America and West Indies
May 1715, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1928

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161-182

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'America and West Indies: May 1715, 1-15', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 28: 1714-1715 (1928), pp. 161-182. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73961 Date accessed: 01 August 2014.


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Contents

May 1715, 1-15

May 2.
Boston, New England.
376. Governor Dudley to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have the honour of your Lordships letters of the 26th of January last which came to my hand two days since, and have sent express to the Province of New Hampshire, directing the Clerks to send me fair copys of that Act your Lordships wrot for that I may lay it before your Lordships. The ship that brings this was fallen down before your Lordships letters arrived, but here is a vessel or two will sail within a few days time, by whom I shall not fail to send the copys aforesaid. I have had the misfortune to lose the Secretarys of both Provinces within two months last past which were men of capacity for their places. Mr. Addington of the Massachusetts and Mr. Story for New Hampshire who never failed me in carfully transmitting the Acts and minutes of Assembly and Council in their several stations, and in August last I was present and saw the fyles all put up, and in my letter of September both at the Secretary's office and at your Lordships' Board I gave notice of their coming, as I have always done, and can't imagine how that single paper shou'd be wanting, but the Gentlemen are both dead, and it shall be forthwith supply'd. It is my duty to acquaint your Lordships that the Secretary of the Massachusetts holds by Commission immediatly from his Majesty; He has no stated salary, but was usually presented by the Assembly with 50 or £60 per annum, and his fees near the same summ, and that is all I cou'd ever obtain for him. The Secretary of New Hampshire lived by the Law and writing, and had a payment annually not exceeding £20 pr. annum, and has been hitherto appointed by the Governour, but your Lordships will please to give order therein. I have in both the Provinces appointed two Gentlemen to each Province to take care of the Seals, papers etc. belonging to the offices severally, until H.M. pleasure be further known, and sworn a Clerk of the Council in each Province for the time being. The inclosed prints were published in both the Provinces, in all seaport towns, and H.M. Officers of the Custom House directed to use all possible methods for the discovery of any collusion or breach made therein. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed, Recd. 27th June, 1715, Read 26th June, 1718. 2 pp. Enclosed,
376. i. Proclamation by Governor Dudley, with the advice of the Council, against commerce with the French of Canada, Cape Breton, or any other parts, the articles of commerce upon the late Treaty of Peace being not yet settled, etc. Boston, 29th March, 1715. Endorsed as preceding. Printed by B. Green, etc. Headpiece, the Royal Arms. 1 p.
376. ii. Copy of the 5th and 6th Articles of the Treaty of Neutrality between England and France in 1686. Same endorsement. Printed by B. Green, Boston. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. Nos. 165, 165 i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 5, 915. pp. 151–153.]
May 3.
Whitehall.
377. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Enclose following, for H.M. pleasure thereupon. Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed,
377. i. Same to the King. Representation upon the disposing of the lands in the late French part of St. Christophers. The sooner that Island is settled and planted, the greater advantage it will be, not only to the inhabitants and trade thereof, but it will also be an addition to your Majesty's Revenue by the increase of the 4½ p.c. duty there and Customs here, and an increase of people in that island will be an addition of strength and security to the rest of your Majesty's Leeward Charibbee Islands; Wherefore we humbly offer the same be done as soon as conveniently may be. We have been inform'd the French part of that Island contains above 20,000 acres of good land fit for sugar canes; besides the lands about the salt ponds, and some others of less value, but fit for feeding and breeding of cattle. We shall humbly propose two methods for the speedier settling this Island. The first is, that it bee sold outright to the highest bidder, which may perhaps be done, especially the best lands, for about £3 per acre, with a quit-rent of about 6d. per acre Island money upon the whole. Of these lands we humbly propose that about 4,000 acres of the worst near the sea side be parcelled out in plantations, not exceeding 10 acres each, and given gratis to a poorer sort of inhabitants; and that there be a clause in their respective grants, prohibiting them to sell or dispose of their lands to any persons having lands there already; and that they be oblig'd to furnish one white man (in case they are disabled themselves) with one good gun, 30 charges of powder and ball and cartridge box and sword for the militia, to be ready on all occasions. That in case of failure they be liable to a penalty to be specifyed in the grant, or the lands to revert to your Majesty. There will then remain above 16,000 acres, which if disposed of at £3 pr. acre as aforesaid, will amount to above £48,000 besides the quitrent as above. We further humbly offer, that the abovementioned lands be divided into plantations in the following proportions, none exceeding 300, some of 250, 200, and 150, 100, 50, and some of 25 acres; that each grantee be oblig'd to cultivate the said lands in a certain limitted time; and for every 40 acres to keep one white man, or two white women, within a year after the date of their grant or bill of sale, and one white man or two white women, for every 20 acres, 3 years after the said date. And whereas the granting of large tracts to one person is a hindrance to the people of an Island or Plantation, and is one of the chief reasons of the weakness of Jamaica, and other your Majesty's Colonies in America; we humbly offer, that no person having already 300 acres of land in that Island be allow'd to purchase any of the French lands, unless it be upon the marriage of their children and the separation of their families; and that as few as may be of the inhabitants of the other three Leeward Islands be encourag'd to purchase; since the known fertility of the soil and healthfulness of the climate of St. Christophers, may invite many persons from the other Islands to go thither, which wou'd be a weak'ning to the said Islands and detriment to the whole. The other method we humbly lay before your Majesty is, that the said land be granted in fee farms, at a yearly reserv'd rent of about 4 or 5s., that country money, pr. acre; and the grantees have liberty to fine off ¼ or ⅓ of the said rent as they shall think fit; This in our humble opinion wou'd contribute to a speedier settlement; since people may be more willing and able to settle plantations on the terms of a yearly reserv'd rent, than of a sum in gross for the purchase. This reserv'd rent may be sufficient to answer the salaries of the Chief Governor and the four Lieut. Governors (who are now paid out of the 4½ pr. cent.) and afford a further sum towards contingent charges. The better to perform this work, which method soever your Majesty may think fit to approve of, we are humbly of opinion it will be necessary that Commissrs. of known probity and ability, not exceeding three, with Surveyors under them, be sent from hence, impower'd and instructed to execute their Commissions without the intervention of any Governor, Lt. Govr. or Commander in Chief unless his or their assistance be desir'd. We further humbly offer that in all grants or bills of sale the grantee or purchaser be subjected to the laws now in force in the other part of that Island, and particularly that they be obliged to pay your Majesty the duty of 4½ per cent. That the said late French part be divided into parishes, and that the inhabitants be impower'd to send a proportionable number of Representatives to the Genl. Assembly. That to incourage the speedy building and settling of the towns of Basse Terre, French Sandy Point, and White Flag Bay, the ground of the said towns be laid out in proportions for building tenements of different sizes, and granted gratis to such as apply for the same, with this proviso, that they build according to the proportions within the space of 18 months. Autograph signatures. 6 pp. [C.O. 239, 1. Nos. 23, 23 i.; and 153, 12. pp. 192–199.]
