America and West Indies
February 1716

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1930

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9-28

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'America and West Indies: February 1716', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 29: 1716-1717 (1930), pp. 9-28. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=73985 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Contents

February 1716

Feb. 1.
Admty. Office.
30. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. The time for the continuance of the passes sent to the Plantations being expired, and my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty designing to send some more, they desire to know how many may be necessary for ships and vessels belonging to each Government and Plantation, to secure them from the Argerines [=Algerines, Ed.], and trading from one Island to another, or other places, but not coming to England to be furnished with such passes here. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. 1st, Read 3rd Feb., 1715/16. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 7. No. 64; and 324, 10. pp. 88, 89.]
Feb. 2.
Whitehal.
31. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. There being at present, by the resignation of Francis Oldfield, Esqr., a vacancy in your Majesty's Council of Jamaica, we humbly offer William Broderick, your Majesty's Attorney General in that Island, to supply the vacancy etc. [C.O. 138, 14. p. 349.]
Feb. 3.
Whitehall.
32. Circular letter from Mr. Popple to the Agents of the Plantations, (James Campbell, for Newfoundland; Col. Blakiston, Micajah Perry, Virginia; Jno. Champante, New York; Jeremy Dummer, New England; Stephen Duport, Joseph Jory, Leeward Island; John Thurston, Jamaica; Wm. Heysham, Barbados; Sir Jno. Bennet, Bermuda).
The Council of Trade and Plantations desire to speak with you on Wednesday upon enclosed letter relating to passes etc. (v. Feb. 1st.) [C.O. 324, 10. pp. 89, 90.]
Feb. 3.
Whitehall.
33. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Having considered the reasons offered by the Admiralty to your Lordships against the continuance of Mr. Bridger's office (v. Jan. 21), we find no reason to alter anything in our opinion of 3rd Aug. last (copy inclos'd): and we observe the Lords of the Admty. are of opinion with us, that the woods in those parts ought to be preserved with all possible care; with this difference only that it may be done by the Governor. But how far a Governor of a Charter Government whose very salary depends upon his interest with the people, may be a proper person to perform effectually this necessary service, is submitted to your Lordps. Tho' this were not the case, it is not to be suppos'd that a Governor can do this work himself, both for want of leisure and knoledge in the method of manufacturing the several species of Naval Stores: he must therefore employ some other person who must be paid for his labour and time. But the Governments in New England, who are so much concern'd in the destruction of the woods, by converting the trees fit for masts into boards and logs, will never consent to pay such an officer, who is to abridge them of that liberty; he must therefore be pay'd by the Crown, if it be expected he should do his duty, and effectually perform the service. We would not by this be understood to favour the pretentions of any particular person, but only to shew the usefulness of such an officer, and the necessity of his being qualified, as mentioned Aug. 3rd. We have of late been often attended by several New England planters and merchants and some mast makers, who all affirm (particularly the last) that the New England masts of 24 inches diameter and upwards are as good and durable as those from Riga and Gottenburgh and even preferable to them for their soundness. The necessity of a Surveyor commissioned by H.M. to preserve the woods, will the more plainly appear to your Lordps. from the inclosed accounts of the waste and destruction in them (v. Jan. 25th). It is indeed objected that during Mr. Bridger's stay there the trees were cut down and destroy'd. This we look upon rather to represent the office as ill executed than as useless in itself. However in justice to Mr. Bridger, we must observe, that he made several seizures of masts which were discharged by the partiality of the Courts there; and as to complaints exhibited against him here, upon the strictest examination we do not find them supported. We take leave further to observe, that besides the care of preserving the woods, the Surveyor ought to be capable of instructing the people in the method of preparing trees for the production of tar, and in the method of raising and curing of hemp. [C.O. 5, 914. pp. 319–322.]
Feb. 3/14.
London.
34. Marquis de Monteleone to [? Mr. Secretary Stanhope]. I beg your Excellency to order the Governor of Carolina to remit to you by the first opportunity, the money etc. stolen by a pirate, referred to below. Signed, Monteleone. French. 2 pp. Enclosed,
34. i. Inventory of jewels etc., belonging to the Spanish Marques de Navarres, Governor of Popayan, an inland towne some distance from Cartagena, deposited with Governor Charles Craven by James Cumberford, marcht. of Jamaica, for the use and security of the said Marques. June 2nd, 1715. Charles towne, South Carolina. 1½ pp.
34. ii [?] to [? the Marques de Monteleone]. The [preceding] inventory was sent July 8th from Charles towne by one James Cumberfort, who went supercargo of an English brigantine who carried the Marques de Nevares from Jamaica back to some of ye Spanish Plantations. The Master one L[e]wis sett a shoar at St. Martas ye said Marques and promiss'd to send him his goods ashoar; but insteed broke up sume of his truncks and took out of them a great deal of riches part of which is putt down in ye said inventory. Cumberfort, not approving of what ye master had done, whilst he was ashoar, and not being able to oppose ye master and crew, dissembled, till they came to Charles town where he gave information to Governour Craven who seis'd ye ship and seamen etc. The Governour refused to give him an authentick testimony of ye goods he had delivered up to him etc. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 387. Nos. 2, 2 i., ii.]
Feb. 7.
Whitehall.
35. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Pulteney. We desire you will communicate to us what lights you have upon the state of Annapolis Royal and the garrison there, and if there are any officers in town lately come from thence. [C.O. 218, 1. p. 285.]
Feb. 7.
Virginia.
36. A.N. to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following. Signed, A. N. Endorsed, Recd. 23rd April, Read 1st May, 1716. Addressed. Postmark. ½ p. Enclosed,
36. i. R.C. to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Anonymous complaints against Lt. Governor Spotswood, in the form of questions. Signed, R.C. 2 closely written pp. [C.O. 5, 1317. Nos. 15, 15 i.]
[Feb. 8.]37. Mr. Dummer to Mr. Popple. A violent cold prevents my coming out. To-morrow morning I hope to be at the Board about the Mediterranean passes, etc. Signed, Jer. Dummer. Endorsed, Recd. Read 8th Feb., 1715/16. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 81.]
