America and West Indies
June 1715

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1928

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198-215

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'America and West Indies: June 1715', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 28: 1714-1715 (1928), pp. 198-215. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73963 Date accessed: 31 August 2014.


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Contents

June 1715

June 2.
Whitehall.
445. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Upon H.M. happy accession, propose that new seals be made and sent to the Plantations, etc. [C.O. 324, 10. pp. 70, 71.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
446. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Reply to May 30th. We desire you will please to represent to H.M., in relation to the [French] complaint of the English fishing upon the Banks near Port St. Peter, on the coast of Cape Breton; that by the 12th Article of the Treaty of Peace, "the subjects of the most Christian King are hereafter excluded from all kind of fishing in the seas, bays, and other places on the coast of Nova Scotia which lye towards the East within 30 leagues, beginning from Sable Island inclusive and thence towards the South West"; but we do not find the subjects of Great Britain restrained from fishing in any part of the sea whatsoever. And as to the removal of the French inhabitants of Nova Scotia, with their moveable and immoveable effects, we referr you to our letter of May 30th, which we desire you will please to lay before H.M., together with our Representation of 17th March, which we then transmitted to you. [C.O. 218, 1. pp. 229, 230.]
June 3.
Whitehall.
447. Same to Same. Reply to May 31st. Quote from their books as to early settlements in Newfoundland 1497–1668 (v. C.S.P. passim, and especially, 1668. No. 1729, 1729 i.). Continue: We do not find that the Spaniards ever had any settlement, either under the English or French in Newfoundland. By the 7th Article of the Treaty of 1670 between Great Britain and Spain, the Spaniards yeild up to England all lands, countries, islands etc. in America, which were then in the possession of the subjects of Great Britain. [C.O. 195, 6. pp. 114–117.]
June 3.
Whitehal.
448. Mr. Popple to Mr. Bridger. Requires his answer to May 20 by Wednesday, etc. [C.O. 5, 914. p. 28.]
June 4.
Virginia.
449. Lt. Governor Spotswood to the Council of Trade and Plantations. According to what I had the honour to write your Lordships in my last, I have been for a good part of last spring employed in finishing the fortifications of Christanna, and in settling there a body of our Tributary Indians to the number of 300 men, women and children, who go under the general name of Saponies; and as they seem to be much pleased with their present settlement, well affected to the English, and reckoned a brave people, I hope by their means and the guard of white men placed among them at the Fort, the neighbouring frontiers will be better guarded than heretofore against the incursions of any foreign Indians, especially when this place is further strengthened by the addition of the other Nations of Indians, which I acquainted your Lordps. in my last, had a desire to incorporate with ye Saponies, and have by their messengers inform'd me that they only delay their coming in till the Senequa's who are hunting near their habitations (and with whom they are in no good terms) are removed. The good disposition I found among the Saponies to have their children educated in the principles of the Christian religion, has encouraged me to sett about that work. To this purpose I have placed a schoolmaster among them with a sallary of £50 per annum, which I pay out of my own pockett; and have made choice of about 70 boys and girls who for their years are the most susceptible of learning, to be under his care. And as he is a person whose inclination as well as capacity renders him very fitt for this imployment, there is all humane probability of the success of this undertaking; whereby a foundation will be laid for a more lasting friendship with those Indians, than can be expected while they retain their savage principles and heathenish superstitions. At the same time that I was thus imploy'd at Christanna, the king of the Tuscaruros came thither to give me assurances of the inclinations of his people to live in a good correspondence with this Government. I took the opportunity of this interview to settle the limits of the hunting grounds of the Tuscaruros and our Tributarys that they may not interfere with one another, and also to engage them to be conformable to a late law pass'd here, prohibiting all Indians from coming near the dwelling of any of the English. I have learn'd enough of the temper of the Indians to be fully convinc'd of the necessity of this regulation. They have naturally a great opinion of the power of the English; but when they are permitted to come frequently among the inhabitants to see the weakness and scattering manner of living of many familys on the frontier plantations, those impressions wear off, and they become encouraged thereby to all those bloody attempts they have heretofore made. This has been fatally verifyed in the massacre of North Carolina in 1711, where the first attacks fell upon those familys in which the Indians were most conversant. But I am now to informe your Lordps. of a more unhappy instance of the imprudence of suffering the Indians to be too much acquainted with the strength and scituation of H.M. Colonys. The Government of South Carolina believing they had their Indians in an intire subjection have upon all occasions permitted their resorting to Charlestown, traversing the country at pleasure, and whenever their necessitys required (as upon the apprehensions of an invasion from the French during the late war, and reducing the Tuscaruros after the massacre in North Carolina) call'd to their assistance great numbers of different Nations, and by this means given them an opportunity to forme a generall conspiracy against that Province, which broke out last month, and, as Collo. Craven informs me, is intended to extirpate out of that country all H.M. subjects. The number of those savages is so great that the English there being unable to make a stand against them, have deserted the open country and fled for sanctuary to Charlestown, where they also expected to be attack'd, the enemy being, at the time of dispatching hither the express (viz. on