America and West Indies
June 1719, 1-13

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Cecil Headlam (editor)

Year published

1933

Pages

101-123

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'America and West Indies: June 1719, 1-13', Calendar of State Papers Colonial, America and West Indies, Volume 31: 1719-1720 (1933), pp. 101-123. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=74070 Date accessed: 28 November 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

June 1719, 1-13

June 1.
Whitehall.
211. Mr. Popple to Jeremiah Dummer. Asks for papers relating to H.M.S. Squirrel in Nova Scotia. v 1st Jan. [C.O. 218, 1. p. 401.]
June 2.
Whitehall.
212. Mr. Delafaye to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Col. Philips being on his departure etc., you are to prepare the draughts for his Commission and Instructions forthwith for the approbation of the Lords Justices, and a representation of whatever else you think necessary for enabling him to discharge his trust, and for the furtherance of H.M. service and the improvement of that Colony etc. Signed, Cha. Delafaye. Endorsed, Recd., Read 3rd June, 1719. 1 p. [C.O. 217, 2. No. 67; and 218, 1. p. 403.]
[June 2.]213. Papers relating to the proceedings of H.M.S. Squirrel on the coast of Nova Scotia.
213. i. (a) Deposition of Nathaniel Cunningham. In Aug. last at the Island of Canceau, I told M. Le Sond the French would not be allowed to fish there another year, for the Articles of Peace had left it in our favour etc. He swore that if the French did not, the English shd. never fish there more. Boston, Oct. 27, 1718. Signed, Nathl. Cunningham.
213. i. (b) Deposition of Giles Hall and William Walter. Relates a quarrel with Bernard Le Sond, Cape Canso, 1717, the latter claiming it as French ground and threatening to complain to the Governor of St. Peter's who had written to him that if the English do carry or ship any French men in their services, the French and Indians would come and cut them off etc. Boston, Oct. 30, 1718. Signed, Giles Hall, Wm. Walter.
213. i. (c) Deposition of John Henshaw and Jonathan Rowse. Some time in May, 1718, Govr. St. Ovid. came over to Cape Canso and forbid the English fishing upon that shore, for it was belonging to his Governmt. After I had some dispute with him concerning that matter, the Govr. and Le Sond went away together up the Bay, and some days after the Indians came down in a body to pull down houses and stages to plunder us. They said Le Sond ordered them to do so, for he had an order from the Govr. etc. But Le Sond would never show any order from the Govr. But oftentimes was threatening us by making use of the Indians to drive us off from our fishery. Boston, Oct. 30, 1718. Signed, John Henshaw, Jona. Rowse. The whole endorsed, Recd. 2nd, Read 3rd June, 1719. Copy. 2 pp.
213. ii. Duplicate of No. 137. vi.
213. iii. Minutes of Council of the Massachusetts Bay. Boston, Oct. 18, 1718. Ordered that the perishable goods seized by Capt. Smart at Cape Canso be sold at public vendue, and the vessels with other things not perishable remain in the harbour. The produce of the said goods to be deposited in the hands of Andrew Faneuil, and that he and Capt. Smart give bonds that the same be returned in case there should be orders from Great Brittain that satisfaction be made to the French. Instructions to the Judge of the Admiralty accordingly. Endorsed as preceding. Copy. 1½ pp.
213. iv. Governor Shute to Governor de Brouillan, sent by Capt. Thomas Smart. I have had complaints by several of H.M. good subjects of this Province who have undertook the fishing business at Cape Canso of the encroachmts. of the French etc. I therefore ask the proper redress from you, before I proceed to other methods of asserting and vindicating the rights of the King of Great Brittain reserved and secured to him by the Treaty of Utreicht; By letters from several English merchants now residing at Cape Canso I am informed that there is a great number of the French already come over thither, that they have sett up stages and houses on that shoar, and that there is French ship in that harbour and more expected. I need not tell you that if these proceedings are abbetted and favoured by the French Governmt. they will be accounted an open and notorious infraction of the 12th and 13th Articles of the Treaty etc. Quoted. Continues: No other lands but the Islands being given to the French, they can upon no colour or pretence of justice, settle themselves upon Canso, which is the Continent of Nova Scotia and does of right belong to the King of Great Brittain as much as any other part of H.M. Dominion. I have therefore sent Capt. Smart to demand in the King's name that orders be immediately given to the French that are gone over to Cape Canso to fish on that shoar and make there fish on the land there to withdraw and return to the French Territories and that the French ships or vessels now riding in the English harbours be ordered to depart and that H.M. good subjects have no further molestation in the use of those priviledges, which they claim by the ancient right of the Kings of Great Brittain and by the said Treaty of Utreicht by which the same is strengthen'd and confirm'd. Signed, Saml. Shute. Same endorsement. Copy. 1¾ pp.
213. v. Memorial of James Pitts. Oliver Noyes, John Marshall, Nathl. Cunningham and Benjamin Alford in behalf of themselves and partners concerned in the Fishery to the Governor, Council and Assembly of the Massachusetts Bay. June 9th, 1718. Cape Canso being a harbour accommodated for the making and curing of fish, Memorialists fitted out a considerable number of vessels, with stores for the summer's voyage and to erect houses, stages etc. In 1716, Lt. Young in H.M.S. Rose called at the said harbour and finding about 30 French shallops a fishing there, ordered them away and received answer that they acknowledged it to be within the English boundarys and would be gone. Notwithstanding the subjects of the French King have this spring to the number of about 300 taken possession of the same, erected houses and stages and one ship from France now in the harbour and more dayly expected, have seized the best places to make their fish and threaten the English with a removal pretending what they act is by the advice and direction of the Governour of Cape Britton, they claim it as their right, and that if they are interrupted they will stand by and defend their interrest etc. Signed, James Pitts, Oliver Noyes, John Marshall and Compa. Same endorsement. Copy. 1½ pp.
213. vi. Duplicate of No. 137. v.
