America and West Indies
September 1715

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1928

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278-291

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'America and West Indies: September 1715', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 28: 1714-1715 (1928), pp. 278-291. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73968 Date accessed: 21 November 2014.


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Contents

September 1715

Sept. 1.596. Mr. Bridger to Mr. Popple. It would be of very great service to H.M. had I a power to seize all the masts I shall find cut on my arrival at New England, being very well assured that there are a great many cut last winter without the Royal Lycence, and tis the general practise of those people to cut masts and let them lye perishing in expectation of saleing them. Such an order well executed would deter them for the future and save many mast trees in a year, etc. Signed, J. Bridger. Endorsed, Recd. Read 1st Sept., 1715. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 63.]
Sept. 1.
Whitehall.
597. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Enclose drafts of Commission and Instructions for Mr. Bridger (v. Aug. 11th) including a clause relating to Nova Scotia, since the Act for the preservation of pine trees etc. do's not mention Nova Scotia (that country not being then in the Crown), etc. We think it necessary H.M. pleasure be signify'd to the several Governors of the Provinces mention'd in the Instructions, that they give him all the countenance and protection possible in the execution of his Commission, and that they do assist him as usual with guards in the woods as occasion shall require, to protect him while he is there doing his duty, from any attempts of the Indians or other enemy. Annexed,
598. Draught of Commission and Instructions for John Bridger to be Surveyor of the Woods on the Continent of America. [C.O. 5, 914. pp. 114–127; and (autograph signatures. 1 p. without enclosure), 5, 4. No. 11.]
Sept. 1.
Whitehall.
599. Mr. Pringle to Mr. Popple. I am ordered by Mr. Secretary Stanhope to send you the enclosed letters for the information of the Council of Trade and Plantations, etc. Signed, Ro. Pringle. Endorsed, Recd. 1st, Read 6th Sept., 1715. 1 p. Enclosed,
599. i. Caleb Heathcote to Lord Townshend. Mannor of Scarsdale, July 16, 1715. On the danger from the Indians and the French, and his design for Naval Stores, etc. Set out, N.Y. Col. Doc. V. 432. Signed, Caleb Heathcote. 4 pp.
599. ii. Same to Same. July 12, 1715. On the danger from the French and Indians, etc. Set out, N.Y. Col. Doc. V. 431. Signed, Caleb Heathcote. 3 pp.
599. iii. Caleb Heathcote to Governor Hunter. Scarsdale, 8th July, 1715. The French with a considerable force have entered the Onondagoes country, were they intend to erect a Fort, etc. Proposes a Congress of Governors, etc. Set out, N.Y. Col. Doc. V. 430. Signed, Caleb Heathcote. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1051. Nos. 4, 4 i.–iii.; and (without enclosures) 5, 1123. p. 336.]
Sept. 2.
Whitehall.
600. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Reply to July 25th, q.v. Your Majesty's Revenue in Virginia consists of two branches, the one is 2s. per hhd. upon all tobacco exported, tonnage on shipping and head mony, and the other is the quit-rents. The first of these is the only Revenue of that Colony which is appropriated for the support of the Government; But by the decay of the Tobacco Trade occasion'd as we are inform'd, by the great duties upon tobacco here, and the great quantities of it made in sevl. parts of Europe, that revenue has proved insufficient to defray the ordinary charge of the Government, which amounts to about £3,000 sterl. per annum, and the inhabitants (for the reason aforemention'd) are not in a condition to raise new taxes to make good that deficiency: for the labour both of them and their servants being in tobacco, that scarcely yeilds them necessaries for their whole year's work; Besides which, they have been at the expence of erecting a building, which they call the Capital, and contains a handsome house for your Majesty's Governor with public offices for the rest of the civil Government, and cost above £10,000. They have also formerly upon occasion of the misfortunes befall'n Carolina from the Indians, been at very great expence in assisting and protecting them, and upon this late occasion, they have agreed to raise 1,000 men at 30s. per month each, to be sent for the relief of that Province; These expences incapacitate them as aforemention'd from making good the deficiencies of the 2s. per hhd., wch. is considerably in debt, and the officers' salaries by consequence unpaid. When this Revenue has formerly prov'd deficient, you Majesty's Royal Predecessors have been graciously pleas'd to supply those deficiencies out of the Revenue of Quit-rents, as will more fully appear by the annex'd copy of a report from Willm. Blathwaite, Auditor