the 11th of last month) within two days march of the place. On this surprizing event, the Governor of South Carolina has made pressing instances to me for assistance of arms and ammunition, and that I might not be wanting to relieve H.M. subjects upon such an occasion, I have gott ready such a supply of both as the condition of this Colony will permitt, and wait only the arrival of the Valeur man of war from Maryland to dispatch the same away. I have likewise by my letters to the Governors of the Northern Provinces, used my interest to induce them as well to the like contribution out of H.M. stores under their command, as to order the guardships attending there to repair to Charlestown, to animate those people under their present consternation, and to enable them to stand their ground till ye fortifications of ye Town (which I understand are much out of repair) are put into a state of defence. I beg leave on this occasion to represent to your Lordps., of how much importance it is that sufficient stores of arms and ammunition be constantly lodged here, as well for the preservation of this Colony, which is of so great consideration in the British trade, as for the relief of our neighbouring Provinces; this is now the second time during my Government, that the Carolina's have been obliged to apply hither, and recieved supplys of arms for their relief. And if Maryland should happen to fall into the same distress, it cannot be so conveniently supplyed from any other Government as from hence. Upon this consideration I hope your Lordps. will be pleased to intercede with H.M. for an additional supply of stores of war to be sent hither, at least that a part of what was lodged at New York and New England after the Canada Expedition, may be ordered to this place, as the most proper repository for them, especially now I am building a convenient magazine for preserving such stores, and have prevailed with the Assembly to settle a sallary on an armourer for keeping them in order. And since there is too much reason to apprehend from the unusual intercourse between the Southern and Northern Indians, that there is a generall combination between them to fall upon all the English Plantations, wherein this Colony cannot hope to escape having it's share in the calamity, I cannot forbear representing to your Lordps., how ill provided we are with money to support such a war; the Revenue of 2s. a hogshead is so far defective that the established sallarys due last October are not yet paid off. I shall always carefully avoid asking H.M. to be at any extraordinary charge for our defence. Neither do I think it necessary at present to go the same length as our late Assembly, by addressing H.M. to divest himself of his whole Revenue of Quitt Rents; but I humbly hope H.M. will be graciously pleased upon your Lordps.' interposition, to order the present deficiencys of the Revenue of 2s. per hogshead to be supplyed out of the other Revenue of Quitt Rents, as it has been formerly done on the like occasions. And I cannot ommitt pointing out to your Lordps. what appears upon the Journals of this Colony in 1676, when it was judged that if at the begining of Bacon's rebellion, there had been but a small stock of money at the disposal of the Governor, that rebellion might have been easily prevented, which afterwards cost the Crown above fourscore thousand pounds to quell. I don't pretend to argue from hence that the Quitt Rents should be constantly lodged in the country to answer all emergencys; that Revenue is the King's property. And whatever H.M. is pleased to grant out of it, ought to be recieved as an act of his Royal bounty. And I hope I may with as good a grace as any former Governor, intreat this favour, seeing by the schemes I have laid for encreasing the Quitt Rents, one third of the number of acres (which is all that has been paid for in the present scarcity of tobacco) has this year yielded a larger Revenue than the whole for some years past. And as the affairs of the Plantations are more immediatly committed to your Lordps.' care, I hope I do not address myself improperly, when I humbly beg your Lordships will have the goodness to lay before H.M. what I have here represented. I expect every day, a further account of the affairs of Carolina, and shall ommitt no opportunity of communicating the same to your Lordships, etc. Signed, A. Spotswood. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd July, 1715, Read 16th May, 1716. 4½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1317. No. 29; and 5, 1364. pp. 342–350.]
June 8.450. Mr. Bridger to Mr. Popple. Replies to queries of May 20. A proper Act of Parliament is required for preserving the woods. Gives prices of New England timber, etc. The freight from New England will be 45s. Signed, J. Bridger. Endorsed, Recd. 10th, Read 14th June, 1715. Addressed. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 38; and 5, 914. pp. 28–30.]
June 9.
Treary. Chambers.
451. Mr. Taylour to Mr. Popple. The Lords Commrs. of the Treasury desire the opinion of the Council of Trade and Plantations upon enclosed. Signed, Jo. Taylour. Endorsed, Recd. 10th, Read 14th June, 1715. Addressed. ½ p. Enclosed,
451. i. Petition of John Bridger to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Prays for the renewal of his Commission as Surveyor of H.M. Woods on the Continent of America. 1 p.
451. ii. John Bridger to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Reasons for continuing a Surveyor of H.M. Woods in America. Describes the wasting of the woods etc., as in his former reports. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 866. Nos. 39, 39 i., ii.; and 5, 914. pp. 30–39.]
June 10.
Excheq. Office, Inner Temple.
452. Certificate by the Remembrance Office that Charles Low and John Hyde (v. May 5 and 16) have given security for Governor Hart. Signed, James Pearse. Endorsed, Recd. 11th, Read 13th June, 1715. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 69.]
June 14.
St. James's.
453. H.M. Warrant restoring Martha Assaileies to a plantation in St. Kitts. Countersigned, James Stanhope. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 281, 282.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
454. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Enclose following for H.M. signature. Annexed,
454. i. Draft of H.M. Instructions to Francis Lord Guilford, on behalf of Charles Lord Baltemore, Proprietor and Governor of Maryland. In the usual form of Instructions to Proprietors of Plantations. [C.O. 5, 727. pp. 454–486.]
