America and West Indies
January 1718, 16-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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Cecil Headlam (editor)

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1930

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155-168

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'America and West Indies: January 1718, 16-31', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 30: 1717-1718 (1930), pp. 155-168. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=74034 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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January 1718, 16-31

Jan. 16.313. H.M. Additional Instructions to Governor Sir N. Lawes. Quotes and approves Representation of Council of Trade, 21st Dec., 1717, upon petition of South Sea Company against Act of Jamaica laying a duty of 20s. pr. head upon negroes exported from that Island, and Representation of Jan. 3, 1718. The Act laying an additional duty of 20s. pr. head was repealed 9th Jan. Continues:—We hereby do signify our will and pleasure unto you, that you do not pass any Law for the future, that shall lay a duty on the re-exportation of negroes, that have been, or shall be brought into Our said Island only for refreshment, and much less on such as touch in Our ports of Jamaica without landing there. But the Assembly are to have liberty to lay such tax on the negroes bought there as they shall think fit. And our further will and pleasure is, that you do take due notice of the objections mentioned 21st Dec., 1717. And we do particularly enjoyn you carefully to observe the several Instructions already given you by us with relation to the passing of Laws in that Island, more especially in such cases where Our Royal Prerogative or the Trade of Great Britain may be any ways affected, which precaution will be still more necessary in the passing of money Bills, than those of any other nature, because generally these have their duration but for one year, and frequently have their effect before Our Royal Pleasure be known concerning them. Signed, G. R. [C.O. 324, 33. pp. 118–120.]
Jan. 16.
St. James's.
314. Copy of Governor Rogers' Commission, v. No. 220 i. [C.O. 342, 33. pp. 122–125; and 5, 189. pp. 376–380.]
Jan. 16.
London.
315. Col. Codrington to Mr. Popple. Asks for a short day for hearing him by Counsel in relation to the grant of some lands in St. Xtophers, about which he attended the Board before Xtmas. Signed, W. Codrington. Endorsed, Recd., Read 17th Jan., 1717/18. Addressed. ¾ p. [C.O. 152, 12. No. 58.]
Jan. 18/29.
River Essequebo.
316. Commander Van der Heyden Rézen to the Directors of the Dutch West India Company. Signed, Pr. Van der Heyden Rézen. Endorsed, Read 28th (N.S.) April, 1718. Dutch. 3¾ pp. Enclosed,
316. i.–xxiii. Inventories of slaves etc., lists of goods required, clearances etc. Dutch. 52 pp. [C.O. 116, 21. Nos. 156, 156 i. ff.]
Jan. 20.
New York.
317. Governor Hunter to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Acknowledges letters of 26th May and 4th Sept. Continues:—As to the first, I have issued a Proclamation forbidding trade with the French Plantations, what effect it may have in deterring men from it I cannot tell, no vessels ever did clear for these ports, neither would it have been suffer'd; and at their return tho' it be apparent that they have been in these ports, yet as your Ldships. have hinted, there being no Acts of Parliament forbidding that trade, or inflicting penaltys for such, all I can doe is to vex them, which has already provok'd the spleen of some of the tradeing sort, in the mean time whatever is in my power to discourage it shall be executed. Returns "most humble and most hearty thanks" for letter of 4th Sept., "with Mr. Secretary Addison's signification of H.M. most gracious pleasure, and condescention in favour of me his unworthy but most zealous and faithfull servant: as this will undoubtedly supress all the seditious attempts of that most contemptible party, I cannot forbear congratulating your Ldships. upon it, seeing by means of that you'll be eas'd of much trouble, and H.M. service in these parts goe forward as you would have it. At the same time (and all by the last post from Boston) I receiv'd one from your Secretary, with Mr. Mullford's complaints, which I think have been effectualy answerd by the Council and Assembly here some time before I receiv'd them, and the answer transmitted to the Agent in order to be laid before your Lordships, in which you'll observe that he is in effect declar'd what he realy is, and in all Governments has been, an enemy to the Publick: this was occasiond by the paper printed at London call'd a Memorial of Aggreivances, and dispersd here. I did not indeed think him worth that notice he being realy a craz'd man, but since he has given your Ldships. the trouble of his complaints I shall now again (for I have done it often before) state that case of the whale fishing, that you may have it in view. It was the custom in this Province long before I had the honour to preside in it, as will appear by the enclosed lycences, for all whale fishers to take out lycences from the Governour for such fishing, they agreeing and promiseing as fees or acknowledgment, to pay the twentieth part of the produce after all expence is deducted. Soon after my arrival here many such fishers (I know not but Mr. Mullford might have been in one or other of these Companys) came voluntarily to me for such lycences. Mr. Mullford at last thought fit singly to dispute that right. The matter was put upon an issue at law, pending the suit I submitted it to your Ldships, sent you the pleadings, and begg'd the Attorney Genls. advice or opinion which was transmitted to me, etc. quoted, in which, after haveing remark'd some errors in the pleadings on both sides, he concluded that judgment ought to be given for the Crown, long after the receipt of Mr. Attorney's opinion, and a rule for correcting the pleadings on both sides, judgment was accordingly given for the Crown, no appeal lodg'd or offer'd. I agree with the Gentlemen brought by Mr. Mullford before yr. Ldships. that there was not at any time neither is there now any tax or duty upon whale oyl, or whale bone in these Provinces, if they mean that there never was any acknowledgment paid for lycences it is false, for the inclosed lycences were issued dureing the residence of Mr. Cox and Mr. Godfrey in these Provinces, of which Mr. Cox then a Councellor cannot pretend ignorance. As to the proposal made by some merchants, all strangers to me, and known but by a few on this side, I must observe that if the whale fishing be decay'd it is not for want of numbers of fishers, for it is evident they increase yearly, but as the skillfull fishers declare it is oweing to the frequent wounding of whales which not being catched fright away the rest, neither is it so much decayd as is pretended, but the truth of the matter is that the town of Boston is the port of trade of the people inhabiting that end of Long Island of late years, so that the exportation from hence of that commodity must in the books be less than formerly, but I must farther observe that though ye perquisite ariseing by these lycences is in its self so inconsiderable that it is worth no Governours time to dispute it, yet should it at this time be given up it would only open a gap, and give encouragement to Mr. Mullford and such as he has misled to dispute every individual right of the Crown, or perquisite of the Government whatsoever, and the time has been, and may come again when if the Governour and the officers have no fees, he and the officers may be left to starve or beg for bread, and perhaps beg in vain, if they have not wherewithal to subsist themselves. For instance one other part of Mr. Mullford's complaint, the quit rents, upon my arrival here the Receiver General complain'd that there was a total cessation of payment of quit rents, and beggd for a remedy, he hop'd for none in the common course of law, the delinquents not only trusting to, but bragging of the impossibility of finding jurys in the country that would give a verdict for the Crown if left to a jury, upon which the delinquents were subpœna'd to the Court of Chancery, which immediately had its effect, for the arrears of quit rents were immediately brought in, and have ever since been regularly paid into the King's Receiver. As to Mr. Mullford's being cited whilst he was not a trustee for that township, truly it may be so, for it is impossible for an Attorney General to know precisely the names of the trustees of a township who are shifted and chang'd so frequently, and at that distance, but if he was not then he had immediately before been one of the trustees and at all times has mismanagd and misled that poor people who have little harm in them if he keeps away from them, and I have reason to beleive that by the very next conveyance I shall send your Lordships their formal renunciation of him, and all his works, but if Mr. Mullford had delayd or refusd to pay his quit rents, as he actually did, what exempted him from prosecution. Had I followd Mr. Mompesson's advice in the — cessavit per biennium, and by virtue of that vacated their grants, they would have had more reason to complain. Although as I humbly presume the Agent has laid before your Ldships. a copy of the Genl. Assembly's address to me, relateing to that man and his conduct, yet I herewith send it again marked (C) together with the minutes of Council by which the Council approve, and joyn with them in said address. Mr. Mullford was prosecuted for printing or causing to be printed pubblishing and dispersing a false scandalous and malicious libel unjustly reflecting on the Governour, and Governt. of this Province (as that