of the Plantations; This Revenue of Quit-rents, was always left in the hands of the Receiver of that Colony, to be there ready for all emergencies, till a few years ago, it was call'd for over as fast as it cou'd be rais'd and paid into the Exchequer here. This being the case with relation to the Revenue of that Colony, the Government there have no public mony to make use of in case of an invasion of the Indians or other enemy. They might indeed draw out their Militia for the defence of their country, but then if they shou'd stay out any time, it wou'd occasion the loss of one year's crop of tobacco, which wou'd be a great prejudice to the Trade and Navigation of this Kingdom, a considerable diminution in your Majesty's Revenue of the Customs here, and tend to the almost irreparable ruin of the planters there. Upon consideration of the whole matter, we are humbly of opinion that your Majesty be graciously pleas'd to allow the quit-rents to remain there in bank as formerly; that a power be lodg'd in your Majt.'s Gover. and Council, to make use of them or any part of them upon any great or sudden emergency, subject always to be accounted for to your Majty. in the exactest manner, and that so much of them may be transferr'd to the accot. of 2s. per hhd., as will make good the deficiency of that Revenue: And we are the rather of this opinion, for that we are inform'd the quit-rents of other your Majesty's Plantations in America, are not brought into the Exchequer here, but are apply'd to the ordinary and extraordinary expences of those respective Governments. In case your Majesty be graciously pleas'd to approve hereof, we further humbly offer that your Majesty's pleasure be signify'd to your Governor, that the charge of the Civil Government be not increas'd by the augmentation of the salaries of any of the offices there, without your Majesty's particular directions. [C.O. 5, 1364. pp. 236–244; and 5, 1335. No. 193.]
Sept. 2.
London.
601. Col. Vetch to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The true regard I have for the good of H.M. service and the intrest of my country, together with the particular concern I have in the Garrisson of Annapolis Royall and Country of Nova Scotia, obliges me to lay before your Lordps. once more the deplorable state of that Garrisson and Country, of which I have the following accounts by letters from New England of the 18th July. The soldiers desert in great numbers 18 having come away to New England at one time in 3 canoes, and say that most of all the Garrisson will do the same, having had no pay for 3 years, never any bedding, and the worst cloathing ever any men had, which does not last 3 months, and those charged at excessive rates; they have stay'd hitherto in hopes of their pay, and that they should be all relieved this summer which Coll. Nicholson publickly promissed them when there. Mr. Nicholson's discourageing, or rather discharging all trade there to the inhabitants, and causing keep the gates of the Fort shutt against them night and day, that they may have no manner of commerce with the Garrison, and having by Proclamation discharged their harbouring or resetting any of the natives, with whom they used to have a considerable trade for peltry, hath so discouraged them from staying that they had built abundance of small vessells to carry themselves and effects to Cape Britton, which was what the French officers so much solicited and threatned to do. (How Mr. Nicholson will answer such orders together with his dismantling the Garrison as he did at his coming away, and deserting his command, by coming home without leave, at such an extraordinary juncture, whenever he heard King George was proclaimed, is what I leave to your Lordps. to judge of.) The Indians being likewise by ye aforesd. orders debar'd from all commerce and supplys whatsoever (save from Cape Britton) are so incensed against the English, that they seise and plunder what fishing vessells they can come at upon the coast of Cape Sables, and committ the same hostilitys as in open warr, which no doubt they are instigated to do by the French, in order to ruin that so noble and valuable fishery upon that coast, which is of so great consequence to the Crown, and only able to vie with that of the French with Cape Britton, a present we shall too late repent of making them, and which they are now improving to that degree, that unless some speedy and effectuall methods are taken for protecting and encouraging the English fishery upon that coast the French will soon be masters of the whole, nor do I know any more effectuall or probable way of doing it, then by putting in execution as early as possible next spring, at least some part of the proposalls I had the honour to lay before your Lordps. last year, which if your Lordps. should think fit to lay before H.M. and Parliament, I doubt not but they would be put in execution etc. Signed, Sam. Vetch. Endorsed, Recd. Read 2nd Sept., 1715. 1½ pp. [C.O. 217, 2. No. 5; and 218, 2. pp. 263–265.]
Sept. 2.
London.
