America and West Indies
November 1714

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1928

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37-48

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'America and West Indies: November 1714', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 28: 1714-1715 (1928), pp. 37-48. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73952 Date accessed: 20 August 2014.


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Contents

November 1714

Nov. 3.
Whitehal.
80. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Request payment of enclosed account of office expenses and nine months' salaries due Michaelmas last. [C.O. 389, 37. pp. 81–84.]
Nov. 8.
Whitehall.
81. Lord Townshend to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following for their report, etc. Signed, Townshend. Endorsed, Recd. 9th, Read 10th Nov., 1714. 1 p. Enclosed,
81. i. Extract of letter from Caleb Heathcote to Lord Bolingbroke, New York, Sept. 1st, 1714. Presses his former scheme for bringing over 6,500 men to work on the production of Naval Stores. The design is altogether new, but there is no other way of effectually doing it in this age. For the people of America, can by going on in the beaten road of raising of grain, stock, and the like, live easy enough, and it will be very difficult to persuade them to fall upon anything, which they are not certain will pay them well for their labour, but was the ice broke for them, without any expence or risque of theirs, by which they could be made sensible, how much it is for their interest, they would afterwards fall upon it readily enough, etc. 2 pp.
81. ii. An account of the value of the stores proposed to be raised by 6,500 men, etc. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. Nos. 72, 72 i., ii.; and (without enclosure) 5, 1123. p. 137.]
Nov. 8.
New York.
82. Governor Hunter to Mr. Popple. Begins with duplicate of Oct. 18. Continues:—I am unwilling to interrupt the publick joy with my private grievances, not knowing as yet to whom I am to apply for redresse I have given that trouble to my particular friend the Earle of Stair, pray Sr. be assisting in procureing and expediteing H.M. approbation of the Acts for paying the publick debts here, you know well that the Revenue bill was never intended to be pass'd tho' prepar'd by the Lords so these matters no waws interfere. I have beg'd for one half of what is indue upon the Palatine account in the mean time untill matters are setled, I'm sure no man has suffer'd more then I have done so no body has a better excuse for crying out for reliefe. I shall not doubt it nor of your good endeavours toward it, etc. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. 14th Jan., Read 21st June, 1715. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 85; and 5, 1123. pp. 289, 290.]
Nov. 8.
New York.
83. Governor Hunter to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers to letter of Oct. 18. All things are quiet and easey since H.M. accession to ye Crown, and I have faire hopes of a better settlement. I must once more earnestly recommend to your Lordps. the Acts for paying the publick debts here. I cannot doubt of your Lordps'. recommendation for H.M. approbation knowing your generous endeavours for my poor interests, that you are well appriz'd of my sufferings and know how considerable my share is in that debt. Recommends to their Lordships " the presenting the inclosed Address to his Majesty who has a people here in all appearance ready to sacrifice everything to his service. I wrote to your Lordps. that all had like to run into confusion upon our frontiers, but I have quieted the Indians and undeceived them and now they seem firmer to our interests than ever." Refers to enclosure ii. etc. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. 14th April, Read 21st June, 1715. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
83. i. Address of the Justices of the Peace, Sheriff and Grand Jurors of the City and County of New York at Quarter Sessions to the King. With hearts full of joy we congratulate your Majesty's accession to the Crown and Dominions of Great Britain, by which we and all your subjects are secur'd in the enjoyment of all those blessings which Heaven has bestow'd on a country so happily constituted; and while we behold that Constitution so confirm'd to us by the amiable prospect of it's continuance to the latest posterity in the succession of an illustrious race of Princes, with the deepest sense of gratitude to Heaven and our Deliverer, we reflect on the fatal consequences which must have attended the success of a Pretender, and his adherents, whose advances gave so sad a view, to all those to whom their Religion, their Country, or its Laws were dear, in each of whose defence and preservation your Majesty shall ever find our hearts and hands prepar'd. Most Gracious Sovereign, Those of your People remote from your Dominion, who are so happy to be more immediately under your Majesty's Administration, have so often felt the ill effects of mistaken power from such of their Governors, who fancy'd themselves above, and us below the condition of subjects, and such were our melancholy circumstances for some past years, that we most humbly implore your Majesty's pardon if amidst our joy and congratulations on your accession to the throne, we take leave to assure your Majesty, that now none of the British Territories have a fairer prospect of the enjoyment of that happiness, which naturally flows from the present settlement of our religious and civil rights, than we of this Province, who have liv'd in tranquility, and enjoy'd the blessings of Peace in the midst of a long war, from the auspicious conduct of Brigadier Hunter etc., who by admonition and example has daily inculcated and cherish'd in us an early affection to your Majesty's person and Royal progeny. And it was from him we long since learn'd that the liberties of Great Britain, the Protestant Succession and the Protestant Religion, howsoever divided or distinguish'd by factious and turbulent spirits, must stand or fall together, etc., etc. New York, City Hall, 2nd Nov., 1714. Signed, Ralph Hurnnau, H. v.d. S.p. cyel, Petrus Kip, John Graham, J.v.D. Leul, Henry Play, Oliver Schuyler, Thomas Roberts, junr., John Bankes, Dirck Eghberts, Samuel Provoost, Villiam Jackon, John Johnston, Jacobus Kip, Jacobus Bayard, John Cruger, Joh. Jansen, J.D. Riemer, Fra. Harison, Sheriff, Will. Sharpas, Cl. pacis, Jno. Crooke, Leeudert Huygd de Kleyn, Isaac Kip, Abraham Gouneau, Andrew Fresneau. Same endorsement. 3 pp.