Feb. 8.38. Mr. Thurston to Mr. Popple. I have been so severely handled, to-night, with the cholick, etc., that I pray you will get another day to be appointed for me to attend the Board. But if it be only to know what number of ship passes may be necessary for Jamaica, I find 20 may be sufficient, etc. Signed, J. Thurston. Endorsed, Recd. Read 8th Feb., 1715/16. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 11. No. 4; and 138, 14. pp. 356, 357.]
Feb. 8.
Jamaica.
39. Mr. Blair, Speaker of the Assembly of Jamaica, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The Assembly of this island having been made sensible of your Lordships' great goodness in successfully recommending to H.M. favour two such beneficial laws as the Acts for quieting of possessions and that for regulating fees (which laws tho' of the last consquence to this Island, and which the inhabitants thereof have had so long at heart, have been by designing persons obstructed till the best of King's by his great judgment has placed persons at the Board which were not to be imposed on) do lay hold of this first oppertunity to return your Lordships their humble thanks, etc. Signed, J. Blair, Speaker. Endorsed, Recd. (from Mr. March) 12th, Read 15th May, 1716. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 11. No. 15.]
Feb. 11.
St. James's.
40. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Reply to letter of 10th Nov. We have sent to Mr. Craven our Governor of South Carolina directions to send a speedy answer to the charge exhibited against him etc. and positively orderd him to restore the goods of the Marquis de Navarres, etc. (v. 3rd Feb.), and likewise to answer how John Lewis happen'd to make his escape etc. The first letters we receive shall be transmitted to you, and nothing shall be wanting on our part to do justice and vindicate the honr. of our Government etc. Signed, Carteret, P., Ja. Bertie for Beaufort, Fulwar Skipwith for Craven, J. Danson. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 387. No. 3.]
Feb. 13.
Whitehall.
41. Mr. Secretary Stanhope to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina. Refers to his letter of Nov. 10 last, concerning John Lewis. Continues: It is H.M. pleasure that you give, without delay, particular and strict orders to the Govr. of South Carolina to send hither by ye first opportunity what money, plate, jewels or any other effects whatsoever which belonged to the Marquis de Navarres, that so the same being lodged in your hands, of which you will acquaint me as soon as they arrive, H.M. may dispose of them as to him shall seem just. Signed, James Stanhope. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 329.]
Feb. 14.
Whitehall.
42. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. Enclose Office accounts from Midsummer to Christmas last. There is a salary due to this Commission, Secretary and under Officers for six months ending Christmas last. Accounts, certified, annexed. [C.O. 389, 37. pp. 116–118.]
Feb. 14.43. William Shirreff to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Being bound to Annapolis Royall, I lay before you the necessitys that place may probably in a short time be reduced to for want of provisions, having neither money nor creditt att Boston, nor any other supply sent them, than what yor. Lordships were graciously pleased to procure in Jully last, wch. being but for six months att six to four men's allowance, will by this time be very nigh expended etc. Signed, Wm. Shirreff. Endorsed, Recd. 14th Feb., Read 28th March, 1716. Addressed. ¾ p. [C.O. 217, 2. No. 15.]
[Feb. 15.]44. Capt. Taverner to Mr. Popple. Encloses following. P.S. Please to remember the New England men that carrys of the fishermen from Newfoundland. Signed, Wm. Taverner. Endorsed, Recd. 15th, Read 29th Feb., 1715/16. Addressed. ¾ p. Enclosed,
44. i. Abstract of following.
44. ii. Capt. Taverner's remarks upon the present state of the South part of Newfoundland. Great Placentia and Point Vert are both destitute of inhabitants, houses, stages etc., all lying waste except a few houses, possessed by some French people, which keep no boats. This is very surprissing because that place was cry'd up by the English before they had it, to be the best fishing place in the land, the greatest part of inhabitants, in the old English settlements, are ruin'd by the badness of the fishing on that coast, yet not one of them is come to Placentia. Their reasons are that a general report, was spread abroad by his enemies, that Coll. Moody, and severall New England merchants, had bought all the French plantations, at Placentia, and Point Vert, that if any person came there to settle, he would be oblig'd to hire a plantatn. of some of them at an extravagant rate. That severall of the garrison were put into houses, in the town, by Col. Moody, to sell his wines, that the soldiers came over to the town, when they pleas'd often got drunk, stealing of people's goods, and comiting abundance of disorders, so that 'twas not posible, for ships, or inhabitants, to settle or fish there, etc. Col. Moody did buy all the stages, houses etc., of Mr. Costebelle, the late French Governor, on the north side, where the Fort stands, and severall plantations in the town, and New England merchants several also in the town. When complaint was made to Col. Moody about the soldiers, they were not suffered to remain in the town at night. If soldiers have the liberty to keep taverns in the town, alias Great Beech, and their brethren to come over when they please, neither ships or planters will ever go there to fish. There are a great many houses, stages, beeches, in Little Placentia, and the coast of Chapeaurouge, which are left destitute, it's a great pitty, etc. If the inhabitants will not come, the ships never will. At Ogeron fish'd last season a ship belonging to St. Sebastian, and one belonging to St. Jno. de Luz at Burein. At St. Peters and the places adjacent, seventeen of the inhabitants which I administred the oaths to in 1714, by the perswasion of a French priest went off with their families in Oct. to Cape Britton, leaving their stages, houses etc., which are unposs[ess]ed, those men pretend to sell those plantations, that if anyone makes use of them, without buying, shall pay an extravagant rate, adding that as they took the oath, according to the Treaty, they are intitiled to the same liberty as any Brittish subject, that althô they are removed to Cape Britton they may return to their former setlements when they please. For these reasons none of H.M. subjects will inhabit those parts untill H.M. pleasure is known about those plantations, etc. If they were inhabited by the English, they would take a farr greater quantity of cod-fish than in the former English settlement, but also considerable quantitys of furrs, and salmon, especially furrs, in case the French, and Indians from Cape Britton, was prevented, for comeing over and wintering at Cape Ray and the places adjacent. Refers to La Garrantier Tulon (v. Feb. 17) who bought the plantation of Mme. du Burre of St. Malo and in April last brought thence in a French ship not only