[June 15.]455. [?General Walter Hamilton to the Council of Trade and Plantations.] Objections to the demands of the French King or M. d'Iberville upon Nevis. The agreement of April 19th, 1706, was made under compulsion, M. d'Iberville, when they refused to sign, carrying the principal inhabitants on board his ships, and making the rest prisoners in the Church, with threats of carrying them amongst the Spaniards if they would not sign etc. (v. C.S.P. 1706. No. 357 ii., etc.). The hostages were taken off by force. What is mentioned to be due from them for their entertainment att Martinique, has been wholly discharged by the publick of Nevis. Even after the agreement was signed, several houses, sugar works etc. were burnt, and some slaves carried off; this, and the compelling the inhabitants as aforesaid render the agreement void in itself. It is hoped that the hostages will be discharged, etc. (v. C.S.P. 1706 etc.) Endorsed, Recd. (from Genl. Hamilton), Read 15th June, 1715. 2 pp. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 59.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
456. Mr. Popple to Genl. Walter Hamilton. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire you will consult such Gentlemen as are here in town (if you do not know it yourself) and let their Lordships know whether the French broke the Articles signed the 19th of April, 1706, either by burning houses, works, etc. and seizing of negroes, or whether they did any other acts of hostility after the said time, and if they have, how far the same may be proved, etc. [C.O. 153, 12. p. 216.]
June 15.457. Governor Burges to Mr. Popple. As Mr. Bridger's petition (v. June 9) relates to an office within my Government, I beg their Lordships will let me be heard, before they come to any resolution etc. Signed, E. Burges. Endorsed, Recd. Read 15th June, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 40; and 5, 914. p. 39.]
June 15.
Whitehall.
458. Mr. Secretary Stanhope to Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following for their opinion thereon. Signed, James Stanhope. Endorsed, Recd. 18th, Read 20th June, 1715. 1 p. Enclosed,
458. i. Address and Petition of several Gentlemen and Merchants, Inhabitants of New England in America, to the King. We beg leave in all humility to congratulate your Majesty's peaceable and happy accession to your Imperiall Crowns, the tidings whereof have been received by all your good subjects here with expressions of joy and loyalty as never before known in these parts on any occasion. The assurance we have of your Majesty's goodness emboldens, and the pressures of our present difficulties oblige us to cast ourselves at your Royall feet, craving leave humbly to represent to your Majesty, that since the silver money is exported hence to Great Brittain and the publick bills of creditt that were issued to support the charges of the late war, and had their circulation in trade, are in great part call'd in, the trade of these Provinces is reduced to a low ebb for want of a medium of exchange. For remedy whereof in some degree a considerable number of merchants and others have projected a scheme for a Bank of Credit founded on land security for passing their bills and notes with one another in matters of trade, which we presume to lay with all submission before your Majesty, imploring your Royall favour to incorporate us by a Charter for such ends and purposes and to invest them with such liberties and powers, as to your Majesty in your great wisdom shall seem meet, for carrying on the same; whereby your Majesty's good subjects here will be the better enabled to cultivate and improve Navall Stores for supply of your Royall Navy, and to take off in greater quantities the manufactures of Great Brittain and to make more seasonable returns for the same, which will be no less to the advantage of your Brittish than of your New English subjects. Signed, Jona. Williams and 181 others. 4 pp.
458. ii. Petition of Brittish merchants and traders to New England, and of divers inhabitants of New England now in London to the King. The trade of New England (the money being all drawn from thence to Great Brittain) labours att present under very unhappy circumstances for want of a medium of exchange to assist in paying for the manufactures it necessaryly takes from hence, etc. Support preceding scheme for a Bank of Credit. Signed, J. Byfield and 56 others. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 866. Nos. 44, 44 i., ii.; and 5, 914. pp. 44–49.]
[June 15.]459. Petition of John Graves to the Council of Trade and Plantations, in behalf of the poor distress'd inhabitants of ye Bahama Islands. Petitioner has been tenn years endeavouring to gett the said Islands established under the protection of the Crown, and has been at a very great charge in expending moneys and time, as does appear by the ennex'd breviate, and having fresh information come to my hands but yesterday of their deplorable condition by reason that pirates have lately been amongst the said Islands that had robbed the Spaniards of a considerable summe of moneys etc. And having no form of Government, it is impossible for that handfull of poore people to detect and bring them to Justice. Your Lordships will see by the copy of my information here, what jeopardy all their lives are in. Therefore Petitioner desires the Board to represent their case to H.M. in order to have immediate releif by sending a Governor and Garrison, and what warlike stores shall be thought fit to New Providence, wch. is the Island where all the Governours reside at, so that the notorious villany of piracy be restrain'd, and the offenders be brought to Justice. Signed, Jno. Graves. Endorsed, Recd. Read 15th June, 1715. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
459. i. An information, May, 1715. George Herne, Commander of a sloop trading between South Carolina and the Bahama Islands in Jan. last, found himself near the Bahama Islands in bad weather and spied afloat, but driven over a reef of rocks, a fourth-rate Spanish man of war with 200 men aboard, bound from ye Havana to St. Augustine, with money to pay the garrison there. Capt. Herne sent his boat to offer assistance. The Spanish Captain detained it, believing them to be pirates, but afterwards purchased provisions from them etc. Upon the arrival of some vessels from the Havana to help him, one of the commanders of the Spanish ship(s) told deponent that they had fitted out a brigantine from ye Havana to Providence with 150 men to cut off all the people there, for that they were a nest of pirates, and had robbed them lately of a considerable quantity of moneys etc. They having saved what they could, sett their ship on fire. Herne proceeded for New Providence and acquainted the inhabitants of the Spanish designe, they owned that there had been some pirates amongst the Islands, especially upon Harbour Island, and brought some thousand peices of eight lately there, but they having no Governmt. they could not seize them, but for their own security Capt. Walker and some others went to Harbour Island and seized one of the pirates and sent him in irons to Jamaica to be try'd, and Walker hired a vessel and went to the Havana to acquaint the Spaniards what they had done, and to satisfie them, that it was not the inhabitants, and endeavoured to prevent their being cut off. The pirate sent to Jamaica bribed the mate of the sloop and made his escape, wt. the consequence will be to Capt. Walker and the inhabitants time will tell us, etc. This information I had from Samuel Turpin who came from Carolina March last and had it from Capt. Hern's own mouth, etc. Signed, Jno. Graves. 1 p.
