour and justice you have done me in your Representations to H.M. and that to my Lord High Treasurer, and must suffer with patience untill the more important affaires at home shall afford leasure to apply ye proper remedys. It would be a crime to doubt it after what you have done. As to ye Palatins, my substance and creditt being exhausted, I had noe remedy left but by a letter to the managers of ye work to intimate to that people that they should take measures to subsist themselves dureing this winter upon the lands where they were planted, and such as cold not, might find it by working with the inhabitants leaveing with the Commissarys their names and the names of ye places or landlords where they are imploy'd dureing that time, that they may be in readyness upon the first publick notice given to returne to ye work which they have obliged themselves by contract to pursue. Upon this intimation some hundreds of them took a resolution of possessing the lands of Scoharee and are accordingly marched thither, have been buissy in cutting a road from Schenectady to that place and have purchased or procured a quantity of Indian corn toward their winter subsistance. It being impossible for me to prevent this, I have been ye easier under it upon these considerations that by these meanes the body of that people is kept together within ye Province, that when it shall please H.M. to resume the designe of prosecuteing that work that body at Scoharee may be imploy'd in working in the vast pine-woods near to Albany, which they must be obliged to doe haveing noe manner of pretence to ye possession of any lands but by performing their part of the contract relateing to that manufacture, and that in that sittuation they serve in some measure as a frontier to or at least an increase to the strength of Albany and Schenectady, but if ye warr continues, or should by any misfortune break out again, it will be neither possible for them to subsist or safe for them to remain there, considering the ill use they have already made of arms when they were intrusted with them. The tarr work in the mean time was brought to all ye perfection that was possible in the time. The trees have received their last preparation, and staves prepared for the barrells, the magazine almost finished and ye road between it and ye pine woods almost compleated. Mr. Sackett who has had ye direction of that work ever since Mr. Bridger did basely desert it, assures me that the trees promise beyond expectation; the best of it in our present circumstances is that ye longer they stand now the more tarr they will yeild, provideing it does not exceed a year or two. The reasons of the difference between the method of prepareing the trees which your Lordps. have transmitted to me and that we follow are obvious. The sun has much more force here than in Moscow, which oblidges us to consult and follow the seasons of the yeare in our several barkings. I myselfe have observed that where by mistake the trees have been first rinded on the side where the sun's heat had most influence, the ground neare it was filled with turpentine drein'd by't from ye tree. My friends in England who know nothing of ye matter press mightilly the sending over a quantity of tarr to convince the world of the solidity of ye project. To your Lordps. I referr them who are sufficiently appriz'd of the time absolutely requisite to produce ye first quantity in the manner it is done in all other countrys from whence wee have had it, and shall conclude this subject with this reflection; If ye production of that quantity of tarr requisite for ye Navy in H.M. own plantations be a reall advantage, or rather at this time indispensably necessary to Great Brittain, if the world is convine'd that tarr is made out of pitch pine, of which we are here sufficiently perswaded our trees yeilding as much turpentine, (which is ye same substance) as any in the world, if a sufficient number of hands duely instructed and imploy'd are ye instruments and means of produceing it, which are now here at great expence and soe imploy'd, if all this I say be true as undeniably it is, then I shall still conclude it impossible that this design can be dropt when it is brought soe near to ye pitch of perfection. By the inclosed Minutes of Assembly your Lordps. will observe that nothing is yet done or to be expected from them toward the support of Government. I communicated to them as I was directed your Lordps.' sentiments with relation to their proceedings. What regard they pay to them, your Lordps. will be appris'd of by their resolves of Oct. 30, whereby they still insist upon ye Councill's haveing noe right to amend money bills, a notion but lately broached, the practice of almost all former Assemblys standing on record against them in that matter. The indecent heats and undutifull expressions in their house upon the reading your Lordps.' letter are not fitt to be repeated. Two things they avowedly declare they will never depart from, that is the appointing of sallaries and the custody of ye publick money, and now haveing for severall years starved the Government, they consume the time dureing their severall sessions in bantering it, that is by prepareing bills which they know can never pass, and others which if passed would raise noe money, whilst in the mean time their frequent sessions cost the country more money than an honourable support of Government would amount to. I have nothing to hope for from a new Assembly for ye reasons formerly alleadged to