Henry VIII
November 1536, 6-10

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1888

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'Henry VIII: November 1536, 6-10', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 11: July-December 1536 (1888), pp. 406-417. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75484 Date accessed: 23 September 2014.


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November 1536, 6-10

6 Nov.
Hist. MSS. Com. Report vi., 446.
992. Henry VIII. to the Earl of Derby.
Acknowledges and thanks the earl of Derby for his letter of All Hallows Day and the articles, and approves of what he has done. As the malice of the rebels may revive, he is to keep his forces in readiness so that in the very beginning, either with violence or good means, he may suppress it, or at least hold his ground until the King (on advice) may send succour. Derby is to make espial in Yorkshire and other counties. He (the King) has sent letters of thanks to some of the gentlemen. Derby is to deliver them and thank all. Windsor, 6 Nov. 28 Hen. VIII.
6 Nov.
R. O.
993. Cumberland to Fitzwilliam.
Yesternight I received the King's letters, copy enclosed. The commons throughout Yorkshire, Durham, Northumberland, Cumberland, Westmoreland, and most of Lancashire are wilfully set and minded, and the gentlemen taken with them likewise, rather for war than peace, and daily spoil those yet unsworn to them who are but a small company. The commons of Westmoreland sent unto Sir Wm. Musgrave and Jack, his deputy at Bewcastle, to be sworn; but they, together with Eske and Lune, as the Gramez, &c., replied they would be sworn to no rebels, and if my son at Carlisle would have given them licence they would have harried all Cumberland and Westmoreland. Sir Wm. Musgrave, seeing the town of Carlisle in danger, came in and helped my son, wherein he has deserved thanks of the King. If the commons have not such answer from the King as will content them they will congregate in greater numbers than ever. Give credence to bearer, my son Henry Clifford's servant. At my castle of Skipton, 6 Nov.
Copy, p. 1. Headed: To my lord Admiral.
6 Nov.
R. O. St. P. v. 62.
994. Agnes abbess of Sion to Cromwell.
According to the King's desire will be ready to lodge lady Margaret Douglas in their precinct. Sion, 6 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord of the Private Seal. Endd.
6 Nov.
R. O.
995. Duke of Norfolk to Lord Darcy.
According to my promise I have declared all such articles as were by you and others delivered to me, and the King has been at no small pains to make answer to them, writing the same with his own hand, and no creature privy thereto until it was finished; "which be of such sort that in mine opinion there is nothing to be amended therein." He had determined to send them by Sir Ralph Ellerker a[nd Robert] Bowes, when knowledge came that Aske had essayed by divers letters to Sir Marmaduke Constable and to Lancashire, Cumberland, Westmoreland, Kendal, and other places, to make new commotions contrary to the promise made to my lord Steward and me. This untrue dealing of him hath caused his Highness to stay the sending of answer until now. I think, when you see the said answer, with all his Highness has determined to do touching those foolish commons, ye and all others will think there never was so gracious or pitiful a prince, imputing the errors of his people rather to the seducing of light foolish persons than to malice. I beg to know what has been done contrary to the promise made and by whom, and how it should be redressed. For old love, I must warn you also of the speech of the people here who think you consented to Aske and the commons in the delivery of Pomfret. I have used myself like a true friend, thinking you delivered the castle for lack of victual and ordnance and were forced to go with the commons like many other noblemen. To declare yourself, I advise you to take, alive or dead, but alive if possible, that arrant traitor Aske, which will extinct the ill bruit and raise you in the favour of his Highness. Windsor, 6 Nov. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add. Sealed.
6 Nov.
R. O.
996. The Mayor and People of Kingston on Hull to the Duke of Norfolk.
Have today received his letters, but dare not deliver Anthony Curtees, Wm. his servant, Robt. Horncliffe, and Chr. Blaunde without a special commandment of the Grand Captain. Kingston-upon-Hull, 6 Nov. "By Willm. Roger, mayor of Hull, Robert Constable K., Wylm. Constable with all other the King his trewe subjectes beynge within Kyngeston-uponHull."