602. Francis Spelman, Fort Major, and Andrew Simpson, Ensign, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Representation upon the hardships of the Garrison at Annapolis Royal, as ordered by Major Thos. Caulfeild, Lt. Govr. The Garrison consisted of 230 men on 9th June. Repeat complaints of bad cloathing and no pay, etc., ut supra, passim. As for the fortifications, the ramparts are in a tollerable good order, but the outworks Coll. Nicholson demolished before he left, having dismounted the lower battery, put the cannon into the fossee, burned the platforms, and destroyed all the stockades round the Garrison. The French inhabitants were encouraged to go to Cape Britton by the French Officers, and discouraged by Coll. Nicholson from staying in that country, who gave orders that the gates should be kept shutt and no French man to be let into the Fort but one at a time and only in case they wanted to speak with an officer, etc. Lt. Governor Caulfield has done all that was possible to encourage them to stay till he has farther orders from Brittain. The provissions furnished by Coll. Nicholson being expended in June last, and there being no fund for any further supply the Garrison would infaliably have been dissolved had not the sd. Lt. Govr. with much difficulty prevailed with one Mr. Clerk at Boston to send them a further supply of provissions for which Lt. Govr. Caulfield engaged his own credit. The circumstances of the Garrisson are such that unless some speedy care is taken that they may have their pay, etc. in all probability it will be dissolved by the desertion of the soldiers. Signed, Fra. Spelman, Andrew Simpson. Endorsed, Recd. Read 2nd Sept., 1715. 2 pp. [C.O. 217, 2. No. 6; and 218, 1. pp. 266–270.]
Sept. 2.
Whitehall.
603. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Enclose preceding Memorials relating to the Garrison at Annapolis Royal, etc. [C.O. 218, 1. pp. 265, 266.]
Sept. 3.
Middle Temple.
604. Henry Newman to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Being inform'd that a new list of H.M. Council for New Hampshire is preparing, I humbly beg, as one that Col. Dudley has entrusted with soliciting the affairs of that Province, to be permitted to see that list before it receives your Lordships' approbation, etc. Signed, Henry Newman. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 6th Sept., 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 65.]
Sept. 5/16.
Rio Essequebe, Fort Kykoveral.
605. Commandant Vanderheyden Rézen to the Directors of the Dutch West India Company. Signed, Pr. Vanderheyden Rézen. Endorsed, Read Nov., 1715. Dutch. Enclosed.
605. i.–viii. Inventories, lists of requirements etc. Dutch. [C.O. 116, 21. Nos. 122–131.]
Sept. 5.606. Capt. Walton to Paul Docminique, a Lord Commissioner of Trade and Plantations. When I first proposed, a regular settlemt. to be made in ye Virgin Islands, my intention was not for dilating our Collonies, well knowing that 1,000 men together are much better than 2,000 in separate places; But that a regular settlemt. might be made on Spanish Towne, which with a little art and a few men, (although that is a very insignificant Island) may be made capable of defending itselfe from any power, and likewise be a means for preventing other nations from setling them, and all ye other ill conveniencies, that attend ye trade of those parts, by it's being as it is. The Govermt. of ye Leeward Islands by reason of it's distance, is not able to hinder any people whatsoever that should be inclineable so to doe, as appears very plain from ye French and Dutch's having formerly setled there, when they was as much under that Govermt. as they are now; Therefore if it shou'd not be thought adviseable for ye Govermt. to be at any charge in making a settlemt. as proposed, I humbly beg your favour that I may be so recommended to ye King, as to have a pattent for Spanish Towne in compensation, for 9 years loss of time, trouble and expences with power to make such fortifications, as I shall judge necessary for ye better security thereof, and likewise if it be thought proper, that I may have H.M. Commission for the care of them, with a sufficient sallary, etc. Signed, J. Walton. Endorsed, Recd. Read 8th Sept., 1715. 2 pp. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 67.]
Sept. 6.607. Governor Burges to Mr. Popple. Thanks the Board for consulting him as to proper persons to fill up the vacancies in the Council of New Hampshire, and proposes George Vaughan, Lt. Govr., John Hincks, Richard Gearish, George Jeffray, Theodore Atkinson. Signed, E. Burges. Endorsed, Recd. Read 6th Sept., 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 64; and 5, 914. pp. 127, 128.]
Sept. 7.
Whitehall.
608. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Hunter. Having lately received a memorial from Col. Lodwick relating to the proceedings of the French amongst our five Nations of Indians at New York, to some misunderstanding between you and Col. Peter Schuyler, and to your having appointed Mr. Lewis Morris Chief Justice of New York (v. Aug. 23); we send you a copy, for your particular answer and observations, upon which occasion you may be assur'd that nothing of this kind shall have weight with us before we have had an opportunity of hearing from you. We must take notice that we find by our books that His late Majesty King William, upon a proposal from the Earl of Bellomont, had ordered £500 for the building a Fort in the Onondage country, which we suppose to be near the place mentioned in the memorial, and £2,000 for the Forts of Albany and Schenectady; and also that mony was raised at New York for carrying on that work; and as we do not find that any Fort has been built by us in the said Onondage country, we desire you will make enquiry and inform us whether the forementioned £2,500 or any part thereof was remitted to New York, and in that case, what became of it, that is, how it was expended or laid out, and whether it was ever accounted for. Since the writing of what is above, we have received yours of July 25th, with the Acts and papers referred to; and tho' we have not had time to consider of all the said Acts and the other matters concerning which you write, we did however upon the receipt of your said letter, represent to H.M. your recommendation of Mr. Clarke to supply the present vacancy in the Council there, and we doubt not but H.M. will be graciously pleased to approve the same. We have likewise considered the Act you have now sent us for granting a supply for the support of the Government and for striking bills of credit, etc., and should have laid the same before H.M. for his royal approbation, but it seems to us to be repugnant to the Act of Parliament for settling the rates of foreign coine in the Plantations; for by the New York Act an ounce of plate is valued at 8s., whereas by the Act of Parliament here a piece of eight of Sevil, Pillar, or Mexico of 17½ penyweight is not to pass for more than 6s., and at that rate an ounce of plate will not be above 6s. 10 10/35d. Now the consequence of this is, that if the New York Act be approved of here, the Proprieties and all other Governmts will immediatly do the same thing, and the intent of the Act of Parliament be thereby wholly evaded. We shall not therefore lay this Act before H.M. till we hear further from you upon this difficulty. As to the Act for Naturalization, we have it now before us, and you may be assured we shall give all due regard to the recommendation you have given of it. We observe with pleasure your attention in relation to the Indian war, and hope after your return from Albany to have an account of the good effects of your presence there. The ship which brings you this being just upon departure, we would not lose this opportunity, etc. [C.O. 5, 1123. pp. 336–340; and 5, 1079. No. 91.]
Sept. 8.
Whitehall.
609. Mr. Popple to Capt. Walton. The Council of Trade and Plantations request your answer in writing to-morrow morning to the following questions. (i.) In case H.M. should give you a grant of Spanish Town for a term of years, and make you Lieut. Governor of the Virgin Islands, under the Government and direction of the Capt. General or Commander in Chief of the Leeward Islands, are you able and willing to ingage to settle Spanish Town with 50 families in 7 years from the date of your patent ? (ii.) Will you engage to fortify the said Island, as you propose, and to serve as Lieut. Governor, without any charge to the Crown ? (iii.) And will you oblige yourself not to disturb those who are already in the possession of any lands, and have cultivated or improv'd the same, they paying a moderate or reasonable quit-rent ? [C.O. 153, 12. pp. 332, 333.]
Sept. 8.
Whitehall.
610. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Enclose following, "which being in the usual form, we desire you'll please to lay the same before H.M. And there being several vacancys in ye Council of H.M. Province of New Hampshire, vizt., two by the deaths of Peter Coffin and John Gerrish, two by the great age and infirmitys of Robert Elliot and John Ware who are not able to attend, and three others, vizt. Wm. Vaughan, John Plaisted and Richd. Waldron, whom we propose to leave out of the said Council, for that they are very much concern'd in the destruction of the woods by saw mills (v. Aug. 3rd), we have inserted the names of Shadrach Walton, Thomas Phipps, Theodore Atkinson, Richard Gerrish, George Jeffery, Thomas Westbrook, and Richard Wybird Esqrs. in the draught of Instructions for New Hampshire, as persons the best qualifyed we can hear of, to serve H.M. in that station," etc. Annexed,
610. i. Draughts of Instructions for Elizeus Burges to be Governor of the Massachusets Bay and New Hampshire. In the usual form. [C.O. 5, 914. pp. 185–293.]
Sept. 9.
St. James's.
611. Order of King in Council. Appointing George Clarke to the Council of New York. Signed, Christo. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. 14th, Read 17th Nov., 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1051. No. 15; and 5, 1123. pp. 376, 377.]
Sept. 9.
St. James's.
