Henry VIII
Miscellaneous, 1536

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Institute of Historical Research

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James Gairdner (editor)

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1887

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'Henry VIII: Miscellaneous, 1536', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 10: January-June 1536 (1887), pp. 421-424. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75434 Date accessed: 23 November 2014.


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Miscellaneous, 1536

Add. MS.
9835, f. 22. B. M.
1016. Plan of a Pageant.
The "Solame Warner" to be a figure of the holy city showed by the angel to St. John. A "Haternitie" (Eternity) gorgeously garnished with jeneper of like height, knit with a truelove knot, and over this the King's and Queen's arms in one scutcheon. "Fugured with the Father of Heven, with these scripters, Tota pulcra est amica me [a]; and also the Conception of Our Ladie, Electa ut sol pulcra ut luna; stella matutina, with the sonne, the mone, the day ster; the gates of Heven, portæ cæli; the plantes of roses, planta rosarum; the sider tree, caerus (cedrus?) exalt'; the well of Life, pituous (puteus) aquarum; the rode of Jesse, Virga Jesse, or conclusede (hortus conclusus?), the closed garden; the lilie amongest thornes, sicut lilia inter spinas; the tower of Davet, torrus Davet; the onspotted glasse, specula sine macula; the olyf tree, oliva speciosa; the city of God, civitas Dei."
The Queen's badge garnished with the Scripture, "bound to obey and serve." (fn. 1) The Coronation of Our Lady solemnly garnished, and to be crowned with the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost. The descent of the Holy Ghost on Whitsunday, (fn. 2) with these Scriptures: "Et cum complerentur dies Pentecostes erant omnes unanimiter in eodem loco." A maiden with an "inycore" sitting in an arbour by a fountain's side. The transfiguration of Jesus, with this Scripture, "Faciamus hic tria tabernacula." The story of Martha and Mary Maidelayne, with this Scripture, "Domine, non est tibi curæ." The story of Adam and Eve, with the serpent under the apple tree. Cages with quick birds, to be set in a meadow. The story of Saint Anestetas. Fourteen other subtilties at the pleasure of the maker.
ii. Overleaf is a copy of a proclamation ordering all noblemen and gentlemen who came hither to this Parliament, and are not in attendance upon the King or Queen, or commanded by the Council to remain, to return home to put the country in a state of defence; and to serve the King touching the subsidy and other things.
Pp. 2.
R. O.1017. Garter to [Cromwell].
The King has concluded that Mr. Seymour, with whom I have spoken, shall be named viscount Beauchamp.
Hol., p. 1. Endd.
R. O.1018. Ri. Gwent of the Arches to Dr. Leyton.
This is to desire you touching the prolocutor that ye will not only abstain from provoking any man to name me to it, but also do your best that some other man should be chosen. If ye knew what hangs upon it, and what displeasure it will be to me, I doubt not you will help to rid me from it. I am sorry you told Strete, a brabbling fool whom Mr. Secretary loves, what was not true of the deanery of Lichfield. If you will do me no pleasure, do me no hurt.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
R. O.1019. William Gowreley, yeoman purveyor for the King's mouth, to Lord Lisle.
Begs he will speak to Bartlett, the searcher at Calais, that his servant, Agnes Woodroffe, may pass with such fowls as she has for the writer. Bartlett says that she serves the poulterers of London, and that the King is defrauded of his custom. Assures him it is not so, for he is as deeply sworn as any one that the King shall not be defrauded. Begs him to write to his servant in the Isle of Wight that the writer may have some of Lisle's mews, as in times past, for the King. Lisle will receive of the said Agnes 12 eggrets and 2 doz. of quails; "and I pray your Lordship, be bold with her for a dish of such fowl as she hath whensoever it shall please you." Has asked Mr. Treasurer of the Household (fn. 3) to write in his behalf.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
R. O.1020. Roger Denys to Lady Lisle.
By your letter, dated Calais, 20 May, I perceive that you are displeased with me, for which there is no cause. You write that none of your servants shall account before me or any one, but you do not observe Mr. Basset's will. If I had not seen it and perceived what we were bound to, I would never have moved such questions. My business takes me into those parts twice a year for my lord, my master, who puts me more in trust than twenty times the value of the lands. Often being there, I hear more things than I think you know. States the position of the feoffees of her late husband's estates according to his will. Is sure she is a better lady to his cousin Jane than she deserves.
As to your daughters, your late husband gave you possessions for their finding, and left but little to his son James, who may call us, the feoffees, to account, and it would be well that we should know what to answer. I am the worst able to bear any charge, and the best of them will bear no more than I shall. I have not done or spoken herein, otherwise than my brother, Master Hacche, of Wollegh, has. All that your servants say is not truth. I ask you to have the will observed, and not to follow your servants' mind. The law will bind you to do so, and you cannot defend it. If anything happened to your ladyship, your daughters might call on us for their marriage money, and we could not avoid it. I beseech you to write your pleasure, and if anything is amiss it shall be reformed. London.
Hol., pp. 3. Add.
Otho C. x. 256. (fn. 3) B. M.1021. The Princess Mary.
"Certain articles and instructions g[iven by] the Kinges Highnes to his right trusty [and] right entierly beloved cousin and [councillor] the duke of Norffolk, whome with [others] in his companie, his Majestie sendet[h to the lady] Marie, his doughter, for the purp[ose ensuing]:—