P. 1. Copy. Endd.
6 Nov.
R. O.
997. Robt. Holdesworth, Priest, to Sir Hen. Sayvell.
Is glad to hear that he is in good health and has done the King such good service. Is informed that a stay is taken by the duke of Norfolk, Shrewsbury, and others of the Council, and to meet again at Doncaster. "Sir, believe an old man, ye shall see them so discreetly handled, and so substantially, that the whole power shall never come again together, a[nd] the great doers thereof with their great bands looked upon at the leyntz (lergth)." Does not care twopence for the robbing of his house. The money was in the corner under the stair, going in to his chamber out of his parlour. Expects it is safe, for they could not have had leisure to search so nearly. Hears that Sayvell and his folks are gone home from Rotheram during the truce. Bids him filch the money privily and spare not to spend it. Advises him to beware of lord Darcy and Sir Ric. Tempest, for if they take him at advantage he is but gone; also of all who have been great setters forth of this business, as Sir Robt. Nevell, Mr. Thos. Grysse, and others. Hears by market men that they are sore moved against him, for going from his neighbours and for being extreme against them. If he cannot find the money, and wants some to serve the King, will borrow for him. London, 6 Nov. 1536.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
[6 Nov.]?
R. O.
998. Rich. Cromwell to Cromwell.
Wrote lately by Sir Wm. Newnam, the suggestion of Mr. Gonston, that there should be watch laid by those who trade with Flanders, lest powder or ordnance come from thence. This day the great traitor, Aske, and Sir Robert Constable are at Hull setting forth a ship, whether to fly, or to fetch ordnance, or for what purpose I know not. My lord's Grace has sent Mr. Gonston and Mr. Hatclyf to Grimsby to intercept any vessel they send from Hull. I was never so weary, seeing I can do the King no service here and am so long absent from your Lordship. Lincoln, Monday night. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
6 Nov.
R. O.
999. Sir Thomas Palmer to Cromwell.
Sends his Lordship a wild boar he has killed in Picardy by force of English hand. In taking he put two Picards in danger of their lives, and Palmer thinks one of them will die. Gynys, 6 Nov.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Sealed. Endd.
6 Nov.
R. O.
1000. Jehan de Tovar to Lord Lisle.
In behalf of the bearer, Chas. de Grave, a merchant of cloth of gold and silk, native of Houscoet, dwelling at Antwerp, who desires leave to sell his merchandise to you and other English gentlemen. I am very glad to hear the good news, of which I have been informed by a Spanish prelate who has passed this way, that the commonalty in England are reduced to obedience. Gravelines Castle, 6 Nov. 1536.
Since writing, I hear that the French have passed a good way this night through the English pale to pillage the Emperor's country. I beg you will take measures to check such attempts. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
6 Nov.
Add. MS. 28,589, f. 107. B. M.
1001. Ortiz to the Empress.
Wrote 24th Sept. and 19 Oct. Now the number and weight of the King of England's sins must be complete, provoking his subjects to rebel as he is such a rebel against God. No letter has come this time from the ambassador, because the king of England stops all intelligence, but the rebels are said to be 30,000 or 40,000 men in a letter from the queen of Hungary. You may imagine in what danger the Princess stands, being in the power of the heretics, and the need of the prayer being put throughout Spain, which I have asked of your Majesty. Rome, 6 Nov. 1536.
Sp. Modern copy, pp. 2. Add.
7 Nov.
R. O.
1002. Henry VIII. to the Earl of Cumberland.
We have received your letters from your castle of Skipton, 31 Oct., declaring your determination to withstand the rebels, the damage you have sustained, and the good service done at Carlisle by the lord Clifford, your son, and seen your letters to our cousin of Norfolk. For your loyalty we thank you, and doubt ye not but we shall recompense your losses. Now that the danger is past, we require you to regard your own safety and to write from time to time "conformably to the tenor of our last letters." [We intend to give a general pardon to all; a few "notable villains that have begun this insurrection" excepted. You may, "to put them out of despair," declare this, for we shall with speed send down our proclamation for it.] (fn. 1)
Pp. 2. Draft headed: "By the King." Endd.: Minute of letter to my lord of Cumberland, 7 Nov.
