America and West Indies
August 1718

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Cecil Headlam (editor)

Year published

1930

Pages

327-343

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'America and West Indies: August 1718', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 30: 1717-1718 (1930), pp. 327-343. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=74045 Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

August 1718

Aug. 5.
Whitehall.
645. Mr. Secretary Craggs to the Board of Ordnance. H.M. has been pleased to approve your report of 10th Sept. relating to the building of forts etc. in Nova Scotia and Placentia, and accordingly you are to advance £200 to Govr. Phillips, and send from hence nails and tools for the purposes mentioned etc. Signed, J. Craggs. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 137, 46. No. 32.]
Aug. 6.
Kensington.
646. H.M. Warrant continuing licence of absence to John Cornelius, Naval Officer of Barbadoes, for two years more. Countersigned, J. Craggs. Copy. [C.O. 324, 33. pp. 182, 183.]
Aug. 6.
Kensington.
647. H.M. Warrant granting leave of absence to William Thomas, of the Council of Antegoa, for one year longer for the recovery of his health. Copy. [C.O. 324, 33. pp. 184, 185.]
Aug. 7.
Whitehall.
648. Mr. Popple to Mr. Carkesse. Enquires if Keys and the accounts referred to by Governor Shute, 26th June, have arrived etc. [C.O. 5, 915. p. 179.]
[Aug. 7.]649. William Nuvine to the Council of Trade and Plantations. In behalf of Arthur Freeman and Dorothy his wife petitions for speedy report upon Act of Antigua to enable Arthur Freeman etc. Endorsed, Recd., Read 7th Aug., 1718. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 12. No. 110.]
Aug. 7.
New York.
650. Governor Hunter to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses duplicates of 7th July. Continues:—Your Lordships have also an account of the Revenue of the Jerseys since my administration. But there is no Auditor for that Province. As also such an account as I could at this time procure of the Revenue of this Province. But the Treasurer absolutely refuses to have the accounts audited by the Deputy Auditor here, being by the acts made accountable to the Governour, Councill and Assembly which is the method of audit in both Provinces. I told him in Council that whatever obligation he was laid under by the acts of Assembly they could never be supposed to dissolve the obligation he lay under to account to the King for money granted to him in the manner he should please to prescribe. But Mr. Clarke the Deputy Auditor has given a more full account to the Auditor General of that matter than I can doe. I judged that the Representation to her late Majesty from the Governour, Councill and Assembly in Lord Cornbury's time might give your Lordships some further information of the causes of the continuation of the old currency of silver in these Provinces and have for that reason herewith transmitted it. The account of the patents for lands is not so perfect as to be fitt to be sent by this ship which goes to Bristoll, but by one bound speedily for London it shall be sent. There was little land left in this Province for me to grant except that resumed from Captain Evans and of that there remained little besides the high-lands which can be put to no manner of use but furnishing firewood. The former Governours and Coll. Ingoldsby in his short time haveing granted away all that was of any value in that tract. The reservation of quit rent is always conformable to the Instructions etc. Could we extend our frontiers there would be land enough. By last post from Boston I have a letter from London informing me that one Mr. Baker a merchant there has had a sum of money remitted him from hence to enable him to oppose some or all our money bills at home. If we may guesse at his employers by his correspondents they are the same persons who have dureing all my time strenuously opposed all publick settlement and support of Government, and if I had not had the good luck to have them left out in the last elections for City members there never had been any such settlement, and I am afraid if ever they get themselves chosen again there will be no further. This I beg may induce your Lordships not to give an easy ear to the suggestions of such men but to lett the people here have an opportunity to answer for themselves in a matter which affects their very being or at least their being happy. Your Lordships cannot but observe the vast increase of trade and shipping here which is the true cause of the unaccountable rage of some of these men who formerly monopolized what is now become so diffusive. Our money bills are equal to silver over the greatest part of the English Continent and 30 per cent. better than the Country bills upon the Change at Boston it self, Our credit better than any of our Neighbours, a more universal unfeign'd duty and firm affection to H.M. and the present happy settlement then is perhaps to be found in any one part of his Dominions, all which may be endanger'd by the ruinous ends which these men are pursueing. Whilst the last Debt bill was prepareing in the Assembly the Chief of these men being by chance or design at that time one of the Grand jury for the City perswaded the rest to sign an adress to me against the passing of that bill when it was presented I gave for answer that the bill was not yet before me but I should lay their Representation before the Council and Assembly whom it more immediatly concerned, which accordingly I did. The Assembly sent for them in custodie and justly reprimanded them for their fault. Experience has show'n that the suggestions in that Address are groundless and false. I doubt not but Mr. Baker has laid it before your Lordships for I am informed that he has laid it on the tables of most Coffeehouses in the City. If your Lordships would but be pleas'd to look back into the affairs of this Province dureing my time and take a view of the difficultys I have had to struggle with occasion'd in a great measure by these very men, and the good luck or art I have had to get the better of them, and compare the former confusion with the present happy tranquillity I am confident your goodnesse will induce you to make some allowance for failures of small consequence if any there be, and to continue your protection and patronage to me against the rage of a small number of restless men who have nothing in view but their own private interests or the gratifying their resentment etc. P.S. The Acts last past are not yet ingrossed. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. 8th Oct., 1718, Read 23rd April, 1719. 4 pp. Enclosed,
650. i. Account of families of Germans settled on Hudson's River. 394 families = 1601, not including widows and orphans. Signed, Joshua Kocherthal, John Fred. Hager (?). Same endorsement. 1 p.
