Henry VIII
August 1536, 6-10

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

James Gairdner (editor)

Year published

1888

Pages

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Henry VIII: August 1536, 6-10', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 11: July-December 1536 (1888), pp. 103-114. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75469 Date accessed: 30 August 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

August 1536, 6-10

[6 Aug.]
R. O.
236. Norfolk to Cromwell.
Since my letters to you yesternight the news of the King's displeasure with me has been renewed by two letters, one before dinner and another since supper, from such as would not write without some ground. I desire to know the truth by this bearer, who shall meet me ere I come to London; spare not to be plain to me. I thank God for His strokes, having deserved "infinite more" of His Godhead, but never of the King.
On Thursday by noon I will be in London. Send word where you will then be, "for sorry I would be to come to the Court before I spake with you." Kenynghale Lodge, this Sunday, 10 p.m.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
6 Aug.
R. O.
237. Ralph Eure to Cromwell.
George Dakyn, servant to Mr. Ric. Cromwell, your nephew, is indicted as one of the murderers of my servant Davy Sendry, and would have been arraigned, but that Sir George Darcy, sheriff of the county York, informed me that Mr. Bramston, your servant, had brought him a message from your Lordship in favour of Dakyn. I therefore stayed the friends of my servant until your lordship should know the heinousness of the murder from the confessions of divers men who were present, which the bearer will deliver. York, 6 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Cromwell. Endd.
6 Aug.
R. O.
238. Perys Salusbury, Steward of Ruthyn, to Duke of Norfolk.
I am very sorry for the great misfortune that happened to you and to us to the utter undoing of the Marches, through the loss of the duke of Richmond, to whose service I was admitted by you. I send by the bearer a leash of greyhounds, and my son Robert sends for my lord of Surrey a leash of merlins. Edward Thelwall, deputy receiver, hath gathered my lord's tenants to pay their rents before the accustomed time, and by reason of my lord's departure intends to take them to his own use. Ruthyn, 6 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
6 Aug.
R. O.
239. John Hutton to Cromwell.
On Friday last it was proclaimed here with sound of trumpet that it was lawful for any of the Emperor's subjects to go to sea and invade or defend themselves against the French king's subjects, putting in sureties not to vex the Emperor's friends, otherwise their booty to be good prize; also that no Frenchmen's goods are to be imported. Fears that divers English will run into danger thereby, "for out of England hither they do daily colour all strangers' goods," by which the King loses his right, and it is contrary to the league between the King and the French king. Suggests that the Custom Houses should be forbidden to suffer any man to enter goods but in his own name, and to charge masters of ships taking lading to these parts to come with their cockets to the governor here. Wares come here daily, mostly with no cockets, which is a great decay to our commodities, and a great robbery to the King. If we may duly punish transgressors and have English cloth made true, both of cloth and colour, the commodities and their occupiers will prosper in few years. If the contrary, they will shortly decay. We have a privilege from the dukes of Burgundy that no Englishman, a brother of this fellowship, (fn. 1) shall pay more than one custom, other strangers paying two. Offers to advertise the customers of all goods laden hence paying but one custom, so that if any goods come to be customed more than is certified, they may be staid as suspect. Cloths shipped here since the general shipping have hindered this company 500l. in the sale of cloths sold here this mart., and also have made a stay of the sale of 3,000 cloths. Antwerp, 6 Aug.
Hol., pp. 3. Mutilated. Add.: Privy Seal.
7 Aug.
R. O.
240. Sir Brian Tuke to Cromwell.
Enclosing a memorial concerning the debt of Kyme and his fellows, which by Cromwell's means has been brought to better purpose than Tuke thought it would have been. If he has been remiss in suing for himself it is because he would not avaunt his own merits, being always contented with his lot. London, 7 August 1536.