612. Order of King in Council. Referring representation of the Council of Trade and Plantations upon the Virginia quit-rents (v. Sept. 2nd) to the Lords Commrs. of the Treasury. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read 16th Jan., 17 16/17. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1317. No. 53; and 5, 1364. pp. 442, 443.]
[Sept. 9.]613. Capt. Walton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to 8th Sept. The money memorialist has expended for the service of his country (without mentioning above 9 years loss of time and a company of Foot) is of much more value then Spanish Town, and therefore if H.M. should give him the said Island, he wou'd desire to have it in the same manner, as ye Proprietors of Pensilvania etc., have theirs. No Commission under ye Govermt. of ye Leeward Islands, can be serviceable to ye Crown; by reason that to my knowledge, that Govermt. will always doe whatever lyes in their power to suppress and keep under ye Virgins and be undr. that Govermt. I am both able and willing to engage that if a separate Commission with a power be given (or that Island in property) that there shall be above 50 families setled thereon at ye time limited or sooner, and then will fortifie it as I see occasion, but no Commission from the Crown without a sallary to support it, and for the inhabitants that are there setled, they shall have as much as they can cultivate at ye usual rates land is there set for, there is a great many single plantations in America that brings in three times as much as Spanish Town. Endorsed, Recd. Read 9th Sept., 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 68; and 153, 12. pp. 333–335.]
Sept. 9.
Whitehall.
614. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Representation upon Capt. Walton's petition, 17th June, etc. Petitioner alledges that the late Commissrs. for Trade made a report without hearing of him, etc. We find by our books, not only petitioner but several other persons were heard and examin'd in relation to the nature and situation of the Virgin Islands, and the expediency of seperating them from the Government of the Leeward Islands, under which they have always been since the said Leeward Islands were separated from Barbadoes. And that the then Commissrs. reported their opinion, that this matter should be by the Governor of the Leeward Islands laid before the respective Councils there, for their consideration, whether it were advisable to make a settlement there or no, upon which we do not find that anything was done. Recommend that the Captain of a ship of war going to Jamaica be directed to call at the Virgin Islands and report etc. v. A.P.C. II. No. 1152. [C.O. 153, 12. pp. 335–337.]
Sept. 9.
St. James's.
615. Order of King in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 13th, Read 15th Sept., 1715. 1 p. Enclosed,
615. i. Petition of John Deane, of London, mercht., to the King in Council. His ship, the Three Sisters bound from Africa to Spain, was forced into Antego with a cargo of negroes etc., and lost. The cargo was seized by the Governor, Mr. Chester and Mr. Adams, petitioner's correspondents there, were obliged to enter into a bond of £1,000 to produce a register within 12 months as required by the Statute of the 7th and 8th William III., for ships coming into the Plantations. This cannot be done, for the ship was foreign built, taken from the enemy by the Dutch, and not afterwards made free in England. There was no intention of going into the Plantations to unload. Prays that proceedings may be stopped in the Court of Admiralty at Antego, and that the bond aforesaid may be cancelled. Copy. 3½ pp.
615. ii. Opinion of Sir E. Northey, Attorney General, that the Three Sisters, unless rebuilt with a new keel and long employed in England remained a foreign vessel, but if forced into the Plantations without any intention of unloading, the goods will not be thereby forfeited etc. 28th July, 1715. 1 p. Signed, Edw. Northey.
615. iii. Similar opinion of Edward Ward. 1 p.
615. iv. Deposition of John Maketh, mariner, that they were compelled to run the Three Sisters ashore for their preservation. She was not designed for Antigua etc. 17th Aug., 1715. Signed, John Maketh. 1 p.
615. v. Deposition of David James, mariner. Corroborates preceding. 11th Aug., 1715. Signed, David James. 1 p.
615. vi. Warrant for the inspection of the damage sustained by the Three Sisters, Antigua, 11th Jan., 17 14/15. Signed, H.Pember, Judge of the High Court of Admiralty. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 10. Nos. 70, 70 i.–vi.; and (without enclosures ii.–vi.), 153, 12. pp. 341–347.]
Sept. 9.
St. James's.
616. Order of King in Council. Approving draught of Instructions for Genl. Hamilton, and appointing Councillors as proposed therein, (31st Aug.). Signed, Christor. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. 14th, Read 17th Nov., 1715. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 152, 10. No. 75; and 153, 12. pp. 364, 365.]
Sept. 12.
St. James's.