459. ii. A briefe representation of the proceedings in relation to the obtaining of a reestablishment of a Collony and Government in the Bahama Islands under the Crown, by John Graves, H.M. late Collector of the Customes there. v. C.S.P., 1705–1709. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1264. Nos. 146, 146 i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 5, 1292. pp. 422, 423.]
June 16.
Whitehal.
460. Mr. Popple to John Taylour. Reply to June 9. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire information from the Treasury as to the grounds for Governor Hunter's complaints against Mr. Bridger, v. 12th Sept., 1711, and 1st Jan., 1712. [C.O. 5, 914. pp. 40, 41.]
June 16.
London.
461. Petition of William Shirreff to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Petitioner served as Lt. Governor's Clerk at Annapolis Royal ever since the expedition to Canada (in which he went a volunteer) and received no pay. Prays for employment to relieve his miserable circumstances, etc. Endorsed, Recd. Read 17th June, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 122.]
June 17.
St. James's.
462. Order of King in Council. Approving Governor Hunter's Instructions, and the appointment of David Lyol to the Council of New York, etc. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd, Read 23rd June, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 91; and 5, 1123. p. 309.]
June 17.
St. James's.
463. Order of King in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 5th July, Read 7th Dec., 1715. 1 p. Enclosed,
463. i. Petition of John Graves, Collector of Customs in the Bahama Islands, to the King. Describes miserable condition of the Bahamas, and prays to be appointed Governor. Set out, A.P.C. II. No. 1232. Copy. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1265. Nos. 12, 12 i.; and 5, 1292. pp. 481–485.]
June 17.
St. James's.
464. Order of King in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 29th June, Read 30th Aug., 1715. 1¼ pp. Enclosed,
464. i. Petition of Capt. Walton to the King in Council. Appointed Lt. Governor of the Virgin Islands in 1706 etc., petitioner has been serving his country for 9 years without receiving the least encouragemt. or reward. Prays H.M. to direct the Council of Trade to report with all convenient speed what is proper to be done with the said Islands, and for his compensation. (v. A.P.C. II. No. 1152). Copy. 1½ pp. [C.O. 152, 10. Nos. 64, 64 i.; and 153, 12. pp. 222–225.]
June 17.
St. James's.
465. Order of King in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 6th, Read 13th July, 1715. ¾ p. Enclosed.
465. i. Lt. Governor Caulfeild to the Lords of Council. Duplicate of No. 159.
465. ii.–xx. Duplicates of Nos. 159 i.–xiv., and Nos. 159 ix.–xi. [C.O. 217, 1. Nos. 127, 127 i.–xx.; and (without enclosures) 218, 1. pp. 248, 249.]
June 17.
St. James's.
466. Order of King in Council. Seals are to be prepared for the Plantations, for H.M. approbation, etc. (v. June 2.) Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd, Read 23rd June, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 7. No. 49; and 324, 10. p. 72.]
June 17.
St. James's.
467. Order of King in Council. Upon the report of the Lords of the Committee for the affairs of the Plantations upon the Representation of April 25 supra, it is referred back to the Council of Trade and Plantations to propose in what manner they conceive H.M. may assist Jamaica from hence, etc. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd, Read 23rd June, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 10. No. 75; and 138, 14. pp. 333, 334.]
June 17.
St. James's.
468. Order of King in Council. Approving Instructions for Governor Hart. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read 16th Jan., 1716/17. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 717. No. 71; and 5, 721. No. 15.]
June 17.
Whitehal.
469. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Request payment of enclosed account of office expenses and salaries due from Michaelmas, 1714, to Lady Day, 1715. [C.O. 389, 37. pp. 88–90.]
[June 17.]470. Governor Burges to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Col. Vaughan, who is a gentleman of New England, can tell your Lordships with how little application, and what great corruption Mr. Bridger executed his office; how seldom he visited ye woods, and how often he sold 'em. He will tell your Lordships that one Wentworth made oath before him that Mr. Bridger took money of him to let him cut pine trees, and he believes no team went into ye woods to cut pine-logs, without having first agreed with Mr. Bridger. He took £50 of Mr. Mico to let a ship, consign'd to him, load with masts etc. upon pretence that her contract with ye Navy Board was not a sufficient authority for want of a licence, which, it seems, she had forgot. Mr. Lechmere is now in town, who was then Mr. Mico's partner, etc. Mr. Bridger came to Cales on board a Spanish ship loaded in New Hampshire with masts, yards, standers, and other timber for ye King of Spaine's use, and, 'tis thought, he was too much interested in that vessel not to know what she carried. Refers to Mr. Meinzies and Thomas Coram for instances of Bridger's corruption, etc. Signed, E. Burges. Endorsed, Recd. Read 17th June, 1715. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 41; and 5, 914. pp. 41–43.]