P.S.—If Sir John Shelton sue for any new assignment for the house of the King's children (for his old is expired), I beg he may not be appointed upon me, for, many things being gone from my receipt, I shall not be able to bear the assignments.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
7 Aug.
R. O.
241. William lord Sandys to Cromwell.
On Friday, 4 Aug., at my new house of Mottisfont, which by your help I have of the King's late gift, I received news from Guisnes that my lord Deputy of Calais, my lord Comptroller, and Mr. Vice-Treasurer had sent for my deputy and vice-bailly of Guisnes before the Council of Calais, and discharged them and my other servants of their offices within Guisnes forest. Cannot remonstrate as it was by the King's order; but the appointment of vice-bailly was given to him by the high bailiff, and he conferred it upon a servant who from his youth had done him good service. Moreover the King's patent made him keeper of the castle, town, and county of Guisnes, with all the profits appertaining in as large manner as Sir Nicholas lord Vaux held it. Wonders that when he was so lately with Cromwell he had no notice that such was the King's pleasure. Begs Cromwell to protect him from dishonor. Reports have been spread by his enemies that they would take care he should warm no stones anywhere but in the castle of Guisnes. They are also seeking to deprive the serjeant royal whom he has appointed for the county of Guisnes of that post, which was always in the appointment of the lieutenant. Reminds Cromwell that at his last interview the King's favor and Cromwell's friendship had made him in heart much younger than before, but if he is used thus he will draw much faster into age. The Vine, 7 Aug. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
7 Aug.
R. O.
242. John Freman to Cromwell.
The King's commission commands me to pull down to the ground all the walls of the churches, steeples, &c., leaving only houses necessary for a farmer. "Sir, there be more of great houses in Lincolnshire than be in England beside suppressed of their values, with thick walls, and most part of them vawtid, and few byars of other stone, glasse or slatt which might help the charges of plokyng down of them." To follow the commission will cost the King 1,000l. at least within the shire. Means first to take down the bells and lead, which will bring 6,000 or 7,000 marks, then pull down the roofs, battlements, and stairs, letting the walls stand "and charge some with them as a quarry of stone to make sales of," unless Cromwell think better otherwise. Valdey, 7 Aug.
Desires Cromwell to remember his old suit for the farm of 35l. a year, for which he will give the King 200l. Remembrances to Mr. Wrethisley.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
8 Aug.243. Sir Thomas Clifford, Captain of Berwick-upon-Tweed.
See Grants in August, No. 10.
8 Aug.
R. O.
244. Henry Prior of Shene to Cromwell.
Your lordship has put in our commission for the visitation of our religion that our brethren shall preach within our monasteries. I think your lordship's meaning is that our priors (who may ride abroad) shall preach also in other churches. Yet I beg you to sign and seal the bill "involved," that I may signify this by your authority. Charterhouse of Shene, 8 August.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
8 Aug.
R. O.
245. Sir Humfrey Wyngfeld to Cromwell.
At the last gaol delivery at Ipswich three felons were arraigned, and being found guilty pleaded their book. The See of Norwich being vacant, and no ordinary to hear them read, the justices "repried" them without any judgment. Because the keeping of them was somewhat dangerous, they were straitly and surely kept. The bearer, one of the bailiffs, can explain the circumstances of their escape. Ipswich, 8 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal.
8 Aug.
Faustina, C. vii. 102. B. M.
246. The Master and Fellows of Queen's College, Cambridge, to Cromwell.
Requesting that a decayed Carmelite house, abutting on their college, which has been deserted by all the friars except two who would gladly leave, may be dissolved and given to them. The kings of England when they visited Cambridge have always gone to their college, either as being out of the noise of the town or because it is near the river and agreeably situated. Cambridge, 8 Aug.
Lat., pp. 2. Add: "D. Thome Crumwello, D. Privati Sigilli."
8 Aug.
R. O.
247. John Abbot of Combermere to Cromwell.
Has received his letter desiring him to grant a lease of the parsonage of Childes Arcall to his servant Roger Paddye. Has recently granted it to a servant of the lord Steward, who made the request when the abbot was with him about the business of the monastery. Cambermer, 8 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
9 Aug.
R. O. Cranmer's Letters, 325.
248. Cranmer to Cromwell.
Begs him to mediate for Mr. Hambleton, a man of good birth, who has been put from his lands in Scotland, only because he favors the truth of God's word. Aldington, 9 Aug. Signed.