83. ii. Conference between Governor Hunter and the Five Nations of Indians, Albany, Sept. 20, 1714. Set out, New York Documents V., pp. 382–389. Signed, Robt. Livingston, Secretary for the Indian Affairs. Same endorsement. 9 pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. Nos. 86, 86 i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 5, 1123. pp. 290, 291.]
Nov. 10.
Whitehall.
84. Lord Townshend to the Council of Trade and Plantations. H.M. having been pleased to appoint Robert Lowther Esq. to be Governour of Barbadoes, I desire you will direct a Commission and Instructions to be prepared for him as usual, for H.M. approbation. Signed, Townshend. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 16th Nov., 1714. ¾ p. [C.O. 28, 14. No. 26; and 29, 13. p. 127.]
Nov. 15.
Whitehall.
85. Lord Townshend to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers following for their report " what may be proper to be done herein." Signed, Townshend. Endorsed, Recd. 15th, Read 16th Nov., 1714. 1 p. Enclosed,
85. i. M. le Comte de Pontchartrain to M. d'Iberville. Nov. 7 (N.S.), 1714. Monsieur Soubras Commissary at Isle Royale formerly called Cape Breton informs me by his letter of Sept. 22 (N.S.) that on his arrival he found M. de la Ronde and Captain de Pensens had been sent to Accadie in two different vessels, the first by M. L'Hermite, and the latter by M. de St. Ovide, upon occasion of the complaints of the French inhabitants of Accadie, and in order to obtain from M. Nicholson the Governor, entire liberty for them to retire with their cattle and corn to l'Isle Royale. M. Pensens has returned, and has submitted a report of his negotiation, from which it appears that by M. Nicholson's leave, these two officers assembled the inhabitants to learn their intentions; that upon demanding that they should have the term of one year according to Article XIV. of the Treaty of Utrecht to remain upon their estates without any hindrance, the decision has been referred to the Court of London, as likewise their demand for power during that time to transport their corn and cattle, for building ships to transport their effects, and for receiving from the French the tackle and other necessarys for those who shall build at Port Royal and elsewhere; upon the demand of having an ordinance published granting them permission to sell their habitations and to leave powers of attorney, it was answered, "Referred to the Queen, and to her letter, which ought to be a sure guarantee." As M. Nicholson has promised a speedy dispatch of all these articles, the King, to whom I have given an account of the matter, desires you to take such measures as you shall judge most fit to press for their execution, and that you should act in such manner that the King of England may give as soon as possible the necessary orders to that purpose, etc. Copy. French. With English translation. 3 pp. [C.O. 217, 1. Nos. 18, 18 i.; and 218, 1. pp. 90–103.]
Nov. 15.
Whitehall.