213. vii. (a) Governor Shute's Instructions to Capt. Thomas Smart, H.M.S. Squirrel for his designed negotiation at Cape Canso and Cape Breton. You are to repair to Cape Canso and if you find the complaints (v. supra No. i.) to be true; you are first to go over to Cape Breton and after delivery of my letter to the Governour, you are to enquire of him whether those proceedings of the French have been of his countenance and approbation; which if he disowns you are to give immediate orders that they withdraw themselves their ships and boats from Cape Canso and the coast thereabouts, and that there be no further cause of complaint of the like injuries for the future. If the Governour owns his approbation of the actions of ye French, you are to make a plain and open protestation of the injustice thereof, and the breach thereby made of the Treaty of Peace as well as an infringement of the rights of the English to the said land by a much older claim. You are to show him the Treaty etc., and urge from the 12th and 13th Articles of the indisputable title of the English to the said country and coast and in the King's name to demand that justice be speedily done to the English in that affair; and assure the Governour that the disturbances given to their enjoyment of that place if supported and vindicated by him will be resented by the English Governmt. as a plain and notorious violation of the Treaty of Peace, and measures will be taken by them accordingly: After which you are to allow him a reasonable time to bring of the people and their effects from Cape Canso; and if then no compliance be made to your demands, you are to seize upon what fish and other effects you find within the English limits and bring it of with you and to demolish whatsoever buildings the French have sett up there and compel the French people to quit the said place, except such as are friendly to the English, and have their leave to reside among them. You are by all means to endeavour the effecting your business without bloodshed and not proceed so far unless urged to it by plain and evident necessity. I have ordered Capt. Cyprian Southack to accompany you. He has the vote of the Council to assist you in your negotiation; He has a perfect knowledge of the boundaries of those countries and carries with him a good draught thereof, and has had long experience of the customs and manners of the French inhabiting there. You are therefore to do nothing of moment without his assistance. (b) Sailing orders for Capt. Smart. Signed, Samll. Shute. Endorsed as preceding. Copy. 2½ pp.
213. viii. Governor St. Ovide de Brouillan to [? Governor Shute] Louis Bourg. The Royal Island, 23rd Sept., 1717 (sic). Capt. Smart has delivered me your letter etc. Refers to his letter to Governor Philipps. Cf. July 23, 1718. Continues: This day we have had a serious conference with Mr. Smart and Capt. Southack etc. The difference which we found in the 12th Article [of the Treaty of Utrecht] of which he is the bearer and that which I have, occasioned us to give reciprocally copys of the 12th and 13th Articles which we have each of us signed. You will remark by the 12th of yours Sr. that the points of the compass are not equall and moreover there is no mention made of the 30 leagues near the coasts of Nova Scotia as it is in mine which on this occasion causes a very great errour so that 'tis impossible to come to any agreement at present where the ancient limits might or ought to be, for according to your rhombe of the wind you bear much in the Royall Island, and according to ours we border about the rivers of St. Mary. I don't think it convenient for private subjects who ought to be no more than the interpreters of the orders of the Kings their masters to decide points so nice, etc. Nevertheless I have offered Mr. Smart to withdraw after the fishery is over to other places in the Royall Island, all the French inhabitants that are at Canso and thereabouts, provided that he would likewise evacuate the English inhabitants that are there untill we had a perfect decision from our Courts. I know Sir, how strict the knotts are which unite our two Crownes, and I should be very sorry to do any thing that might give any occasion to break them etc. I am going to inform the Council of what we have done. I reckon that I shall have positive news next Spring of what has been regulated thereon etc. Signed, St. Ovide de Brouillan. Same endorsement. 2 pp. [C.O. 217, 2. Nos. 68–75].
June 2.214. Mr. West to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Reply to April 23rd. Excepting one, I have no objection to the Acts passed in the Massachusetts Bay in 1718, provided that the severall Acts to which they respectively referr shall have had the approbation of your Lordshipps' Board, etc. The Act, to which I object, is for the regulating and limiting credit in trade, and for the preventing the double payment of debts. By which it is enacted that no actions shall be brought on any books or account whatsoever for debts to be contracted by merchants, etc., after the expiration of two years from the contracting thereof etc., which I am of opinion may be very prejudiciall to merchants who are resident in England, and have debts due to them in New England, since by it they are barr'd from sueing for their just debts unless they repaire into the Province within the prescrib'd term. It is provided indeed that the Act shall not extend to barr any action of account between creditor and debtor, where either of them are beyond the seas etc., the consequence of which provisoe is, that all other actions are barr'd etc. The whole Act is no ways proper to be pass'd into law. Signed, Richd. West. Endorsed, Recd. 5th June, 1719. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 867. No. 37; and 5, 915. pp. 285, 286].
June 3.
Whitehall.
215. Mr. Popple to Mr. Carkesse. Encloses extract of Capt. Scott's letter, Nov. 16, 1718, relating to Newfoundland trade, for the information of H.M. Commissioners of Customs. [C.O. 195, 6. pp. 499, 500].
June 3.
Whitehall.
216. Same to Mr. Burchett. Reply to May 18th. Capt. Ogle's departure for Newfoundland being so very sudden, the Council of Trade and Plantations had not time to make some additions as they intended to the usual Instructions. And you will find very little new in those now sent you beyond some small alteration in the form of the return. But to supply that defect they send you copies of some papers which may be of use to Capt. Ogle.—Capt. Scott's letter Nov. 16, 1718, and letter from Consul at Lisbon, and Mr. Bridgen's Memorial, Jan. 23, 1719. As to the fishing Admirals (Jan. 23) their Lordships are of opinion that as the cases are stated, Capt. Scott is certainly right, but any Capn. of a ship who shall import into Newfoundland from any part of Europe out of H.M. Dominions prohibited goods, by the 6th paragraph of the Act of the 15th of King Charles II, does not only forfeit his right of being Admiral, but likewise the commodities so imported, together with his ship, guns, tackle, furniture, ammunition and apparel. But for the Commadore's Government upon this or any other occasion that may offer, I likewise enclose a collection of the several Acts relating to Trade and Navigation. Annexed,—
216. i. Heads of Enquiry relating to the Trade and Fishery of Newfoundland. 32 Heads of Enquiry and Additional Instructions 1–16, as 3rd March, 1718. Additional Instruction 17 now concludes: That the method taken by Commodore Scott to oblige those who depart before ye convoy not to take off the fishermen with them may take effect, you are to use your utmost endeavors to improve the same, by taking all the care possible to have such obligations so witnessed, in case it may be thought proper to put them in force, that they may not be invalidated for want of evidence to prove them authentick; And you are likewise to be as strict as is practicable, to oblige all New England ships to sail at the same time, that you shall leave the land, and to get all the proof that can be had of any breach of obligations entered into, as aforesaid, and transmit an account thereof to the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations.