Add.: My Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
R. O.249. James Hamilton to Henry VIII.
Has been compelled to leave his native country for setting forth God's word and speaking against the usurped power of the bishop of Rome, and his possession and living have been taken from him. Begs the King to take him into his service. Otherwise will be compelled to seek service in some other parts, which he would be very loath to do. Is likely to fall into great trouble and danger of his creditors.
P. 1. Endd.
9 Aug.
R. O.
250. Sir Fras. Bryan to Cromwell.
On receipt of your letter I followed the King, who was gone out hunting with the Queen. When he had read it he said naughty bruits were soon blown. I thought I could move him then no further, knowing that my bedfellow Henagge had delivered his letter, to which his Grace said all was one. But on the way homeward I asked him what answer I should make you. He said it needed none, for he would order all things well. All your books here [I] send unto you signed. The King had good sport today at the red deer and killed 20 stags and staggards "and no rascal." Charssey, 9 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Cromwell, lord Privy Seal.
9 Aug.
R. O.
251. Robt. Abbot of St. Albans to Cromwell.
According to the King's and Cromwell's commands sends up Dan Wm. Ayshewell, whom he has hitherto esteemed to be an honest man. Sent Albons, Vigilia S. Laurencii.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Crumwell.
9 Aug.
R. O.
252. Mayor and Citizens of Winchester to Cromwell.
Complain of the great troubles and expenses yearly sustained by reason of the liberties and bondages claimed by the bishop of Winchester by his "pawilion court." This last year, hoped by advice of Cromwell and their learned counsel, to have withdrawn their personal suits from the said court and to have denied them from liberties and meddlings within this the King's city. If they had not received Cromwell's letter on the eve of St. Giles, they would have put in execution the said discontinuance. As Cromwell only wished them to spare for one year, which they have done, ask his assistance now. Winchester, 9 August.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
9 Aug.
R. O.
253. John Stoner.
Warrant to Sir Richard Riche, Chancellor of the Augmentation Court, for a grant to John Stoner, serjeant-at-arms, and his wife, being in service with the Queen, of the farm of the priory of Goring, Oxford. Chersey, 9 Aug. 28 Hen. VIII. (Docketed below as executed 6 Sept.) Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
9 Aug.
R. O.
254. William Lok, Mercer, to Cromwell.
Sends him news that he has written to the King. Our mart is very evil, both for sale of cloths and kerseys, because of the wars in these parts. The Sochers have determined to be neutral. The ships that were rigged in Zealand for Copynhavyn remain here, it is said, for lack of mariners and money both. Proclamation was made two days ago that any man might rig ships of war at his own cost, putting in surety that he should not meddle with any of the Emperor's friends. The castle of Gwise has been won by Nassau, and fortified with Burgundians. He has also won a town which belonged to the lady of Vendôme, and they are going on to St. Quintain's, which they expect to take, as there are not 800 men of war in the town. And if they gain that he may go on to Paris. The Emperor has three great hosts,—the one with himself, the second, 15,000 Spaniards which he sends out of Spain, and the third with Nassau. Letters from Seville mention the arrival of three ships from Peru with great substance of gold and silver, yet the Emperor's charges are so great it is all little enough to continue these wars. Great efforts are made to get money for him at 20l. loss in the 100l. for the year. The war begins so sharply that it is not expected to continue long. No letters have come from the Emperor for 20 days. Has enclosed in a letter to the King a copy of one in French sent by the secretary of the Lady Regent here to a lord of Antwerp. Dated at head: Antwerp, 9 Aug. 1536.
Hol., pp. 2. Add. Endd.