86. Lord Townshend to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following for their report. Signed, Townshend. Endorsed, Recd. 15th, Read 16th Nov., 1714. ¾ p. Enclosed,
86. i. Le Comte de Pontchartrain to M. d'Iberville, Oct. 10, 1714. M. de la Malmaison, Commander in Chief at Martinique, informs me by his letter of July 28th that he has received one from the Governor of Nevis demanding the return of M. d'Iberville's hostages, alleging that by the Articles XI. and XXIII. of the Treaty of Utrecht all prisoners are to be set free without distinction and without ransom, and that he has replied that by the same Article XI. it is stipulated that Commissioners should be nominated to settle differences not decided, and particularly the capitulation of Nevis, and that it is therefore necessary to await the decision of the said Commissioners, and that besides he had received no orders to send back these hostages. Upon the report I have given to the King, His Majesty has thought fit to signify to M. de la Malmaison that he approves of his reply, and that he must keep the hostages until this Article is executed, etc. French. Translation annexed. Copy. 2¼ pp. [C.O. 152, 10. Nos. 34, 34 i.; and 153, 12. pp. 145, 146.]
Nov. 16.
Whitehal.
87. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lord Townshend. Enclose following for H.M. signature. Annexed,
87. i. Draft of H.M. Commission to Governor Lowther (v. Nov. 10) in the usual form. [C.O. 29, 13. pp. 127–153.]
Nov. 18.
Boston, New England.
88. Governor Dudley to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letters of the 11th Aug. "giving the sorrowfull news of the death of Her late Majesty of Blessed Memory, and the happy accession of H.M. King George" etc. Continues:—The abovesaid letters (with others for the several Governments) were sent express upon H.M.S. the Hazard gally Capt. Richard Green Commander who parted from Deel the 14th of Aug. as we were often here inform'd by several merchant shipps, but whither he went or where he stay'd we are not capable to give accompt, but so it is that on the 12th of November she was cast away upon the coast in the Great Bay of the Massachusetts, and broken to pieces upon the rocks; No one soul escaping to give any accompt, but by broken letters, and peices of packets, coming on shoar, found in the snow and sand we are assured that it was Green, and that he had packets for Newfoundland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Road Island, Connecticut, New York, Virginia, Maryland, Pensilvania. Peices of all which I have found and sent forward every way; however her stay so long in her voyage was such as made her late coming less necessary for that on the 15th Sept. by loose papers coming in our merchant ships, H.M. sickness and death were told, and within a few days after I receiv'd a Gazette of H.M. death, and the proclamation of H.M. King George, and took the oaths of several masters, and passengers that they were present, some of them at London, others at Canterbury, others at Dublin in Ireland, at the Proclamation of the King. Whereupon with the advice of H.M. Council I proceeded on 22nd Sept. to proclame H.M., to which solemnity I gave notice to all the Members of the Council, and Assembly, the Military officers, and Gentlemen of the Country to attend, and raysed the Militia of Boston, consisting of a thousand foot, and two troops of Horse to attend, and the proceeding is set down in the News Letter enclos'd. The same day it was repeated at Salem, and the day after at Portsmouth in New Hampshire. And that it might go thro all the Governments on the coast of America I gave accompt thereof along the shoar, and they proceeded to do the same, and I suppose have given your Lordships account thereof by this time. On the same 22nd of September I proceeded to administer to all the Members of H.M. Council, Representatives, Officers Civil and Military present, the oaths instead of the oaths of Allegiance and Supremacy, the Test, the oath of abjuration and renunciation, and all the other oaths enjoyn'd by Act of Parliament to enable them to proceed in their places of office and trust, and since have ordered the Judges, Justices and Colonels to administer to every officer civil and military thro'out both Provinces the abovesaid oaths, which is punctually performed in every county and part, and I may assure your Lordships, that I have not person in these Governments, freeholder, or other that I have reason to suspect ill-affected to H.M., but do universally rejoyce in H.M. most happy accession to the Government, and promise themselves great and lasting happiness under the same. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed, Recd. 18th Feb., 1714/15, Read 26th June, 1718. 2¾ pp. Enclosed,
88. i. Copy of the Boston News-Letter, Sept. 20–27, 1714, announcing the death of Queen Anne and describing the proclaiming of King George I. etc. Boston, Printed in Newbury Street, for John Campbell Post Master. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 866. Nos. 168, 168 i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 915. pp. 155–158.]
Nov. 20.
St. James's.
89. H.M. Warrant revoking patent of Arthur Wynter, and appointing Thomas Windham Register of Jamaica. Countersigned, Townshend. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 22, 23.]
Nov. 20.
St. James's.