May 4.
Whitehall.
378. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Enclose following, "and that H.M. undoubted right and title to the Islands of St. Lucia and Tobago may fully appear, we inclose a Representation by this Board 2nd June, 1709, thereupon." Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed,
378. i. Extract of letter from President Sharpe, 28th Feb., 1715.
378. ii. Copy of M. Duquesne's to President Sharpe. v. Feb. 28.
378. iii. Copy of President Sharpe's reply. v. Feb. 28. [C.O. 152, 39. Nos. 125, 125 i.–iii.; and (without enclosures) 29, 13. pp. 304, 305.]
May 5.379. Lord Guildford to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Offers Col. Blackston (sic) and Capt. Hyde as securities for Governor Hart and prays despatch. (v. April 30th.) Signed, Guilford. Endorsed, Recd. 9th, Read 17th May, 1715. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 67; and 5, 727. p. 449.]
May 6.
St. James's.
380. H.M. Instructions to Governor Lord A. Hamilton. Signed, G. R. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 199–257.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
381 Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Enclose following. Autograph signatures. 1p.
381. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Enclose following.
381. ii. Draught of H.M. Instructions to Robt. Hunter, Governor of New York, and New Jersey. Same as former, except that David Lyol is added to the Council. [C.O. 5, 1123. pp. 168–269; and 5, 995. pp. 190–299; and 5, 1079. Nos. 83, 83 i.; and (without enclosures) 5, 980. No. 39.]
May 6.
Whitehall.
382. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Having considered two Acts of New York, for laying an excise etc., and discharging the debts of the Colony etc., we have no objection why your Majesty may not confirm them, etc. [C.O. 5, 1123. pp. 270, 271; and 5, 1079. No. 84.]
May 7.
Boston, New England.
383. Governor Dudley to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have the honour of your Lordships' letters of the 26th Jan., 1714/15, wherein I am commanded to lay before your Lordships an Act lately passed in New Hampshire, wherein a duty is layd on all timber loaden in the Province of Main, that is brought down Piscataqua River to be landed in the Massachusetts, and another duty on all West India goods that pass up the said River, thô' they have paid duty before in the Massachusetts. The said Act was certainly sent home in July or August last past and is now again enclosed, and I am humbly of opinion, do's not impose such a duty, nor was intended so to do in the Council of that Province when it was lay'd before me, however soon after I was advis'd of it and wrote to the Gentlemen of H.M. Council of New Hampshire, and advis'd the suspension of the receipt of the duty upon the Massachusett vessels, until my next visit of that Province, which was delay'd by the death of Her late Majesty, and for want of the arrival of H.M. orders for the continuation of officers until April 12th last past, when being present I made an Order in Council to stop the receipt of the said duty as being a proceeding and demand not contain'd in the Act, which upon the perusal of the Act, I am humbly of opinion is not contain'd therein. At the first complaint of it I projected a meeting of several persons chosen for that end of both Provinces to meet and set the matter in a true light to satisfaction, because the Act contains other charges of impost, the standing Revenue of the Province, who were chosen accordingly, but before they cou'd meet, it being winter, the six months (by Act of Parliament determin'd) were out, and they doubted of the meeting and so 'twas delay'd till my coming thither when the inclos'd Minute of Council was agreed, and all this happen'd before the first of May, when your Lordships' commands arriv'd. The words of the Act, I am humbly of opinion, will not warrant the demand of that duty, but being made for a year the Act is determin'd the 10th of June, and the Collector being forbidden in April, your Lordships will have no further complaint for the time to come the Act being determin'd: And for the time past I inquir'd of Mr. Penhallow the Treasurer of New-hampshire, what the receipt amounted to, and he judg'd 'twould not amount to more than 30 or £40 for the time that it was collected. I hope the past part of this matter will be in a true light by the papers now presented, but there are very great differences referring to the Little Province of New Hampshire, in the affair of their bounds, and the challenge of Mr. Allen and Mason to the soil of the whole Province, which has been in Law, and often appealed home to the King in Council for 40 years last past, which being hear'd and determin'd will set all to rights, which I have been as serviceable in, as I was capable since I have had the honour to command here etc. I have no reason to favour either Province in this matter. My estate and family is in the Massachusetts, which might draw me on that side, and the smallness of the Little Province of New Hampshire on the other side, and the great debts contracted by the unfortunate Expedition to Canada lying heavy upon them both, which I desire earnestly may be provided for, and paid off, that we may be ready for better service, when we may be thereunto commanded by His Majesty. These reasons allow me to be unbyassed in any thing of charge between them. The Massachusetts alledge that the half of the River is their's in right of St. Ferdinando Gorge's Patent which they bought, and New Hampshire alledge that the Fort on their side, of which they bear the whole charge, is all the defence of the River; if this affair might end in the Massachusett's building a fortification on their side of the River, I am humbly of opinion, 'twou'd be a security to both the Provinces, etc. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed, Recd. 27th June, 1715, Read 26th June, 1718. 3 pp. Enclosed,
383. i. Memorandum of enclosed Act of New Hampshire, 1715, showing that the clause of the duty upon lumber etc. is wholly abated. ¼ p.
383. ii. Copy of Minute of Council of New Hampshire, Portsmo., 26th April, 1715, restraining the Collector from taking anything of those, that export lumber out of the Massachusetts, the Act requiring no such thing etc. Endorsed as covering letter. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 866. Nos. 164, 164 i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 5, 915. pp. 147–150.]