June 17.
St. James's.
471. Order of King in Council. Approving Representation of May 6th, and confirming two Acts of New York, for laying an excise, and discharging several debts, etc. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd, Read 23rd June, 1715. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 1050. No. 92; and 5, 1123. pp. 310–312.]
[June 18.]472. Petition of William Shirreff to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Petitions for employment (cf. June 16) as Commissary of provisions for the Garrison at Annapolis Royal, the present Commissary being a Frenchman, though by an Act all foreigners are rendred incapable of serving in any publick post, etc. Endorsed, Recd. Read 18th June, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 1. No. 123.]
June 20.
Whitehall.
473. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Recommend William Shirreff (v. June 16, 18) for employment as preceding. [C.O. 218, 1. pp. 231, 232.]
[June 20.]474. Thomas Coram to the Lords Commissioners of H.M. Treasury. Report on timber in New England. The bill for preserving pines, etc., will not be enough without some further care. Bridger authorizes people to cut what they please, for his own advantage, etc. Refers to No. 475, etc. Signed, Thomas Coram. Jan. 9, 1710. Endorsed, Recd. Read 20th June, 1715. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 43.]
[June 20.]475. Deposition of Benjamin Wentworth, of Daver, New Hampshire, that he and Trustram Heard, James Heard and Ephraim Wentworth each gave 6s. to John Bridger for leave to cut logs in the Queen's woods (v. June 17). Signed, Benjamin Wentworth. Feb. 14th, 17 09/10. Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. Coram) Read 20th June, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 42.]
June 21.
Whitehall.
476. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Enclose following to be laid before H.M. Autograph signatures. 1 p. Enclosed,
476. i. Address of the General Assembly of New York to the King. H.M. loyal and faithful subjects express their hearty joy for H.M. happy succession, an event so eminently propitious to the safety and encrease of the Protestant Religion, and so favourable to the liberty of mankind, etc. They fully resolve to demonstrate by their actions how much they value the bounty of Almighty God in setling your Majesty in the British Empire, etc. Signed, W. Nicoll, Speaker, Samuel Mulforde, Henr. Beekman, J. V. Cortlandt, Cornelis van B(r)unt, Josiah Hunt, Baltus van Cleek, Karel Hansen, Jno. Reade, Cornelis Sebering, Leonard Lewis, John. Cuyler, Hend. Hansen, Saml. Bayard, Jacob Rutsen, Jonathan Odell, Abraham Lackman, Stephen De Lancey, Cornelis Haring, John Stillwell, Lewis Morris. May 18, 1715. Parchment. 1 large p.
476. ii. Address of the Governour and Council of New York to the King. Tender their firm allegiance and lasting duty to H.M., "beseeching the Almighty Providence which has in so signal a manner disappointed the devices of the bad and dissipated the fears of all good men which seem'd to attend the dismal apprehensions of the demise of our late Soveraign Lady of ever blessed memory to bless defend and protect your sacred person and Royal progeny from all attempts of avow'd or secret pretenders to your Crown, or their abettors, the pretenders to loyalty," etc. Signed, Ro. Hunter, A. D. Peyster, S. Staats, R. Walter, Rip van Dam, John Barberie, H. Byerley. New York, Oct. 11, 1714. Parchment. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1085. Nos. 18, 18 i., ii.; and 5, 1079. No. 86; and (without enclosures), 5, 1123. p. 302.]
June 22.
Whitehall.
477. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Hunter. We have now before us your letters of Aug. 27th, Oct. 18th, Nov. 8th and 25th, 1714, and March 28th, 1715. We have also seen those you have writ to our Secretary Sept. 10, 1713–April 9, 1715. The great hurry of business we have been in since H.M. has been pleased to intrust us in the Commission for Trade and Plantations, has prevented our corresponding with you as we would have done; but we doubt not that after a little time, we shall be able to do it regularly; In the mean time, we desire you would be very punctual upon the several articles of your Instructions in your correspondence with us, particularly in giving us the best accounts you are able, of the state of the Provinces under your Government, of the state of ye Palatines, and whether if the design of producing Naval Stores at New York, shou'd be again revived, the trees prepar'd by them wou'd be of any use after such an interval of time, as we perceive there has been since those trees were fitted for cutting. We desire also an account of the Five Nations of Indians and River Indians, how far they may have been seduced by the French, and what you can propose to regain and secure them in our intrest for the future, and whether you have yet been able to bring them to reason in relation to the Tuscaruro Indians. We likewise desire to be inform'd whether you have any prospect that the Assembly of New York will come in to settle an established Revenue for the support of the Government, that we may know how to proceed in our Representations to H.M. in order to the settling of such a Revenue by Act of Parliament here, in case the Assembly still refuse to do it. We further desire you, by the first opportunity, to send us a compleat list of the names of the present Council of that Province, and together with that, another list of the names and characters of such persons as you think proper to supply the vacancies that may happen, either in the Council (according to H.M. Instructions) or in any other office wherein they are to be confirm'd by H.M. approbation. We desire you to inform us what number of inhabitants there are within that whole Province, what Freemen and what servants, white and black. To what degree are those numbers increased or decreased since your entrance upon that Government or since the last estimate, that you understand to have been made of them? What do you conceive most proper to prevent the removal of the inhabitants out of that Province into any of the neighbouring Colonies ? What is the whole number of the militia of that Province ? What commodities are exported from that Province to England ? What Trade is there either by exportation or importation, with any other place, and from