Assembly which expell'd him term'd it) with an intent to raise sedition amongst the people, and in their minds an aversion to both, and as much as in him lay (as by that peice of eloquence its self appears which I have formerly sent to your Ldships.) to obstruct the settlement of a revenue, or any support of Government, to which he has been in all times an open avowd enemy, so it is false what he affirms that he was prosecuted for makeing a speech in the house, he has fled however from that prosecution, and left his security in the lurch. Encloses a list of all the Acts passd in this last Session of Assembly here, which had a period very lately, as soon as they can be ingrossed I shall transmit them with the necessary observations. The Act for paying the remainder of all the publick debts occasion'd the length of this Session, at this time I shall say no more of that act than that it is just in its self, paying to absents, minors, and executors what was justly due to them, but neglected in the former act for that purpose and (which is I am sure a good argument for it with your Ldships.) paying those (or their heirs) who took up arms in favour of the happy revolution, and continued in the service in the several forts for that very cause a considerable time at their own cost, without any acknowledgment or satisfaction 'til now, and besides this I have had the luck to get allowance made in it for many publick and necessary services, which without this act could not easily have been compass'd: the cry which a few made against the strikeing more bills has no ground, or foundation, for there being real fonds given for the sinking such bills, they can have no less credit than the former, which are at this very time twenty-five per cent. better than those of all our neighbouring provinces, and in some fifty per cent. even in their own tradeing towns, and I do affirm, and beleive your Ldships. may have observ'd, that since the circulation of these bills the trade of the place has increas'd at least above one half of what it was, the truth of the matter is, this circulation ennables the many to trade to some small loss to the few who had monopolis'd it, and that is the true cause of the cry, if ever it should reach yr. Ldships. ears. Refers to Attorney General's opinion, enclosed. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. 24th, Read 28th March, 1718. 9 pp. Enclosed,
317. i.–viii. Eight licences for whale fishing issued by Governor Lord Cornbury and Lt. Governor Ingoldesby, 1705–1709.
317. ix. Warrant by Governor Lord Cornbury for seizing whaleoil and bone made by Samuel Mullford without licence. 1st Dec., 1705. Nos. i.–ix. endorsed as covering letter.
317. x. Opinion of Sir E. Northey, Attorney General, upon proceedings concerning the whale fishery at New York, 30th July, 1713. Same endorsement. Copy. ¾ p.
317. xi. Address of the Assembly of New York to Governor Hunter. We have had under our consideration the paper entituled a Memorial of severall agreivances and oppressions of H.M. subjects sent us by your Excellency etc. We are utterly strangers at present to greivances and oppressions which if there were, wee of all men are under the greatest tye and obligation to remonstrate the same to you. There is no money raised or tax imposed on the people of this Colony but by their own consent in generall Assembly which is chearfully given by a dutifull people towards the support of his most sacred Majesty's Government over us, and which hath been duly and faithfully apply'd to the uses intended and accounted for, to the satisfaction of the Generall Assembly during the time of your Excellency's administration, and you cannot with the least appearance of truth be charged with the misapplycation of the publick money or that in the administration of the Government you have in any instance strecht your power beyond its just limitts. The prosecution for Capt. Mulford was not for his endeavouring to have justice and right done, or speaking for the property and liberty of the subjects as is represented by the Memorialist. But for writing printing and publishing a scandalous lybell against the Government of this Colony to prevent the raising any support for it. He had first attempted it by way of speech in the Generall Assembly of which he then was a Member and was heard and past with impunity but when he ventured to print and publish what he there had said he was expelled as he justly deserved. The Memorialist (if he be not the same person) wee believe received the accounts he gives from him who tho one of the Assembly of this Colony is very much a stranger to the affaires and interest of it, and to promote his beloved Connecticut an enemy to it, the being tributaries to barbarous heathens was a cant very frequent with him while in the House and used by him to hinder the raising those necessary supplies the Government wanted to use in the