617. H.M. Warrant revoking patent of Richard Woollaston and appointing John Cornelius Naval Officer in Barbadoes, with clause obliging him to residence. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. pp. 305, 306.]
Sept. 13.
Whitehal.
618. Mr. Popple to Nicholas Lechmere. Presses for report on Act of Bermuda (v. 16th May). [C.O. 38, 7. pp. 324, 325.]
Sept. 13.
Whitehall.
619. Mr. Popple to Sir Edward Northey. Refers to letters of 27th April and 5th July, 1711, asking for his opinion on the petition of Wait Winthrop, etc. Continues:—The Council of Trade and Plantations thinking it a disservice to H.M. interest, to let the Plantation business lye so long undetermin'd desire your opinion thereupon as soon as possible. As likewise upon an Act of Barbado's to dock the intail of Mr. Blackman's estate, transmitted to you, Feb. 16th last. [C.O. 5, 914. pp. 300, 301.]
Sept. 13.
Whitehall.
620. Mr. Popple to General Hamilton. The Council of Trade and Plantations judging it for H.M. service to be informed of the state of the Virgin Islands before any final determination be made concerning them, upon Capt. Walton's petition (v. Sept. 9 etc.) desire that as soon as conveniently may be after your arrival at the Leeward Islands, you inform yourself as particularly as possible, of the state and condition of the said Virgin Islands, with respect to the harbour, soil, productions and conveniencies thereof for trade, as likewise to the number and condition of H.M. subjects inhabiting there, and that you transmit their Lordships an account thereof with your opinion upon the whole, and particularly whether it be advisable to make a settlement there, or no. [C.O. 153, 12. pp. 338, 339.]
Sept. 15.
St. James's.
621. Order of King in Council. Approving Representation of Sept. 8th, with Instructions for Governor Burges, and appointing Shadrach Walton, Thomas Phipps, Theodore Atkinson, Richard Gerrish, George Jeffry, Thomas Westbrook, and Richard Wybird to vacancies in the Council of New Hampshire. Signed, Christo. Musgrave. Endorsed, Recd. 14th, Read 17th Nov., 1715. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 71; and 5, 915. pp. 21, 22; and (duplicate, signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 8th, Read 16th Jan., 17 16/17) 5, 866. No. 98; and 5, 914. pp. 299, 300.]
[Sept. 16.]622. Agents of Carolina and merchants trading thither to the Council of Trade and Plantations. We have an account of several considerable quantities of Indian gunns, which are bespoke for Virginia. We cannot in justice and gratitude but acknowledge the honourable behaviour of the Governour of Virginia and his readiness to assist our Province, yet we have too much reason to fear that their private Indian traders will have more regard to their own gain, than the security of their distressed neighbours, etc., by selling arms and ammunition to our Indian enemies, who according to our last accounts, begin to want a supply thereof, etc. Pray that proper methods be forthwith taken to prevent the Virginians and other inhabitants on the Continent, from supplying the Indians, that now are at war with Carolina, or may hereafter joyn against us, etc. The safety of the whole Province seems in a great measure at present to depend upon this. We have not as yet been able to obtain any relief, any arms, or any men from England. Our last advices give us grounds to apprehend, that some men, which were ordered from North Carolina to our assistance, are cutt off by the enemy, and that an inundation of Indians will fall down upon our settlements, now about the beginning of harvest; if so, nothing can save us, but their want of ammunition, etc. Signed, Abel Ketelbey and 15 others. Endorsed, Recd. Read 16th Sept., 1715. Torn. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1265. No. 8; and 5, 1292. pp. 470–472.]
Sept. 16.
Treasury Chambers.
623. Mr. Lowndes to Mr. Popple. The Lords Commrs. of H.M. Treasury send you the inclosed petition for the opinion of the Council of Trade and Plantations thereupon, etc. Signed, Wm. Lowndes. Endorsed, Recd. 16th Sept., Read 5th Oct., 1715. Addressed. 1 p. Enclosed,
623. i. Petition of John Rayner to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Prays for H.M. Privy Seal to direct the payment of his salary as Attorney General of New York in arrear since June 24, 1713. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 1051. Nos. 5, 5 i.; and 5, 1123. pp. 340–342.]
Sept. 16.
Whitehall.
624. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Endorse petition of John Deane, Sept. 9. Supposing the case is fairely stated, the ship or goods would not be forfeited, and H.M. may direct the Governor of Antigua to cancel the bond, etc. Set out, A.P.C. II., No. 1241, q.v. [C.O. 153, 12. pp. 347–350.]