216. ii. Scheme of the Fishery of Newfoundland for 1719. To the usual scheme, are added enquiries (i) as to the number of passengers on fishing ships, (ii) of men and women servants among the inhabitants, and (iii) how many of the inhabitants remained in the country last winter. [C.O. 195, 6. pp. 501–505].
June 4.
Whitehall.
217. Council of Trade and Plantations to Governor Shute. Acknowledge letters of 26th June and 29th Sept., 1718, and 1st Jan., 1719. There is a clause in an Act of Parliament past this last Session, which requires a more strict examination for the future into the goodness of pitch and tar imported here from the Plantations, and no præmium is to be allowed but for such of the said commodities as shall be perfectly clear and good, etc., as soon as the Act itself is printed, we shall send you a copy of it. We have received the accounts of the Revenue of the Massachusets Bay from May, 1717, to May, 1718, and the accounts of New Hampshire for 1715–1717, and tho' the annual expense of those Governments may be uncertain, yet this is no reason why you should not send us such accounts every 6 months as by your Instructions you are required to do, or at least once a year. We have also received the Minutes of Council and of Council in Assembly of the Massachusets Bay to Aug. last, but we want the Minutes of Council and Assembly since that time, which you ought to have sent us before this time, as likewise, the Minutes of Council for New Hampshire ever since 1716. We must upon this occasion put you in mind that by your Instructions from H.M. you are required to transmit regularly to us these as well as several other accounts which you have hitherto neglected to send, and that if you are not more carefull in this respect for the future, we shall think ourselves obliged to take notice of it in a Repn. to H.M. We approve of what you have done in removing Dr. Cooke from the Council and we must earnestly recommend and require you to use your utmost endeavours to support Mr. Bridger in the execution of his office for preserving the woods; complaints have been made here of the great destruction of those woods contrary to the Acts of Parliament, and that great quantities of timber have been sent from your Governments to Spain. It is necessary therefore that Mr. Bridger should have all the countenance and assistance possible in discharge of his duty. In your letter of 29th Sept. you tell us there are three vacancies by the death of some and by the non-acceptance of others of the Council of New Hampshire etc., but you do not inform us of their names, so that we cannot propose to H.M. the filling of those places till we know in whose room they are to be appointed. We think it necessary to observe to you that we find many things relating to your Governmt. printed in the publick news papers here of which you had given us no manner of account. We are surprised that you have not in any of your forementioned letters acknowledged the receipt of H.M. additional Instruction relating to the passing of laws that may any ways affect the trade or shipping of this Kingdom, tho' we have reason to be assured that you received the same some time ago. We must desire that for the future you do not mix the affairs of your two Governmts. in one and in the same letter but that you write what relates to each Province in a distinct and separate letter. You tell us, 1st Jan., that you have sent all the papers relating to the proceedings of the Squirrel to the Agent to produce the same, in case the French should make any complaint here; but we cannot apprehend why you did not send us those accounts, that we might have made such use of them, as might have been proper. Enclose Mr Solicitor General's opinion about the trial of pirates etc. (v. 5th March). It being for H.M. service that we be at all times acquainted with the absence of Councillors from their posts in the Plantations, We desire that whensoever you give leave to any member of H.M. Council in New Hampshire to be absent from his post, that such leave be under your hand and seal, and that you forthwith transmit to us a copy of such licence of leave, as also an account when such Councillor departed from New Hampshire and to what place he is gone. We observe that you do not send us the private Acts which from time to time are passed in the Province of the Massachusets Bay, this you ought to do that we may see whether those Acts are passed in such a manner as is agreable to your Instructions. It will be necessary for the future that when any private bills are sent over the parties concerned in those Acts do appoint some person here to sollicit the dispatch of them, otherways they will lye by unconfirmed. In your letter of 1st Jan. you complain of the miserable condition the Province of the Massachusets Bay is in, by reason of the paper bills etc., which daily sink in value, and that if some proper measures be not taken that Province and its trade will be ruined. This is a matter which you ought to have explained more fully to us particularly what you mean by proper measures. If you have [any] thing in view, how to remedy the inconvenience you apprehend or any scheme to propose for the doing it; you might have communicated it to us that we might have considered the same and given you our thoughts thereupon. We send you inclosed our observations upon some of the Acts of the Massachusets Bay and New Hampshire for your information and direction in like cases for the future. As also a paper of queries to which we must desire your particular answer. Their being frequent complaints that great numbers of British seamen and servants are every year carryed from Newfoundland to New England by New England ships to the great prejudice of this Kingdom and the trade of Newfoundland, Instructions are annually given to the Commadores of the Convoy to prevent the said unwarrantable practice as much as possible, and Commadore Scot the last year took bonds from 3 New England masters etc., (v. 16th Nov. 1718). Notwithstanding which the said masters did carry away several men etc. We send you inclosed the said bonds that you may use your best endeavour to have them put in sute as well for the punishment of the offenders as for an example to deter others from the like practices for the future which we think the Governmt. of New England ought to discourage as much as possibly they can. least this matter should be complained of in Parliament. Annexed,
217. i. Observations upon some of the Massachusets Laws, 1715. Acts in addition to the Act against counterfeiting bills of credit, and in addition to the Act for encouraging the killing of wolves. By your Instructions fines and forfeitures are reserved to the Crown, but by these Acts the forfeitures are reserved and applyed to particular uses. (b) As to the Act for holding a Superiour Court of Judicature etc. for the County of Hampshire, the first clause restores the Superiour Court of the County of Hampshire, which is to sit every 2nd Thursday in August yearly according to the law for establishing a Superiour Court of Judicature, which law we find was passed in 1699, but then the same clause goes on, any act or law since made to the contrary notwithstanding. As we do not find any Act since 1699, that seems to relate to this matter, we cannot understand what law is repealed by this, which is what you ought particularly to have explained to us, that we might the better be enabled to lay our opinion before H.M. We send you the opinion of Mr. West upon the Act, 1716, in addition to the Act for making lands and tenements liable to the payment of debts, whereby you will see that this Act is not fit to be passed into a Law, and therefore you ought to move the Assembly to pass a new Act not liable to the objections mentioned. We have no objection to the Act for the further continuing an Act against the objections mentioned. We have no objection to hawkers, pedlars and petty chapmen, etc., but should be glad to know what reason there is for passing such an Act in the Massachusets Bay. We have no objection to the Act for the change of the surname of Spencer Bennet, alias Phips of Cambridge, Esqr., but that some person or persons should be appointed here to sollicit the dispatch of this and all other private Acts and to pay the fees in the several Offices, when H.M. pleasure is declared upon them. There are Acts passed in 1716 and 1717, for granting duties of impost and tunnage, etc., tho' these are expired, we must observe to you that such laws are not fit to be passed by you H.M. Governor: for the first of them lays double the duties on British ships, that it do's on ships belonging to the Massachusets Bay, and the other lays a duty on goods from this Kingdom, which ought not to be allowed of, and therefore you ought to take care for the future not to pass any law whereby the trade or shipping of this Kingdom shall be affected.