90. H.M. Warrant revoking patent of John Baber, and appointing William Congreve Secretary of Jamaica. Countersigned, Townshend. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 24, 25.]
Nov. 20.
St. James's.
91. H.M. Warrant re-appointing William Forbes Provost Marshal of Barbados. Countersigned, Townshend. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 25.]
Nov. 22.
St. James's.
92. Order of King in Council. Suspending approbation of Act of Jamaica, 1713, for the more effectual relief of the freeholders and inhabitants of Kingston, until provision be made for indemnifying such persons whose houses are by the said Act to be pulled down, or a new Act be prepared etc. (v. July 16 and A.P.C. II., No. 1211). Endorsed, Recd. Read 22 July, 1717. 1½ pp. [C.O. 137, 12. No. 49; and 138, 15. pp. 268–270.]
Nov. 23.
St. James's.
93. H.M. Commission to Robert Lowther, Governor of Barbados. Countersigned, Townshend. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 3–13.]
Nov. 24.
London.
94. Col. Vetch to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to letter of Nov. 23. (i.) The number of French inhabitants in L'Accadie and Nova Scotia is computed at 2,500. (ii.) They have all obliged themselves to remove save two families, Mr. Allen and Mr. Gourday. (iii.) There are about 500 families upon Cape Breton, besides the garrison which consists of 7 companys already, etc. (iv.) The consequences of the French removing from Nova Scotia to Cape Breton are evidently (a) leaving that country intirely destitute of inhabitants. (b) They have intermarried with the Indians, by which, and their being of one Religion, they have a mighty influence upon them, so it's not to be doubted but they will carry along with them to Cape Bretton, both the Indians and their trade; which is very considerable, (c) and as the accession of such a number of inhabitants to Cape Bretton, will make it at once a very populous Colony (in which the strength of all country's consists), so it is to be considered that 100 of the French who were born upon that Continent and are perfectly known in the woods can march upon snow shoes and understand the use of birch canows, are of more value and service then five times the number of raw men newly come from Europe; so their skill in the fishery as well as the cultivating the soil must inevitably make that Island by such an accession of people and French at once the most powerfull Colony the French have in America, and of the greatest danger and damage to all the Brittish Colonys as well as the universal trade of Great Britain. (v.) The fortifications upon Cape Bretton as they are very considerable, especially at Louisbourg and St. Anne upon which the French have laboured for these two summers past with the utmost diligence having the assistance not only of the garrison and a considerable number of people from Canada together with the inhabitants that are gone to settle there, but have had likewise the assistance of three men of warr, who carry'd them all sorts of stores and remained with them all summer to help work upon the fortifications, one of which is to continue all winter there to assist them upon the said fortifications, as Mr. Cummings will more particularly inform your Lordships, etc. (vi.) As to the time of their removing from Nova Scotia with their effects, several who have no very great substance have already remov'd thither this summer, and the rest design to do so next summer as soon as their harvest is over. (vii.) There may be about 5000 black cattle, besides a great number of sheep and hoggs in all that country, the greater part of all wch. no doubt they will carry of if permitted. The consequences of which are evidently, it will intirely strip that country and reduce it to its primitive state; to replenish which at the same rate it now is from New England the nearest Colony at a moderate computation of freight only will cost above pount;40,000, besides the long time it will require to stock that country. But the French by this means will have their new Colony almost stockt at once, and save near £100,000, and the transporting their grain will be of very great service to them, there being a considerable quantity of wheat and peas rais'd there now. (viii.) As to the consequences of allowing the French to sell their lands in those parts; (a) it would intirely disappoint the settlement of that valuable country because it is never to be supposed that any person will goe to buy land in a new country when in all H.M. Plantations abroad there is such encouragement of land gratis to such as will come to settle in them. (b) It would be a breach of the public faith contain'd in H.M. Royall Instructions when the reduction of that place was undertaken by which the lands are promis'd away to the Captors for their encouragement to reduce the same. Nor is there any Article in the Treaty of Peace that entitules the French to any such priviledges; nay moreover I am of opinion that by the Treaty the French inhabitants are allowed either to remove if they design'd it or at least to make a demand of the same in a years time after the ratification of the Treaty, neither of which was done, nor wou'd the inhabitants have offer'd to goe had they not been, not only importuned but threatned by the French officers in the French King's name, to be treated as rebels if they did not remove, which how far that is consistent wth. the Treaty is most humbly submitted. Endorsed, Recd. Read Dec. 22, 1714. 4½ pp. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 20; and 218, 1. pp. 105–112.]