fishermen, and green men, provisions, craft etc. for the plantation, but also men, provisions, clothes and fishing craft, for the rest of the inhabitants, all wch. was landed at St. Peters, a great deal of the goods sold to the inhabitants, all of it on accot. of Mme. du Burre, as appeared by Gallantrie's own confession. He is now in France and designs to repeat his voyage in March, carrying with him fishermen and aprentices to keep 6 or 8 boats all sorts of clothing, and fishing craft necessary for his voyage, and have commissions from the inhabitants there which are all French to bring them men, provisions, clothing and craft as last year, all this upon accot. of Mme. du Burre, so that at present none of our British ships have any bussiness in that part of the country. I told him he could never expect to be allow'd this liberty etc., for in that respect, St. Peters would be a nursery to breed French seamen, he answer'd would doe it untill was prevented by an order of the government. In Sept. and Oct. last came a French ship belonging to St. Mallo, from Cape Britton loaden with salt, wine, brandy, provissions, and fishing craft, wch. was dispos'd of in a great measure to those French inhabitants; they loaded aboard that ship 1000 quintal of fish, about Cape Ray and the harbours adjacent fish'd 8 sail of French Biscayers. In Sept. last from Cape Britton several of the French inhabitants' servants, came over to Cape Ray, and the coast adjacent, to kill furrs, and hunt. Some of them came as far to the eastward as the bays de Espere. The French inform me that about Cape Ray was abundance of furrs, that the martin there was the largest and finest in the world, that some hunters had on the coast, seen 1000 deer in a company, that the Indians, from Cape Britton did frequently come there in shallops to furr and hunt in the winter season. This two last seasons, a ship belonging to Guernisy, fish'd at St. Peters, the first season kept 8 boats, the last 16 boats, his principall officers, and most of his men were Mallouins, his fishing craft, and provisions all French, except bread. I was inform'd that several other Guernisy vessels, which fish'd in other places were man'd, and victul'd the like, which I look on to be a detriment to the subjects of Brittain, and it seems reasonable, to beleive that the merchts. of St. Mallo are concern'd in their ships. Upon the whole, its very plain that neither inhabitants, nor ships have incouragement to settle or fish in those parts. The French from Cape Britton are very industrious in spreading reports that the Indians of Cape Britton are comeing to St. Peters and the harbours adjacent to plunder the French inhabitants that remain there, their design in so doeing is to hinder the inhabitants of those places from goeing to Cape Ray to catch furr, and the English inhabitants to settle in those harbours, their design hitherto have had ye desired effect, for neither will any boat go a furring on that coast, nor is there one Englishman as yet, come to settle there, besides this engine of the French have frightned away a great many of the inhabitants, servants which have taken the oath, being afraid of the Indians, comeing. It's plain that the French, by their strategems and cunning, doth at present make that part of the land of little or no use to Brittain, which is the best part of Newfoundland for fishing, furring, fowling, masts, etc., and no doubt but that the French will incroch upon us so far as to take that valuable part of Newfoundland to themselves once more, in case it's not speedily prevented by proper orders, etc. Have in the Heads of an Act of Parliment (No. iii.) prescribed proper remedies, to prevent those evils, could the Indians, of Cape Britton, be prevented from comeing over to Newfoundland, it would be of great use to the Trade. 8½ pp.
44. iii. Heads of an Act to encourage the Trade and Fishery of Newfoundland, proposed by Capt. Taverner. 13 pp. [C.O. 194, 6. Nos. 12, 12 i.–iii.; and 195, 6. pp. 204–240.]
Feb. 16.
Virginia.
45. Lt. Governor Spotswood to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Replies to letters of 4th and 18th Aug. Describes his endeavours to regulate the passing and auditing the accounts of H.M. Revenue. The number of the Militia is about 14,000 horse and foot and of tithables 31,658. Is removing arms and stores of war to a new magazine and will send an account of them. Hopes that the Tributary Indians, under his new regulations will prove useful friends. The most considerable nation of them are settled on the frontier at a fort he has lately built, which is to be maintained by the Indian Company. All the Indian trade of the Colony is carried on there. "The Company have out of regard to their permitting their children to be educated in the Christian religion agreed to furnish them with goods at a cheaper rate than any other forreign Indians." As they are well content, believes they will prove a good barrier against foreign Indians and keep the other Tributaries in awe. In order to their conversion to the Christian faith, has at his own expense settled a schoolmaster amongst them, who has 100 of their children under his care. Encloses proposals for the settlement of the boundary with N. Carolina, the only scheme in which both Governments have hitherto been able to acquiesce. Describes its advantages and asks for directions thereon, etc. Signed, A. Spotswood. Endorsed, Recd. 18th April, Read 16th May, 1716. 4½ pp. Printed, Va. Hist. Soc. Coll., Spotswood Papers, II., 139. Enclosed,
45. i. Proposals for determining the bounds between Virginia and N. Carolina. Signed, A. Spotswood, Charles Eden. Endorsed as preceding. 1¾ pp. Printed, N.C. Col. Rec. II., 221; Spotswood Papers, II., 141. [C.O. 5, 1337. Nos. 31, 31 i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 1364. pp. 362–371.]
Feb. 17.
Whitehall.
46. Mr. Popple to Capt. Taverner. Encloses following for his answer. [C.O. 195, 6. pp. 203, 204.]
[Feb. 17.]47. Petition of David Arbuthnot and Thomas Young, owners, and William Cleeves, commander, of the Golden James of Pool, to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Repeat complaints of Cleeves, 1715 (q.v.) against Capt. Taverner at Newfoundland. They have met with further discouragements from him this year, etc. Signed, Dad. Arbuthnot, Tho. Young, Willm. Cleeves. Endorsed, Recd. Read 17th Feb., 1715/16. 3 pp. Enclosed,
47. i. Peter Tupper and Wm. Cleeves to Lt. Governor Moody, St. Peters, 4th May, 1715. On the 2nd inst. arrived here the St. Elina Modesta of and from St. Malo bound for Cape Briton, in which came M. Garantre Tulon, who took the oaths of fidelity last year in this place. He brought with him provisions etc. for his plantation, concerning wch. he now comes to you, we haveing not permitted him to land sd. effects untill he produce an order from you, because brought in a French bottom. The plantation he says he is now owner of must have been bought or given him since Nov. 30 (N.S.), because Cleeves was offered it in a letter of that date by Mme. de Beausyour of St. Malo, etc. Signed, Pr. Tupper, Wm. Cleeves. Endorsed as preceding. Copy. ¾ p.