650. ii. Account of the Revenue of New York July 1715–Aug. 1718. Receipts: £19, 898 15s. 7½d. Expenditure: £17, 683 15s. 5½d. Signed, A. D. Peyster, New Yorke, 7th Aug., 1718. Same endorsement. 2 pp.
650. iii. Address of the Governor Lord Cornbury, Councill and Assembly of New York to the Queen, petitioning against the Act for ascertaining the rates of foreign coins etc. (v. C.S.P. 1708–9. No. 157 i). Same endorsement. Copy. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1051. Nos. 84, 84 i,; and (without enclosures) 5, 1124. pp. 72–76.]
[Aug. 7.]651. Account of Revenue of New Jersey, 23rd June 1710–23rd Sept., 1718. Totals: Receipts, £9951 4s. 3d. Expenditure, £9220 2s. 6d. Signed, Thomas Gordon, Receiver General. Endorsed, Recd. (with preceding) 8th Oct., 1718, Read 23rd April, 1719. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 971. No. 80.]
Aug. 8.
Whitehall.
652. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Hamilton. Acknowledge letters of 10th April and 6th May. Continue:—We have laid before his Majesty what you write in relation to the settlement the Danes had begun to make at St. Johns, and suppose you will soon know H.M. pleasure thereupon. In the mean time we send you the inclosed copy of a Memorial lately presented by the Danish Envoy (v. 3rd July), not only for your information but that you may transmit to us such observations upon it as may be of use hereafter. And particularly that you may send us the best information you can of the time, when the Danes first settled St. Thomas, whether any opposition was then made to it? And upon what account it was they were suffer'd to make such settlement. Whether it was by connivance or permission? We desire also to know as soon as possible whether you have yet received any satisfactory answer from the Governour of Porto Rico to the demand you made in behalf of H.M. subjects that were carried off Crabb Island. We have had under consideration an Act pass'd at Mountserrat the 27th of April last, for quieting possessions etc., which by the inclosed report of Mr. West, one of H.M. Council at Law, is not fit for H.M. approbation (v. 27th May). But as the Act may be of use for quieting the possessions of severall persons in that Island, we shall let it lye by, till the Assembly shall have had an opportunity of passing another not liable to those objections. Upon further consideration of the Act passed at Antigua, to prohibit the importation of foreign sugar etc., we have thought necessary to lay the same before H.M. for his disallowance. We should be glad to know from you whether the soil of foreign Colonies where sugar canes are planted be more valuable than that of H.M. Islands under your Government and particularly whether the lands of Guardaloupe or Martinique be preferable to the lands in the late French part of St. Christophers? But as there are likewise many other matters of consequence to H.M. service, whereof we should be punctually informed according to your Instructions, we have reduced the same into certain queries (enclosed), to which we desire to have an answer as soon as conveniently may be, and that for the future you will transmit an annual account to the Board which may answer the aforesd. queries. Annexed,
652. i. Queries to Genl. Hamilton. (i.) Number of inhabitants, freemen, women and children, servants, white and black, in each of the several Islands under your Government? (ii.) To what degree are those numbers encreased or decreased since the last estimate? (iii.) Whether any of the inhabitants have removed, and what you conceive most proper to prevent such removal? (iv.) What trade is there with any other place besides this Kingdom, and from whence are the said Islands furnish'd with supplies (particularly of any manufactures) that they were wont to have from Great Britain? (v.) How is the trade of the said Islands encreased or decayed of late years, and the reason? (vi.) What are the present methods us'd to prevent illegall trade? and what further methods do you think adviseable for that purpose? (vii.) What number of ships etc. are there belonging to the said Islands, where built, and what number of seafaring men? (viii.) What manufactures are settled in the said Islands? (ix.) What is reckon'd to be the annual produce one year with another of the severall commodities in each of the said Islands? (x.) What trade have they with any foreign Plantations? How is that trade carried on? What commodities do they send to, or receive from foreign Plantations? We further desire that you would send us the best accounts you can possibily get concerning the foreign Plantations in your neighbourhood; at what times and by what means they were first possessed? What is the number of the inhabitants and of the Militia or what other military force is in each of these Plantations? What are the severall commodities produced in them? and how much is the annual produce one year with another of such commodities? What trade is carried on to and from these Plantations? What form of Government is establish'd in them and what methods are used to encourage and improve the products and the trade thereof? [C.O. 153, 13. pp. 352–373.]
Aug. 11.
N. York.
653. Governor Hunter to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses following. Signed, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. 8th Oct., 1718, Read 23rd April, 1719. Holograph. 1 p. Enclosed,
653. i. Account of grants of lands in New York made during Governor Hunter's administration. Same endorsement. Torn. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 1051. Nos. 85, 85 i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 1124. p. 77.]
Aug. 12.
Kensington.