[About 9 Aug.] (fn. 2)
R. O.
255. Thomas Legh, LL.D., to Cromwell.
Was told in Paternoster Row that Mr. Bedill had reported that the King had granted to him, Dr. Trygunwell, and Dr. Petre the office concerning the bulls: which the King, at Cromwell's motion, granted to Dr. Peter and the writer. Mr. Pawlmer, under pretence of amity, this day told Legh that Cromwell was angry with him (Palmer) because Mr. Howlcroftc, and also Mr. Clyfford, came so boldly into his chamber to supper, and had also observed that Dr. Legh used to come as boldly to his table all the journey in Kent as if he had been Cromwell's fellow. Palmer advised the writer not to venture into Cromwell's presence at table for three or four days. Thinks this a device to get him out of the way till they have wrought their purpose, and begs Cromwell will continue his favor. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
9 Aug.
Lamb. 616, f. 29.
256. The Council of Ireland to Henry VIII.
To the same effect as their letter to Cromwell, which follows. Limerick, 9 Aug.
Signed.: J. Barnewall, your Chancellor—P. Oss.—James Butler, Treasurer—Gerald Aylmer, Justice—John Alen, Master of your Rolls.
Pp. 3. Add. Endd.
9 Aug.
R. O. St. P. ii. 349.
257. Council of Ireland to Cromwell.
According to their previous writing the Deputy and they repaired with the army, victualled for a month, to Kilkenny, 25 July, leaving the treasurer of the wars to defend the Englishry, reedify Powerscourt, and continue the works at Athye Bridge and Woodstock. As James of Desmond (son and heir to John of Desmond, dec., who usurped the earldom of Desmond with all the King's lands in Munster which belonged to the earl of Kildare) had proclaimed himself earl and combined with Obrene, deferred Parliament until this force should be repressed. The Deputy, with the King's power, both English and Irish, advanced to the borders of Casshell and encamped three days, waiting for James of Desmond, who had promised "me the chief justice" and the mayor of Limerick, but kept not his appointment. Had hoped to sever him from Obreen. Marched forward to a manor of Desmond's called Loughgyr "in an island of fresh water," a stronghold in like reputation here as Maynooth is in the North. Foraged that night upon the corn, and took the castle. Donaugh Obreen, Obreen's eldest son, who has married the daughter "of me, the earl of Ossorie," came to the Deputy and offered to serve the King if he had the keeping of Carrickogynnell, which has been in possession of the Brenes this 200 years. Considering the necessity of the time, thought to allow his request. Next day marched to "the said castle," which the Deputy won by appointment, put in an English garrison, and resorted to Limerick. Here consulted to set forth to the breaking of Obrene's bridge, in which the assistance of Obrene's son seemed so necessary against his father and James of Desmond, that they concluded to deliver the said castle by indenture to Ossory and James Butler to keep at their charge, with Donaghe Obrene as their deputy. After that the castle was, "by tradyment," recovered by the persons who had it before. Trust, however, their conclusion shall take effect. On Friday marched for the bridge, being conducted by Donaghe and his friends by a way never before taken by any English host. On Saturday came to the bridge. On this side was a strong castle of hewn marble, and another, not so strong, at the other end, both built in the water some way from the land. At this end four arches between the castle and the land were broken. Describe the assault and capture of the castles and bridge on Sunday morning by some of the Deputy's retinue and Mr. Sayntclow's company. Lost, two gunners slain and some wounded. Broke down the castles and bridge, with which the mayor of Limerick and some 30 persons fell into the water, but only one was drowned. Yesterday the army returned hither. Today James Butler and Donaghe Obreen repair towards Waterford to conduct hither certain ordnance; for Obreen will neither deliver up the earl of Kildare's goods, nor put from him Kildare's son and servants. The Deputy is a forward, active, and "painful gentleman." Have much ado to stay the army from insurrections for their wages, and are in doubt that they may be deserted and left in power of the King's enemies; if not, they trust to do good service. Beg favor for the bearer, Thomas Alen. Limerick, 9 Aug.