47. ii. William Cleeves to Lt. Governor Moody, St. Peters, 4th May, 1715. Complains that his voyage last year was ruined by the French being allowed to dispose of their salt. Having now brought another cargo of salt from the Isle of May, prays that a stop be put to French trading. Signed, Wm. Cleeves. Same endorsement. Copy. ¾ p.
47. iii. Lt. Governor Moody to Mr. Tupper and Mr. Cleeves. I find you expect that Tulon should throw his salt into the sea, and run the risk of starving, in order to be obliged to purchase from you, very reasonable indeed! etc. You may happen to feel the heavy displeasure of ye Governmt. for yor. tyranny over H.M. new subjects unless you can shew the King's authority for what you have taken ye liberty to doe unto them both this and ye last year, the French inhabitants complaining to me dayly that they are not able to live under such cruel tryanny etc. I would advise you to mind yor. fishing and deliver Monsr. Tulon his goods, etc. Signed, J. Moody. Same endorsement. Copy. 2 pp. [C.O. 194, 6. Nos. 11, 11 i.–iii.]
Feb. 17.
Whitehall.
48. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Reply to Jan. 30. Having considered Lord A. Hamilton's letter, we beg leave to acquaint you, that in our books, we find two precedents of Assemblys in the Plantations attempting to address separately from the Governor and Council and to have that address presented by Agents of their own. Quote case of Virginia, 1701, and report of Board of Trade [C.S.P. 1702, No. 497] that such a practice "would prove of very ill consequence, except only where those representations contain'd matter of complaint against Governors," etc.; and of Barbadoes 1705 [v. C.S.P. 1705, Nos. 570 i., 931]. Continue: "Since which we don't find any of the Assemblys offering at this method of addressing till lately that of Jamaica. We observe the only cases wherein the Commissioners for Trade thought this practice allowable were, when the Addresses contain'd matter of complaint against the Governor for maladministration, or when he refus'd to transmit or represent what they desir'd. By the letter of my Lord A. Hamilton which you have transmitted to us, and by the Minutes of the Assembly of Jamaica, we find that upon the 3rd of Nov. last the Assembly agreed to one Address, and order'd their Speaker to transmit it to such person or persons in Great Britain as he shou'd judge most convenient, neither asking the Governor to transmit it nor taking at all notice of him nor the Council. We do not find that this Address contains any complaint against the present Governor of Jamaica for maladministration, oppression or act of injustice, neither had this Assembly, when they transmitted this Address in so unusual a way, made any such complaint. To which we must add that by what appears by our books, he seems exactly to have follow'd his Instructions. We are therefore of opinion that in a case of this nature such a method of presenting their Address ought to be discountenanc'd. Before we speak to the other parts of his Lordship's letter, we cannot but take notice that not only the Assemblys of Jamaica, but of several other Colonies in America, as has been represented by the respective Governors, have of late, pretended to assume new privileges and powers, which if not prevented may tend to the weakening of H.M. prerogative in those parts. As for the Assembly of Jamaica in particular, it might have been hop'd from the extraordinary marks they had receiv'd of H.M. goodness in passing the two Acts which they so long wish'd for, and which their Governor had so frequently sollicited, they wou'd have comply'd with what H.M. recommended to them in His most gracious letter, and that they wou'd readily have agreed to the repaying what had been advanced by the Governor and Council for the subsisting the late Regiment of Col. Handasyde, and the two Independent Companys now there, and that they wou'd have made further provision for the said two Companies. But to our surprize they have voted the one no debt, and propos'd an extraordinary method of providing for the other. We cannot give you a clearer view of the justness of this debt than by referring you to the state of it drawn up and unanimously agreed to by the Council of Jamaica upon 12th Nov. (Copy enclosed.) If they do not find some method for discharging this debt it may have very ill consequences, since it will throw the burthen of such debts, wch. are contracted for their own defence, and therefore ought to be supported by themselves, upon H.M., and because it will ruin the credit of the Government there in such a manner, that upon the most pressing and extraordinary occasions no man wou'd venture to advance anything upon it. However till the Assembly can be brought to a due temper in this matter, there does not at present occur to us any other method than what the Governor has propos'd for the discharge of that debt, viz: That H.M. be pleas'd to give particular order for its being paid out of the first and readiest of His Revenue in that Island. The manner in which the Assembly hath provided for the two Independent Companies appears to us likewise very short of what might have been expected from them. We observe they have provided for these two Independent Companies (even in their salt beef and flower) only for six months, and in case 200 white men be not landed upon the Island by the end of the six months, then in the same manner they are to be provided for six months longer. If therefore at the end of the first six months (which expire in April) they shou'd pretend, that 200 white men are landed upon the Island, then there is no further provision for the soldiers, and it cannot be expected that the Governor and Council will advance more if immediate care be not taken for their being repay'd what they have already laid out, nor can we think the arrival of 200 white men cou'd be a sufficient security to that Island either against their own negroes, or their powerfull neighbours, shou'd the first rebel or the last invade them; so that we are humbly of opinion this requires H.M. immediate consideration that an effectual provision may be made for these two Companies, since we are persuaded it is absolutely necessary for the safety of Jamaica that there shou'd be such a standing force in that Island till such time as a sufficient number of white men be imported and settled there, according to H.M. aforesaid letter. What my Lord Archibald mentions of splitting of votes, in order to carry some of the Elections, seems to be a great abuse, but we are not as yet prepared to propose a proper remedy but shall enquire into it and acquaint you with our thoughts of that matter when we are further appriz'd of it. Autograph signatures. 6 pp. Enclosed,
48. i. Minutes of Council of Jamaica, 11th Nov., 1715, and account of cash disbursed by the Governor and Council of Jamaica for the subsistance of Col. Handasyd's late Regiment 1st May–27th Aug., 1714, and the two Independent Companies by H. E. 27th Aug., 1714–13th Nov., 1715. Copies. 7½ and 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 4. No. 13; and 138, 14. pp. 357–364 (without enclosures); and (enclosures only) 137, 46. Nos. 11, 12.]