654. H.M. Warrant granting licence of absence to Valentine Morris, Lt. Col. of the Regiment of Foot in the Leewards Islands, for one year as a Member of the Council there etc. Countersigned, J. Craggs. [C.O. 324, 33. pp. 183, 184.]
Aug. 12.
Offley Place, Hertfordshire.
655. Sir. H. Penrice to Mr. Popple. Explains that, owing to absence from London, he cannot attend the Board as requested, 7th Aug. etc. Signed, H. Penrice. Endorsed, Recd. 13th, Read 14th Aug., 1718. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 867. No. 5.]
Aug. 14.
Whitehall.
656. Mr. Popple to Sir Henry Penrice. Reply to 12th Aug. The occasion of the Lords Commissrs'. desiring to speak with you, arose from a letter from Governor Shute (v. 26th June), wherein he says that he had tryed some pirates, which must have been by virtue of a Commission issued for that purpose by the late Queen directed to Col. Dudley or the Govr. of the Massachusetts Bay for the time being, and adds that the had the opinion of the Judge of the Court of Admiralty at home thereupon, which their Lordps. do believe may be a mistake, because Sir E. Northey was of opinion that all the Commissions sent to the several Governors in the Plantations impowering them to try pirates in King William's time, determined by his demise, and advised the same should be renewed upon the late Queen's accession to the Throne, and they were renewed accordingly; However their Lordps. desire that you would please to let them know what questions Col. Shute did propose to you on this subject, if you can recollect the same. [C.O. 5, 915. pp. 180, 181.]
Aug. 14.
Virginia.
657. Lt. Governor Spotswood to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Abstract. Encloses Journals and Acts of the last Session. Observations upon the Acts for settling fees and for granting £1000 for maintaining scholars at the College of William and Mary, and some private Acts. Continues:—There were two others offerred for my assent etc., viz. An Act for dividing Westopher Parish and an Act for the better securing the payment of levys. The first framed upon the representation of a part of that parish against the declared sentiments of the greater number of the parishioners, and has so much of a party spirit in it, that it seems for that very reason it pass'd the Council so easily now, when another Bill verbatim the same was unanimously rejected by them last Session as unjust. The last, having been transformed into various shapes by both Houses, is at last so ill liked by many who voted for it, that I judged it not amiss to give them time to consider farther of it, in their next Session, etc. He expected that the Council would have promoted the renewing the Treaty with the Five Nations, but they delivered their opinion, that no measures should be taken with those Indians untill they should break into open hostilitys. He therefore proposed to prorogue the Assembly by Proclamation, but the Council being of opinion that an adjourned Assembly could not be prorogued without a meeting, he let them meet and adjourns them by short prorogations, to have them ready in case of any disturbances by the Indians, "that they may be in a readiness to apply a remedy to an evil, which they cannot be perswaded to prevent." Submits this question of proroguing Assemblies under adjournment to the Board's determination. "If the Parliamentary custom of Great Britain, is to be followed here in cases of adjournment, the same may as well be urged as a precedent to restrain a Governor from proroguing the Assembly at all without a meeting of the Members: and how great a burthen that would bring upon a country which pays so largely, as this does, both for the attendance and travelling expences of their Burgesses, is very obvious" etc. Refers to Minutes of Council concerning the behaviour of the Council to himself. They distinguish between the opinions they give as Virginians and as Counsellors to the King. "This is the very ground-work of our discord; for while I perceive the Creolean is uppermost in all their judgments, I cannot but take them for unfaithful Councelors; and while they prove me to be staunch for H.M. rights, they will think me a Governor not for their purpose, and for that reason strive to blast my credit" etc. Refers to a new contest, "which Mr. Ludwell and Mr. Commissary Blair have begun to set on foot, which is to dispute with the Crown the right of supplying the Churches of Virginia with Ministers; for I having lately preferred to a better benefice, the incumbent of a parish where Mr. Ludwell and Mr. Blair's brother are Vestrymen, they invited a Minister from another living, and fix'd him in their Parish by a vote of their Vestry etc. I laid this matter before the Council 30th July, where Mr. Ludwell and Mr. Blair strenuously opposed the powers granted H.M., urging the practice of the Country in placing and displacing their Ministers, to be of more force etc. This pretended right of patronage, has no other foundation than a clause in an Act made in 1662 entituled, Ministers to be inducted," etc. Desires Attorney General's opinion on this case. Refers to enclosures. The Proclamation prohibiting the unlawfull concourse of persons who have been guilty of piracy was occasioned by the great resort to this Colony, of certain pyrates who being cast away in North Carolian, surrendered there upon H.M. Proclamation; but as there's no great faith to be given to the forc'd submission of men of those principles, it seem'd necessary in a country so thinly inhabited as this is, to restrain their carrying arms, or associating in too great numbers, lest they should seize upon some vessell and betake themselves again to their old trade as soon as their money was spent. There are yet diverse pyrats on this coast, but the men of war cruising about our Capes, has prevented their taking any of our inward or outward