May 8.
Charlestown.
384. Charles Rodd to his Employer in London (forwarded by him to the King). It is with extreme regret that I am obliged to inform you of the deplorable state to which we are reduced. At the beginning of the week before Easter, the rumour spread amongst us that the Indians were discontented, and threatened to rise. This at first appeared ill-founded. But the news was confirmed by the arrival of Bray and Warner, two Indian traders, who gave us the same information, and said that unless the Indians saw the Governor, and some satisfaction was given them, they would not fail to take up arms. These two men were sent back at once to inform the Indians that the Governor would come at once to redress their grievances; which he did the same day. Bray and Warner arrived the Thursday before Easter in a town of the Yammasees near Port Royal, where was Nairne, our Agent, Mr. Wright and one by name Mr. Cochram who dwelt with the Indians, and several other Indian Traders. They met the Indians and their Kings, delivered their message from the Governor, and offered them every kind of satisfaction for the wrong which had been done to them. The Indians appeared satisfied, shook hands in token of friendship, and drank with them as usual; after which the traders retired each to his own dwelling. But next morning at dawn their terrible war-whoop was heard and a great multitude was seen whose faces and several other parts of their bodies were painted with red and black streaks, resembling devils come out of Hell. It is usually in this guise that they appear in war. The red indicates War, and the black represents the death without mercy which their enemies must expect. They threw themselves first upon the Agents and on Mr. Wright, seized their houses and effects, fired on everybody without distinction, and put to death, with torture, in the most cruel manner in the world, those who escaped the fire of their weapons. Amongst those who were there, Captain Burage (who is now in this town, and from whom I derive what I have just said) escaped by swimming across a river; but he was wounded at the same time by two bullets, one of which pierced his neck and came out of his mouth, and the other pierced his back and is lodged in his chest, without touching a vital spot. After which he went to the house of Col. Barnwell, and so gave the alarm to the inhabitants of Port Royal, from whence he informed the plantations of everything that had occurred. By the intervention [une admirable effet] of Providence, the ship of Captain Swaddle, which had been seiz'd for landing merchandize in an irregular manner, happened to be there, with her Captain and other persons on board. They received the wretched inhabitants, to the number of about 400; and as night drew on, scarcely had these unfortunates got on board, when the Indians entered the plantations, and finding nobody in the houses, came down to the water's edge, and fired heavily on the ship all the night, but killed no-one; they continually repeated their diabolical War-whoop as they fired. Next day they killed the horses and cattle with gun-shots, and sacked and plundered everything they met with, dancing in a grotesque fashion, and uttering loud cries of joy whilst they fired and burnt the houses. Such a spectacle might have given pleasure, had not the results been so disastrous. Another Indian Trader (the only one who escaped out of a large number) saved his life by crawling into a marsh, where he kept himself hid near the town. He heard, during the whole day, an almost continual fire, and cries and grievous groans. He often raised his head in his hiding-place, and heard and saw unheard-of things done; for the Indians burned the men, and made them die in torture. They treated the women in the most shameful manner in the world. And when these poor wretches cried O Lord! O my God! they danced and repeated the same words mocking them. Modesty forbids me to tell you in what manner they treated the women: modesty demands that I should draw a veil over this subject. This man who had witnessed so many cruelties, stripped himself naked so as completely to resemble the Indians; and in this state, made his escape by night, crossing the town without being perceived, he heard many people talking there, and saw several candles in each house; and having avoided the sentries, God granted that he should arrive here safe and sound. Mr. Jean Wright, with whom I had struck up a close friendship, and Mr. Nairne have been overwhelmed in this disaster. I do not know if Mr. Wright was burnt piece-meal, or not: but it is said that the criminals loaded Mr. Nairne with a great number of pieces of wood, to which they set fire, and burnt him in this manner so that he suffered horrible torture, during several days, before he was allowed to die. During these proceedings, the Governor collected the troops and camped at the house of Captain Woodwards. A little while after, the cannon was fired to give the alarm, and the laws of war were published; one party of Indians attacked the Governor even in his entrenchments; but they were very soon repulsed etc. When the necessary measures had been taken, and the Governor was advised by those who were with him that he was strong enough, he pursued the Indians; and having sent by water Col. Barnwell and Col. Mackey with a sufficiently large number of troops to the town where the Indians had practised the cruelties I have spoken of, he advanced by land with his main body. The second or third night, having camped in a plain near a river, where there were woods on either side, the scouts gave warning that the Indians were in the woods and divided into several bodies. Upon this news, all necessary precautions were taken and we remained under arms all night. Next day at dawn the Indians began a continual fire till an hour after sunrise, and almost surrounded the whole camp, being drawn up in crescent form. But the Governor and those with him, having rallied some fugitives, threw themselves upon the Indians and put them to flight, after having killed some of their leaders, amongst others one named Smith, who had in his pocket a ridiculous letter, addressed to the Governor, in which he advised him to quit the country, because they had determined to seize it, adding that all the Indians of the Continent had joined, or would join with them. And that we were only old women in comparison with them, etc. It was not thought advisable to pursue these monsters, the marshes being so placed that we should only have lost all our forces. It is believed that they have fled, and will presently form a large body to cut us to pieces. For we have sent people everywhere, and we learn from every side, from North to South, that the Indians have killed the Whites who were with them. It is some years, as we learn from prisoners, that the Indians have been preparing; they design to seize the whole Continent and to kill us or chase us all out of it. Some fancy that the Spaniards of St. Augustin and the French of Mobile and the other Plantations have encouraged and advised this horrible enterprise. I learn that all the traders who were with the Indians, except two or three who escaped, have been killed, and that poor Richard perished with six others, etc., only one escaped, who tells us that they were with the Cheriquois, and that these Indians appeared to be our friends, and made a feast, to which they invited the Whites in order to deceive them, after which they shot them, etc., etc. I should never finish, if I endeavoured to give you all the deplorable details of the condition we are in. The people from the country seek refuge here in crowds from all sides. The cries and groans of the women and children are heard unceasingly. Our misfortunes are great, and I fear lest they will be increased every day by famine and disease, apart from the warfare of these accursed Indians, so that I despair of surviving so many ills. One ought not, however, to renounce all hope so long as one is alive. When I consider what I have gained, and spent on the plantation in three years, that I had about 16 slaves, and the best estate in the Province, which would have produced several hundred pounds sterling in a year or two, and that I have lost everything in a moment etc. etc., it seems to me a hundred times worse than death. I leave you to judge of the deplorable state to which I am reduced. It is a capital offence to leave the country. It is probable that, in view of the measures taken, we shall be able to hold firm against the Indians, for seven or eight months, if my Lord Carteret and you are touched by our condition. If you represent it to H.M. warmly, so as to obtain assistance, if we are sent munitions, about 1,000 men, some ships, and an Order to all the Plantations on the Continent to help us; if we are granted a free trade, at least for some time, as is desired here; and if a Proclamation is published in all H.M. Dominions, to prevent, under very severe penalties, the sale of powder, ball, muskets or any other instrument of war to these infamous criminals, this is the way to prevent the ruin and destruction of this fine country, etc. It would be wrong to represent Carolina as an inconsiderable country. Perhaps if this Province were lost, the whole Continent would suffer. For you may be assured that the evil will not stop there, but will spread everywhere, etc. May God open the eyes of those who hold the helm of State, that they may take pity on an afflicted people, and that they may work to aid them, etc. If you think that nothing will be done, I pray you to arrange that the Governor and Council may allow me to return etc. Signed, George Rodd. French. 3½ pp. [C.O. 5, 387. No. 1.]