Sept. 16.
Whitehall.
625. Same to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Quote Governor Spotswood's letter of July 15 (q.v.) as to his sending help to Carolina, and request for supply of arms, etc. On this occasion, we desire you will please to represent to H.M. our concurrence with Col. Spotswood's proposal, and our humble opinion, that it will be for H.M. service that some further supply of arms and ammunition be sent to Virginia, etc. Autograph signatures. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 1342. No. 2; and 5, 1364. pp. 249–251; and 5, 1335. No. 194.]
Sept. 21.
St. James's.
626. H.M. Warrant appointing George Clarke to the Council of New York in place of Roger Mompesson, decd. Countersigned, James Stanhope. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 307.]
Sept. 22.
Whitehall.
627. Mr. Popple to Lt. Governor Spotswood. Acknowledges letter of 15th July. Continues:— The Council of Trade and Plantations have laid the contents of it before H.M. etc. as 16th Sept. Your care in assisting your neighbours is very commendable, and will be taken notice of by the Board as occasion shall offer. Encloses copy of Memorial relating to supplying Indians with guns (v. 16th Sept.). Tho' their Lordships have no reason to doubt your vigilance to prevent any such inconvenience, they have order'd me to recommend it to you to have as much care as possible that such arms be not disposed of to any Indians in war, with H.M. subjects, or not well affected to our interest. [C.O. 5, 1364. pp. 252, 253; and 5, 1335. No. 195.]
Sept. 29.628. Petty Expenses of the Board of Trade, postage, coal, stationery, etc., Midsummer to Michaelmas. 5 pp. [C.O. 388, 77. Nos. 4–7.]
Sept. 29.
New York.
629. Governor Hunter to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses papers containing the result of his interview with the Five Nations. Continues:—The first proposals was made by the instigation and influence of our Indian Traders who are more intent on their private profitt than ye publick good. I by some arts putt the Indians into a better mind, which putt them upon emending what they had said the day before, and requireing it to be raiz'd out as appears by the paper, etc. That vile race have renew'd their efforts since my leaveing Albany as appeares by (enclosed) paper. But I have sent them more ammunition and all the arms I cold spare, and now I am pretty confident they will proceed as soone as may be, haveing summoned all their dependents to attend them. For my part, I can see noe other way of putting an end to ye Carolina warr and preventing a more generall one but this, how slight soever some people seem to think of it. I must also entreat your Lordps. to intercede with H.M. that the ordinary presents to the Indians upon ye accession of the severall Princes to ye Throne may be speedilly transmitted. They are much wanted and will be of great service at this time. Inclosed also your Lordps. have a state of the seizure and condemnation of the Eagle brigantine. The owners have appealed, to ye High Court of Admiralty. I shall only observe to yor. Lordps. that if this sentence is repealed (which I think impossible) the Laws of Trade are noe longer of any use in these parts, forreigners and foreigne bottoms may and will import what they please into these Provinces, in spight of all H.M. Officers. I hope your Lordps. will be pleased to interpose your recommendation of this case, the officers here being bully'd by the vaunted interest and power of ye owners in Brittain. I'm sorry and asham'd to tell you that one of H.M. Councill here is one of ye owners who gave directions for ye perpetration of this fraud and breach of the Laws of Trade. There is also inclosed an Address from the Grand Jury here, which cheifly relateing to the Reverend Mr. Vesey, I thought it necessary to shew the generall sentiments of the people here with relation to that untowardly man. I have not receiv'd my Instructions or any commands from your Lordships of a long time, etc. P.S. I have againe importun'd Mr. Secry. Stanhope about the augmentation of the troops. Since ye writeing of what is above Dr. Samuell Staats one of ye Councill is dead. I humbly recommend Dr. John Johnston the present Mayor in his place. Many of the Councill liveing remote I am frequently at a loss for a quorum, to remedy that I begg leave to recommend David Jamison or David Lyall as a supernumerary. (Note in margin, Not to be don.) Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. 7th, Read 10th Nov., 1715. 3 pp. Enclosed,
629. i. Propositions made by the Sachims of the Five Nations of Indians to Governor Hunter, Albany, 27th Aug., 1715. Set out, N.Y. Col. Doc. V. pp. 437–439. Same endorsement. 3 pp.
629. ii. Further Propositions by the same. 27th Aug., 1715. Set out, N.Y. Col. Doc. V. pp. 439, 440. Same endorsement. 3½ pp.