Indian affaires. But, wee thank God, without any other effect than affording now and then some deversion, 'tis a little odd in a Memorialist who talks so warmely for liberty and property and represents the Province to be miserably distrest if not vassall by the raising of £30,000 for a Canada Expedition, £27,000 for the paying of their debts and about £4,000 a yeare to support the Government, to propose an expedition against the Indians at the expence of half our personall estates at once, for the pious purpose of cutting their throats and possessing their lands, and to make this chimericall project appear practicable, instances a Quebeck Expedition that brought 3,000 of them to temper with the loss of only three men, and two Granada shells. But wicked and ridiculous as this Memoriall is, it may be attended with effects worthy the care of a Brittish Ministry to prevent, and had it been given some years since when the French were our enemies in the manner it now was to the Members of the House of Commons it would hardly afailed of bringing an Indian warr upon all the Colonies of English on the Continent. Your Excellency is not ignorant that by villainous arts the Indians are made to believe that the English on the Continent have agreed to cutt them off and that you are the only Governour that have refused to joyne in that execrable project, that it was with difficulty they were perswaded to disbeleive it (if yet they do so) and if this silly Memoriall should fall into the hands of the enemies of the Government either forreigners or English what mischeivous use might not be made of it. The Indians will be told such a proposall has been made and to the Members of a Brittish Parliament and that it is under their consideration. Your Excellency but too well knows the ill impressions the Indians have received, and the disposition they are in to beleive such a tale, and the ill consequences that must attend the beleife of it. For our parts, wee think ourselves bound to declare our abhorrence and detestation of reducing the Indians by force and possessing their lands, except they first make warr upon us, for to the steadyness of these Indians to the interest of Great Brittaine it is that wee owe in a great measure our present security from the irruptions of the more barbarous, whilst the warr with France continued, this Colony was not only covered and defended by these Indians but when expeditions were undertaken against the French on this side, wee ever found them most ready to assist in them with all their force, so that besides the injustice of such a vile attempt as surmised in that paper, if it were practicable such an action must bear the brand of the blackest perfidie and ingratitude, and we hope your Excellency and Councill will joine with us in directions and instructions to the Agent to find out this offender and make applycation to H.M. Ministers in order to his being brought to justice. Signed, W. Nicoll, Speaker. 21st Oct., 1717. Same endorsement. Copy. 1½ pp.
317. xii. Minutes of Council of New York, 21st Oct. and 21st Nov. 1717. Concur with preceding and recommend that a paper signed Samuell Mulford and intituled An Information be communicated to the Assembly etc. Same endorsement. 2½ pp.
317. xiii. List of 23 Acts of New York passed 27th May—23rd Dec., 1717. Same endorsement. 2½ pp.
317. xiv. Report upon Mr. Mulford's complaint against Governor Hunter by " the person who acts as Attorney General of New York." Same endorsement. 2¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 1051. Nos. 58, 58 i.–xiv.; and (without enclosures) 5, 1124. pp. 1–11.]
Jan. 20.318. Petition of Ollivier Tulon to the King. Prays for H.M. Order that Sir John Lambert may pay him the £400 due to him according to H.M. Order of Sept. 3rd, 1717; that he may be allowed to return to St. Pierre and pursue his fishing there; that his sureties at Bilbao may be discharged; and himself compensated for his expenses and loss of time, etc. Signed, Ollivier Tulon. Endorsed, Mr. Sec. Craggs wrote to the Lt. Governor of Placentia to permit Tulon to his house and fishing trade, and to the Consul at Bilbao to discharge his securities. 2½ pp. Enclosed,
318. i. Account of Tullon's fish sold at Bilbao 26 Nov. (N.S.), 1717. 2 pp.
318. ii. [? Ollivier Tulon] to Mr. Secretary Addison. The fish has been sold at Bilbao for 2,926 peices of 8/8 etc. No date or signature. Copy. ¾ p. [C.O. 194, 23. Nos. 27, 27 i., ii.]
Jan. 20.
Whitehall.
319. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Earl of Sunderland. Reply to 13th Jan. Col. Purcell has informed us that by the Government of Antigua, he meant the Government of the Leeward Islands etc. We have not had any intimation of H.M. intentions to remove the present Governor. [C.O. 153, 13. p. 190.]
Jan. 23.
Whitehall.
320. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Addison. Enclose following to be laid before H.M.