217. ii. Queries to Col. Shute. Governor of the Massachusets Bay. We desire you to inform us what number of inhabitants there is at present, distinguishing the number of freemen, women and children, and of servants white and black: how are they increased of late years? And what number of servants, men and women have been imported of late and from whence? What is the number of the Militia? What forts or places of strength are there? And in what condition are those forts? What is the strength of the several Nations of Indians in your neighbourhood? and are their inclinations for us or for the French? What is the condition of the French settlemts. at Canada and Cape Breton? and how may they affect any of H.M. Plantations, and what can be done to prevent any hazard or inconvenience from those settlements? How and in what particulars is the trade of the Province increased or decreased of late years and what has been the reason and what changes has been observed in the fishery since the conquest or session of Nova Scotia, and what scattered settlements are there either French or English along that coast without the Bay of Fundy? What are the present methods used to prevent illegal trade? and what further methods do you think adviseable? What number of vessels are there belonging to the Massachusets, where built, and what number of seafaring men? What manufactures are setled in the Province of any sort whatsoever? What mines are there? and what improvements made in the working of them? What is reckoned to be the annual produce one year with another of the several commodities in the Massachusets? What trade has that Province with any foreign Plantations or any part of Europe besides Great Britain? how is that trade carryed on? What commodities do they send to or receive from such Plantations or any foreign nation in Europe?
We further desire that you would send us the best accounts you possibly can get concerning the French Plantations in your neighbourhood? What is the number of the inhabitants, and of the militia, or what other military force is in each of those Plantations? What are the several commodities produced in them? and how much is the annual produce one year with another of such commodities? what trade is carryed on to and from these Plantations? what form of Government is established in them, and what methods are used to encourage and improve the products and the trade thereof.
217. iii. Queries to Col. Shute, Governor of New Hampshire. We desire you to inform us, what number of inhabitants there is at present in New Hampshire, distinguishing the number of freemen, women and children, and servants white and black? To what degree are those numbers increased or decreased since your entrance upon the Government, or since the last estimate made of them? What trade is there either by exportation or importation with any other place besides this Kingdom? and from whence is the Province furnished with supplies (particularly of any manufactures) that they were wont to have from Great Britain? How and in what particulars is the trade of New Hampshire increased or decayed of late years, and what hath been the reason? What are the present methods used to prevent illegal trade? and what further methods do you think adviseable? What number of vessels are there belonging to the said Province, where built, and what number of seafaring men? What manufactures are setled in that Province of any sort whatsoever? what mines are discovered, and how are they wrought or improved? and what changes or improvements have been made in the Fishery since the cession of Nova Scotia? What is the annual produce of the several commodities in that Province? What trade has New Hampshire with any foreign Plantations? or any part of Europe besides Great Britain? how is that trade carryed on? What commodities do they send to or receive from foreign Plantations, or any foreign nation in Europe? [C.O. 5, 915. pp. 272–284.]
June 4.
Whitehall.
218. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords Justices. Abstract. Report upon an Act of New York, 1717, for paying several debts etc. Refer to April 23rd and 6th May, 1718. Have now received from the Governor and Council an answer to the merchants' objections etc. Examine those objections and conclude, that ye objections against allowing these several sums are slightly grounded, and that the Legislature have acted both justly and prudently in endeavoring to extricate the Province out of the difficulties, their publick debts had involved them in. We must further observe, that ye approbation of the said duties for sinking the bills of credit cannot, as is pretended, render the support of the Governmt. precarious. The Custom and other funds appropriated for that use being sufficient to answer more than the ordinary charge of the Government there. We are also so far from agreeing with the merchants that these bills will be to ye prejudice of the trade of New York, that we doubt not, if the credit of the bills is maintained according to the tenor of the Act, the trade of the Province will be greatly incouraged and facilitated thereby, as it appears to have been since the first bills were issued. Nor are we sensible that it was in the power of the Legislature to have taken any other method which would have answered their intention so well it being very probable, that the funds appropriated for sinking ye bills of credit both of 1714 and 1717 will effectually serve for that purpose, the Excise having been already farmed for five years at 3750-oz. of plate pr. annum. But whereas the Act now complained of, is of the same nature with the Act passed in 1714, there should likewise have been as there was in the former, a clause therein contain'd to prevent the same from taking effect until it should have been laid before H.M. and his pleasure signify'd thereupon. It must likewise be allowed, that the credit of the bills struck in 1714 may possibly be affected by ye additional increase of those in 1717. The merchants have asserted to us, that they are fallen about 9 or 10 p.c., however as the Governor and Council have represented, in their memorial, that ye difference between gold in New York and Pensylvania (where there is no paper credit) is but little more than ½ p.c., and in current silver little or nothing, and that the value of silver varies, as there is more or less silver in that Province, we are apt to believe the merchants may be misinformed or imposed on in this particular as well as in several others, that ye discount on the bills of credit is not so considerable as they imagine, but if it be, that it may very probably have been occasion'd by causes very different from those by them assigned. But as the case now stands, these debts are owned and provided for by ye Governmt. and the bills of credit being issued, they are transferred in course from ye first claimants to others who have been obliged to take them according to the direction of the Act; We must therefore submit it to your Excellencies consideration, what confusion and disorder the Colony and the trade thereof would be in, if the merchants' prayer of their petition should be granted. Upon the whole therefore, we must humbly offer it as our opinion, that if H.M. should be graciously pleased to confirm this Act, it would tend to the great advantage and benifit of H.M. said Colony. But at the same time it seems absolutely necessary that the Governor should be enjoyned by H.M. command in order to prevent the further increase of paper credit and the anticipation of any fund upon which mony may be raised to supply the emergencies of the Governmt. not to give his assent to any other bill of this nature, and to transmit to one of H.M. principal Secretaries of State and to this Board every six months accounts of the produce of the funds appropriated for sinking the bills of credit, and of the amount of the bills accordingly sunk, which we hope would more effectually raise the credit of that Colony, and better contribute to the promoting of trade there, than the method proposed by the merchants. Set out, N.Y. Col. Docs. V. pp. 522–526. [C.O. 5, 1124. pp. 93–107; and (corrected draft) 5, 1079. No. 108.]