your Lordps., which experience has since that time confirm'd, the same members being return'd for ye last to one man. I shall only add, and I pray God my prediction may prove false, the remedy for those evils if delay'd will cost more then ye Province is worth. Such bills as shall passe my consent this sessions shall be transmitted by the next conveyance. My constant attendance on the Assembly here hath oblig'd me as constantly to prorogue that of the Jerseys. Neither can I promise myselfe any good issue from that meeting, if those gentlemen formerly mentioned continue in the Councill, that faction upon all occations vilifye and affront the Government in all it's branches. One of them Peter Sonmans, an alien, lately after haveing given orders to a servant of his (to whom it seems dureing a former administration Mr. Bass had intrusted the Records of the Eastern Division of that Province) not to show them to those who had not only my order but Mr. Basse's for that purpose, upon heareing of a second application and complaint to me from the parties concerned, thought fitt to break open the trunck in which the Records had beene kept and carry them out of the Province. Some time after the Cheife Justice haveing issued out his warrant for a search, and another for apprehending the said Sonmans, the Records were sent from New York by a permitt for Philladelphia. But Mr. Basse, who is likewise Surveyor of the Customes at Burlington, as he affirms to me suspecting there might be some prohibitted goods in the said trunck when at Burlington, and haveing a key sent him by an unknown hand sealed up in a blanck peice of paper, had ye curiosity to open ye trunck, where to his great surprize he found all the Records of the Eastern Division safe and sound, and swears he will now never part with them more but with his life. I suppose ye collusion is palpable enough to your Lordps., but I shall make all more plain by the next conveyance. In the mean time the taxes are paid with daily difficulty and prosecution occasioned by the ill example and countenance of some of these gentlemen and matters of Government in the high road to the same confusion that raigns in this Province, whilst the remedy is easey and noebody hurt by't. Our Indians are now quiet againe, a very good Fort and Chappell built in the Mohak's country, where I have at present 20 private men and an officer, the other in the Onondagues country is like to meet with some opposition by ye evil arts of French emissarys, but I hope to get ye better of that and carry on ye work this summer. The Missionary for ye Mohaks is arriv'd and upon his departure for his mission, I doubt not but he will be kindly receiv'd, etc. P.S. I need not inform your Lordps. of the loss that must attend ye interruption of ye tarr work if it is resumed by reason of ye want of a yearly succession of prepared trees. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. Dec. 29, 1712, Read March 11, 17 12/13. 7 pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 58; and 5, 1123. pp. 70–79.]
Oct. 31.
New York.
123. Governor Hunter to the Earl of Dartmouth. Refers to enclosure. Acknowledges letter of July 8th, which gave us no small comfort, assureing us of the remittances for the publique service being speedily answer'd. Copies of all my vouchers went home by the Virginia Fleet, etc. Acknowledges letter of Aug. 21st, etc. The Fort in the Mohaks' countrey is built and garrison'd by an officer and 20 men who are very well receiv'd. That in the Onondagues is like to meet with some obstruction which I make no doubt to conquer. I must earnestly intreat your Lordp's. generous assistance toward a remedy for my present insupportable pressures. If I had so much as in a thought departed from H.M. interests, service, and commands, I should not think myself intitled to 't, but upon that confidence I throw myself at your Lordp's. feet, etc. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Holograph. 2 pp. Enclosed,
123. i. Copy of No. 122. [C.O. 5, 1091. Nos. 79, 79 i.; and (duplicates), 80, 80 i.]
Oct. 31.
New York.
124. Governor Hunter to Lord Bolingbroke. Your Lorp. will undoubtedly hear what I have communicated to the Earl of Dartmouth and the Lds. Commissioners of Trade with relation to the deplorable and dangerous situation of H.M. Government in this Province, and I can not doubt your Lorp's. generous assistance toward a speedy remedy so much being at stake. I have formerly beg'd your patronage to your friend Mr. Harrison who deserves much more then I have in my power to do for him. The present Secretary of ye Jerseys is one of the vilest of men. I am confident Mr. Harrison would fill that post to the satisfaction of all men concern'd. I am much concern'd that I have no returns to the representations against that person and some others of the Council there who are in many instances a lawlesse and worthlesse race of men, and the quiet of that Province is in danger by their continuance in these parts. I would fain resolve all into the hurry of more important affaires at home, which I now hope is well over, etc. P.S. I most humbly thank your Lorp. for the justice you have procur'd me as to my rank and commission, etc. Signed, Ro. Hunter. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 1085. Nos. 4,; and (duplicate) 5.]
Oct. 31.
Westminster.
125. H.M. Letters Patent appointing George Tucker Provost Marshall of Bermuda, in the room of Edward Jones. Countersigned, Cocks. Endorsed, Recd. 15th Dec. 1712. 1 p. [C.O. 37, 9. No. 23.]