bound ships, etc. Refers to enclosed account of grants of lands etc. Continues:—The Memorial mention'd in your Lordps.' letter concerning the French settlement at Louisiana was ommitted to be sent, etc. I have often regretted that after so many years as these countrys have been seated, no attempts have been made to discover the sources of our rivers, nor to establish any correspondence with those Nations of Indians to the Westward of us, even after the certain knowledge of the progress made by the French in surrounding us with their settlements: The cheif aim of my expedition over the great mountains in 1716 was to satisfy myself whether it was practicable that way to come at the Lakes. Having on that occasion found an easy passage over that great ridge of mountains, wch. before were judged unpassable, I also discovered by the relation of Indians who frequent those parts, that from the Pass, where I was, it is but three days march to a great Nation of Indians living on a river which discharges itself in the Lake Erie etc. Describes route of the French from Montreal to Mouville, their chief town in their new settlement of Louisiana. Continues:—By this communication, and the forts they have already built, the British Plantations are in a manner surrounded. By their commerce with the numerous Nations of Indians seated on both sides of the Lakes, they may not only engross the whole skin trade, but may when they please, send out such bodys of Indians on the back of these Plantations, as may greatly distress H.M. subjects here: and should they multiply their settlements along these Lakes so as to join their dominions of Canada to their new Colony of Louisiana, they might even possess themselves of any of these Plantations they pleased. Nature tis true has formed a barrier for us, by that long chain of mountains which run from the back of South Carolina as far as New York, and which are only passable in some few places: but even that natural defence may prove rather destructive to us, if the passes are not possess'd by us, before they are known to them. To prevent the dangers which threaten H.M. Dominions here from the growing power of these neighbours, nothing seems to me of more consequence than that now while the Nations are at peace, and while the French are yet uncapable of possessing all that vast tract which lyes on the back of these Provinces, we should attempt some settlements on the Lakes, and at the same time possess ourselves of those passes of the Great Mountains which are necessary to preserve a communication with such settlements. As the Lake Erie lyes almost in the center of the French communication, and (as I observed before) not above five days march from the late discovered passage of our Great Mountains; that seems the most proper for forming a settlement on. By which we shal not only share with the French in the commerce and friendship of the Indians on the banks of the Lakes; but may be able to cutt or disturb the communication between Canada and Louisiana, if a war should happen to break out. If such a settlement were once made, I can't see how the French could dispute the right, seeing in lands uninhabited, the Law of Nations vests a title in the first occupant; and should they think fitt to attempt disposessing us by force, we are nearer to support, than they to attack. As this country is the nearest of any other to furnish out and supply such a settlement, and as I flatter myself, that I have attain'd a more exact knowledge than any other Englishman yet hath, of the scituation of the Lakes, and the way through which they are most accessible over land, I shal be ready to undertake the executing this project, if H.M. thinks fitt to approve of it etc. The quit-rents of Virginia would answer the charge. Proposes, to begin with, "to reconnoître the country, and find out a proper post to be fortifyed on the Lakes," etc. Set out, Spotswood Papers II., 286. Signed, A. Spotswood. Endorsed, Recd. 3rd, Read 7th Oct., 1718. 15 pp. Enclosed,
657. i. Copies of Acts of Virginia and Governor's Instructions etc. relating to the collating to ecclesiastical benefices. Same endorsement. 2½ pp.
657. ii. Proclamations by Lt. Governor Spotswood (a) for publishing the repeal of the Acts for preventing frauds in tobacco payments and for the better regulation of the Indian trade, and (b) prohibiting trade with the French settlements in America. Williamsburgh, 12th Nov., 1717. 2 pp.
657. iii. Proclamations by Lt. Governor Spotswood (a) prohibiting the harbouring of deserters from H.M. ships of war, Nov. 13, 1717; (b) publishing the repeal of the Acts prohibiting the unlawfull assembly of Quakers, and concerning forreign debts, 14th May, 1718; (c) prohibiting the unlawfull concourse of such persons as have been guilty of pyracy, 10th July, 1718; and (d) proroguing the General Assembly, Williamsburgh, 30th July, 1718. Same endorsement. 3½ pp.
657. iv. List of patents granted for land in Virginia by Lt. Governor Spotswood. States names, dates, acreage and counties and upon what consideration granted. Includes a grant of 46½ acres in Gloucester County to John Lewis, John Smith, and Jno. Washington junr., for importation rights, 28th April, 1711. Same endorsement. 11th June, 1718. 24½ pp.
657. v. Account of H.M. Revenue of quit-rents in Virginia, 25th April, 1717–1718. Total received, (including £3766 1s. 4d. brought forward and arrears) = £6937 2s. 0¾d. Total disbursed, £1408 1s. 4¾d. Signed, J. Roscow, Rr. Genll., John Gryme, Depty. Audr., A. Spotswood. Same endorsement. 3 pp.
657. vi. Account of H.M. Revenue of 2s. per hhd., Virginia, 25th Oct., 1717–25th April, 1718. Receipts, £1144 4s. 11¼d. Payments, £2192 15s. Signed and endorsed as preceding. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 1318. Nos. 50, 50 i.–vi.; and (without enclosures) 5, 1365. pp. 142–169.]
Aug. 16.
Offley Flace.