whence is that Province now furnished with supplies (particularly of any manufactures) that it was wont to be furnished withall from England ? How and in what particulars is ye trade of that Province increased or decay'd, of late years ? and what has been the reason of such increase or decay ? What are the present methods used to prevent illegal trade, and what further methods do you think adviseable for that purpose ? What number of ships or other vessels are there, belonging to that Province, and what number of seafaring men ? What number and what sorts of those vessels have been built there ? We find by letters from the Lord Cornbury and Mr. Heathcote, that the linnen and woollen manufactures are greatly increased at New York, in so much that near two thirds of what is used in that Province, is there made; which if not prevented will be of great prejudice to the Trade of this Kingdom. We desire you therefore to give us as particular an account as possible of this matter, both with regard to the quantity and goodness of the said manufactures, with your opinion what may be proper to prevent that growing evil, in order to our taking such measures here, as may be found convenient. In the mean time it is necessary that you give these undertakings all the legal discouragements you can. It has been impossible for us as yet to consider the Acts of the two Provinces which you have sent us, however, we have read and examined the two New York Acts for laying an excise upon strong liquors, and for paying the debts of the Government, and H.M. on our Representation was graciously pleased to confirm the same (June 18th); the orders for which will be sent you by Mr. Orby, by this conveyance. Upon this occasion, we cannot but observe to you, that we have not before us the Minutes of Council and Assembly when those Acts were pass'd, which wou'd have been a help to us in examining the same; and therefore we must desire that you will be very punctual in transmitting to us such Minutes for the future. The papers you mention to have sent to the Earl of Stair, are not yet come to our hands; his Lordship being employ'd by his Majesty at the Court of France; and as we do not foresee when he may return, we think it may be of service that you send us duplicates thereof by the first conveyance. To all which enquiries, and to all such other matters as are required by your Instructions to be communicated to this Board; we also further desire you to add whatever else you may in your own prudence, think conducive to H.M. service, to the interest of England, to the advantage of that particular Province, and to our assistance in the discharge of the trust reposed in us. We have only to add that we shall be very ready upon all occasions to do all that in us lyes, that may conduce to H.M. service, the good of the Province and your particular int'rest in the execution of your Commission. [C.O. 5, 1123. pp. 302–308; and 5, 1079. No. 87.]
June 23.478. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Nottingham, Lord President of the Council. Having receiv'd this day ye copys of four Orders of Council wch. we sent for to the Council Office, upon some of our Representations to his Majesty and there having been several other Representations formerly made by the Board of Trade upon wch. we have not yet seen the copys of any orders, we take this occasion to acquaint your Lordship, we conceive it to be for H.M. service that we have notice of his pleasure as soon as may be after the declaration thereof upon our Representations, and we pray your Lordship will please to direct that for the future [that] copys of all orders wh. concern us be transmitted to our office as soon as conveniently may be. [C.O. 389, 37. p. 91.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
479. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Bishop of London. Represent the necessity of missionaries to the plantations being men of unspotted characters and lives unblamable. We have frequent accounts of some of them very different, etc. Refer to Governor Hunter's report of one in New Jersey etc. Printed, N. J. Archives, 1st Ser. IV. 212. [C.O. 5, 995. pp. 301, 302.]
June 24.480. Memorial in behalf of Lt. Governor Bennett to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Asks for Instructions on points set out June 30, q.v. Prays the Board to write to the Council of Bermuda, to determine those causes in the Chancery Court, wherein the Governor is a party or interested and cannot therefore sit Judge, according to the Attorney General's opinion enclosed. Also that the said Council should take care to do Col. Bennet justice in procuring him payment of all reasonable demands he has upon the country out of the publick Treasury on account of monies by him disbursed on their account, etc. Endorsed, Recd. Read 24th June, 1715. 1 p. Enclosed,
480. i. Opinion of the Attorney General upon two queries relating to the Governor's sitting as Judge in Chancery in his own cause. (1) The cause may be heard by the Council and determined by them, the Chancellor the Governor being concerned, and therefore cannot sit to determine those causes. (2) The Courts of Common Law may proceed in causes wherein the Governor is party as well as in other causes, and of this there can be no doubt. May 20, 1715. Signed, Edwd. Northey. 1½ pp. [C.O. 37, 9. Nos. 34, 35.]
June 24.
Whitehall.
481. Bryan Wheelock to Mr. Bridger. In the absence of Mr. Popple, encloses following for his particular answers in writing, as soon as may be. Enclosed,
481. i. Charges against Mr. Bridger. (1) That he has not been diligent in surveying the woods and marking trees for the Navy. (2) That he sold licenses for a piece of eight to persons to cutt logs, and only those who paid were allowed to cut them, etc. (3) That he took £50 from Mr. Mico for permitting a ship under contract but without a license, to load masts, etc. (4) That he refus'd to attend the service at the Palatine settlements at New York, when requir'd, notwithstanding H.M. special letters, and that he never was refus'd money when he call'd for it. (5) That instead of preserving, he has wasted the woods, by giving deputations to such as have saw-mills, for certain yearly sums of money. [C.O. 5, 914. pp. 49, 50.]
June 24.482. Petty expences of the Board of Trade, postage, stationery, etc. March 25—June 24. 4 pp. [C.O. 388, 77. Nos. 1–3.]