June 4.
Whitehall.
219. Council of Trade and Plantations to the Lords of the Committee for hearing Appeals. Reply to 15th Dec. 1718. We have been attended by Sir A. Cairns and others, who desire the said grant [on the coast of Nova Scotia]; as likewise by Mr. Dummer, who opposes the intended grantees being allowed any consideration for curing fish in the said coast; and altho' it may be reasonable that an acknowledgment should be paid for the use of such stages and other conveniencies for curing of fish, which the grantees shall at any time build at their own expence within the limits of their grant, yet we are intirely of opinion that where such conveniences are not built by the grantees, all other H.M. subjects should have the liberty of cutting timber, building stages and curing fish on the coast without being liable to any impositions upon that account. It may be pretty difficult to settle a particular rate to be paid for the use of stages and other conveniences, which may be built and furnished by the grantees; But in our opinion it would be just to put the grantees in this particular upon the same foot with the people of New England, who according to the best information we have been able to get, do receive one shilling for every quintal of fish cured at Marblehead for the use of their stages, cookrooms and of a shore man to each stage; But to provide as effectually as may be against any inconveniencies which may hereafter happen to the prejudice of the fishery in those parts, we would propose that there may be a clause in the grant reserving to H.M. a power to make from time to time such alterations and regulations in relation to the Fishery, as H.M. may think proper. As this new settlement, if made under proper regulations, may prove advantageous to H.M. service, and beneficial to the trade of Great Britain; and as the grant now in question may possibly serve as a precedent for such future dispositions as H.M. shall think fit to make for peopling of Nova Scotia, your Lordships will allow us the further liberty of recommending to you upon this occasion in a particular manner to have a view to the preservation of the timber and the production of Naval Stores in this new Colony; For which purpose we should propose, That both in this and all future grants to be made of any lands in Nova Scotia, one full 20th part of the land granted shall be reserved to H.M., His heirs and successors, as a nursery for masts and timber for the Royal Navy the said 20th part to be marked out by H.M. Survevor General of the Woods in America, in one or more parcels, in parts most adjacent to navigable rivers, wherein no person whatsoever shall be permitted to cut down any trees under the highest penalty the law can inflict. That all pine and for trees of the diameter of 24 inches and upwards at 12 inches from the ground, growing in any other part of the premises to be granted, shall be reserved to H.M. His heirs and successors; the said trees to be marked by the Surveyor of the Woods, or in his absence, by some person to be appointed by him for that purpose. That the patentees be restrained from exporting to any foreign parts out of H.M. Dominions, any deals, masts, planks, ship timber, hemp, pitch, tar or any other Naval Stores whatsoever, under the same restrictions and penalties as in the case of the enumerated goods from the Plantations. That an annual quit-rent be reserved to the Crown of 14 pound weight of hemp water rotted, bright, clean and fit for making cordage for the Navy for every 100 acres of land granted that shall be enclosed, planted, cultivated or improved, the said quit-rent to commence within four years from the date of the grant. The said quit rent to be double the twelfth year and treble the 20th and so to continue for ever after. The said hemp to be delivered to such person or persons as shall be appointed by H.M. to receive ye same, at such place or places, as the sd. persons shall name for that purpose, within ten miles of the ground where the said hemp grew, free from all charges to H.M. That the patentees be put under the strongest obligations to comply with these conditions, and all others mentioned in our former reports upon this subject; and that the same may be more carefully put in execution that H.M. Surveyor of the Woods or a proper person deputed by him, be present at the laying out of the lands to be granted in the manner abovementioned; till which time the patentees shall not be permitted to take possession thereof. [C.O. 218, 1. pp. 404–408.]
June 4.
Whitehall.
220. Same to the Lords Justices. In obedience to your Excellencies' commands of 2nd instant we shall take care to give all possible dispatch to Col. Philips' Commission and Instructions. Repeat former representations for a man of war to attend upon that Government; and for a present to the Indians as is done to the Five Nations etc. (v. 30th April). Conclude: There being no provision as yet made by Parliament for the fortifications of Nova Scotia, we shall at present only propose to your Excellencies to give directions to the Board of Ordnance for sending an Ingineer thither, to survey the proper places, and make the necessary dispositions there, against the time that provision shall be made for so necessary a purpose. [C.O. 218, 1. pp. 409, 410.]
June 5.
Whitehall.
221. Same to Same. Reply to 28th May. Quote Governor Shute's Instructions to Capt. Smart and Capt. Southack's Journal (v. 1st April, 2nd June.) Continue: Thus your Excellencies may perceive that Capt. Smart's proceedings in this affair were by order of the Govr. and Council of the Massachusets Bay, who we presume believed it was their duty to assert, in this manner H.M. right to ye lands or islands where the seizure was made: and altho a gentler method might possibly have been more adviseable at so critical a juncture, yet we can't help thinking that Col. Shute and H.M. Council of the Massachusets Bay have expressed upon this occasion a very laudable zeal for H.M. service. For upon the best light we have hitherto been able to get into this matter it would seem the French had no manner of reason to set up a title to the lands or islands where the seizure was made, or even to fish upon that coast. However if your Excellencies should be disposed in favour to the Memorialist, and to cultivate a good understanding between the two Nations, to give your orders to the Govt. of the Massachusets Bay and Capt. Smart, to return the vessels and effects seized by the latter at Canceau, we have nothing to object to it, provided this restitution be made as a pure act of grace and favour; that previous thereunto full and ample satisfaction be given to all H.M. subjects on whom any reprizals may have been made by the French upon occasion of this seizure, and that especial care be taken in the said order of restitution to guard against any pretence his most Christian Majesty may set up to the lands or islands whereon the sd. seizure was made, or of any right to fish upon that coast in consequence of the said restitution, for upon a very strained construction of certain words in the Treaty of Utrecht, the French claim a right to the Island of Canceau, besides there is so great a difference in the accounts we have of the place where this seizure was made, some calling it the Island of Canceau, some the Cape of that name, and others the main Continent of Nova Scotia, it will be highly necessary, that great caution should be taken in the manner of wording your Excellencies' Orders upon this subject, lest at any time hereafter when Commissaries shall be appointed to fix the boundaries of Nova Scotia, advantage should be taken thereof by the persons empower'd to transact that matter in dehalf of the French. Enclose copy of proceedings of the Council of the Massachusets Bay after Capt. Smart's return, (v. June 2nd), "which we thought proper to annex because there seems to be a very considerable difference in the value placed upon those effects by the French, and that set upon them in New England." [C.O. 218, 1. pp. 411–415.]