658. Sir H. Penrice to Mr. Popple. Reply to 14th Aug. Some time ago my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty sent me a letter from Governor Shute relating to some pirates that were taken, desiring to know what shou'd be done wth. them; it being apprehended that the Act 11° and 12° W. III. for the more effectual suppressing of pirates, was expired. My report was to this effect. That the Act was continued by an Act 5° Anna, and since continued by another Act 1mo Georgii, and that it is still in force; and that pirates may be tried in the Plantations by a Commission under the Great Seal of Great Britain, or under the Great Seal of the Admiralty, in manner and form directed by that Act of Parliament. But I am very certain it was never proposed to me to report my opinion whether the Commission issued by the late Queen for the trial of pirates, to Coll. Dudley, or to the Govr. of that Province for the time, determin'd by the demise of the late Queen, or whether it ought to be renew'd upon H.M. happy accession to the Throne, etc. Refers to Admiralty for copies of correspondence etc. Signed, H. Penrice, Endorsed, Recd. 18th, Read 19th Aug., 1718. Addressed. Postmark. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 867. No. 6; and 5, 915. pp. 181–183.]
Aug. 19.
Whitehall.
659. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Encloses copy of Sir H. Penrice's letter 16th Aug. etc. and desires him to move the Lords Commrs. of the Admiralty to inform the Lords Commrs. for Trade of what passed at their Board concerning this matter. [C.O. 5, 915. pp. 183, 184.]
[Aug. 19.]660. Extracts of several letters from Carolina. (a) South Carolina, 17th Dec., 1717. Our Assembly by a late Act has encreased the duty of goods imported here etc. There is likewise a late Act that 18 months after the ratification thereof lays an additional duty upon negroes of £40 etc. Negroes will now fetch a better price than ever etc. The Act for carrying on the Indian trade by the publick is continued for 5 years which in the opinion of many is not thought to be for the advantage of the country. We are very much afraid we shall by that means loose in a few years all our Indians who will goe over to the French interest and become greater enemies than ever, the Act is in itself a monopoly and the country has no further to doe in it then to oblige such as should goe amongst the Indians to trade to give security for their good behaviour among the Indians and the Indians themselves are allready averse to this manner of carrying on the trade amongst them and deam it as a hardship imposed upon them. There have allready been some vessells in the Bay of Mexico Peneicola and Moville with our Indian tradeing goods and have sold them to the French and Spaniards and are return'd hither with considerable quantities of skins and more will be going, tho' there is now since passed a Law to prevent them, here are in port some Bristoll man who now talks of fitting out directly from Bristol to these places which will prove of very evil consequence to this country and by which means we may loose all our Indians and this chiefly by reason that the country has engrossed the whole trade thro' a mercenary and ignorant temper which reigns in most of our people. 'Tis highly reasonable this should be remedied by disannulling the Act at home as they have done that of the Virginia Company for carrying on that trade by a Company Virginia, our Assembly has at length posted the Act for cancelling their bills of credite, this next March is to be paid in a tax of £47,000 of which £24,000 is to sink the same of bills and the remaining £27,000 to pay of sundry orders and debts contracted by the Publick. In March 1718 is to be paid in another tax of £30,000 to sink the same value in bills, so that by March come 12 months will be cancelled £54,000 bills, unless they'l think fitt to break again thro' their Act and forfeit their publick faith, etc. (b) South Carolina, 13th June, 1718. Capt. Mede sailed over our barr 18th May in company with Capt. Hudson and Capt. Clarck in the Crowley, the latter put back for his passengers and boats that he lost goeing over the barr and the 22nd as he was just proceeding from the barr was unfortunately taken by two pirates, one a large French ship mounted with 40 guns and the other a sloop mounted with 12 guns with two other sloopes for their tenders having in all about 300 men all English the ship is commanded by one Theach and the sloop by one Richards who have been upon this account in those and other vessells about two years and is the same sloop and company that was off of our barr the last summer and took two vessells inward bound they now took besides Capt. Clarck, Capt. Craigh in a small ship belonging to this place as he went over the barr bound for London and the William Capt. Hewes from Weymouth. Whilst these ships were in their possession they sent one of Clark's passengers with Richards and another person master of one of their tenders to towne with a message to send them a chest of medecines which if was refused by the Government they would imediately put to death all the persons that were in their possession and burn their ships etc. and threatn'd to come over the barr for to burn the ships that lay before the Towne and to beat it about our ears, as the Town is at present in a very indifferent condition of making much resistance if them or any other enemye should attempt it and that we were very desirious to gett them off our coast by fair means which we could not doe otherwise for want of such helps as other Governments are supply'd with from the Crown, the chest of medecines was sent etc. Soon after they dismissed our people and their ships having first taken from the two vessells that were homeward bound what little money they had on board and all their provisions and from the two others the same and distroy'd most of their cargoes etc. all for pure mischief sake and to keep their hands in. They made no farther stay (thanks to God) but are gone to the Northward etc. Those people are so accustomed to this easy way of living that nothing can reclaime and most of those that took up with the Proclamation are now return'd to the same imployment which has rather proved an encouragement than anything else, there now being three for one there was before the Proclamation was put out. They are now come to such a head that there is no trading in these parts, it being almost impossible to avoid them and nothing but a considerable force can reduce them which at first might have been done at an easy charge, had the Government but rightly appraised what sort of people they generally are and how most of them that first turn'd pirates have formerly lived being such as had always sailed in these parts in privateers and lived in the Bay of Campechia they had not we believe thought that a pardon would have supresed them that being of so near akin to their present way of living. Since they are gone severall vessells are come in amongst which is a brigantine from Angola with 86 negroes which was mett with by the pirates they took from her 14 of their best negroes, she belongs to Bristol, a ship from Boston is also come in which was likewise plunder'd by them, etc. The Spaniards and French are very industrious in improveing their settlements in these parts and will stick at no charges to bring the Indians entirely under their Goverment, the latter are like to become very powerful at their settlements of Mobille in a very short time. By the care our Government takes of its Plantations one woulds imagine that they are of no further concern to the Government than they are an opportunity of advancing and gratifying a Courtier or a considerable party man. The neglect of this upon a sudden warr with any of neighbours it's greatly feared may prove of the utmost ill consequence to the rest it being the only barrier we have. Wee wish it may be thought of before it proves too late, it cannot be expected that it can ever become a place well settled under a Proprietory Government and able to defend itself or of any securitye to our other Plantations etc. Endorsed, Recd, (from Mr. Godin) 19th, Read 28th Aug., 1718. 5 pp. [C.O. 5, 1265. No. 107.]