Nov. 25.
N. York.
95. Governor Hunter to the Council of Trade and Plantations. To the duplicate (Nov. 8) on the other side I have only now to add that by the last post from Boston I have receiv'd what could be sav'd out of the sands and snow on the shoar, of the packets sent by the Hazard sloop of warr wch. was lost with all her equipage in a storm about ten leagues from Boston. I had there your Lordps.' letter with the Proclamations and orders, etc. With this also your Lordps. will receive the remaining part of the Acts past in the last Session of Assembly here which could not be gott ready for the former conveyance, these are (1) An Act for the Treasurer's paying the money therein mention'd. (2) An Act for the Treasurer's paying the arrears due to the Clerk and door-keeper of the Assembly. (3) An Act to intitle Gerrard de Grau and his assigns to the fishery of porpoises. (4) An Act for shortning law suits and regulateing the practice of the law. (5) An Act for preventing the multiplicity of law suits. These two last are of ye same kind and for the same reasons with these past in the Jerseys, upon which I have already remark'd. (6) An Act for appointing Commissioners to lett to farm the excise in this Colony. (7) An Act for regulating fences. (8) An Act for encourageing the Indian Trade at Albany. I must again implore your Lordps.' recommendation of the Acts for paying publick debts to H.M. for his Royal approbation. My share in it is chiefly what is indue to me for fireing for the Garrisons for rebuilding and repairing the Forts and barracks and the arrears of my bare sellary. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. April 14, Read 21st June, 1715. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 87; and 5, 1123. pp. 292–294.]
Nov. 26.
Virginia.
96. Lt. Governor Spotswood to Mr. Popple. By this ship I send you some Virginia seeds, wch. my friend Mr. Richd. Brayne, in Manchester-Court Westminster, will deliver to you, they being packt up with some other things of his. The Gentleman who collected them for me here, is a person very curious in such matters, and says he has marked on ye several papers what is needfull, or what he knows of ye soil they particularly delight in, some you may find without any directions upon them, as being uncertain what to give, or unnecessary to give any at all. Refers to enclosures etc. by which you may perceive how wrongfully I have been charged wth. playing Mr. Berkeley foul. I observe your sentiments of Councellors appointed by a Governor and should pay abundance of deference to your opinion; but certainly ye continual practice of a Council, must be ye rule of preceedence at that Board, unless H.M. thinks fit to order it otherwise, and then if his pleasure be in favour of Mr. Berkeley, it will be ye first precedent upon ye Council Journals of this Colony. The same may be said of ye laws passed by a Governor, wch. you say of Councellors appointed by him; that they are but provisionally such: yet they are in force till ye Sovereign's disallowance thereof be notifyed. And as it has been very seldom known yt. ye Royal sanction has been given to a law of Virginia, so I find yt. it has almost as rarely hapned yt. H.M. Predecessors have thought fitting by their letters or warrants to confirm those Councellors whom any Governor had appointed, pursuant to ye power given him under ye Broad Seal, whenever the Council here falls under ye number of nine, etc. Signed, A. Spotswood. Endorsed, Recd. 29th Jan., 17 14/15, Read 16th May, 1716. 1½ pp. Enclosed,
96. i. Copy of Minutes of Council of Virginia, Nov. 4, 1714, as to the precedence of Mr. Berkley. Same endorsement. 4 pp.
96. ii. Council of Virginia to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refer to preceding, in reply to insinuations made against themselves and the Lt. Governor in that matter. Signed, Robert Carter, James Blair, Phill. Ludwell, John Smith, John Lewis, W. Byrd, Wm. Cocke, Nathl. Harrison, Mann Page, Robt. Porteus. Same endorsement. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1317. Nos. 25, 25 i., ii.; and (extract, without enclosures) 5, 1364. pp. 305–308.]
Nov. 27.
Barbados.