Feb. 18.
Whitehal.
49. Mr. Popple to Nicholas Lechmere. Asks for return of Act of Bermuda sent him May 16, 1715, q.v. [C.O. 37, 9. p. 325.]
[Feb. 21.]50. Memorial presented by Francis March and others (? merchants concerned in Jamaica) to the Council of Trade and Plantations, in vindication of the Assembly of Jamaica, against the Governor's representation. Noted for their loyalty to the Crown and obedience to their Governors, they have, since the government of the Duke of Albemarle (when their freedom was violated by measures not unlike those taken during the present administration), forbore representing the hardships imposed upon 'em, etc. Lord Hamilton's dislike to the Address of the Assembly proceeds from it's want of bearing his Lordship's name; but in the late reign he excused himself from joining in several Addresses of former Assemblys to the Throne, particularly that against an exclusive trade to Africa, in regard it preceded what in his mind was more incumbent upon them, an Address upon what he was then pleased to call a Glorious Peace, which Peace in an Address of his Lordship's lately presented to H.M., his Lordship has found out the contrary epithet for. As he declined bearing his part in a petition concerning the most valuable branch of the trade of that Island, etc., the Assembly could not divine that his Lordship would at this time take amiss, what at other times was his choice. As to the insufficiency of the said Address without its conveyance thro' his Lordship, 'tis most humbly submitted whether his Lordship's transmitting it be the essential, or the ceremonial part of it. The consequence of this position of his Lordship must be, that if ever the Island should be unfortunate in a Governor who would screw up the King's Prerogative to the oppressions of the people, or otherwise administer illegally, etc., they would want the benefit of the undoubted right of the poorest Englishman that of petitioning their King, etc. The cheif reason of his Lordship's not being complemented for his joining in such Address appears in the Assemblys lamenting the misfortune of his Lordship's prorogueing 'em (which his Lordship could not be supposed to concurr in) in as much as it prevented an earlier congratulation of H.M. happy accession to the Throne, and when H.M. protection by a Naval force and otherwise is therein most humbly implored. As to their refusal to subsist the soldiers there, and to reimburse money laid out for that use etc., Jamaica has been the only of H.M. Coloneys that supplyed the army with an additional subsistance wherein above £150,000 hath been expended by the said Island, during and since the late war; which provision whilst there was an imminent danger by the war was cheerfully raised by the Assembly of Jamaica by several Acts, but on the conclusion of Peace a number of white people to settle in the Island was in justice to themselves to be the further care of Assemblys; and therefore it was thought adviseable to address Her late Majesty for the easing the Island of the charge of a Regiment, but withall that those private men of the Regiment who were willing should be admitted to remain there; and a provision was proposed to be made by the Assembly for the regiment from six months to six months untill H.M. pleasure should be known, but such provision not suiting his Lordship's advisers who were for raising the taxes and laying impositions yearly as usually, on a debate arising thereon those who had the welfare of the Island most at heart who must be supposed to be the estated men determining not to close with the yearly provision which in case the Regiment was withdrawn sooner could not be applyed to the use of white people but would sink in the Treasury of the Island. The then Assembly was thereupon dissolved in Oct., 1713, but the last provision for the Regiment, being determined, writts were issued for the election of a new Assembly wherein his Lordship's advisors interfered too far not to give the country sufficient cause of jealousy; the spirit and bent of which advisors, is fully seen in the then and present Attorney General's letter to one of his Lordship's freinds, wherein he advises those who had Chancery suits not to vote against his Lordship (who is Chancellor of the Island) (v. Enclosure ii.). The Assembly met in Nov., 1713, and 'tis to be beleived not without discontent but soe much did their necessary warmth give way to the service of the Island that they not only provided for the regiment for six months then to come, but compensated for the time they had been unpaid since the last Assembly, and designed to continue such provision in case H.M. did not recall the Regiment before the six months were determined in condescention to their Address, and as there was above £10,000 then in Bank of mony raised by an additional duty which was unappropriated the Assembly designed part of it towards the immediate reception of white people and another part towards their further encouragement. But it was still their misfortune not to please, and therefore did not continue long lived enough to see their good intentions carryed into execution, for they were dissolved in Feb., 1713. Your Lordships will take notice that the Assemblys were for peopleing the island, and not maintaining any army longer than that Regiment should continue. But his Lordship being advised that he could get an Assembly to his mind applyed to her late Majesty for 300 men to be continued in the Island, which he was pleased to say the country would cheerfully support, notwithstanding the factious endeavours of a few who were the seeds of the first settlers, implying as 'tis humbly apprehended that as the first settlers were under the late usurpation, so their posterity must be of Republican principles, but 'tis observable, that those he calls factious, have been the successive Representatives of the Island for the three last Assemblys, who were they not the prevailing part of Jamaica, could not have withstood the methods used to prevent their serving, for when the next writts issued for the election of an Assembly to meet in Dec., 1714, the industry and invention of those who pretended to be his Lordship's freinds not only contrived that three or four elections should be of a day, and in general that no man should vote in any two precincts, by which means those of best estates in several precincts were denyed the liberty incident to their freehold; but in some places no notice of election given but to those whom they were sure of, in other places the poll was to be directed and was accordingly closed when ever a majority of their freinds were present; but when this finesse not before practiced since the Duke of Albemarle's Governmt. could not prevail it is not to be wondered if after such an incroachment on their freedom the Assembly met with a quick sense of the ill use made of the Prerogative of the Crown, and therefore the next thing after an Address was agreed for the congratulating H.M. access to the Throne, was to appoint a Committee to enquire into the practices used at the election of that Assembly wherein a gentleman of the Council and the present Attorney General as well as the then Provost Marshall being notoriously concerned his Lordship was advised to and accordingly did prorogue them the third day after their convention and soon after dissolved them which deprived the Assembly of all opportunitys of providing for the two Independant Companys ordered to remain there, or of raising or appropriating mony towards their being better peopled, thô its to be made apparent that in regard to his Majesty, who in so short a time could not be supposed to be acquainted with the Island's application for the recalling the soldiers, the design of the most considerable of that Assembly was to provide for such Companys further support; tho' not to let them have the management of mony, which was known to have run into other channels than 'twas designed for. But from Dec., 1714, till Oct., 1715, no other Assembly was called, tho in the mean time preparations were made for an Assembly by his Lordship's freinds, who for that purpose procured the most part of the Militia Officers in the Island who