Aug. 20.
Hampton Court.
661. H.M. Warrant for John Gamble to be of the Council of Antegoa in the room of Richard Oliver deceased. Countersigned, J. Craggs. [C.O. 324, 33. p, 185.]
Aug. 20.662. J. Miranda to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers to Instructions to Governors 31st July, 1717. Continues: In Feb. last my ship Hampstead English built was obliged to pay at New York 3s. per. tonn pursuant to a Act of their Assembly which lays a duty upon all English ships of 3s. per tonn and excludes their plantacion built ships from paying the same. The abovesaid ship being now departing to New York, prays that instructions may be sent that this scandalous practice may have an end etc. Signed, J. Miranda. Endorsed, Recd., Read 21st Aug., 1718. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1051. No. 72.]
Aug. 20.663. Mr. West to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to June 26. By the Act of New York for paying and discharging several debts due from this Colony, to the persons therein named etc., it is proposed to raise a fund sufficient to pay of all the publick debts of ye said Colony, some of wch. are in the preamble recited to be due to severall companies of soldiers (and their families) who had been employ'd by ye Governmt. of ye said Colony presently after ye Revolution, for the defense of the same; and also to severall persons who at the same time had furnish'd the Government with goods necessary for ye publick service, for wch. debts no provision had ever been made etc. I have been attended by several merchants of London trading to New York. Their first objection is that several sums are to be paid upon claims disallowed by the Act of 1714 etc. But I am of opinion that the merchants of London are not proper to object to what debts ought to be allow'd or disallow'd, that being a thing which is absolutely in the power of the Generall Assembly etc. The only head upon which the merchants can properly object is by showing that the manner in wch. ye publick debts are proposed to be paid will be prejudiciall to the trade of Great Britain etc. It is certain that the only considerable sufferers by it are the merchants of Great Britain who trade to that Province. This Act raises money upon an anticipated fund wch. is appropriated for 17 years to come, during wch. terme no interest is provided for these bills of credit nor any persons appointed (let the necessityes of merchts. for want of money be never so great) to pay any money upon the said bills during the time of their circulation. So that the British traders to that country are by their Factors, under pain of loosing their debts, oblidged to accept of these bills in payment for their freight, goods etc. at par, when they are upon the beforementioned account actually at 30, 40 and 50 pr. cent discount. By an order of your Lordpps.' Board made about 10 or 11 years agoe, to ye end that ye merchants of Great Britain might be at a certainty in the carrying on their trade, it was made a generall rule to be observ'd by the Governors of ye Plantations that 17 pwt. 12 qrs. of plate should pass current but for 6s. sterling and no more being after ye rate of 6s. 10d. pr. oz. But as it is represented to me (v. enclosure), by this method of creating paper money silver is advanc'd from 6s. 10d. to 9s. per oz., so that ye merchants for what goods they had sold before ye issuing of these bills of credit, and for wch. their money is still standing out must loose 33 p.c. And what is still a greater hardship upon our British merchants the inhabitants of New York take this further advantage, when a cargoe arrives in that Colony, they knowing that ye long lying of a ship will eat out ye profitt of the voyage and that the goods imported may not be proper for any other Colony force the merchants to sell their goods at the usuall price, for wch. they pay them in these bills of credit at par, which being of no value in any other place, they are sure of haveing them back again for their own commodities at their own rates. It does not clearly appear to me, that ye merchants can be any loosers in consequence of these bills, but only for the debts now actually due, for I beleve all merchants in future contracts will take care to proportion the price of goods to the discount the bills of credit are at. By the Instruction of 31st July, 1717, Governors are directed not to pass any law which may anyways affect the trade or shiping of this Kingdom, unless there be a clause therein declaring the same shall not be in force untill it be approv'd by H.M. This Act does seem very materially to affect the trade of this Kingdom, especially if it be considered that it continues the customes etc. which commodities are imported into that Colony by British shiping, and that imediatly upon ye passing of this Act, Bills of Credit were in pursuance of it struck and sent about for payment, which is a very material variation from the method taken in 1714, when a bill of ye same nature was pass'd, since in that bill there is a clause to this effect, That none of the intended bills of credit should be struck or pass current, before the Royall assent was signified etc. Which is a caution I am of opinion ought in prudence to have been observ'd in the drawing of this Bill. And it is indeed ye only objection in point of law which I have unto it. All the others are perfectly merchantile, and matters of a prudentiall consideration. From the Governor's letter and the Agent it appears that the ends for which the said money was given, were perfectly just and honourable, and that the money given to the Governor was to defray the extraordinary or incidental charges of Government, which happens in all countries and cannot be foreseen. And therefore in that particular I am of opinion that his accepting the said summe for those purposes is not contrary to the Instruction of 20th April, 1703 etc. Concurs with the Governor, that since the bills of credit are actually current, they cannot now be called in again without throwing the Colony into the utmost confusion. Signed, Richd. West. Endorsed, Recd. 26th Aug., 1718, Read 22nd April, 1719. 4½ pp. Enclosed,
663. i. Memorial by Merchants trading to New York. Objections to the Act of New York referred to in preceding. Signed, Char. Lodwick and 5 others. With a declaration by 4 masters of ships lately come from New York:—Since Jan. last there has been issued out new bills of creditt the wch. we and others were obliged to take for freight equall to silver money. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1051. Nos. 82, 83; and (without enclosure) 5, 1124. pp. 64–71.]