320. i. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Representation upon the petition of William Cockburne (v. 21st Nov., 1717). The petitioner seems to suffer very great hardship by the decree of Chancery in Jamaica, and very justly to deserve your Majesty's favour; But since the Governor of Jamaica is restrain'd by your Majesty's Instructions from allowing an appeal to your Majesty in any cause under the value of £500 sterling, which excludes the petitioner's case; We are humbly of opinion that your Majty. may by a particular order, dispence with that Instruction and direct your Governor to allow of an appeal for the reasons mention'd in the Attorney's report hereunto annexed. [C.O. 138, 16. pp. 59–61.]
Jan. 23.321. Thomas Minshall and other Fishmongers to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Support Mr. Borland's petition (v. 22nd Oct., 1717), the demand for sturgeon being great and the fishing at Pillaw, Dantzick and the Elbe decreasing etc. Signed, Tho. Minshall and six others. Endorsed, Recd. 23rd, Read 24th Jan., 1717/18. ¾ p. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 133; and 5, 915. pp. 79, 80.]
[Jan. 24.]322. Copy of a dedimus to Thomas Bernard, Chief Justice of Jamaica, to administer the oaths to William Broderick, Attorney General, and William Nedham and James Risbee, Assistant Judges of the Supreme Court, and Thomas Barrow. 9th July, 1716. Signed, A. Hamilton. With certificate by Thomas Bernard that he did so administer them. 12th July, 1716. Signed, Tho. Bernard. Endorsed, Recd. 24th Jan., Read April 2nd, 1718. 3 pp. [C.O. 137, 13. No. 2.]
[Jan. 24.]323. Copy of a Commission for rehearing the trial of the sloop Kingston, 9th July, 1716. Signed, A. Hamilton. Endorsed as preceding. 5¾ pp. [C.O. 137, 13. No. 3.]
[Jan. 24.]324. Copy of a dedimus to Wm. Brodrick and Wm. Nedham for administering oaths to Thomas Bernard, v. supra. 9th July, 1716. Signed, A. Hamilton. With certificate that the oaths were duly administered. 12th July, 1716. Signed, Wm. Brodrick. Endorsed as preceding. 3 pp. [C.O. 137, 13. No. 4.]
Jan. 24.
Whitehall.
325. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Quote petition of Christopher Stoddard (v. 14th Nov., 1717.) Continue:— We have discoursed several times with the said Stoddard and have considered the several proofs he has produced to us, we have likewise spoken with the widow of Capt. Mitchel and with such other persons as were able to give us any informations about this matter; and thereupon we humbly take leave to represent to your Majesty, that the said Stoddard was really a sufferer as he alledges when the French plundered the Island of St. Xphers in 1706, and had a debenture allowed him on that account but that the plantation on which he was at that time setled did not belong to himself, but to a brother of his by virtue of a temporary grant, that when your Majesty's petitioner setled again on the same plantation after the French left the Island the grant made to his bro. was expired and he had not obtained any for himself and that tho' he may have suffered by being afterwards disposessed of the said plantation by Col. Parke, yet he never before now made any complaint on that account. As to what he complains of his being disposessed now lately by one James Milliken of the other plantation, which he says he had been put in posession of by Captain Mitchel, we find the state of this matter to be as follows; that Captain Mitchell having a grant from Col. Douglas for 3 years of the said Plantation did some few months before the grant was to expire treat with Stoddard about entring with him in partnership on the said plantation; that accordingly Stoddard did bring some negroes of his own upon it and by their labour, and with some assistance from negroes belonging to Captain Mitchell did erect a dwelling house for himself upon the plantation, Captain Mitchell having one there already and likewise cleared some few acres of land: However there had only passed a verbal agreement, and none in writing between Captn. Mitchell and Stoddard. Captain Mitchel dyed soon after and his widow sent to require Stoddard to quit the plantation, she having consigned the house belonging to her late husband and all the right she might have to the plantation to one Mr. Cunyngham who was to give her a valuable consideration, in case he could get a renewall of the grant which Captain Mitchell had for the said plantations. That soon after the widow came over to England, and it appears that Stoddard continued on the plantation for some time undisturbed (without having obtained any grant for it). But upon the arrival of Genl. Hamilton the present Governor of the Leeward Islands, Stoddard as he affirms did make application to him for a temporary grant of the said plantation to which the Governor answered he had promised the grant of that plantation to one James Milliken but would give Stoddard some other which he the said Stoddard not being satisfyed with and refusing to withdraw from the plantation after the grant of it had been given to the said Milliken, he has been ejected by course of law. Considering what has been laid before us about this matter, we do not find that Stoddard has properly any right to the plantation, yet, if it be true as he affirms, that he had made considerable improvemts. upon it, he seems upon this account as well as upon that of his former sufferings, and of his numerous family, to have at least some title to your Majesty's compassion. But we have no account what Genl. Hamilton or James Milliken may have to offer about this matter there being no persons here instructed to appear for them. We beg leave to offer to your Majesty, that a copy of Stoddard's petition may be sent to Genl. Hamilton and to the said Milliken for their speedy answers thereto. [C.O. 153, 13. pp. 206–211.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
326. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Representations upon the Act of New Jersey, 11th March, 1713, that the solemn affirmation and declaration of the people called Quakers shall be taken instead of an oath in the usual form, and for qualifying them to serve as jurors and to execute any office etc. Tho' this Act gives the Quakers greater indulgence, than is allowed them in this Kingdom, yet as your Majties. Governor, and other persons concerned in the affairs of that Province have represented to us that this Act is absolutely necessary for the strengthening the hands of the Government there, we have no objection why your Majesty may not be graciously pleased to confirm the sd. Act. [C.O. 5, 995. p. 426.]
Jan. 27.
Whitehall.
327. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Addison. Sir Nicholas Lawes having acquainted us this morning with his intention of going next Monday to Portsmouth in order to proceed immediately to his govt. of Jamaica, desir'd that before he gos, he may receive H.M. directions, concerning the following matters; vizt. the opinion of the Attorney and Sollicitor General upon some observations made by Sir Nicholas Lawes, concerning H.M. Proclamation for pardoning pirates etc. Our Representation (Sept.) for renewing the Commission for trying pirates etc., and our letter (Oct.24th) relating to Mr.Page; Sir N. Lawes acquainted us that he thought it absolutely necessary for H.M. service that the said Page shoud be remov'd; We cannot but agree intirely with him in this particular as well as in the necessity of his receiving H.M. directions, concerning the other matters beforemention'd; and therefore we desire you will be pleas'd to lay these matters before H.M. that his pleasure concerning them may be known before Sr. Nich. Lawes leaves Great Britain. [C.O. 138, 16. pp. 61–63.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
328. Earl of Sunderland to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following. It is H.M. pleasure that you take care that the same be complyed with. Signed, Sunderland. Endorsed, Recd. 28th, Read 29th Jan., 1718. 1 p. Enclosed,
328. i. Address of the House of Commons to the King, Jan. 27, 1718, that a report by the Council of Trade relating to Naval Stores may be laid before the House. Copy. ¼ p. [C.O. 323, 7. Nos. 118, 118 i.; and 324, 10. pp. 158, 159.]
Jan. 28.
Whitehall.
329. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Hamilton. We have in former letters recommended to you the using your utmost endeavours, to hinder the inhabitants of Anguilla, as well as of St. Christophers and other Islands under your Government from dispersing themselves and setling in Crab Island, by giving them assurances that they will be provided for as soon as ever the French part of St. Christophers is disposed of by publick authority, which we hope will now be very soon done; We must again recommend this to you as a matter of a very great importance, and desire you to send us by the very first opportunity an account of the present state of the said French part of St. Christophers, specifying how much of it, is possessed by temporary grants from you, or any former Governors, how much is disposed of by absolute grants from the Crown? and what part still remains not possessed or disposed of ? in this account you will mention the names of each grantee, his qualifications, the number of acres he enjoys, what improvements he has made upon his plantation, and how long he has been in possession of it; And as you may have thought fit not to renew several grants, which had been made by former Governors, but to grant out the same plantations to other persons, we desire you to send us a particular account what alterations of that kind you have made; the names of the persons removed, as well as of the persons in favour of whom you made these alterations, and your reasons for so doing; we must on this occasion observe to you, that it will not be proper, you should for the future make any alterations of that kind: you cannot but be sensible, that when the time for the disposing of the aforesaid French part of St. Xtophers draws near, we shall have many applications in behalf of present and former possessors of plantations in the said part of the Island; and therefore you will think it highly necessary, even for your own sake that we should be fully and truely informed of the several particulars we now desire you to send an account of; we shall for the same reason expect to have this account as soon as possibly may be, We once more recommend to you the care of hindring the inhabitants, and particularly those of St.Xtophers from removing from thence, and we desire to know, if any are lately removed, the numbers of them, and what you believe to have been the occasion of their removing. [C.O. 153, 13. pp. 211–213.]