7 Nov.
R. O.
1003. Henry VIII. to the Earl of Westmoreland.
Understands, by his chaplain sent to the duke of Norfolk, the danger he has been in from the rebels, and how he has preserved himself from "thinfection of their traitorous poison." Promises that he shall be recompensed. Begs him to look to his personal safety, to keep good espial and from time to time advertise the King. [Has determined to give a general pardon, a few "rank villanous traitors that began this matter" excepted; and, to put them from despair, he may declare this.] (fn. 1)
Draft, p. 1. Headed: "By the King." Endd.: Minute of the letter to my lord of Westmoreland, 7 Nov.
7 Nov.
R. O.
1004. Suffolk and Others to Henry VIII.
This day we received a letter from the earl of Cumberland, enclosed. As to helping him we see no possibility. Your Grace shall receive with this a letter to me, duke of Suffolk, from the traitors Aske and others, whose names appear in the letter. I had sent for a gentleman to the mayor of Hull, whose name appears in the said letter, not knowing the traitors to be there. We have sent an answer to the earl of Cumberland (copy enclosed), to comfort him in the meantime. Lincoln, 7 Nov. Signed by Charles duke of Suffolk, Sir J. Russell, Sir Francis Bryan, Sir Ant. Browne, and Sir Wm. Parr.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
7 Nov.
R. O.
1005. Suffolk and Others to the Earl of Cumberland.
Have received his letters of the 5th inst., and perceive the good service done by him and my lord his son. (fn. 2) Thank him for his news of the Borders. Cannot devise how to send him guns and gunpowder, as he desires, without their falling into the hands of the rebels. Are sorry they cannot do him pleasure; and also for the losses he has sustained. Upon the order taken by Norfolk and Shrewsbury, the rebels are yet at a stay. Will send him news, and desire him to do the same to them and keep himself in surety. As some of his letters to the King have been lost, they will see this one conveyed to his Grace. Lincoln, 7 Nov.
Copy, pp. 2. Add. Endd.: My lord of Suffolk's letters.
R. O.2. Another copy with the signatures (copied) of Suffolk, Sir Anthony Browne, Sir J. Russell and Sir W. Par.
Pp. 2. Mutilated.
7 Nov.
R. O.
1006. Richard Cromwell to Cromwell.
This night, while in attendance on my lord's Grace, I heard of the arrival of my servant this bearer, Robert Pykering, who has been in the North parts with his wife's relations this half year. I told my lord's Grace, who commanded he should be brought before him. Being examined, he showed news consonant with that of my Lord's espials, together with other news. My lord's Grace then commanded me to send him to your lordship, not doubting but, when you have heard him, the King's highness with his Council will decide upon the necessary measures. My lord's Grace and his Council marvel that they have no news of the King's decision therein, and that our enemies are before them in their information. I beg you will examine this bearer yourself, or appoint Mr. Writhesley or some other. Lincoln, Tuesday at 11 p.m. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.: 7 Nov.
7 Nov.
R. O.
1007. John lord Hussey to Darcy.
Has lately been in trouble, partly because he was said to be in confederacy with Darcy; and was "like to have suffered," but the duke of Norfolk, by suit to the King, has delivered him. The Duke has shown him that men say Darcy gave up the castle of Pomfret. The Duke has "declared" Darcy so far, that if he find means to send up Ask, quick or dead, he may be sure of the King's favour. Begs him urgently to accomplish the King's pleasure. Windsor, 7 Nov. Signed, John Huse.