were of the best fortunes, to be changed for their voting contrary (as 'twas pretended) to the interest of the Governmt. and in their room the dreggs of the people, taylors, carpenters, bricklayers and tavern keepers were commissioned and the Fort at Port Royal put into the hands of a Dr. of Physick who lived twelve miles from it to influence the inhabitants of that place. Rumours were as industriously spread that the Cheif Justice who has his place but during the Governrs. pleasure and others in employments who were thought for the interest of the country would be removed, which was always improved in order to prevent their interfering in the interest of the country, and tho a Proclamation was issued in August last promising a freedom of elections yet in the choosing the Assembly now or lately sitting the days of election were calculated much alike to those of the two foregoing elections, but still to no purpose, which manifests that his Lordship contends with the Island and not with a few factious men of it. And what still makes this interposition of his Lordship's in elections severer is, that he resented any opposition to the schemes of his advisors to that degree that he has given the votes of two gentlemen of the Council against what is called his Lordship's interest as a reason for his writing for England in their disfavour and of their being now left out of the Council: and on the other hand has skreened those who voted for his Lordship's interest even by the interruption of the course of justice (v. Encl. iii.). From this 'twill appear that the not providing for the soldiers hitherto is owing to the dissolutions of several Assemblys, which have been attended with the utmost ill consequences to the Island, inasmuch as the settlement of white people hath been retarded, which if encouraged according to the Assembly's design would by this time have left no room for the desire of soldiers, and great sums of mony have been lost by disuse of Assemblys in the not raising an Additional Duty in three years, which would have been a fund for the further encouragement of white people, by means whereof the present Assembly have been obliged for the payment of debts and answering other emergencys to clogg the exportation of negroes with a further duty to the great discouragement of the Affrican Trade and the importation of silver and gold into Great Britain. And tho the Assembly do not think fit to reimburse what has been provided for the soldiers in the intervals of Assemblys, 'tis humbly submitted whether they can be upbraided with defection or obstinacy in that particular, since if they had been allowed to sitt they would have made a provision for the soldiers, etc. If it be thought their duty to confirm the payment of mony raised without their consent, the consequence must be, that Assemblys are no otherwise usefull than to establish payments applyed without law. By the long disuse of Assemblys, the repairs and erecting of forts and fortifications which (as the Island is surrounded by many jealous neighbours) are of the highest importance to Jamaica have been neglected, which the Assembly dissolved in Feb., 1713, had so much at heart, that at their instance the Council and they appointed a Committee of both to view the state of the fortifications of Port Royal (the key of the Island). Report enclosed. Your Lordships will observe the ruinous and unserviceable condition of that fortress yet such was the unhappiness of that Assembly that their necessary vigilance on what was the safeguard of their estates was interpreted as an unpardonable officiousness in regard that forts and fortifications were properly her late Majesty's, and therefore solely under her Representative's management thô it can be made apparent and so it was insisted by that Assembly, and allowed by the Council as appears by their Minutes (enclosed) that their behaviour on that occasion did not vary from the repeated usage of all Assemblys which had there been no other law for seems to have its commencement and continuance founded upon the sollicitude natural to mankind for the product of their labour and mony but which has still the countenance of the Revenue Act of that Island which gives a power to a Committee of either Council or Assembly to examine the disbursements made by the Receiver General of the yearly sum appropriated to fortifications, and as all powers and authoritys must be attended with the necessary means of executing them, so with submission is the viewing of the fortifications of Jamaica, incident to the power of enquiring what mony was disbursed thereupon which proceeding the Assembly can never think to have been unnecessary when they reflect with the greatest pleasure that your Lordships have recommended both the improvemt. of the fortifications, and the further peopling of the Island which instance of your Lordships' singular favour to that Island supposes a deficiency in the managemt. thereof, and what part of the Legislature of Jamaica it's owing to is submitted. It has been urged in Jamaica in disfavour of the Island and probably has reached your Lordships, that the Assembly dissolved in Feb., 1713, adjourned themselves for a month without his Lordship's leave wherein 'tis hoped the country will stand justifyed when your Lordships are acquainted that the Assembly had then sat for near three months, had past two laws in favour of the Regiment, the one retrospective in supplying what they might have received in the interval of laws, and the other for a future provision, these with several other laws were then under the Govr. and Council's consideration, and the term time (there called the Supream Court) drawing very near which must oblige the Assembly to remove their seats, and the season for making sugar being then advanced, which calls for the greatest care and industry of any time in the year they did in a very dutifull manner address his Lordship on those reasons for a recess for a month the refusal of which as well as the Address appears by the extract enclosed, and being on enquiry found that the liberty of adjourning longer than de die in diem had been asserted and allowed in the Governmt. of the Lord Vaughan they then reasserted it, which as it followed a close application to business and an Address for leave can't tis hoped be stiled undutifull, and the less so that it is humbly apprehended to be warranted by their Charters of Government whose constant language has successively directed that the laws and usage of the Assemblys of that Island are to be assimilated to the laws and usage in England, and if it be the right of the Commons of Great Britain to adjourn longer than from day to day, it seems to be the original intent of the Crown as well to grant such a liberty to that little body of Freemen, as it does in general to institute the Legislative power of the Island in the nature of an epitome of the English Parliament. For should it be the misfortune of the Island to be lopped of that priviledge they become subject to the pleasure of a Governr. and in consequence are deprived of the freedom of Englishmen. But however this adjournment may be now given as a reason for such dissolution, yet that many more which will not so well bear a repetition, were then assigned is evident from the extract of his Lordship's Proclamation for that purpose, wherein the summoning before them and ordering a commitment of the present Attorney General and others guilty of notorious corruptions in the elections for making a law for raising a sum for an Agent to manage the affairs of the Island here, and a law for regulating the disorderly and too loose lives of the ministers beneficed in the Island, are imputed to the then Assembly as so many invasions on liberty Prerogative and the Church. Whereas it is humbly conceived that the enquiry into their own elections was their undoubted Province, and the passing reasonable and beneficial laws were the end of their convention. Signed, Francis March, Jon. Carver, Ezekll. Gomersall and 8 others. Endorsed, 21st Feb., Read 18th April, 1716. 11 pp. Enclosed,
50. i., ii. Extracts of Journal of Assembly of Jamaica Dec., 1713, etc. Same endorsement. The whole, 5 pp.