May 9.
St. James's.
385. The King to Governor Hunter. Whereas it has been humbly represented to us by the Proprietors of New Jersey, that it is of great consequence to the publick peace of that our Province as well as for the security of the property of our subjects, that the offices of Keeper of the Records and Surveyor General of the lands should be faithfully discharged and that they had for that end appointed James Smith and James Allexander for officiating the said two offices, etc., you are to assist and countenance them in the execution of their offices, etc. Countersigned, James Stanhope. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 259.]
May 9.
Bermuda.
386. President and Council of Bermuda to the Council of Trade and Plantations. On the 26th of the last month about ten at night dyed H. E. Henry Pulleine of a fever, wch. distemper hath carried off many of the inhabitants, amongst whom the Govr's. Lady also departed this life, the ninth day after him. My Lords this country having had long experience of the conduct and management of Col. Bennett both as to civil and military affairs, when he was our Govr., have therefore addrest H.M. that he may succeed in the Government, and do humbly intreat your Lordps. will contribute to our happiness by promoting his interest, etc. Signed, M. Burrows, Presidt., Tho. Brooke, Jno. Trimingham, Saml. Sherlock, Wm. Outterbridge, Saml. Smith, Jno. Peasly, Len. White. Endorsed, Recd. 20th, Read 21st June, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 37, 9. No. 33; and 38, 7. pp. 222, 223.]
[May 9.]387. Draught of H.M. Instructions to the Lt. Governor of Placentia. v. May 12. Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. Secy. Stanhope) Read 9th May, 1715. 3 pp. [C.O. 194, 5. No. 92; and 195, 6. pp. 93–96.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
388. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Submit Capt. Taverner's accounts. Continue:— We further conceive, by the accounts before us, that Mr. Taverner may, by the end of this summer, finish what he is about in the survey. We therefore humbly submit it, whether it may not be proper, to send him orders to return at the end of this next fishing season, to give a full account of his transactions, and that in the mean time the Lords of the Admiralty be desir'd to give orders to the Commanders of the King's ships, to be assisting to him, during his stay there, for the better inabling him to perform the survey he is now imploy'd in. Autograph signatures. 1¾ pp. Enclosed,
388. i. Copy of Capt. Taverner's account, 1714. [C.O. 194, 23. Nos. 19, 19 i.]
May 10.389. George Vaughan to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I am of ye country of North America in New England, and understanding that some affairs are transacting respecting that country, am the more incouraged to contribute what I am able for its welfair, etc. Encloses following. Signed, Geo. Vaughan. Endorsed, Recd. 10th, Read 11th May, 1715. Addressed. ½ p. Enclosed,
389. i. Mr. Vaughan's observations on the American Plantations. Many things might be effected in the Plantations, which are worthy consideration, and have a proper tendency to the benefit of Great Brittain, which because of the distance, and due want of inspection, are wholly neglected. The settlement of the Plantations hath occasion'd ye increase of trade, and further'd ye English Navigation etc. As they grow trade will grow by and with them, etc. It is humbly conceived that one great end of the Plantation Office was to promote and forward the growth of the English Plantations, their numbers and dominions, to regulate the Government there and the trade to and from them; all which are much impeded for want of better information of their constitutions circumstances and abillities and thereby the whole damnifyed for want of a better regimen. Wherefore it is humbly proposed: that some Commissioners be imployed to inspect, consider, and survey each Collony in order to learn and report how and by what means a further improvement may be made so as to render the trade more beneficiall and accommodable and those Dominions more conducive to the glory and grandeur of Great Brittain. In the Plantations on the main there are but few who are very rich, yet on the other hand there are none who are miserably poor (unless pr. accident) so that their numbers being many their small estates added together, are of a considerable value, and if brought to an equall charge in all taxes, in their proportion for the publique good; and paid into a Generall Treasury; and for the present laid out in the necessary charges, for the suport, defence and advantage of the Governments; then the weaker parts might be fortifyed, and made defencible and thereby protected from the incursion of enemies, whereas now they are exposed and opressed; when the bigger and greater ones are supplied with men, and arms from the Crown; which cannot be accounted for any other way but that things are not fully and impartially represented, as for instance New York is assisted and New Hampshire neglected, this the only place which suplies the Crown with stores of great masts for the Royal Navy, and the American settlements with lumber, was a frontier in the late war to the Indian enemy and the French both by land and sea; that an inland and great goverment, surrounded with inhabitants on every side; a great and rich people, and New Hampshire consisting of only six towns, and about 1,000 men which things if duly represented, would doubtless be regulated, and the generall good of that country provided for. It is thought the four Goverments in New England have in them 34,000 men, vizt. Masachusets, 20,000, Road Island 5,000, Connecticut 8,000, New Hampshire 1,000, and that every man one with another is worth £10 annuall income, which at 2s. in the pound is £34,000; and their annuall charge in time of peace is not more then £14,000; and that the other Collonies on the Main by the same way of reckoning would pay £150,000 and their annuall charge not to exceed £10,000, so that if they were taxed to the use of the Crown, as the subjects of great Brittain are, there would be £160,000 to spare, to defray the further necessary charge in Civill Goverment, and other needfulls, as a Lord Lieutenant, Governours, Judges, Magistrates etc. It is certain that the Plantations are very much pinched by want of a medium of exchange in their traffick and that of late the silver and gold is almost all sent for returns to great Brittain. And they have but few bills of credit, for use of the Goverment, which are not sufficient to suport the trade, therefore humbly proposed whether it be not highly reasonable, that the King by his Royal Perogative, should give the Goverments liberty, to emit bills and let them out to loan at 6 pr. cent., on land security, to the value of £500,000, in New England, and in proportion to the rest. The Revenue of New England, would be £30,000 pr. annum, and what is over and above the necessary charge, might be expended in victualling ships of war, sending home navall stores, etc. Proposed: (1) That in North America a survey be made of all lands, their soil, cituation, quantity, accommodations, rivers, bays, what number of inhabitants, how and by what means they may be rendred more serviceable to the Crown. (2) That certain quantities of land may be appropriated for the use of the Crown for timber, masts, sparrs, planks, dealls, etc. (3) That directions may be given for the resetling the towns destroyed by the Indians, since