629. iii. Governor Hunter's Reply to preceding. 29th Aug., 1715. Set out, N.Y. Col. Doc. V. pp. 441–443. Same endorsement. 4 pp.
629. iv. Reply of the Five Nations to preceding. 31st Aug., 1715. Set out, N.Y. Col. Doc. V. pp. 443–445. Same endorsement. 3¾ pp.
629. v. Propositions made by the Sachims of the Five Nations to Governor Hunter relating to proposals made by the Far Indians, etc. Albany, 29th Aug., 1715. Set out, N.Y. Col. Doc. V. pp. 445, 446. Same endorsement. 1¾ pp.
629. vi. Propositions made by the Sachems of the Five Nations to the Commissioners of the Indian Affairs. Albany, 2nd Sept., 1715. Ask for arms and ammunition from Corlaer in order that they may go to war with the Indians in war with Carolina, etc. Set out, N.Y. Col. Doc. V. pp. 446, 447. Same endorsement. 1½ pp.
629. vii. Address from the Grand Jury of New York to Governor Hunter. We congratulate you on H.M. Commission, which we hope is very welcome to you, as it brings an unspeakable joy to all those who from yor. Excellency's adherence to the intrest of the Protestant Succession were in the most doubtfull and dangerous times confirmed in the esteem of those blessings which we now see apparently attending it, etc. Under your Excellency's administration, we are assured that the securitys of our liberty, property, religious and civil rights will be continued unto us. We are now no longer apprehensive of those dangers which threatned us from a Popish Impostor. We are in no fears of a Pretender from abroad, whilst a truely Protestant King acting by advice of a truely Protestant Ministry guides the helm, and as a deliverance particular to this Province, we think ourselves rescued from a mischiefe contrived with that craft and subtilty by which he who presides over all evil usually directs his Agents. For however false those complaints were, which were carry'd home against yr. Excellency, yet so were they timed that with reason we fear'd the event. But Heaven interposed, and those who digged the pit, we hope, are themselves fallen therein, etc. Signed, Olver Schuyler, John Hyatt, Johannes Hardenbrock, Cornelius Kiersteed, Phillip Schuyler, John Parmyter, John Tiebout, Anthony Rutgers, Jacob Boelen, Benja. Wynkoop, D. Provoost, G. Schuyler, Jacobus D'Key, J. V. Hertsbergen, Abraham Boelen, H.V. Derspiegle, Dirick Egberts, Renehet, Nicholas Rosevelt. Same endorsement. 1½ pp.
629. viii. Case of the Eagle. The brigantine coming from the coast of Guynea in March last with negroes arrived at New London, Conecticut, where one of the owners going on board from New York sold several of the said negroes having first reported their vessel there and had a permit from the Collector for so doing. Thence sailed to Long Island, New York, and anchored near South-hold on that Island, where the said owner traded 40 negroes, and afterwards in other remote parts of this Province sold as many more as he could. At last came to New York, where the vessel was seized for a breach of the Act of 15th Charles II. for the encouragement of trade, that no ship shall lade or unlade any goods, until her master shall have made known to the Governor etc. his arrival, and have shewn she is an English ship. She was condemned Aug. 16th, and an appeal is brought to the High Court of Admiralty. 'Tis objected by the traders that 'twas customary to land negroes sometimes before the entry of the vessel. It has been done by verbal permission of the officers, but this was a concerted intent of fraud of the £3 per head import duty. They further object that negroes are not merchandise, etc. Signed, Wm. Davis. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1051. Nos. 12, 12 i.–viii.; and (without enclosures) 5, 1123. pp. 367–371.]
Sept. 30.
St. James's.
630. H.M. Warrant appointing Lewis Morris Chief Justice of New York, " during our pleasure and his residence within our said Province," etc. Countersigned, James Stanhope. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 13th Oct., 1715. Copy. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 1051. No. 7; and 5, 190. pp. 307, 308.]
Sept. 30.
Bermuda.
631. Lt. Governor Bennett to the Council of Trade and Plantations. On the 27th inst. arrived here a sloop from London, wherein came a patent creating me Governour of these Islands, which trust I shall endeavour to discharge with integrity etc. Signed, Ben. Bennett. Endorsed, Recd. 16th Nov., 1715, Read 14th June, 1716. 1 p. [C.O. 37, 9. No. 37; and 38, 7. p. 327.]