June 5.222. Lt. Col. Moody to the Lords Justices. Encloses following as ordered etc. Signed, J. Moody. Endorsed, Recd., Read June 19th, 1719. 1 p. Annexed,
222. i. Copies of H.M. letters from Lord Dartmouth to Lt. Govt. Moody, July 11, 1713, and H.M. letter to Governor Nicholson, June 23, 1713, relating to the sale of their lands and tenements by the French at Placentia, with a list of such lands and tenements purchased by Col. Moody in 1714, by virtue of H.M. order, 12 plantations and one house, for total sum of £1687 10s. 2 pp. [C.O. 194, 6. Nos. 63, 63 i.]
June 5.
Admiralty Office.
223. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Reply to June 3rd. "If the Council of Trade and Plantations have any further Instructions to prepare for Capt. Ogle, and they can be ready in eight or ten days, it will be time enough," etc. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed, Recd. 6th, Read 10th June, 1719. ¾ p. [C.O. 194, 6. No. 62.]
June 5.
Antigua.
224. Governor Hamilton to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Encloses Act to amend an Act for raising £5000 etc., by which former Act the Gentlemen of the Assembly were at last sensible that they had overrated their sugars, and that the prices would not answer the markett in Great Brittain and that all creditors would be sufferers thereby, for that reason they prepared this Act to moderate the price, as had before been recommended to them by H. M. Council of this Island. I therefore hope your Lordships will recommend this Act to H. M. for his Royal approbation. Signed, W. Hamilton. Endorsed, Recd. 22nd Aug., Read 16th Sept., 1719. ¾ p. [C.O. 152, 12. No. 153].
June 5.
Antigua.
225. Same to Same. I herewith transmit an Act for raising a poll-tax etc. for the Island of Nevis, which will be delivered to your Lordships by Col. Joseph Jory, Agent for that Island. The Act in itself explains the uses it is to be applied to except that part appropriated for the use of the gentleman prisoner at Martinique, which is one Mr. Charles Earle the only one of four remaining of those that were taken off by Monsieur D'Iberville when that Island was taken by the French in 1706 and has been ever since kept there as an hostage for the pretended ransom. And £200 mentioned for Mr. Philip De Witt, which is part of a gratuity the gentlemen of that Island are desirous to allow him for the hardships he suffered whilst one of the pretended hostages at the aforesaid Island, from whence he made his escape some time since and is now settled at Nevis, which Act I hope your Lordships will recommend to H. M. for his Royal approbation. Signed, W. Hamilton. Endorsed, Recd. (from Col. Jory) 12th Aug., Read 16th Sept., 1719. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 12. No. 154].
June 6.
New York.
226. Governor Hunter to Mr. Popple. Encloses Minutes of General Assembly of New Jersey, etc. The Assembly here (now sitting) have read twice and committed a Bill for ye continuation of the Revenue for one year after the expiration of ye present Acts. The report of my going home curtailed the term for they had determined to setle it for five years etc. I shall leave both Provinces in perfect peace to which both had been long strangers. I live in torture with a violent pain in my hipp, etc. I have no hope of cure on this side etc. I labour'd hard for an Agent for ye Jersey, but the fear full and stingy nature of a sect of men in our Assembly gott the better of me and I must find a better way to reward our friend Bampfield etc. Set out, N. J. Archives, 1st Ser., iv., 387. Endorsed, Recd. 27th July, 1719, Read 30th Aug., 1720. Holograph. 3 pp. [C.O. 5, 971. No. 84].
June 8.
Bermuda.
227. Lt. Governor Bennett to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Refers to letter of 26th Oct. Continues: I understand that in South America all H. M. Govmts. have recd. the Decleration of War against the King of Spain, but none had reached the Continent the 10th past as by several accounts, nor has any been brought here, but doe hear mine was carried to Jamaica, soe expect it by the first vessel. Several privateers are fitted out from the Leeward Islands, Jamaica and Providence, and is said that the enemy had taken in the Gulf one of ours from Jamaica and carried her into the Havana: I am likewise advised that the two Providence privateers mett with three periaugres bound for the Havana from Florida which they took. On the 23rd of Apr. arrived here from the Bahama Islands a sloop wherein were nine pirates who surrendred themselves and received the King's most gratious pardon accordingly: And on the 15th of the last month an other sloop brought to just without our bar. the Comander whereof sent his boat a shoar with written proposals to me, wherein they owned themselves pirates, and incerted, that if I would allow all they had on board to be their own they would come in and surrender, or otherwise be gone by such an hour, and I thought proper for the service to agree to their demands, and hope I was right; there were seventeen in number one Warner was Capt., what they brought in with them was a small quantity of wine, brandy, and provision: I believe the pirates in general have submitted and accepted of H. M. pardon, for I only hear of one Coudon that is out in a ship of 110 men and 20 guns, and one England in a sloop of 8 guns and 70 men. The publick seal was according to order cut and have now sent it under the care of a person who will convey it to Mr. Popple etc. Will transmit accounts of the Magazine etc. Inclosed is an account of the fortifications viewed by me and Council, which I hope will satisfie yor. Lordps. that I have not neglected that part of my duty as was represented. Refers to enclosures. Signed, Ben. Bennett. Endorsed, Recd. 23rd July, 1719, Read 7th July, 1720. Holograph. 2 pp. Enclosed,
227. i. Accounts of money received by virtue of an Act to supply the deficiency for building a house for the Governor etc., 1713–1716. Same endorsement. 4 pp.