P. 1. Add.
7 Nov.
R. O.
1008. William Constable to Sir Marmaduke Constable, Jun.
"The cause of my coming forth of the country partly to you is not unknown." My chance and the shifts I have made with honesty, I will describe to you when we meet. At the beginning of this insurrection I was in Wales, and chanced to revert to a town not six miles within England to a priest I knew in Oxford to borrow some money. He showed me that in towns near the coast all strangers must be examined before my lord chief justice; and exhorted me not to oppose the constable. I appeared before my lord chief justice, who would not believe I was your brother, and, as he "had haste to London," left me with my lord of Bath, and I am "like to dance a galyard with a pair of fetters about my legs." Please send word to my lord of Bath, and send me some money, for "I am as poor as ever was Job." At Stoe, 7 Nov.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Brother. Endd.
7 Nov.
R. O.
1009. Sir Ralph Ellerkar, Jun., and Rob. Bowys to Darcy.
After our departure from you at Hampolle, we attended upon my lord of Norfolk and lord Talbot towards the Court. Norfolk had so "travailed his body" riding Northwards that he could not labor over 30 miles a day; so that it was Thursday, the feast of All Souls, about 10 a.m., before we came to Court. The King was then at Windsor, where Norfolk declared to him in his privy chamber the articles declared by you and the commonalty to his Lordship. After dinner we were sent for, when Norfolk and Talbot repeated the articles, and we declared particulars as far as we could. "And although the King's most royal majesty at the beginning showed his courage to be much provoked unto extreme displeasure against us all of the North parties of his Grace's realm by occasion of our so high and notable attemptates touching some[what] his royal estate and honor, as in the prescribing and assuming unto his Grace councillors for the order of his Grace's realm, yet nevertheless his Highness of his most gracious benignity having rather respect unto the preservation of his people in quietness, than to be revenged upon them by sword or battle, thooff his Grace did accompte him right highly provoked thereunto, was much assuaged," especially by the mediation of Norfolk and others of the Council, and determined by his own study to make answer to the articles, which we hoped would have been to the comfort of us all. But since the order taken between my lord of Norfolk, my lord Steward, lord Latimer, and you, Rob. Aske has sent letters into Cumberland, Westmoreland, and Lancashire, to Sir Marmaduke Constable, the elder, and others, moving to a new insurrection, and has caused unlawful attempts on Leonard Bekwythe and others; which has given new offence to the King and staid our suits. Norfolk also thinks him ill-used by the breach of his order, which ought to be redressed. Hope still to have a favourable answer in four or five days. Windsor, 7 Nov. Signed.
Pp. 3. Slightly mutilated. Add.
R. O.2. Four copies of the preceding, three of them mutilated.
7 Nov.
Hist. MSS. Com., Report vi. 447.
1010. The Rebels.
Letter sent by my Lord (Derby) in the King's name to all the mayors, constables, and others, the King's officers in the co. of Lancashire.—A watch is to be kept.—None are to pass except those known. Persons speaking ill of the King or Council are to be taken. Latham, Nov. 7.
7 Nov.
R. O.
1011. Jaques de Coucy [Sieur de Vervins] to the Deputy of Calais.
I have received your letter about the four compagnons of Tournehen. To satisfy you I send them back, which I would not have done so easily but for your sake. Your trumpet, to whom I have delivered them, has promised to pay the expenses, a promise which he will do well to keep. I will do my best to recover their "bastons." Boulogne, 7 Nov. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
7 Nov.
Raynald. Annales Eccl., xxxii. 409.
1012. Paul III. to Francis I.
Heard with different feelings the news of the treaty of marriage between the king of Scotland and Francis, and the recourse to arms of the people of England in consequence of their king's impiety. Nothing is more desirable at the present time than the union of pious kings. Exhorts him not to help the king of England. Rome, 7 Nov. 1536, anno iij.
Lat.
7 Nov.
Raynald. Annales Eccl., xxxii. 409.
1013. Paul III. to the Cardinal of Paris.
On the same subject. Rome, 7 Nov. 1536. Anno iij.
Lat.