June 24.
Treary. Chambers.
483. Mr. Taylour to Mr. Popple. Encloses following. In case the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations shall be of the same opinion with the Commissioners of H.M. Customs, my Lords Commissioners of the Treasury desire they will make a representation to H.M. in order to have the Act of Virginia referred to repealed. Signed, Jo. Taylour. Endorsed, Recd. 25th June, Read 1st July, 1715. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
483. i. Commissioners of H.M. Customs to Lords Commrs. of the Treasury. Customhouse, London, June 10th, 1715. Mr. Keith, Surveyor General of the Southern Continent of America, having received several complaints against George Luke Collector of the lower district of James River in Virginia, suspended him, and granted a deputation to Francis Kennedy to officiate there, whereupon an information has been exhibited against Kennedy in one of the Courts in Virginia for the penalty of £500 for exercising an office in the Customs contrary to an Act of Assembly Oct. 23, 1705, whereby it is enacted that no person whatsoever shall bear any office etc. in Virginia, until he hath personally resided the full term of 3 years under the penalty of £500 etc. The Commissioners advised with H.M. Attorney Genll. thereupon, who is of opinion that the Act of the 7th and 8th of King William "having impowered the Lords of the Treasury and ye Commrs. of the Customs to appoint officers of the Customs in the Plantations, and there being no restriction therein, but that they be H.M. natural borne subjects, the laws in the Plantations restraining that power given by an English Act of Parliament is void by the said Act of the 7th and 8th K. William, as being repugnant thereto. And that the Law of Virginia not having been approved by the Crowne may be repeal'd by H.M." Mr. Attorney Genll. is further of opinion "that the forfeiture by the Act in Virginia belonging to the Crowne, the Lords of the Treary. by H.M. command may direct the Attorney Genll. of Virginia to discharge the prosecution, and if judgement be given to acknowledge satisfaction thereon, or that it may be reversed by writ of error." The Commrs. therefore propose that the said Act (which seems very injurious to H.M. natural born subjects) may be repealed, and the prosecution against Francis Kennedy discharged by the Attorney General of Virginia, or as supra. Signed, J. Pulteney, Walter Yonge, Charles Peers, Tho. Frankland. Endorsed, 14th June, 1715. Agreed. 1¾ pp.
483. ii. Opinion of the Attorney General on above case, partly quoted in preceding. Add: The law of Virginia not having been approved by the Crown, I conceive H.M. will be advised to repeal it. Exception is made in the Virginia Act of such persons as have Commissions from H.M. The Attorney General is of opinion that Mr. Kennedy having been appointed in the manner aforesaid is not within the exception, not having been constituted by the King, etc. June 3, 1715. 5½ pp.
483. iii. Copy of Mr. Keith's deputation to Francis Kennedy referred to supra. Signed, W. Keith, Survr. Genll., Hampton in Virginia, Jan. 7, 17 14/15. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1317. Nos. 1, 1 i.–iii.; and 5, 1364. pp. 208–223.]
June 27.
St. James's.
484. Copy of H.M. Warrant appointing John Roos to make new Seals for the Plantations. Countersigned, James Stanhope. Endorsed, Recd. Read 6th July, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 7. No. 51; and 324, 10. pp. 73, 74.]
June 27.
Boston, New England.
485. Governor Dudley to the Council of Trade and Plantations. My last addresses to your Lordships covered the Act of Assembly of New Hampshire your Lordships demanded. Refers to enclosures. And now I humbly take leave of your Lordships, and shall ever be sensible of the favours I have had from the Honourable the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations during my service in these Provinces. Signed, J. Dudley. Endorsed, Recd. 15th Aug., 1715, Read 26th June, 1718. 1 p. Enclosed,
486. i. Account of stores of war expended at Castle William, Boston, 24th June, 1714–1715. 1 p.
485. ii. Account of stores of war at Castle William, 24th June, 1715. 1 p.
485. iii. Account of powder expended at Marblehead, 24th June, 1714–1715. ½ p.
485. iv. Account of stores of war at Marblehead, 24th June, 1715. ¾ p.
485. v. Account of stores of war, expended and remaining at Fort Anne, 24th June, 1714–1715. 1 p.
485. vi. Account of stores of war expended and remaining in New Hampshire, 24th June, 1714–1715. Nos. i.–vi. endorsed as covering letter. 2 pp.
485. vii. Governor Dudley to the Board of Ordnance. 27th June, 1715. Encloses preceding accounts. Signed, J. Dudley. Same endorsement. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. Nos. 163, 163 i.–vii.; and (without enclosures) 5, 915. pp. 146, 147.]
[June 27.]486. Copy of Articles of Capitulation imposed upon Nevis by M. D'Iberville. (v. C.S.P. 1706. Nos. 357 iii., v., ix.) Endorsed, Recd. (from Genl. Hamilton) 27th June, Read 28th July, 1715. French. 8½ pp. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 62.]
June 28.
London.
487. Merchants trading to New England to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Being inform'd of your Lordpps.' intention to recommend to the House of Commons a bill for taking off the duties on timber imported from H.M. Plantacons; we address our thanks to your Lordps. for taking care of an article so important to the trade of Great Brittain. Pray that it may be passed this Session, etc. Signed, Will. Turner and 36 others. Endorsed, Recd. 29th June, Read 1st July, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 47; and 5, 914. pp. 54, 55.]