227. ii. Account of the condition of the fortifications of Bermuda. Same endorsement. 4 pp.
227. iii. Account of money received for building Governor's house, 1716–1718. Same endorsement. 5 pp. [C.O. 37, 10. Nos. 13, 13 i.–iii.]
June 9.
Lond.
228. Col. Vetch to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Being informed that your Lordships were to take under your consideration the setling the limits betwixt the British and French Colonys etc., I lay before your Lordships the inclosed Memorial which I delivered to my Lord Sunderland, about a year agoe which his Lordship seemed then to approve etc. Offers his services, etc. Signed, Sam. Vetch. Endorsed, Recd., 9th June, Read 5th Aug., 1719. 1 p. Enclosed,
228. i. Memorial of Col. Vetch, late Governor of Nova Scotia, to the King. Refers to his scheme for reducing the French Colonys 1708 ff. Continues: Tho' the Grand Expedition against Canada miscarried, because it seem'd to be design'd so to do by some of the principal actors, yet your Memorialist's projection for the reduction of Nova Scotia succeeded perfectly well etc. He was made Governour untill the latter end of the late Queen's reign, when, only for his zeal for your Majesty's Royal House, and the service of his country, he was remov'd etc. Describes the activities of the French and consequent sufferings of the Colonies. Urges that Commissioners be appointed on both sides to adjust the French and British boundaries etc. 2 pp. [C.O. 217, 2. Nos. 86, 86. i.].
[June 9.]229. Wm. Nevin to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Prays the Board to report in favour of the Act of Antegoa to enable Arthur Freeman etc. Endorsed, Recd., Read 9th June, 1719. ¾ p. [C.O. 152, 12. No. 134.]
[June 9.]230. Same to Same. Has been lately appointed Agent for St. Christophers, as well as for Antegoa and Mountserrate, but is now advised to goe to Tunbridge Wells for the recovery of his health. Prays to be consulted before any report is made upon any Acts from those Islands. Endorsed as preceding. ¾ p. [C.O. 152, 12. No. 135.]
[June 9.]231. Agents for the sufferers of Nevis and St. Christophers to the Council of Trade and Plantations. Pray that debentures may be issued in accordance with an Act passed in the last Sessions of Parliament entitling the sufferers of Nevis and St. Christophers who resettled in either Island to their shares of the bounty money etc. Signed, Ste. Duport, James Butler, John Smith. Endorsed, Recd. 9th June, Read 2nd July, 1719. ¾ p. Enclosed,
231. i. List of debentures claimed by above. For James Stephens £340, John Seaborne by intermarriage with Mary Jones, £40. 8. 10., Mrs. Mary Pogson, £17. 5. 1., Capt. Wm. Kitt, suffered at St. Christophers, resettled at Nevis, £327 14. 9. ¼ p. [C.O. 152, 12. Nos. 142, 142. i.]
June 9.
Whitehall.
232. Mr. Popple to Mr. Carkesse. Desires from of the oath the Governors of Plantations take for observing the Acts of Trade etc. [C.O. 324, 10. p. 261].
June 10.
Custom Ho., London.
233. Mr. Carkesse to Mr. Popple. In reply to preceding encloses following. Signed, Cha. Carkesse. Endorsed, Recd. 12th, Read 18th June, 1719. Addressed. ½ p. Enclosed,
233. i. Copy of a Commission granted in the 9th year of K. William III for appointing Commissioners to administer the oath to be taken by Governors in the Plantations, by the Act of 7 and 8 William III, with the form of that oath. 2½ pp. [C.O. 323, 7. Nos. 157, 157 i.; and (without enclosure) 324, 10. p. 261].
June 10.
Whitehall.
234. Mr. Popple to Col. Mathew. You having some time ago recommended Richard Cooke to be of the Council of Mountserrat, my Lords Commissioners for Trade etc. desire to be informed whether he be still living etc. [C.O. 153, 13. p. 410.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
235. Mr. Popple to Mr. West. Refers to his report on the Act of the Massachusets Bay in addition to the Act for making lands and tenements liable for debts etc. (9th July. 1718), and asks for the further objections to it mentioned therein. [C.O. 5, 915. p. 287.]
June 10.236. Mr. Vaughan and Mr. Capon to the Council of Trade and Plantations. In obedience to your Lordships' commands to give our best account of the Isles of Canso, describe the same and argue that they are the property of Great Britain, as they are far distant from Cape Britton and more especially from the mouth or Gulf of St. Lawrence, and even from the Gutt of Canso, and the French map (v. No. 208 iii) is donne with partiallity purely to favour the last year's French fishery at Cape Canso etc. Nor can the French have the least title to Les Isle Madame, which is in the main sea, without Britton etc. As to the boundaries we are humbly of opinion, what was in the possession of the French, under their Governour Monsieur Supercass. when the garrison at Annapolis was delivered to Generall Nicholson, in Oct. 1710. with all the appendages, doth of right belong to the Crown of Great Britain; more particularly from Annapolis westward, to the River St. George or to Kenebeck which, as we are informed, was in Supercass's Commission, and from St. George River, northward to the head of Penobscot River, and from the head of Penobscot River, to the head of the river near Red Island in St. Lawrence, and from thence to Cape Roziers, on an easterly line. Signed, Geo. Vaughan, Peter Capon. Endorsed, Recd. 10th June, Read 5th Aug., 1719. 1¾ pp. [C.O. 217, 2. No. 87.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
237. Mr. Popple to Mr. West. Encloses, for his opinion, draught of Commission and Instructions for Governor Philipps, and desires him to prepare a clause to impower Col. Philipps to appoint Justices of the Peace in Nova Scotia. [C.O. 218, 1. pp. 415, 416.]
June 10.
Whitehall.
238. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Encloses extract of Governor Hamilton's letter, 19th Dec., 1718, relating to pirates and the insufficiency and unserviceableness of the man of war at the Leeward Islands, etc. [C.O. 153, 13. p. 409.]
June 11.
Admiralty Office.