50. iii. Governor Lord A. Hamilton to Col. John Clarke. St. Jago de la Vega, June 13, 1715. Whereas I have been informed, that some differences have lately hapned between some of the magistrates for the parishes of St. Davids and St. Thomas in the East and Robert Whitfinch and John Lees and John Cossby one of the said magistrates did issue his warrant for Whitfinch and Lee to appear before him to have had this matter decided but being willing to take cognizance of it myself in due time I doe hereby order you to give notice to the rest of the magistrates of the sd. parishes to forbear any further proceedings against the sd. Whitfinch and Lee till my further pleasure be signify'd and that in the mean time they may be at liberty to proceed on their lawfull occasions without any molestation whatsoever. Signed, A. Hamilton. Same endorsement. Copy. ¾ p.
50. iv. Francis Hawkins, Engineer, to Governor Lord A. Hamilton. Spanish Town, Jan. 12, 1711/12. Port Royal and all other the fortifications of this Island are much out of repaire, and will admitt of severall advantageous improvements, etc. Details. Signed, Francis Hawkins. Same endorsement. Copy. 1 p.
50. v. Account of repairs and stores needed for the Fort etc. at Port Royal. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 11. Nos. 12, 12 i.–v.]
Feb. 21.
London.
51. Col. Vetch to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Gives information, as desired, about Nova Scotia. As to the fortifications, repeats part of Sept. 2, 1715. Continues: The great guns of the lower battery which were the best in the garison (being 56 pounders) were thrown into the fossee, thiss battery was the principal defence upon the sea part lying low and equall almost with the water: by the removal of this it is now verry weak upon that side what could be the design of thiss dismantling the garrison I leave to your Lordships to judge. As to the number of the garrison I am told they are about 240; and indeed it is next to a wonder that there is any face of a garison remaining there considering the treatment they have mett withal and the pains hath bein taken to ruine the same, not only by its being abandoned and neglected intirely during the space of three years by the late Ministry during the warr; but since the Peace by being made all prisoners in the fort, and debarred any communication with the inhabitants without whom it was hardly possible for them to subsist etc. No garrison will ever remain there without being allowed both pay and provisions, when even under that regulation they will hardly be upon the levell with the slaves in the neighbouring Colony of New England where 3 shills. pr. day is the days hyre of the commonest labourer; nor indeed will the souldiers' sixpence per day doe more in that country then buy them tobacco, wash their lining and provide them in shoes, stoking etc. besides what is commonly allowed in a cloathing; every sort of cloathing being there just four times the price it cost in Brittan. Hopes that the Garrison may be allowed the common pay and provisions of the New England troops, 7 shillings that country money pr. week pay besides their provisions, etc. As to their victualing, the best way is by contracting with some of the Boston merchts., provisions in the time of peace being generally as cheap as here, besides the difficulty of navigation; the ship which went from hence last summer was necessitate to go by way of Boston for a pilot etc. As to the French inhabitants, there is not many removed, notwithstanding the discouragemts. they mett withal some time ago, and will no doubt gladly remain upon their plantations (some of which are considerable) provided they may be protected and encouraged by the Crown etc. With their stocks of catle, their remaining is verry much for the advantage of the Crown providing it shall be found practicable to keep them faithfull to their aledgence in case of a warr with France, which will be hard to doe while the preists remain amongst them to whose dictates they are absolutely devoted. Upon the whole matter as the fishery upon that main coast is without doubt the best and the greatest in the world both with regard to its earlyness its constancy and continuance the whole season long etc., so were it but setled with some forts in proper places and a Brittish Colony (as I formerly proposed to your Lordships) it would soon make one of the most profitable Colonys the Crown hath in America, both with regard to Naval Stores, the consumption of Brittish comoditys, the vast profits of the fishery, and the making of saylors to mann our fleets, besides a considerable furr trade to be caryed on with the natives for our English manufactorys, etc. P.S. Mr. Cummins, Collector at Newfoundland, and deeply concerned in that fishery, writes me: The fishery att Cape Bretton hath bein verry great last summer betwixt 800 and 1000 boats afishing which belonged to 82 large mercht. ships with two men of warr, they killed from 3 to 400 quintals pr. boat: this fishery will certainly ruine Newfoundland: being much earlier and better than Newfoundland: and so much before them att all mercats, so that it will be absolutely necessary to improve the fishery upon the coast of Accadie; and to get garisons setled there to protect the fishery and setlements, and to encourage the western parts of England to go a fishing there, instead of Newfoundland the fishing there having failed for these two years past, to the great loss of all Adventurers. Signed, Sam. Vetch. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd Feb., Read 28th March, 1716. 2½ pp. [C.O. 217, 2. No. 16; and 218, 1. pp. 297–305.]
Feb. 22.
Whitehall.
52. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Reply to Feb. 1st. As to Newfoundland, the ships trading there furnish themselves with necessary passes in this Kingdom. 40 passes may be sufficient to be sent to Virginia, 30 to Maryland, 40 for New York and New Jersey, about 100 for New England, 40 for the Leeward Islands, 20 for Jamaica annually, and for Barbados and Bermuda the same number as have been usually sent. [C.O. 324, 10. pp. 91, 92.]
Feb. 23.
St. James's.
53. Lords Proprietors of Carolina to Mr. Secretary Stanhope. Reply to 13th Feb. We have given directions to Mr. Governor Craven etc. (v. 11th Feb.) Continue: We did not think it proper to give any delay to justice, and therefore we overlook'd some objections that have been thrown in our way, in relation to our being unaccountable for the Marquis de Navarres's goods, in case they should be lost at sea, not doubting but that in executing H.M. commands, if any such misfortune shou'd happen, we are indemnifyed. The first ship that sails to Carolina shall carry our orders, and the first answer we receive shall be carefully transmitted to you. Signed, Carteret, P., Ja. Bertie for Beaufort, Fulwar Skipwith for Craven, M. Ashley, J. Danson. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 387. No. 4.]