it is the best part of New England for deals, masts, fishing etc. (4) That proper measures be taken to reclaim the Eastern Indians from idolatry and bring them to the English interest. (5) That the importation of masts, deals, hemp, tar, etc. be incourag'd into Gt. Brittain. (6) That the Castle of New Hampshire may be secured and its defence provided for. (7) That the Lt. Governour may reside in New Hampshire, since the Governour will not. (8) That the wast land may be put to quit-rent for the use of the Crown. (9) That directions may be given for the imediate settlement of the bounds between province and province for prevention of future differences. The importation of masts, deals duty free and pr. a bounty will increase the Brittish Navigation, make Great Brittain independant for Navall Stores on foreign Princes, promote the English manufactures, keep the silver coin in the Kingdom, and suppress the growth of the woollen manufactures in New England. If the importation of masts, deals, tar, etc., be encouraged, proposed (1) that every ship importing them shall pr. themselves or others transport 10 of the begging vagrants of the City of London to New England for every hundred tunns imported. (2) That a Generall Name be given to the country of North America where the English Settlements and Plantations are. (3) That each Goverment be constituted a province or Collony of the same. (4) That every three years a generall Congress of the Governours be appointed, and meet accordingly, to consult the generall good of the whole. (5) That a Commissioner be appointed to preside in the said Congress to regulate and report all acts under the hand and seall of their Secretary for the better information of the Board of Trade. 3¼ closely written pp. [C.O. 5, 866. Nos. 33, 33 i.; and 5, 914. pp. 14–21.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
390. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. The Right Honble. the Lords of the Committee of Council having been yesterday at the Board of Trade and Plantations, and being of opinion that it is very prejudicial that the fishing ships do not bring home the complement of men they carry out, many of them being entic'd away by the New England men, and others left in the country, their Lordps. desire you to move the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty that the Commadore of the Newfoundland Convoy be directed to signify to the masters of all British ships there, that they take particular care to bring home the complement of men they carry out, except in case of death, for that otherwise they will be prosecuted here. Their Lordps. further desire that Capt. Kempthorn may have directions from my Lords of the Admiralty, to receive on board his ship such money as shall be brought him by the Agent of the Garrison at Placentia for their use. [C.O. 195, 6. pp. 96, 97.]
May 10.
Admty. Office.
391. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Reply to preceding. My Lords Commrs. of the Admiralty have given directions to Capt. Kempthorne of the Worcester, as supra. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. Read 11th May, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 5. No. 92; and 195, 6. pp. 99, 100.]
May 10.
Whitehall.
392. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Since our letters of 10th and 23rd March, etc., relating to the survey of the late French part of Newfoundland, we have had under consideration some papers receiv'd from Capt. Taverner, and finding he is not recall'd, or anybody else sent in his place, we think it proper to lay before you the account of the charges he hath been at, etc. for H.M. directions thereupon. We conceive Mr. Taverner may by the end of this summer finish what he is about in the said survey; we therefore humbly submit it whether it may not be proper to send him orders to return at the end of this next fishing season, to give a full accot. of his transactions; and that in the mean time the Lords of the Admiralty be desir'd to give orders to the Commanders of the King's ships to be assisting to him the said Taverner during his stay there, for the better inabling him to perform the survey he is now imploy'd in. [C.O. 195, 6. pp. 97–99.]
May 11.393. Mr. Sheafe to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers to the disputed Proprietors' title to New Hampshire, now descended to Sir Mathew Dudley by the decease of Thomas Allen, successour to John Mason, and proposes that it should be now purchased by the Crown. Signed, Sampson Sheafe. Endorsed, Recd. 11th May, Read 6th Sept., 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 66.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
394. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Enclose following, "wherein we have made some few alterations." Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed.
395. Draft of H.M. Instructions to John Moody, Lt. Governor of Placentia. St. James's, May 13, 1715. You are with the utmost application to exert yourself in everything which may encourage and promote so beneficial a trade as the fishing at Newfoundland may be to our subjects, when carry'd on as it ought to be, etc. (1) You are not to encourage any of the French who are still in Newfoundland, to stay there. (2) You are to take care that none of the waste grounds, beaches or stages in Newfoundland be disposed of, till our further order, and that none of the inhabitants upon pretence of purchases from the French, do hinder the fishing ships from using the proper rooms necessary for the curing of their fish, the directions of the Act to incourage the trade to Newfoundland being the sole rule for regulating the disposal of such rooms to the said fishing ships. (3) In all matters in which you have not particular directions from us, you are to consider Placentia as subject to the regulations in the sd. Act and are to govern yourself thereby; and in pursuance of this Act you are to take notice that every fishing ship from Great Britain, or the fishermen thereof, that shall first enter any harbour for creek in Newfoundland, shall be Admiral of the said harbour for that season; that the master of the ship next entring shall be Vice Admiral, and the master of the third ship Rear Admiral; that if any persons are possess'd of several places in sevl. creeks or harbours, they shall make their elections which they will abide in, within 48 hours after any demands of any after comer; and in case of any difference touching the said matters, or any other differences arising between the masters of fishing ships, and the inhabitants there, about fishing rooms, stages or flakes, such differences and disputes shall be determin'd by the fishing Admirals in their respective harbours, an appeal being reserv'd to the Commanders of our men of war who shall be appointed convoys for Newfoundland. (4) We do strictly prohibit and discharge you or any of the officers or soldiers of the garrison under your command to have anything to do with the Fishery or Trade; and you are to take care that the beaches and stages be left to the public use, and dispos'd of as the foresaid Act directs. (5) As you are to consider the French who have continued in Newfoundland, as under the same regulations with our other subjects; you are therefore to take care that none of the French inhabitants have liberty to trade with France, Canada, or any other French settlement, but be oblig'd to trade with our subjects of Great Britain only. [C.O. 195, 6. pp. 100–104; and (without enclosure) 194, 23. No. 20.]