8 Nov.
R. O.
1014. Norfolk to Darcy.
I received your letter yesterday by Percivall, (fn. 3) and have noted two points; one, your willingness to serve the King, the other, for the soon sending to you of Sir Ralph Ellerker and Robert Bowez. As to the first, you shall do as I ever thought you would; and you never had the like opportunity in your life. As to the second point, they had been sent long ago if news had not come of new insurrections in those parts contrary to the appointment taken at Doncaster. The King has determined to send me to Doncaster to you and others of those parts, if you will come and speak with me. I beg you to dismiss all suspicion of fraud in this matter, and to cause others to do the same. "I have lived too long in this world to think otherwise than truly and honest[l]y." I think you cannot assemble for this before 29 November, so I shall set forwards to be at Doncaster to meet you on the 28th Nov. As your friend, I advise and pray you to help to conduce these troublous matters to a good end. Windsor, 8 Nov. (fn. 4)
P.S.—At my suit the King is content that my lord Admi[ral], your kinsman, shall come with me.
Copy, p. 1. Endd. by Wriothesley: "The copy of my lord of Norff. letters sent to the lord Darcy, which copy was found in the vicar of Blackburne's chantry."
[8 Nov. ?]
R. O.
1015. Rich. Cromwell to Cromwell.
As I suppose you have but few of your servants with you now, I send Mr. Roper and Robert Aley. If you want any more, let me know; and also whether I shall lie here all this winter, that I may make provision, as victuals are scant. Meryng, who is with me here, and loth to depart, begs that in his absence his office be not granted to any other man. I beg you will send the harness you have bought, for I am destitute. Lincoln, Wednesday. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
[8 Nov.]
R. O.
1016. Rich. Cromwell to Cromwell.
This night my lord's Grace (fn. 5) has appointed Sir John Russell, Mr. Brian, and me to march with our companies towards Newark tomorrow morning. God and St. George be our foremen! You will see the news by my lord's letter. Lincoln, Wednesday night. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
8 Nov.
R. O.
1017. Sir Brian Hastyngs to Suffolk.
Learnt, 7 Nov., that the false rebels lord Darcy, Aske, and Sir Robert Constable have made posts from Hull by Tempyll Hurst, York, and Durham, to Newcastle, to prepare new money, that every soldier may, if needful, have 20s. in his purse. Lord Darcy intends to come, with all his power, through Doncaster, and the rebel Aske and Sir Robert Constable, with the East Riding, Howdenshire, and Marshland, by water to Gainsborough and Stockewith, and thence to Lincoln, to take the harness there, and so to meet lord Darcy. Haytfeld, 8 Nov., 5 p.m. Signed.
P. 1 Add. Endd.
8 Nov.
R. O.
1018. John abbot of Peterborough to Thomas Hennege.
About three weeks past (after my lord of Suffolk's departure from Stamforde) I caused a watch to be nightly in this town, wherein was taken a simple fellow, who had letters from the queen of Scots to the King. I caused the fellow to be stayed in the monastery, and sent the letters to Sir John Seynt John for the duke of Suffolk. Sir John wrote back that the Duke's pleasure was for me to keep the party until I had further knowledge from his Grace. Having no further commands from my lord of Suffolk, I wrote again to Mr. Seynt John, about six days past. And thereupon Mr. Bryan has written me his letters, which I send by this bearer, and sent the said letters directed from the queen of Scots, and willeth me to send up the party to one of my friends in the Court. I desire you to cause him to deliver the said letters to the King. Peterborough, 8 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
8 Nov.
R. O.
1019. Sir Thos. Boteler to Cromwell.
I have received your letter dated 6 Nov., and will execute the contents to the best of my power. Two canons of Norton, Sir John Penketh, and Sir Henry Barnez, are imprisoned with their late abbot in the King's gaol at Chester for divers misdemeanours charged against them at the suppression. Would not intercede for them if he believed them guilty, but the common fame of the country imputes no fault to them. Begs Cromwell's interference, as it is said Sir Piers Dutton would have put them to execution without examination. Lichfield, 8 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
8 Nov.
R. O.
1020. Katharine wife to John Audelett (fn. 6) to Cromwell.
My husband is bound to abide the arbitrament between him and the abbot of Abendon before Christmas next, which is nigh. I beg your mastership to further the matter that it may be at an end, for my husband is sickly, as this bringer Mr. Androys can tell you. I send a poor token and would know your pleasure, for the comfort of my husband and me. Abendon, 8 Nov.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Katherine Audlett, widow, Nov. xxiii°."