Aug. 21.
Custom House, London.
664. Mr. Carkesse to Mr. Popple. Reply to 7th Aug. Mr. Kay did not deliver any such accot. here, etc. Signed, Cha. Carkesse. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd, Read 26th Aug., 1718. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 867. No. 8; and 5, 915. pp. 200, 201.]
Aug. 21.
Whitehall.
665. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Craggs. When we had under consideration the Instructions for Sr. Nicholas Laws, H.M. Governor of Jamaica, we found several things therein, which we thought necessary to be alterd, and having represented the same to H.M.; He was graciously pleasd to approve thereof. We therefore now humbly offer, that the like alterations be made in the Instructions to the other Governors, mutatis mutandis, as near as the nature of each Govt. will allow, according to the inclosd papers, etc. [C.O. 324, 10. p. 206.]
Aug. 21.
Whitehall.
666. Same to Same. Propose as above alterations in Instructions of Governor of Barbados, in articles iii., ix., x., xv., xxv., xxvi., xlix., lxviii., lxxxv., xcvi. [C.O. 29, 13. pp. 486–497.]
Aug. 21.
Whitehall.
667. Same to Same. Enclose amendments proposed to be made in the Instructions of Lt. Governor Bennett. [C.O. 38, 7. pp. 346–357.]
Aug. 22.
Whitehall.
668. Mr. Popple to John Lloyd, Secretary to the Post Master General. Encloses extract of Lt. Governor Spotswood's letter June 24. [C.O. 5, 1365. p. 142.]
Aug. 22.
Admiralty Office.
669. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. In reply to 19th Aug., encloses following. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd, Read 26th Aug., 1718. ¾ p. Enclosed,
669. i. Mr. Burchett to Sr. Hen. Penrice, Judge of the Admiralty. Admty. Office, 25th June, 1717. Encloses letter from Mr. Dudley to Mr. Dummer, and desires his opinion in what manner the pirates in custody in New England may be properly and legally proceeded against. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd Aug., 1718. Copy. 1 p.
669. ii. Sir H. Penrice to Mr. Burchett. Reply to preceding. I am of opinion, that, the pirates in custody in New England may be most properly and legally proceeded against according to the Act of the 11th and 12th K. William III continued in the reign of Q. Anne and 1mo Georgii etc. as 16th Aug. Signed, H. Penrice. Endorsed as preceding. Copy. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 867. Nos. 7, 7 i., ii.; and (without enclosures) 5, 915. p. 200.]
Aug. 23.670. Receipt by Tho. Smith, the ship Beaver, for a red gilt leather box from A. Philips for Governor Hunter (Commission for pardoning pirates). Signed, Tho. Smith. Endorsed, Recd. 14th, Read 15th Oct., 1718. 1 small p. [C.O. 5, 1051. No. 78.]
Aug. 23.
Whitehall.
671. Reference of enclosed petition to the Attorney General. Countersigned, Roxburghe. ¼ p. Annexed,
671. i. Petition of Sir Robt. Mountgomery to the King. Refers to report of Board of Trade upon his design to make a settlement at Azilia in Carolina. By reason of the Indian war petitioner has been at expense beyond his expectation. Quotes case of grant of licence for a lottery in aid of Virginia in 1612. Continues:—Encouraged by this precedent and humbly conceiving, that the Act concerning lotteries, as it was made by an English Parliament, long before the happy union of the two Kingdoms, does not extend to your Majesty's Dominion of North Britain, Petitioner therefore most humbly prays that your Majesty, taking into your Royal consideration, the general usefullness of the petitioner's design, will be graciously pleased to grant to him and his assigns, your Royal licence for proposing, establishing and causeing to be drawn (within twelve months from, and after the date of the said licence) a Lottery in your Majesty city of Edenborough, or in any of the Royal Boroughs of North Britain, to be drawn openly, and in the usual, and most publick manner, with, and under the inspection of the Magestrates of that City, or Borough etc., Petitioner to issue, by some Bank or Society 100,000 tickets at the rate of 40s. per ticket, the highest prize being £10,000 and the rest at the discretion of petitioner, provided that the general proportion of blanks to prizes shall not be more than four to one, and that the amount of prizes, in the whole, shall be equal to the full summe, which shall arise by the sale of the tickets, after a deduction of 15 per cent. for petitioners expenses in supporting the settlement above mentioned etc. 2 pp. [C.O. 5, 383. Nos. 3, 3 i.]