97. President Sharpe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Your Lordships will please to observe from the inclosed, that I have been at last, in a manner compell'd, in support of the dignity of Government here, to remove Mr. Frere from the Council. Refers to enclosure for reasons, etc., and to his former letters to show in what a condition I found this place, divided into partys, inflam'd against each other; that the methods I thought most proper to bring 'em to some reasonable state of tranquility, was to interpose against any invectives, or malicious prosecutions, and to divide the powers amongst the least exceptionable persons, without any regard to their little heats and divisions; and where I was oblig'd to displace any, who might have used their authority too arbitrarily, to soften it as much as possible, by carrying my resentments no further. In pursuance of which, I divided the eight regiments, of which the Militia here consists, among the men of best estates, four of which I continu'd as I found 'em, together with the commissions of General Officers in the Colonels of three of them. The other four I gave to gentlemen of very good estates and characters, who had formerly been in commission. The civil power had much the same division. From which impartiality, I promis'd myself some good fruit, and, in great measure, as far as so short a time would admit, I have found it; but Mr. Frere not satisfy'd, unless everything follow'd his inclinations, has constantly made it his business, as far as his influence reach'd, to oppose all these calm measures, and altho' I have, by myself, and others, in a great degree, courted him to an acquiescence, he has, presumeing upon my temper, rose from one indignity to another to me; till at last, forgetting all the bounds even of decency, he presum'd to treat me at the Council Table in the manner express'd in the within charge, which I most humbly entreat your Lordships will be pleas'd to take into your consideration, and to do not me only, but the character I have the honour to wear, that justice which your Lordships, in your great wisdoms, shall think proper, etc. Permit me humbly to pray your Lordships to lay this affair before H.M.etc., that the honour, indeed the very being of the Government here, may not suffer, in my person. P.S. On Tuesday the 23rd instant I read my charge to Mr. Frere in Council, and enter'd it in the Council Books; and on Thursday morning he receiv'd a copy of it from the Secretary of H.M. Council here. I have not yet, my Lords, receiv'd his answer thereto; as soon as I do, I shall transmit it to your Lordships, with what further proofs I shall take on this occasion. Signed, Wm. Sharpe. Endorsed, Recd. 26th Jan., Read 4th Feb., 17 14/15. 3 pp. Enclosed,
97. i. Certificate that the following are genuine copies. Signed, Wm. Sharpe, Nov. 27, 1714. 1½ pp.
97. ii. Copy of President's Reasons and Order of Suspension of Mr. John Frere referred to in preceding. (v. Minutes of Council). Nov. 23, 1714.Endorsed as letter. 3¾pp.
97. iii. Deposition of Hall Belgrave, Deputy Clerk of the Council, Barbados, Nov. 26, 1714. Corroborates preceding and describes Mr. Frere's rude and factious behaviour in Council and in Church towards President Sharpe, etc.Signed, Hall Belgrave. 2½ pp.
97. iv. Deposition of Samuel Cox, Barbados, Nov. 26, 1714. Corroborates preceding, etc. Signed, Saml. Cox. 3¼ pp.
97. v. Deposition of Thomas Alleyne, Barbados, Nov. 25, 1714. Corroborates No. iii., etc. Signed, Tho. Alleyne. 2½ pp.
97. vi. Deposition of Richard Carter, Attorney General of Barbadoes, Nov. 26, 1714. Corroborates No. iii., etc. Signed, Rich. Carter. 3½ pp.
97. vii. Deposition of William Savage, Sollicitor General of Barbadoes, Nov. 26, 1714. Corroborates No. iii., etc. Signed, William Savage. 4 pp.
97. viii. Deposition of Nathaniel Clarke, Barbados, Nov. 15, 1714. Col. Frere urged deponent to vote against Col. John Sandford, a Candidate for the Assembly, saying that the Government here would be altered in two or three months, and that then the power and places would be in his, Frere's, and his friends' hands, etc.Signed, Nath. Clarke. 1 p.
97. ix. Deposition of John Sandford, Barbados, Jan. 26, 1714. Corroborates part of No. iii. Signed, Jno. Sandford. 1 p. [C.O. 28, 14. Nos. 34, 34 i.–ix.; and (without enclosures) 29, 13. pp. 167–171.]
Nov. 29.
Boston.