Signed by J. Barnewall, Chancellor; Ossory; Jas. Butler, Treasurer; Gerald Aylmer, Justice, and John Alen.
Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
9 Aug.
R. O.
258. John Alen to Cromwell.
In favor of the bearer, his brother, Thomas Alen, of whom he spoke when with Cromwell, to be taken into Cromwell's service. Limerick, 9 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Sir John Alen.
9 Aug.
R. O.
259. William Body to Cromwell.
The Deputy left Dublin 19 July with the English retinue for Munster and O'Bryne's country, and entered Kilkenny on the 24th, where the Parliament was kept 25th. Thence he removed to Lokkere, a strong castle of James of Desmond, which, being abandoned, the lord Treasurer took on the 31st, and now keeps at his own charge. It had been called the said James's chief fortress in co. Limerick. On the 1 Aug. they marched to the strong castle Carek Ogunyell, i.e., Candle Rock, which was delivered to my lord Deputy on the 2d by Matthew O'Bryne without a blow, on condition that it should be warded only by Englishmen. It is the key of co. Limerick this side the Shannon. We left Limerick, 5 Aug., to break Morowgh O'Bryne's bridge on the confines of Tomound. Morowgh is brother to the Great O'Bryne. Description of the bridge with a fortress at either end, both which, though guns made little impression on them, were taken by assault by Will. Seyntlowe and his men before scaling ladders could be set up. Does not know if this success was owing to hope of fame, or to lack of victuals; for a halfpenny loaf was worth 12d., but there was none to be sold. Blames my lord Deputy, who would not let the army bring their provision carts from Limerick. "And so I, amongst others, lay in my harness without any bed, almost famished with hunger, wet, and cold, from Friday inclusive unto Tuesday exclusive, and then we returned to Limerick."
Commends my lord of Ossory and my lord Treasurer. The latter recovered to our amity Donoth O'Bryne, son of Great O'Breen, whom my lord Deputy had lost by a breach of faith. Their horse and gallowglasses, i.e., footmen, far exceeded the band of 700 Englishmen brought by my lord Deputy; a very small company for so great a journey. My lord Deputy on surety of Ossory and my lord Treasurer wrote to cause Carek Ogunyell to be delivered to Donoth O'Breene, son-in-law to my lord Ossory; but by virtue of a former letter of my lord Deputy it was delivered to Matthew O'Breene, who had it before and will not deliver it again without a new siege. Ossory, the Treasurer, and Donoth feel themselves mocked, but still do good service; while my lord Deputy suffers Geo. Woodwarde, his own servant, and others to go unpunished for yielding up the castle. If Ireland were well inhabited, its fertility is such it would soon turn to the King's profit. The counties of Dublin, Kildare, Carlow, Kilkenny, Tipperary, Ormond, Ossory, Desmond, Limerick, and Thomond are a paradise for beauty and goodness. Limerick is a wonderfully proper city.
Perceives little diligence in my lord Deputy, the Master of the Rolls, and the Chief Justice in levying an aid. They will appoint him no nearer day than 14 Sept., alleging as before that Ossory and my lord Treasurer would hinder them; which is not true, for he has opened the matter to my lord Treasurer. Is preparing to return to Dublin to survey the accounts. Will report more fully on his return to England. Limerick, 9 Aug. Signed.
IIol., pp. 3. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
ii. Enclosure containing on a single leaf:—
(1.) A remembrance of my lord Deputy's band and of such Irishmen as repaired to him:—
English horse and foot, 700; Omere horse and foot, 137; Lord Rooche horse, 12; Makmurgh, Okarell, Cayre Okonour, White Knyght, Olyke a Burgh, Shirif of Iryell, and gentlemen of Washefourd and Kildare, horse and foot, 174; total, 1,023.
(2.) A remembrance of my lord Ossory and my lord Treasurer's band and their friends:—
Ossory, lord James, the Treasurer, Doneth Obreene, Myghell Phathryke, Sir Thomas Botler, Gerald MkShane, my lady Power, and my lord of Cassell; horse, 361; foot, 920.