"Firste, where as the said lady Marie hathe sund[ry times and of] long contynuance shewed herself so obstinate towa[rds the Kinges] Majestie, her soveraigne lorde and father, and so di[sobedient unto the] lawes conceyved and made upon moste juste, ver[tuous, and] godly grounds, that as the willfull disobedience th . . . . . seemed a monstre in nature, so onlesse the mercy . . . . . . . . . . . ben moste abundantely extended unto her, by . . . . . [his gra]ces laws, and the force of his justice she e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . rre that it was greatly to His Highness re . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to see and perceive how little she esteemed . . . . . . . . . . [the lo]sse of his favour, the loss of her honour, . . . . . . . . . . . . . nd undoubtedly to the indignation of Almig[hty God, . . . . . nei]ther obeyed her father and sovereign n[or] . . . . . . . . . . use laws aforesaid. And that of late . . . . . . . [calling] to her remembrance her transgressions . . . . . . . . . . . . te towards God, her father and soveraig[ne] . . . . . . . . . s, she hathe written to the same three sun[dry letters for the dec]laration of her repentance, conceived for . . . . . . . . . . . an humble and simple submission as s . . . . . . . . . . . to submit herself wholly and without . . . . . . . . . . . last letter) to the laws, but also for h . . . . . . . . . . . t herself only in his Grace's mercy, . . . . . . . . . . . [m]ercy and forgiveness for her offences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . favour. Albeit his Majesty ha . . . . . . . . . . . . . used by her as is before decla[red], . . . . . . . . . any private person to ab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [diso]bedient child from them . . . . [yet such is his] Majesty's gracious and divine nature, such is his clemency and pity, such is his merciful inclination and princely heart, that as he hath been ever ready to take pity and compassion [on] all offenders repentantly crying and calling for th . . . . . . . . . . . . in case he may thoroughly perceive the same . . . . . . . . . . . lady Mary's heart, which she hath put in . . . . . . . . His Highness considering the imbecillity of h . . . . . . . . . . . same frail, inconstant, and easy to be per[suaded by] . . . . counsaill, can be right well contented to rem[it some part] of his said just displeasure. And therefore . . . . . . . . . . . . for the certain knowledge of her har[te, his Grace has sent to] her his said cousin with others to d[emand of her] certain questions, her answers . . . . . . . . . . shall require and note in writing . . . . . . . . . . whether she be in deed that person . . . . . . . . . . . respect hath with general word[s] . . . . . . . . matter which is repugnant and . . . . . . . . . . . . Majesty hath gathered and conceyv[ed].
"And first, after their access a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . they shall for the first question d[emand of her whether] she doth recognize and knowledge the [King's Highness for her] soveraign lord and King in th' imper[ial crown and realm] of England, and woll and doth s[ubmit herself unto his] Highness, and to all and singular l[aws and statutes of this r]ealme as becometh every true a[nd faithful subject of this realm to do. A]lso whether she woll with all her [power and qualities that God ha]the indued her withal, not on[ly obey, keep, and observe all and] singular laws and statutes of the [realm, but also set forth, advance] and maintain the same t[o the uttermost of her power, according to her m]oste bounden du[ty].
"Also whether she woll recognize, accept, take, and [repute] the King's highness to be Supreme head in earth under Chr[ist of this] Church of England. And utterly refuse the bishop [of Rome's] pretensed power and jurisdiction, heretofore usurped [within this] realm, according to the laws and statutes of the s[ame, made] and ordained in that behalf, and of all the King's [subjects] humbly received, admitted, obeyed, kept and . . . . . . . . And also woll and doth renounce and utterly [forsake all] manner of remedy, interest, and advantage [unto the said] bishop of Rome's laws, process, or jurisdicti[on . . . . . . in] any wise appertaining or that hereafter may . . . . . . . . . . . le colour or mean belong, grow, succeed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . any case may follow or ensue.
"[Also] whether she woll and doth of her due . . . . . . . . . . . . God her allegiance towards the Kin[g] . . . . . . . . . . . . es of this realm and also of the sin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [th]at she beareth toward the truth fr[eely confess, recogni]ze and knowledge without any other . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [Chris]tes law and man's law the ma[rriage] . . . . . . . . . . . [be]twene his Majesty and her mother . . . . . . . . . . . . . "[Also] be she inquired and examined for wh[at purpose and by whose] motion and means she hath contin[ued in he]r obstinacy so long and who did [embold and animate her] thereunto with other circumstances th[ereto appertaining.]
"[A]lso what is the cause that she at th[is time rather th]an at any other heretofore doth submit [herself in the] premisses, and what or who did [counsel her thereto. Fin]ally, in case the said lady Mar[y, in reply to] these questions and articles, shall allege the matters of the sa[me] to be great and weighty, and such as she shall say she [can] not, being a woman, immediately answer unto, for the d[ifficulty] thereof or some other respect, without the obtaining [of delay] and respite to devise and resolve with hers[elf] . . . . . ., and thereupon require a certain time to m[ake answer] unto them, the said Duke and others app[ointed to be with] him in this affair, perceiving her desire [to proceed from an] honest ground as is expressed, shall gr[ant her such] delay and respite so as she woll pro[mise that she will] make her answer within three or four d[ays at furthest], and the same to make in writing afte[r such form as she shall] after abide by before all men."
Mutilated.
Strype's Mem. I. ii. 268.2. Another copy of these articles, with some variations.

Footnotes

1 This was Jane Seymour's motto.
2 Jane Seymour was "openly showed as Queen" at Whitsuntide, in 1536, when Whitsunday fell on the 4th June.
3 Sir William Fitzwilliam.