Feb. 23.
St. James's.
54. Same to Governor Craven. You are to permit Edmd. Calverly, mercht., to depart the Province, any martial law to the contrary notwithstanding. [C.O. 5, 290. p. 89.]
Feb. 23.
St. James's.
55. Same to the Pressmasters of South Carolina, exempting 13 tradesmen from the press. [C.O. 5, 290. p. 89.]
Feb. 23.
St. James's.
56. Same to Governor Craven. Enclose copies of letters from Mr. Secretary Stanhope, "and likewise the substance of a very heavy charge which has been exhibited to H.M. against you. We are very far from inclining to think you guilty, but the fact is so heinous that we require a very particular answer from you as soon as possible. The Spanish Ambassador begins to talk of this matter and will demand satisfaction in the name of the King of Spain for the injustice that has been committed on the Marquis de Navarres. We are very sensible that this gentleman has been barbarously used, and this matter will fall very heavy upon those who shall appear to be guilty. It seems very strange that more care was not taken in the safe keeping of John Lewis who committed the robbery. It appears by several informations that the Marquis's effects were delivered to you and you are therefore accountable for them and must take care that they may be restored to the right owner. We desire a speedy answer, for we are resolved to vindicate our Government from such a reproach." Signed, Carteret, P., J. Bertie, F. Skipwith, M. Ashley, J. Danson. [C.O. 5, 290. p. 90.]
Feb. 23.
Whitehall.
57. Mr. Popple to John Merrill. Desires him to remind Mr. Pulteney of letter of Feb. 7th etc. [C.O. 218, 1. p. 286.]
Feb. 23.
Council Chamber, Whitehall.
58. Report of the Lords Committee of the Privy Council upon the references of Jan. 12 q.v. Recommend the confirmation of the Act of Barbados to dock the entail of Mount Lucie plantation. (ii) Concur with report of the Commrs. of Trade on the petition of the African Company, and do not conceive, there is any occasion for H.M. to be at the expense of sending any ship of warr for the protection of the said trade during this time of peace. (iii) Concur with the Commrs. of Trade that the Charter granted to the Proprietors of the Bahama Islands be resumed into the Crowne, either by due course of law, or by such other method as H.M. shall think fitt. And are further of opinion that (in the mean time) H.M. would be pleased to order Mr. Mosteyn, who hath been approved by H.M. to be Governor of the said Islands, to proceed thither forthwith; and for his encouragemt. that H.M. would grant him a commission under the Great Seale of Great Britain to be Governor; that so by the resumption of the Charter (which will vacate the Commission, that the Proprietors have given him by H.M. approbation) he may not be deprived of that station, after he had been at the expence and hazard of a voyage thither. Endorsed, Recd. 27th March, 1716, Read 28th Jan., 1717/18. 2⅓rd pp. [C.O. 28, 15. No. 29; and 29, 13. pp. 446–450.]
Feb. 24.
St. James's.
59. H.M. Warrant granting leave of absence for 12 months to Saml. Woodward, Secretary of the Massachusets Bay. Countersigned, James Stanhope. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 331.]
Feb. 25.
Whitehall.
60. Mr. Merrill to Mr. Popple. Mr. Pulteney would be glad to know what particular information the Commrs. of Trade desire etc. (v. Feb. 7th). Signed, J. Merrill. Endorsed, Recd. 25th, Read 29th Feb., 1715/16. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 2. No. 13; and 218, 1. p. 291.]
Feb. 27.
St. James's.
61. H.M. Warrant appointing John Page Chief Clerk of the Supreme Court in Jamaica, in the place of Robert Clowes, decd. Countersigned, James Stanhope. Copy. [C.O. 5, 190. p. 330.]
Feb. 28.62. Capt. Armstrong to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reports on the state of Annapolis Royal and country. An account similar to that of Major Caulfeild Nov. 1, 1715. Continues: As to the fortifications they are in form a regular square, with four bastions made up of earth and sodd work, the earth a loose gravell or sand subject to damage by every thaw, and often great breaches happen, by the fall of the wall into the ditch, till a method was found out to revest the works with timber from the bottom of the ditch to the fraizes 18 foot, and above that with 4 foot of sodd, the greatest part of which being done while Genll. Nicholson was there last. The houses and barracks where the officers and soldiers lodge, with the stone houses and magazines are in a ruinous condition, and not like to stand three years without a thorough repair etc. Signed, L. Armstrong. Endorsed, Recd. Read 28th Feb., 1715/16. 2 pp. [C.O. 217, 2. No. 11; and 218, 1. pp. 287–290.]
Feb. 28.63. The case of Capt. Armstrong and the garrison of Annapolis Royal. The provisions furnished by Col. Vetch were at 7½d. a day, though Col. Nicholson sometimes furnished the same for 5d. The agent, Mr. Mulcaster, informs him that the soldiers subsistence is but 6d. a day. Col. Vetch deducted out of the several sorts of provisions, the one eighth part as a Commissary's perquisite, which with other hardships, and want of provisions, made the soldiers ready to mutiny. Col. Vetch told them the provisions were H.M. bounty over and above their pay. This induced the officers to procure credit of the merchts. in Boston for their relief. Memorialist passed bills of exchange to Mr. Borland for £1008 13s. now 3½ years overdue etc. Prays for relief. Signed, L. Armstrong. Endorsed, Recd. Read 28th Feb., 1715/16. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 217, 2. No. 12.]
Feb. 29.
Whitehall.
64. Mr. Popple to Mr. Merrill. Reply to Feb. 25. The Council of Trade and Plantations desire to know what is the number of the soldiers at Annapolis Royal; and what condition they are in, with respect to their pay, cloathing and provisions; and what regulation is made for supplying them with those particulars for the future. [C.O. 218, 1. p. 292.]
Feb. 29.
Whitehall.
65. Mr. Popple to Mr. Carkesse. Desires to know, by to-morrow, whether a drawback is allowed upon wine and brandy re-exported from this Kingdom to Newfoundland and H.M. other Plantations in America. [C.O. 195, 6. p. 240.]