May 12.
Whitehall.
396. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. We think fit to acquaint you with correspondence with Mr. Burchet. (v. May 10.) Autograph signatures. 1 p. [C.O. 194, 23. No. 21; and 195, 6. pp. 104, 105.]
May 12.
London.
397. Col. Vetch to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I contracted with Mr. Borland for victualling the garrison at Annapolis Royal for 7½d. There is a great sum due to him, and no person more capable to undertake the work etc. The risque and freight being less in time of peace, I believe there may be an abatement made on the price. During all the time I commanded there, the troops never had any cloathing upon account of their arrears or off reckonings. When Mr. Nicholson came to supersede me he brought over some cloathing from Boston, Nov., 1713 etc. It was very bad of the sort alltogether unfit for so cold a climate, being only a sort of frock without any lining and no waistcoats. Refers to Mr. Sheriffe, the Clerk of Major Caulfield, the Lt. Govr. at that time, and Mr. Netmaker. The same sort of cloaths were sold at publick vendue at Boston for less then halfe the price they were charged at to the soldiers, notwithstanding that all cloathing sent from England sell at Boston at 150 p.c. advance. How reasonably this cloathing hath been charged to the Crown, I humbly submit to your Lordps'. consideration. Signed, Sam. Vetch. Endorsed, Recd. Read 12th May, 1715. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 104.]
[May 12.]398. Petition of private soldiers upon the Expedition of Canada to the Duke of Marlborough. Petition for arrears of pay due to them. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 106.]
[May 12.]399. Copy of Minute of Council of War, Annapolis Royal, Sept. 20, 1714. Genl. Nicholson informed the officers of the four companies that neither he nor their captains received any of their pay since the establishment, that their cloathing being part of H.M. stores, were issued to them at the price H.M. paid for the same. There being no clothing provided for them in England, there was an absolute necessity to supply them with those stores, etc. He would transmit their case to H.M. if laid before him in writing etc. Signed, F. Nicholson. Endorsed, Recd. Read 12th May, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 107.]
[May 12.]400. Memorial of officers of the garrison of Annapolis Royal, on behalf of the troops, to the Queen. Pray for pay etc. on scale of New England troops. Duplicate of C.S.P. 1714. No. 741. Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. Shirif), Read 12th May, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 108.]
[May 12.]401. Invoice of cloathing sent by Genl. Nicholson to the Garrison at Annapolis. (v. No. 397.) Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. Shirreff), Read 12th May, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 105.]
May 13.
St. James's.
402. The King to Governor Lord A. Hamilton. Whereas the state and condition of that our Island of Jamaica having been laid before us by our Commrs. for Trade and Plantations, we cannot from the great regard we have for the safety and prosperity of an Island so valuable by its own produce and by its scituation for trade but express our concern to find its inhabitants so decreased and trade of late decayed whilst its vigilant neighbours have omitted no endeavours to increase and strengthen themselves in both. This concern is the greater when we observe there has not been that good agreement in Assembly's so necessary at all times for publick happiness, but more especially at such a juncture. We have therefore thought fit and do hereby require you to call an Assembly (if not already done) and to acquaint them in our name that as it has been our earnest and greatest desire at our accession to the throne of our ancestors, that all our subjects the most remote may feel the happy influence of our Government, so we shall have a particular care of that our Island by affording it such protection from time to time as by the blessing of God and the assistance of our subjects there may render them secure, and by giving our Royal approbation to such good laws as may make them happy, of which we have been graciously pleased to give them an early insistance by confirming two most beneficiall Acts by them so long and so earnestly desired vizt. the one for regulating fees and the other for further quieting possessions etc., in return whereof we cannot but expect from that our sd. Island a ready and chearful complyance in making an honourable provision for our Revenue, in discharging all publick debts, and giving a necessary subsistance to the two independant companies there in our pay, till by the good laws which shall be made for encouraging the encrease of inhabitants there may be no further occasion for them; it not being our intention to burthen our people with extrordinary charges any longer than is consistent with their own safety. It is so much their intrest and of so great concernment to them to enter seriously and heartily upon measures to encourage a resort of people thither and there to fix them that we cannot doubt of their being unanimous in it; to which however we are willing to exhort them further by assuring them that such proceedings for the publick good of our people will always be the most effectual recommendations to the continuance of our Royal favour and protection; and as wee have been pleased to renew your Commission and Instructions we expect you will continue your best endeavours for the advancement of these good ends which we hope will restore that our said Island to a flourishing condition, etc. Countersigned, James Stanhope. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 260, 261; and 137, 11. No. 3.]
May 13.
St. James's.