Aug. 26.
Portsmouth.
672. Mr. Bridger to the Council of Trade and Plantations. I have since my last discovered some persons who have made it a practise to destroy a great number of large mast trees in H.M. woods by cutting them down and sawing them into plank etc. I design to prosecute them forthwith etc. Upon viewing the Eastern parts I have found a great swamp of 10 miles and 4 broad full of good white pine trees of the first sort etc. It lies near a navagable river whence they may be shipped for Great Britain etc. These parts being now setteling and the people building saw mills on every river and brooke almost, which will soon cutt down these fine pines, and all others, unless an imediate care be taken by Acts or such other methods as your Lordships shall think proper etc. Mr. Cooke has perswaded the people H.M. has no right to the woods in this country and agreeable to that oppinion they designe to act the next winter as they give out, what method I must act on, I cannot yet see etc. I find it very dificult to protect the least part of H.M. woods singily by myself, from the common wasts, made therein by the inhabitants of the frontier places near those woods etc. Signed, J. Bridger. Endorsed, Recd. 2nd, Read 3rd Oct., 1718. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 5, 867. No. 14; and 5, 915. pp. 217, 218.]
Aug. 27.
Hampton Court.
673. H.M. Commission to Charles Charnock to be Deputy Judge Advocate of the Forces at Placentia. Countersigned, J. Craggs. [C.O. 324, 33. p. 186.]
Aug. 27.
Hampton Court.
674. Order of King in Council. Repealing three Acts of New Hampshire, for the relief of ideots; providing for posthumous children; and against High Treason etc. Signed, James Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 23rd, Read 24th Jan., 1718/19. 1¼ pp. [C.O. 5, 867. No. 24; and 5, 915. pp. 241, 242.]
Aug. 27.
N. York.
675. Governor Hunter to Mr. Popple. Abstract. Cannot write to the Board as he is summoned by express to meet the Indians at Albany. Intends to meet the Assembly next month, and is confident he will then be able to remedy what is really amiss. But if too easy an ear is given to self interested little merchants there or spiteful ones here, it is to no purpose for him to remain on that side. The Acts last past, which are of no consequence, are not yet ready, owing to a lack of parchment etc. He perceives that his interests move more heavily than usual, but cannot assign a reason. Thinks nothing can prevent his returning in the Spring, but God alone is the disposer of futuritys. Set out, N.Y. Col. Docs. v. p. 516. Signed, I am for ever intirely Yours, Ro. Hunter. Endorsed, Recd. 16th Oct., 1718, Read 23rd April, 1719. Holograph. 3½ pp. Enclosed,
675. i. List of 9 Acts passed at New York, 1718. Same endorsement. 1 p. [C.O. 5, 1051. Nos. 86, 86 i.; and (without enclosure) 5, 1124. pp. 77, 78.]
Aug. 28.
Whitehall.
676. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Hunter. Refer to memorial of Mr. Miranda (v. 20th Aug.), complaining of duties raised at N. York upon English ships, "which we suppose to be [by virtue of] the Revenue Act and the Act to oblige all vessels etc. to pay duty. But as we sent you 3rd Feb. last our objections to those Acts, which are now confirmed by Mr. Miranda's complaint, and did then recommend you to get an Act passed for removing those objections, we hope it is already done or will be very soon otherwise we shall be obliged to lay those Acts before H.M. for his disallowance, and we do not doubt but you will take particular care for the future pursuant to the late Instruction from H.M. that no Acts be passed in your Governmts. which may affect the Trade or Navigation of this Kingdom." [C.O. 5, 1124. pp. 37, 38; and 5, 1079. No. 105.]
Aug. 28.
Whitehall.
677. Council of Trade and Plantations to Mr. Secretary Craggs. We had the honour to communicate to you some time ago such accounts as we had then received, in relation to the pirates in the West Indies and to the state of Carolina etc. Enclose Governor Johnson's and other letters of 18th June and 19th Aug. upon the same subject, that you may lay the same before H.M., and receive his orders thereupon. [C.O. 5, 1293. p. 157.]
Aug. 28.
Whitehall.
678. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Encloses extract of Governor Johnson's letter June 18, for the information of the Admiralty. [C.O. 5, 1293. p. 158.]
Aug. —679. Roger Tublay to Lord Carteret, Secretary of State. A statement of his claim against Don Antonio Casado, son of the Marquis de Monteleon, Ambassador to the Court of Great Britain, in the matter of protected bills for £2000, given by him to the order of Col. Thomas Beckford, June 10, 1718. etc. French. 5½ pp. [C.O. 137, 46. No. 35.]