(3.) Names of the ward put by my lord Deputy into Castle Carek Ogonyell, who redelivered the same:—
Geo. Woodwarde, David Flode, Harry Sower, Thos. Sawch, Robt. Browne, Wm. Gryce, John Tomkyns, John Olderch, Robt. Parke, Robt. Davy, Yvan Osbynow, Harry Ere, Edw. Taylor, John Cottyngham, Harry Sotton, John Sotton, and Philip of Powell.
In Body's hand, p. 1.
10 Aug.
R. O.
260. John [Hilsey] Bishop of Rochester to Cromwell.
In favour of the friars of Guildford, who will beg the King for a perpetual alms to the relief of their great poverty. London, St. Laurence Day.
Reminds him of the master of the Gylbertyns (fn. 3) towards Landaffe.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
10 Aug.
R. O.
261. Sir Roger Touneshend, Sir Wm. Paston, Ric. Southwell, and Tho. Mildemaye to Cromwell.
During their survey in Norfolk for the King's augmentations, sent to the house of Yngham to put their books and necessaries in due order before their coming. Found no religious persons there by reason of a bargain made by the head, dated 24 Dec. Ao. xxvi., by William Woodhouse, who brought his said bargain to the commissioners at Coxforth. He alleged that Yngham is without the case and danger of the statute, being a house of Crossed Friars, not monks or canons. Perused the statute and think it is so. Ask for orders. Coxforth, 10 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
10 Aug.
R. O.
262. Hen. Holbeche Prior of Worcester to Cromwell.
Has received his letter dated 4 Aug. last, in favor of Robt. Sturges, the bearer, touching a lease to be made to him of the tithe and parsonage of Hymulton (Himbleton). The tithe and parsonage is not void, but has been long before his time in their own hands to the use of the monastery. They cannot spare it, for they have not sufficient corn coming in from their tenants, and are yearly driven to buy much. Worcester Priory, 10 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
10 Aug.
R. O.
263. The Mayor and Aldermen of Calais to Cromwell.
Desire instructions what to do about five men of an armed pynke, whom they have imprisoned on the depositions of John Brysco, master of a catche, of Hythe, and John Tulke, mariner; which deposition they send. Calais, 10 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
R. O.2. Deposition of John Brysco, of Hythe, master of a "catche" called the George, examined 10 Aug. 28 Henry VIII., before Mr. Mayor and aldermen.
Yesterday, 9th inst. a pynk of Newport, with about 40 men in her, boarded him in the Downs, asked whence he was and what he carried, and maintained that they were Frenchmen's goods in spite of his denial. Desired to be set on land, and showed two bills of passport of the Customs, but they took him into their pink and afterwards followed John Tovey's cattche of Calais. Then they threatened to carry deponent and his ship to Newport to see if his passports were good. Then the master of the pynke agreed to deliver him and his fellows, but the rest of his company would not consent. At last they put this deponent in his catche, and this morning the wind being N.E., they could fetch Flanders coast no further than Gravelines and agreed to land deponent there, but four or five sails came from the north which they feared, and therefore came to Calais.
ii. John Tulke, mariner, of Hythe, confirms this deposition.
iii. The names of the five Flemings are Peter Cok, Joyce Clement, Gilnan Fleming, Arnold Carman, and Francis Cosyn.
10 Aug.
R. O.
264. John Husee to Lady Lisle.
I have had much ado with the Chancellor of Augmentations since my coming. I find small friendship in him; yet he has appointed my lord 86l. a year out of the priory of Frystock, so that, the 100l. reserved, my lord must become tenant to the King for the rest. I have caused two bills to be made, the one for a gift to my lord, your ladyship, and the heirs of your bodies; the other with remainder to the heirs of my lord's body. I fear he will speed but the first, for he is full of dissimulation. He would in nowise put Mr. Basset in the remainder, though I promised him a velvet gown. I doubt he will deserve neither thanks nor reward. "He passeth all that ever I sued unto." I have followed Mr. Hennage for the 1,000 marks. He gives fair words, but small comfort. He refers all to my lord Privy Seal; so it will be no short suit. I can see no remedy, but, as my lord's pleasure is, to go thorough with Hide, where Mr. Windsor and I will do our best for my lord's advantage. Mr. Basset is in the country and will go into Hampshire. He wants a horse. I can get none of Mr. Page. Miss Margery and all your friends in Court are merry, and hope you may still remain there. The Queen has spoken of you divers times since her departing from Dover. At my return from the country I will inform you how everything passes. London, 10 Aug.