Jan. 28.
Boston.
330. Mr.Cumings to the Council of Trade and Plantations. The export of navall stores from Christmas, 1716 to 1717 from this port to Great Brittain [was] 8294 barls. pitch, 14,591 barls.tar, 13,160 barls. turpentine, 3,152 barls. oil. Besides sugar, molosses, ginger, furrs, wood for dying and 555,000 of hhd. and barl. staves and if your Lordships thought proper to gett the dutys taken off the timber from the Plantations it might be the means to incourage the making of greater quantities etc. The import of forreign goods since Midsummer (v. 17th Sept., 1717) stands thus, 316 hhds. molosses, 14 hhds. rume, 28 barls. and teirces of sugar, 19 bags of cotton wooll, 3 hhds., 2 barls., 124 bags of cocoa nutts: there has been for the last year in all imported 1,900 pipes of Fyall, Madera, and Canary wines and about 400 hhds. rume from our own Plantations since my last accot. etc. If an Inspector General of all the accounts of the import and export of the Continent was appointed it would be a means annualy to give your Lordships a true state of the trade of the Continent etc. Signed, Archd. Cumings. Endorsed, Recd. Read 28th Feb., 1717/18. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 866. No. 139.]
Jan. 29.
Whitehall.
331. Earl of Sunderland to the Governor of Jamaica. Encloses Order of Council, Jan. 9, directing the removal of Samuel Page from his office etc. Signed, Sunderland. [C.O. 324, 33. p. 129.]
Jan.29.
Whitehall.
332. Same to Mr. Congreve. I send you the copy of an Order of Council directing the removal of Mr. Samuel Page from being your Deputy, as Secretary of Jamaica; and I am to signify to you H.M. Pleasure, that you forthwith comply with the said Order. Signed, Sunderland.[C.O. 324, 33. p. 130.]
Jan.29.
Whitehall.
333. Council of Trade and Plantations to the King. Recommend for confirmation Act of New York for preventing the multiplicity of lawsuits etc. [C.O. 5, 1123. pp. 509, 510; and 5, 1019. No. 96.]
Jan.29.
Whitehall.
334. Council of Trade and Plantations to Lt. Governor Spotswood. Acknowledge letter of Aug. 29th. We observe with satisfaction that the journals you have now transmitted, are minuted in the margent, as we had desir'd of you. As it's a very great ease to us in the multiplicity of business that is before us and a conveniency in finding out anything we may have occasion to look into. We doubt not but you will continue this method for the future. We likewise approve of the reformation you have made in relation to the Revenue arising by the sale of lands etc. We have laid before H.M. what you writ etc. concerning Mr. Beverley etc. H.M. has thereupon been pleas'd to direct that the same be transmitted to His Envoy Extraordinary at the Court of Spain, that proper applications be made in H.M. name in that matter. We are still of the same opinion we were in relation to the appointing Courts of Oyer and Terminer. But that this matter might be entirely out of dispute, we sent the sevl. papers recd. from yourself, as also from the Council, to Mr. Attorney General, a copy of which you have here inclos'd, to be communicated to the Council that they may govern themselves accordingly for the future. We doubt not but you will, on your part, make a discreet use of that power lodg'd in your hands, which seems not proper to be exerted but on extraordinary occasions. It is necessary for us in considering the general state of the trade of this Kingdom to have accounts of the trades of each particular country. And as we have accounts of what goods are sent from hence to the Maderas and Western Islands, so it is requisite that we shou'd be inform'd of what returns are made from thence. But the main of the exports from those Islands being to the Plantations in America; we can get here no accounts of them. And tho' the Naval Officers do sometimes give accounts of the entries of ships inwards, yet it is in such a confus'd manner (sometimes expressing