98. Governor Dudley to Mr. Popple. Inclosed are the Acts of Assembly and Minutes of the Council of Newhampshire to this date, etc. We all rejoyce in the news arrived this day that H.M. and the Royal Family are safe arrived and making their publique entry to St. James. Enclosed are seeds of two or three sorts of annual flowers to be sowed in the spring in good grounds and if you have them not already are fine colours. Tell me any you want for the Garden and if they be here I will send them. P.S. We know nothing of any new establishment of the ministry and therefore must be pardoned, but we are very sure to be happy in H.M. reign. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed, Recd. 14th Feb., 17 14/15. Read 26th June, 1718. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 167; and (first two sentences only) 5, 915. p. 154.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
99. Lord Townshend to Lt. Governor Moody. I am in the absence of Mr. Secretary Stanhope by H.M. Order to transmit to you the enclosed Proclamation, which as you will see provides for the security of the Government of H.M. Plantations, that it may no ways suffer by the elapsing the six months from the death of the late Queen, in case before that time H.M. should, by the weighty affairs in which he is engaged, be diverted from perfecting their settlement. I doubt not but that you will take care that it be published in due form, as also of everything that may be necessary for H.M. service, in your parts. This dispatch is recommended to General Nicholson to be forwarded to you if he can have an opportunity, wch. the season of the year, rendred impracticable from hence, and therefore the sloop that set out about the middle of August with stores and money for Placentia, having been driven by stress of weather into Kinsale in Ireland, is now ordered to return, the Lords of the Admiralty having been of opinion, that by the season's being so far advanced, it was not possible for her to make Newfoundland; as soon as the season will permit, she is to set out again with such orders as H.M. service may require, and then you may expect a particular return to your dispatches of the 25th Augt., wch. by this I shall only acknowledge to be in my hands, in the absence of Mr. Secretary Stanhope, on whom the concerns of H.M. Plantations are devolved, the Southern Province falling to his share. Signed, Townshend. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 14.]
Nov. 30.100. Lord Townshend to Governor Nicholson. Begins as preceding. Continues:— "I have no particular directions for you, nor any of your's to acknowledge there having come no letters from you since the Queen's death, what despatches are sent hither from you, shall be taken care of by me, whilst Mr. Stanhope is absent, etc. as preceding. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 15.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
101. Lord Townshend to Lt. Governor Spotswood. Begins as preceding. Concludes:—The sloop which carries this dispatch, is ordered to put in first, if it possibly can, at Virginia, as the port it may soonest reach in this season of the year, as soon as it arrives you are directed to transmit the several dispatches for the Plantations on the Continent with all possible expedition H.M. service requiring that there should be no time lost. Signed, Townshend. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 16.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehal.
102. Lord Townshend to Governor Hart. Begins as preceding. Continues:—I am now to acknowledge my having in my hands your last dispatches to my Lord Bolingbroke of the 7th of July, and as soon as the Board of Trade is setled, which his Majesty has just now thought fit wholly to change, I shall lay before them what you represent in relation to the necessity of encouraging the planting of Tobacco, that so upon their report H.M. may give such directions as he shall judge necessary for his service there, etc. as preceding. If by any accident this sloop puts into your port, you are to forward the other dispatches, etc. Signed, Townshend. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 17.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
103. Lord Townshend to Governor Dudley. As preceding beginning and ending. Signed, Townshend. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 18.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
104. Lord Townshend to Governor Hunter. Begins as preceding. I am to acknowledge my having in my hands your last dispatches of Aug. 27th to the Ld. Viscount Bolingbroke. What you represent of the hardships you are under, and the discouragemts. you have met with, shall be faithfully laid before H.M. whom the weighty affairs in which he has been engaged since his accession to the throne, has hitherto hindred from that consideration of the state of his Plantations in America that they seem to require besides that the Council of Trade being but just now wholly changed, have not entred on their business of which, I hope, they will look upon the setling of H.M. Colonies on a fast foot and redressing the many abuses that have crept into them, as no small part … What I have further to add is to assure you that in my station I shall be ready to do justice to your character and embrace every occasion of convincing you that I am etc. Signed, Townshend. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 19, 20.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
105. Lord Townshend to President Sharpe. Begins as preceding. Acknowledges letter and addresses of Aug. 12th and Sept. 30th etc. Concludes:—Having no other way of conveying the enclosed to the Governor of Bermuda, I desire you'l forward it to him with all expedition. Signed, Townshend. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 20, 21.]
Nov. 30.
Whitehall.
106. Lord Townshend to Lt. Governor Pulleyn. Begins as preceding. I have no particular directions for you, nor any of your's to acknowledge, there having come no letters from you since the Queen's death, etc. Similar letter to Governor Lord A. Hamilton, and the Commander in Chief of the Leeward Islands. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 21, 22.]