Hol., pp. 2. Add. Endd.
10 Aug.
R. O.
265. Lord Leonard Grey to Henry VIII.
According to Henry's pleasure for "furnishing" affairs in Monster, came to Kilkenny 25 July, and there kept Parliament two or three days, tarrying the coming of ordnance and victuals. Then set forward towards Obreen's country through Dessemond's country, where they expected to have some business; but the inhabitants deserted their castles and fled. Tarried one night at Limerick, and on the morrow, 5 Aug., marched to Obreen's bridge. Shot artillery at it two or three hours in the afternoon, but that doing little hurt the Council decided to give an assault next morning by servants of Grey and Wm. Seyntlowe. Provided scaling ladders and ordered every soldier to bring a faggot to heighten the ground. The assault being given accordingly on the Sunday morning, the defenders, seeing their assailants climb up so fiercely, left the castle and ran away, whereupon the defenders of the other castle did the same, although they had plenty of artillery and victual. Lost but two men, servants of the writer, who were killed by guns. It was the strongest castle he has seen in Ireland. Walls of hewn marble 13 feet thick. Thinks it was never devised by any Irishman. Can do anything in these parts if he be furnished as the King and Council promised he should be; but would rather serve with 500 men of his own choosing than all the company he now has. Writes more at large to the Lord Privy Seal. If the King will provide inhabitants he may have what he will in Ireland. Limerick, 10 Aug. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add. Endd.
10 Aug.
R. O. St. P. ii. 353.
266. Lord Leonard Grey to Cromwell.
Took the army to Kilkenny against 25 July, intending to proceed against those rebels Obreen and James FitzJohn of Desmond, and leaving Wm. Brabazon with a company to defend Dublin, reëdify Powerscourte, and continue the works of Athye and Woodstock. From Kilkenny (with the army, Ossory and his son who brought a goodly company, and out of the four shires O'More McMorgho McGyllpatryk, O'Byrne, O'Karvile, gentlemen of Wexford and Waterford and lord Roche) advanced towards O'Breen's country through lands of the said James, who calls himself earl of Desmond. Encamped by Loghgyr, a castle which the said James took from James FitzMaurice, right heir to the earldom, now in England with the King. Found the castle void and delivered it to Ossory's eldest son, lord James. In the morning went to another castle called Caryk Ogennyll, and "fell to a parling" with the constable thereof, who used very high words till the writer brought up his artillery, when he agreed to surrender if allowed to depart with bag and baggage. By advice of the Council agreed to this, as it would save powder and shot, &c. Sent his nephew Dudley and the mayor of Limerick with 100 gunners into the castle, where they set up the King's standard, and then Grey, with Ossory and his son and the lord Chancellor and others, went in and viewed it. Left a ward there of his own company, and came that night to Limerick. Next day marched to O'Breen's bridge and battered that night at one tower. His men and Wm. Seyntlowe's took it by assault next day. Broke up the bridge and castles.