403. H.M. Instructions to Lt. Governor Moody. You are with utmost application to exert yourself in everything which may encourage and promote so beneficial a trade as the fishing at Newfoundland may be to our subjects, when carried on as it ought to be; and for your particular directions herein we require you to observe our following Instructions:—(1) You are not to encourage any of the French who are still in Newfoundland to stay there. (2) You are to take care that none of the waste grounds, beaches or stages in Newfoundland, be disposed of till our further order, and that none of the inhabitants upon pretence of purchases from the French, do hinder the fishing ships from useing the proper rooms necessary for the curing of their fish, the direction of the Act to encourage the trade to Newfoundland being the sole rule for regulating the disposal of such rooms to the said fishing ships. (3) In all matters in which you have not particular directions from us, you are to consider Placentia as subject to the regulations in the said Act, and are to govern yourself therby; and in pursuance of this Act, you are to take notice that every fishing ship from Great Britain or the fishermen thereof that shall first enter any harbour or creek in Newfoundland, shall be Admiral of the said harbour for that season; that the master of the ship next entring shall be ViceAdmiral and the master of the 3rd ship Rear-Admiral; that if any persons are possessed of several places in several creeks or harbours they shall make their elections which they will abide in within 48 hours after any demand of any after comer, and in case of any difference touching the said matters or any other differences arising between the masters of fishing ships, and the inhabitants there, about fishing rooms, stages or flakes, such differencies and disputes shall be determined by the Fishing Admirals in their respective harbours, an appeal being reserv'd to the Commanders of our men of war who shall be appointed convoys for Newfoundland. (4) We do strictly prohibit and discharge you or any of the officers or soldiers of the Garrison under your command to have anything to do with the fishery or trade; and you are to take care that the beaches and stages be left to the publick use and disposed of as the foresaid Act directs. (5) As you are to consider the French who have continued in Newfoundland, as under the same regulation with our other subjects, you are therefore to take care, that none of the French inhabitants, have liberty to trade with France, Canada or any other French settlement, but be obliged to trade with our subjects of Great Britain only. Signed, G. R. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 262, 263.]
May 13.
Whitehall.
404. Mr. Secretary Stanhope to Lt. Governor Moody. Encloses preceding and Act of Parliament referred to therein. As you must be sencible of how great consequence [your trust] is, I doubt not but you will with the utmost zeal not only pursue your Instructions but everything else that may be proper for attaining the ends H.M. proposes by them to the satisfaction of his subjects who trade to those parts, and the rather by the inclosed copies of petitions from Barnstaple and Biddiford you may see the merchants think they have ground to complain of your past conduct, and I am ordered to transmit to you these copies, that you may have an oppertunity of justifying yourself. Captain Taverner having been employed in surveying the late French part of Newfoundland etc. and having transmitted some papers relating to that survey, which have been under the consideration of the Lords Commissioners of Trade, H.M. has thought fit, on their opinion that he should continue the said survey, and to compleat it as far as possible he can, so as that he may return as he is directed about September next, with the ships that are then to leave that place, you are therefore to give him all the assistance you can in the making of the survey. H.M. having given directions for six months provisions and for such a quantity of stores as is here judged necessary for that place as also money in specie for the subsistance of officers and soldiers of which you will be apprised by Mr. Foreman the Agent, I hope all these will come safe to hand and that by your care and conduct the garrison will be in want of nothing till the next season for a fresh supply. I am able also to acquaint you that upon information of preparation made in some ports in Spain to fit out ships for Newfoundland in order to fish there, on pretext of the 15th Article of Peace concluded at Utrecht, H.M. judging this may be of bad consequence to the trade of his subjects, and that they are not well founded in any such pretention has thought fit to direct the Lords Commiss. of the Admiralty to give orders to the Commander of the men of war sent to Newfoundland not to allow the Spaniards to fish in those parts, which you are also to take notice of, and to concur in this matter with the Commander in such a manner as may be most effectual to prevent their fishing without offering the least violence or insult to them any other way. As the Ingineer who is now with you at Placentia is directed to return home next season, and to bring with him an exact survey of both sides the harbour of Placentia, and a plan of what works and fortifications may be necessary, till then H.M. does not think to take any resolution in relation to those fortification[s], and therefore you are directed only to make such repairs as are necessary to protect the garrison from the weather. Signed, James Stanhope. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 264, 265.]
May 13.
Whitehall.
405. Mr. Secretary Stanhope to Capt Taverner. Gives directions for making a complete survey of Newfoundland, returning home with the ships in September. H.M. is paying you 20s. per diem and £217 13s., for the hired vessel, etc. Signed, James Stanhope. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 266.]
May 13.
Whitehall.
406. Same to Same. The King having had under his consideration several papers etc. in relation to the works and fortifications of Placentia, and judging it necessary before he comes to any resolution on this head that he have an exact survey of that Fort, and of both sides of the Harbour, etc., you are to apply yourselfe with the uttmost dilligence in the making this survey, and return with it hither with the ships that leave that place about September next, which on no account you must fail to do. Signed, James Stanhope. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 267.]
May 13.
St. James's.
407. H.M. Warrant to Governor Hamilton for restoring Elizabeth Salenave to a plantation in St. Kitts (v. May 5, 1714). Countersigned, James Stanhope. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 267–269.]
[May 13.]408. Henry Norton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The clothing sent by Genl. Nicholson for Annapolis Royal were directed to be issued at, a serjeant's coat and breeches, 40s., a centinel's, 28s. etc., and a serjeant's complete mounting £4, a centinel's £2 10s. The remainder, which upon the advice of the Governor and Council of New England, he sold by public auction, fetched, a centinel's coat and breeches from 18s. 6d. to 23s. (New England currt. money=60 p.c. advance), etc. Signed, Henry Norton. Endorsed, Recd. Read 13th May, 1715. 3 pp. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 109.]
[May 13.]409. Copy of H.M. Establishment of the Garrison and four Companies at Annapolis Royal, 30th July, 1712. Endorsed, Recd. (from Col. Nicholson), Read 13th May, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 110.]
[May 13.]410. Copy of H.M. Warrant to Col. Nicholson for sale of the stores brought from Canada, 7th Jan., 1712/13. Endorsed, Recd. Read 13th May, 1715. 4 pp. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 111.]