239. Mr. Burchett to Mr. Popple. Reply to preceding. The Lords Commrs. at the Admiralty have [thereupon] wrote to the Commissrs. for Victualling H.M. Navy to know whether they cannot conveniently contract with some proper person at the Leeward Islands for furnishing the Rose and Shark sloop, now attending on those Islands, with provisions there. Signed, J. Burchett. Endorsed. Recd. 12th, Read 18th June, 1719. Addressed. 1 p. [C.O. 152, 12. No. 138.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
240. Mr. Popple to Mr. Delafaye, Secretary to the Lords Justices. Encloses extract from Governor Hamilton's letter, 19th Dec., 1718, relating to soldiers deserting to St. Eustatia etc., for the Lords Justices' directions thereupon: also an extract from the said letter, relating to the preparations the Spaniards are making to attack the Bahama Islands to be laid before their Excellencies. [C.O. 153. 13. pp. 410, 411.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
241. Order of Lords Justices in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report thereon. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. Read 19th Nov., 1719. 1 p. Enclosed,
241. i. Petition of Lewis Piers to the King. Petitioner's plantation in Mountserrat, described, was destroyed by the enemy, who burnt or took away all the records of the Island. Petitioner has a copy of the deed of gift, made by Anguish Brown, the first proprietor of the land, 14th April 1680 to Margaret his wife and the remainder to Robert Lynch to whom petitioner's wife is heiress at law. This is attested by the Secretary but thought insufficient for a purchaser to venture thereupon. Prays H.M. to grant him and his wife Cecilia a patent for said plantation etc. 1 p.
241. ii. Copy of Anguish Brown's deed of gift, Mountserrat, Ap. 14, 1680, referred to in preceding. Signed, Anguis Brown, his mark. 2 pp.
241. iii. Copy of Certificate by William Gerrish, Deputy Secretary of Montserrat, that No. ii is a true copy. 7th Nov., 1718. Signed, W. Gerrish. ½ p. Nos. i.–iii. endorsed, Recd. 10th March, 1718/19. Referred to ye Board of Trade, June 11th, 1719. [C.O. 152, 12. Nos. 162, 162. i.–iii.]
242. Mr. Popple to Mr. Burchett. Reply to 5th June. The alterations the Council of Trade and Plantations intended to offer to the Heads of Enquiry will be too many to be perfected to go by this opportunity, and therefore their Lordships are of opinion that those sent June 3rd may be sufficient for this year. [C.O. 195, 6. p. 507.]
June 11.
Whitehall.
243. Order of Lords Justices in Council. Referring following to the Council of Trade and Plantations for their report. Signed, Ja. Vernon. Endorsed, Recd. 30th June, Read 19th Nov., 1719. 1 p. Enclosed,
243. i. Petition of John Usher to the King. Prays for H.M. order that he be paid the sums due to him as a Treasurer for New England, 1686–1689 etc. In spite of several orders in the past, he has never been able to obtain any relief etc. Signed, John Usher. 1 large p.
243. ii. Duplicate of C.S.P. 1694. No. 985.
243. iii. Report of Committee of Accounts of the Massachusets Bay, March 25, 1695. ½ p.
243. iv. The account of John Usher, 1715. 1 p.
243. v. Committee of Accounts of the Massachusets Bay, to John Usher. Demand payment of £500, three fifths of the principal and one year's interest of loan to same, due Dec. 13th last. Boston, July 23, 1718. Copy. 1 p.
243. vi. Copy of receipt by Caleb Ray for £35 11s. 5d. paid by John Usher committed to gaol on Col. Samll. Shrimpton's execution. ½ p. [C.O. 5, 867. Nos. 57, 57. i.–vi.]
June 12.
Witham in Essex.
244. Col. Mathew. Lt. General of the Leeward Islands, to Mr. Popple. In reply to June 10th, knows no objection to Richard Cooke etc. Continues: By the Minutes of the Assembly of St. Christophers I find their Lops. had sent to Generall Hamilton's for ye proceedings of the Councills and Assemblys even since 1713, they not having recd. them. I having commanded there during part of that time, may probably have incurred their Lops. censure. Explains that he sent Minutes of the Councils and Assemblies, and accounts of stores and imports and exports regularly to Mr. Duport, with duplicates for Antego to Nathl. Carpenter, for Montserrat to Messrs. Tryon & Carpenter, and for Nevis, to Col. Jorie, "all which those agents wrote me word were delivered to your office." etc. Signed, William Mathew. Endorsed, Recd. 16th., Read 18th, June, 1719. 2½ pp. [C.O. 152, 12. No. 139.]
June 13.
Boston.
245. Mr. Bridger to Mr. Popple. Returns thanks for the Board's representation to the Treasury etc. Repeats parts of June 26 and July 9. Mr. Armstrong, Mr. Burniston's deputy knows not an oake from a pine etc. His duty as Collector of New Hampshire, wch. is on the water chiefly, cannot correspond with his duty as Surveyor of the woods etc. I have procured two Acts of Assembly at Portsmo. last month, as to the preservation of the pitch pine there was a great necessity for it tho' I could not prevaile to get an Act before. There are thousands of those trees killed by making of tirpentine, for the country people out of a covetious desire of gain boxed those trees on three sides some, on others 4 sides, wch. infaliably kill'd those trees. In 2 years at farthest I have rod many miles together thro' such woods and all the trees dead, the Assembly came into it at last. The 2 Act is, that the treasurer is obliged to pay any person of the Province 12d. a pound for any quantity of good, sound, water-retted merchtble. hemp, and to continue for three years, this time I thought, and know will bring people into the manufacturing of hemp to their great benefitt. I am sorry I must leave them in the darke, having promised to assist and instruct them etc. I can't stay here and starve etc.
P.S. I understand that the Commrs. of the Navy have contracted for sundry Naval Stores to be brought hence, and as the premium is taken of all stores but such as shall be fit for the service of the Royal Navy, and that there will be a proper person to survey and mark all stores etc., I beg their Lordships' favour for this office etc. The Navy I understand are fell into the way of paying the ships' bottoms with tirpentine and sulphur etc. wch. I advised 20 years since etc. Signed, J. Bridger. Endorsed, Recd. 20th Aug., Read 10th Sept., 1719. 3¾ pp. Enclosed,
245. i. Duplicate of No. 270. i.
245. ii. Copies of two Acts of New Hampshire, 2 May, 1719, for encouraging Naval Stores etc. Same endorsement. 1½ pp. [C.O. 5, 867. Nos. 47, 47. i.–iii.]