June 30.488. Mr. Byfield and others to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Ask for a Royal Charter of Incorporation for their proposed Bank of Credit for New England (v. June 15), on the following conditions. (1) A Joint Stock to be raised of between not less than £100,000 or more than £300,000 in land or other real securities as an originall security for such fund of creditt. (2) No person to subscribe less than £250 or more than £4,000. (3) That they may lend their money or credit at not exceeding 2/3rds of the value of such lands or other real securities as shall from time to time be assigned or given them in pledge. (4) That they may not lend their money or credit at a rate exceeding 5 p.c., etc. (5) One third part of the profits to be appropriated to the publick service for raising naval stores in New England. (6) Upon three years notice from H.M. under the Great Seal of Great Britain after March 25, 1740, the Corporation be obliged to discharge their debts and be dissolved. Signed, N. Byfield, Tho. Sandford, And. Faneuil, Wm. Willard. Endorsed, Recd. Read 30th June, 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 46; and 5, 914. pp. 52–54.]
June 30.489. James Campbell to Mr. Popple. There is an accot. from Placentia, May 11th last, by the way of New England, that the Garrison was then in great want of all necessarys. There was but one ship arrived to fish, and that from the Isle of May with salt, etc. Signed, Ja. Campbell. Endorsed, Recd. Read 30th June, 1715. Addressed. ½ p. [C.O. 194, 5. No. 95; and 195, 6. p. 117.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
490. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Enclose copy of preceding. [C.O. 195, 6. p. 118.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
491. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Refer to representations of 17th March, 18th May, and 2nd June. Quote from Lt. Governor Caulfeild's letter, and enclosure 1, Jan. 3. Continue:—So that the garrison [of Annapolis Royal] seems to be in danger of deserting or starving. To prevent this Major Caulfeild hoped for some supply from New England. But we have been inform'd by persons here, that he had got but very little, the people in New England not being willing to give them any more credit, by reason that a great part of the bills drawn from New England by those who had formerly supply'd that garrison, remain yet unpaid. There seems therefore an absolute necessity that some speedy measures be taken to support the garrison, or else we apprehend that province, which by the fishery on the coast and naval stores to be produc'd there, may be of very great advantage to this Kingdom, will be abandon'd, and fall into the hands of the French or their Indians, and thereby all our other Northern Plantations again exposed to their excursions. And we are the rather of this opinion, for that we find by several papers transmitted us by Major Caulfeild, that the French will not swear allegiance to H.M. but intend to remove as soon as they have conveniencies, and hear how matters go in Europe. However they have sign'd a paper signifying that they will live peaceabley there till such removal. As to the Indians, and particularly those of Penobscot or Pentagoua or Eastern Indians (v. Jan. 3), they are intirely in the French interest, having always Missionary Jesuits amongst them, and have done us the most mischief, during the late wars; having now in very insolent terms absolutely refus'd to swear allegiance to H.M., to let H.M. be proclaim'd in their territories, or to trade with Annapolis Royal. In relation to the French removing from Nova Scotia, we gave our opinion very fully 17th March. As to the Indians, it will be difficult to gain them to our interest while the French Missionaries are allow'd to be amongst them, and how that can be prevented we do not see, until Nova Scotia be peopled and some settlements made on the coast; and therefore we humbly offer that H.M. pleasure be declared upon our former representation and letters, with all convenient speed. [C.O. 218, 1. pp. 239–242.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
492. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Enclose following. And there being three vacancys in your Majesty's Council of the Bermuda Islands, we have inserted the names of Henry Tucker, William Tucker and Robert Burton, Esqrs., who have been recommended to us as fit persons to supply the said vacancys, etc. Annexed,
492. i. Draught of Instructions for Lt. Governor Bennett. In the usual form. [C.O. 38, 7. pp. 224–320.]
June 30.
Whitehall.
493. Mr. Popple to Sir Edward Northey, Attorney General. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire your opinion upon the following queries, vizt., (1) Whether H.M. writ of ne exeat insulam, may in any, and in what cases, be granted by any H.M. Governors, against there predecessors, to imprison them or any of them, to prevent, stop or hinder them from coming over to England, to give an account to H.M., of his or their administration, and the trust repos'd in them there, since by a late Act of Parliament every Governor of the Plantations is answerable in England, for every matter and thing he has transacted or done in his Government there ? (2) By H.M. Instructions, when an appeal is made from the Governor and Council of any of H.M. Plantations to H.M. in Council here, good security is to be given by the appellant, that he effectually prosecute the appeal, and answer the condemnation, etc., and it is further directed that execution be not suspended by reason of such appeal. And whereas it may so happen that the respondent being got into possession by virtue of the judgement of the Governor and Council, may prove insolvent, may run away, or imbezle what shall have been seiz'd in execution, and the appellant be left without remedy, in case H.M. shou'd reverse the sentence given by the Governor and Council, as aforesaid; Quære, whether the respondent ought not to be obliged to give good and sufficient security to be answerable for the estate or effects in dispute, in case H.M. shall reverse the sentence of ye Governor and Council ? [C.O. 38, 7. pp. 321, 322.]
June 30.
St. James's.
494. Order of King in Council. Approving draught of Lt. Governor Bennett's Instructions and appointing Councillors as proposed. (No. 492). Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 7th, Read 13th July, 1715. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 37, 9. No. 36; and 38, 7. pp. 323, 324.]