[May 13.]411. John Mulcaster, Agent and Paymaster to the Garrison and four independent companies at Annapolis Royal, to [? Council of Trade and Plantations]. The Garrison is very much in debt upon account of the victualling, each soldier's subsistance being but 6d. a day, whereas the provisions furnished by Col. Vetch's agreement amounted 7½d., but since May 1714, by Genl. Nicholson's agreement, at not much above 5d. The Garrison is in a very great want of cloaths, strong and warm, etc. Those delivered by Genl. Nicholson's order amounting to £3,030 10s. 6d. will take up the off reckonings to the end of 1716, of which great part remain as yet unused, most of which are extreamly damaged and withall so slight and thinn etc., several of the men must perish, if care is not taken to send a compleat cloathing fitt for so cold and uncomfortable a climate, and also bedding etc. Endorsed, Recd. Read 13th May, 1715. 1¾ pp. Enclosed,
411. i. Lt. Governor Caulfield and the Captains of the Garrison of Annapolis Royal to Governor Nicholson. Oct. 8, 1714. We were detached from the 7th Regiment and lost our bedding and necessarys on the Expedition against Canada. Pray H.E. to represent their condition home. The greatest part of the men complain they engaged to serve only three years, which has been expired some time. Pray that 200 recruits may be sent. It is very necessary a new sett of arms be given to the four companys. But the disatisfactions and murmours among the soldiers have been chiefly caused by Col. Vetch's arbitrary and loose administration, who flattered them with the expectation of full pay and by a profuse management thought to make them plyant to his purposes; but now they are disabus'd, think themselves agrieved, etc. This accounts for the fulsome flatterys he recd. in an Address drawn up by a parcell of mercenary fools and pedlars which is as scandalously false as it is foolish etc. Pray to be reimbursed for nearly a whole year's pay advanced by them in cloths and necessarys to the four companies. Signed, Thos. Caulfield, J. Williams, L. Armstrong, Chris. Aldridge. Endorsed as preceding. 2 pp.
411. ii. Cost of victualling the Garrison of Annapolis Royal, May 1st, 1714—May 31st, 1715, £3,166 6s. 8d. Same endorsement. 1 p.
411. iii. General Nicholson's answers to questions relating to the state of the Garrison at Annapolis Royal. March 25, 1715. Signed, Fra. Nicholson. Same endorsement. 2½ pp.
411. iv. Duplicate of No. 410.
411. v. Account of cloathing of the Garrison at Annapolis Royal out of the stores brought back from Canada. Same endorsement. Boston, June 25, 1714. Signed, Jno. Netmaker. Same endorsement. 3½ pp. [C.O. 217, 1. Nos. 112, 112 i.–v.; and (without enclosures) 218, 1. pp. 208–211.]
[May 13.]412. William Shirreff to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Represents the miserable condition of the garrison at Annapolis Royal, for want of pay these three years past, provisions only obtainable from Boston, and cloathing. All the officers as well as the Lt. Governour who has advanced for their immediate support upwards of £1,000 sterl. will be intearly ruined, he being likewise charged by Genl. Nicholson with all their provisions, etc. Though managed to the best advantage, Genl. Nicholson would give him no allowance for the same. The unsettled state and little care that has been taken of that Garrison has been very detrimentall to the trade in those parts, and will be the ruin of both country and garrison, if not timely prevented etc. Signed, Wm. Shirreff. Endorsed, Recd. 13th, Read 14th May, 1715. 2 pp. Enclosed,
412. i. Lt. Governor Caulfield and officers of the Garrison of Annapolis to General Nicholson. The 7s. a day for firing by the new establishment is quite insufficient, owing to the climate and difficulty of carting timber etc. The soldiers will mutiny if compelled to do this work, etc. Annapolis Royall, 3rd Nov., 1714. Signed, Tho. Caulfeild and 16 others. Endorsed as preceding. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 1. Nos. 113, 113 i.]
May 14.413. William Shirreff to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The cloathing sent by Genl. Nicholson to the Garrison at Annapolis Royal was extreamly bad, damnified and dear, so that the soldiers absolutely refused taking the second clothing he had ordered to be issued to them, etc. The inhabitants because of their dearness rather choised to buy of the marchts. who commonly in those countrys have at least 300 p.c. upon all their European goods. Signed, Wm. Shirreff. Endorsed, Recd. Read 14th May, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 114.]
May 14.
Custom house, London.
414. Mr. Carkesse to Mr. Popple. In reply to May 9th encloses following. Signed, Cha. Carkesse. Endorsed, Recd. 14th, Read 16th May, 1715. Addressed. ½ p. Enclosed,
414. i. An account of the duties upon timber imported from the Northern Crown and from America. Signed, Chr. Tower, D. Coll., 12th May, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 388, 17. Nos. 118, 118 i.]
May 15.415. Copy of Petition of Archibald Cuming(s) to the King. Urges appointment of Surveyor of woods in New England, as April 8th, and solicites the appointment for himself. Overleaf,
415. i. H.M. refers this petition to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their opinion. Whitehall, May 5, 1715. Signed, James Stanhope. The whole endorsed, Recd. 6th May, Read 28th July, 1715. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 866. Nos. 51, 51 i.]
May 15.
Whitehall.
416. Mr. Secretary Stanhope to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following representation for their report. Signed, James Stanhope. Endorsed, Recd. 17th, Read 18th May, 1715. 1 p. Enclosed,
416. i. Nova Scotia or Accadie is one of the Provinces expressly named in the Charter granted by King William and Queen Mary to constitute the Government of the Massachusets Bay in New England, and it seems a direct violation of the very words of that Charter to erect a new Government there, or put any place in that country into hands independent of the Governor of New England. There is no settlement of any of H.M. natural born subjects in Nova Scotia or Accadie, except only the single fort of Annapolis Royal, which always has been supply'd from New England hitherto, and must be sustain'd from thence, if ever it be attacked, therefore will most properly be under the command of the same person. If ever it be thought necessary (for the sake of our Fishery, or to make head against the French at Cape Breton) to make more settlements in that country, most of the people carried thither, will be drawn from New England, and that Colony must sink at the same time, and in the same proportion as the other rises: But they will not feell this so soon, if they are thus united and put under the same head. If they continue two distinct Governments, the people will certainly be very ill friends; thô very near neighbours, for their interests will ever be opposite, as rivals in the same trade, and as they are both to live, and grow rich by the same Fishery. If the Governor of New England has the Government of Annapolis (as it seems of right to belong to him) he will be more independent, and much better able to secure the Crown than he is at present, while he draws all his subsistence from the people, and has nothing but his Commission from the King. No date or signature. 31/8 pp. [C.O. 217, 1. Nos. 116, 116 i.; and 218, 1. pp. 213–216.]