Is loath to write it, but the whole company of Englishmen with him are so misordered that he is often in jeopardy of his life. First the Northern men about their wages "began a sore mutiny and insurrection." Then Wm. Seyntlowe's company at Waterford did the like. Again our first night in camp Seyntlowe's men mutinied in the enemy's country and with a great many Irishmen in the army "not having as good stomachs in their hearts" as could be wished. Had to bend the ordnance on them to pacify them. Fears his own soldiers more than the King's enemies. There are few companies besides the writer's own which have not mutinied or murmured, and now unless I provide money they will do no service unless they may rob and steal as they do daily, notwithstanding the statutes and articles against it. The Provost Marshal is part causer of this, as he will not execute the Council's instructions. When the writer gives an order to one man they answer all together "Let us have money and we will do it." Begs favor for his servant Thos. Alen, the bearer. The Master of the Rolls, Chief Justice, and lord Chancellor have taken great pains. Begs him not to credit light reports. The country passes any he ever saw for sedition and discord, "and they principally delight to put one of us Englishmen in an other's neck." Would write more, but doubts whether his letters reach Cromwell, they are so "tossed and opened." Has received Cromwell's letters opened. Further complaints about disorders. Limerick, 10 Aug. Signed.
Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
10 Aug.
R. O.
267. Edmond Sexten to Cromwell.
The Deputy and army are here, and have done "full noble exploits." I fear this army will break up for default of money, to the King's great hindrance in these parts. Remember my suits which you promised me should be sped. Limerick, 10 Aug. Signed Edmond Sexten, mayer of Lymbryke.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
10 Aug.
Poli Epp., i. 476.
268. Pole to Aloysius Priolus.
Sends him the letters he has written to the bishop of Verona, to be forwarded. Conld not but consult such a friend in his present circumstances. Would have gone to him himself, but that at this time he is usually absent from Verona on episcopal duties. Has no leisure, or, in truth, energy left to answer the letters of Priolus. Has written fully to the Cardinal and also to the Pope. But nothing will be lost by this delay for the object Priolus has at heart. "Reverendus Marcus" also writes to you, to whom I wish you would make the most suave reply, taking no notice of anything bitter that may be in his letter. I hope to be with you in three days, i.e., on the Vigil of St. Mary. "Ex nostro Paradiso," St. Laurence day.
Lat.
10 Aug.
Poli Epp., i. 477.
269. Pole to Jo. Matt. Ghiberti, Bishop of Verona.
I would have come to you myself, but that it is the time you commonly visit your diocese. For not only do I wish to redeem the time of which that unexpected messenger from England deprived me, who carried me hence against my will, but I am involved in matters on which I particularly wish to consult with you. Only ten days ago another messenger came from England, despatched post haste, with letters from Cromwell, written at the King's dictation (quas mihi Regis verbis scribit Cromuellus), and others of Tunstall, bishop of Durham, "cui nunc in Anglia primas in literis tribuunt," endeavouring to turn me from the opinion I defend in my books, and in the end conjuring me for the love of my family and country not to bring my country back again under the yoke, as they call obedience to the Church of Rome. Replied to his letters, and bade the messenger return as swiftly as he came. Meanwhile letters arrived from the Pope, not only desiring but commanding him to come to Rome. The Pope apparently wishes to prove whether he is ready to yield such obedience as he has asserted in words to be due to the Holy See. Has written this to his friends in England, sending them a copy of the Pope's letter with his reply to the bishop, in which he declares he will obey the Pope as a duty. For the Pope wishes a conference of learned men this winter to prepare for the General Council. What else could I do but obey ? I am glad to hear you also are called. I should like to know when you go, that if late enough I might join you. The abbot of St. George has asked me to go thither with him, but he goes at the end of this month, intending to spend some days with the archbishop of Salerno, and I cannot start before the end of Sept. From my paradise, as I may call it, not only for the sweetness of the place, and its pleasant mountains, but still more for the companions, whose intercourse I enjoy. Mark, the monk who brought me hither with him, has been with me 20 days, and there is no one whom I more readily listen to discoursing on divinity. "Rovelonæ, in montibus Euganeis," 10 Aug. 1536.
Lat.
Wilkins, iii. 823.270. Holydays.
Act of convocation for the abrogation of certain holydays, especially in harvest time.

Footnotes

1 The Merchant Adventurers.
2 See Grants in Nov., No. 22.
3 Robert Holgate, who was appointed bishop of Llandaff next year.