the quantities of goods in some ships and oftner omitting it) that 'tis scarce practicable to make a true state of that trade; we desire you therefore to give immediate directions to the proper officer to make out an account of the imports from the Maderas and Western Islands for three years last past, and to send us the same by the first opportunity.: And for the future we desire you to take care to give us annual accounts of the said imports. We are further to desire of you a particular account of all grants of land made by you since your Govt. whether they be temporary or perpetual specifying the number of acres granted, what quit rent is reserv'd upon them with the name of the grantee, and the reasons inducing you to make such grant. We send you here inclos'd the copy of a Memorial lately laid before us concerning the progress the French have made in finding out and securing a passage from St. Laurence or Canada River to their new settlement call'd Louisana, and down the River Mississippi in the Bay of Mexico, whereupon we must desire you to inform yourself as particularly as you can of the facts therein mention'd, and to acquaint us therewith as soon as possible, and give us your sentiments what methods may be most proper to be taken for preventing the inconveniences to which H.M. Plantations on the Continent of America, and the trade of this Kingdom may be subject by such a communication between the French settlements. [C.O. 5, 1365. pp. 39–43; and (rough draft) 5, 1335. pp. 9–16.]
Jan.29.335. Affidavit by Col. Valentine Morris of Antigua. There are above 200 Roman Catholicks in Antigua capable of bearing arms. In the evening of St. Patrick's day since H.M. accession 50 or 60 of them got together in St. John's at midnight and drank ye Pretender's health several of them with drawn swords and roved about ye town in a riotous manner insomuch that the Captain of the Guard drew out the guard. Being C.O. of H.M. Regiment of Foot then posted in ye Leeward Islands, deponent on next St. Patrick's day ordered the Town Guard to be reinforced etc. Deponent has been informed of many other instances of the disaffection of the Roman Catholicks of ye said Island to his present Majesty. Signed, Vall. Morris. Endorsed, Read 8th April, 1718. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 12. No. 75.]
Jan.30.
Whitehall.
336. Orders of Council. Confirming Acts of St. Christophers to prevent the danger that may happen by fire etc. (1716) and to impower the Surveyor to turn the windward common path Eastward, etc., (1717). (v. 16th Oct., 1717); and confirming an Act of Antegoa, (1717) for constituting a Court of Chancery. Signed, Edward Southwell. Endorsed, Recd. 24th, Read 25th Feb., 1717/18. 1½ pp. [C.O. 152, 12. No. 65; and 153, 13. pp. 231, 232.]
Jan.30.
Whitehall.
337. Order of Council. Repealing Act of Antegoa, 1716, for establishing a Court of King's Bench, Common Pleas, and errors, etc. (v. 16th Oct., 1717). Signed and endorsed as preceding. 1½ pp. [C.O. 152, 12. No. 66; and 153, 13. pp. 229–231.]
Jan.30.
Whitehall.
338. Order of Council. Approving Representation of 18th Sept., 1717, and ordering warrants to be prepared for Commissions to pass under the Great Seal for trying pirates in the Plantations, in like manner as those issued in 1700. The Council of Trade are to present the names of such persons as they shall think proper for executing the said Commissions, and whatever else they shall think necessary etc. Signed, Robert Hales. Endorsed, Recd., Read 3rd Feb., 1717/18. 1 p. [C.O. 323, 7. No. 119; and 324, 10. pp. 159, 160; and (copy of first part only, endorsed, Recd. 24th, Read 25th Feb., 1717/18), 323, 7. No. 124; and 324, 10. pp. 192, 193.]
Jan.31.339. Memorandum of Commission appointing the Earl of Holdernesse a Lord Commissioner of Trade and Plantations instead of the Earl of Suffolk and Bindon. Endorsed, Recd. Read 7th Feb., 1717/18. Slip. [C.O. 388, 77. No. 38.]