8 Nov.
R. O.
1021. Guillaume Groul to Pierre Beccwit, at Calais.
I understand by the bearer that you have returned to this country, which gives me very great pleasure. I wish you would come and see me shortly that we might talk together like friends. St. Omer, 8 Nov. 1536.
Hol., Fr. p. 1. Add.
9 Nov.
R. O.
1022. [Henry VIII.] to — —.
Since the rebels of Yorkshire have again dispersed, although great numbers undoubtedly repent the late insurrection yet many remain who endeavour to promote like attempts, and we have written to the earl of Derby to put all his force in readiness, in case of any new disturbance, to resort, if required, to the earl of Shrewsbury, lord steward of our household, whom we have made our lieutenant in those parts, and otherwise to remain in the parts of Cheshire and Lancashire which the earl shall assign him. We have thought meet also to appoint you with your force to serve us in the company of our said cousin Derby and you shall make ready the most able men you can if need shall require to join our said cousin; meanwhile taking order to leave men of honesty behind you to stay the parts thereabouts in your absence. Windsor Castle, 9 Nov. 28 Hen. VIII.
P. 1.
R. O.2. An undated letter with the same preamble requiring the person addressed to have his tenants and friends, to the number of—(blank) ready at an hour's warning to repair to such place as the King's next letters shall appoint.
Corrected draft in Wriothesley's hand, pp. 3.
9 Nov.1023. The Marquis of Exeter.
See Grants in November, No. 6.
9 Nov.
R. O.
1024. E. Lady Savage (fn. 7) to Cromwell.
Perceives, by her cousin Urian Brereton, Cromwell's favour to her in her suits to the King. Begs remembrance of them when he shall see a time convenient. Sends his Lordship, by bearer, a gelding. Fyncheley, 9 November. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: My lady Savage.
9 Nov.
R. O.
1025. Sir John Nevill to Cromwell.
Expressions of willingness to serve him. Since the first rising in Lincolnshire, has been with the lord Steward and other noble men. Clyfton and another son-in-law and three of his own sons have been serving the King also, with such power as they can make, as appears by the King's books in Gostwyke's hands. Asks his favor in his suit about his debt to the King. Would have come up out of Leicestershire, but dares not till he knows the King's pleasure and Cromwell's. Durst never go to his house since the insurrection, and will not, if he lose all he has to his shirt. Leceter, 9 Nov. Signed: John Nevyell.
Pp. 2. Add.. Lord Privy Seal.
[9 Nov.]
R. O.
1026. Sir Bryan Hastyngs to the Duke of Suffolk.
Received on the 9th day of this "mone" at 6 p.m. Suffolk's letter expressing surprise that he has not written of the demeanour of " these rebels." Has written, and no doubt Suffolk has ere this received the letter. Hears many tales, but writes nothing but what may be certified to the King as true. Where Suffolk intended to send Mr. Bryan and others to Newark, thinks it unnecessary as yet. Lord Darcy has warned the honor of Pomfret, and the rebel Aske another part, that watch may be kept nightly.
With 500 men of his own appointing and two guns and ordnance he could keep Doncaster bridges against the rebels till Suffolk and the lord Steward are ready to resist them, though his "strength" is taken from him by Sir Arthur Darcy. Was steward of the honor of Tyckull and Conesborow under Sir Henry Wyatt, dec.; but Sir Arthur now claims the rule, by young Master Whyat, and has as yet done nothing. This night a post came from my lord of Norfolk to Doncaster, and there waits for a post out of the North. "My lord, remember my former letter, and take heed of the North part of Lincolnshire, for it is more dangerous than is about Doncaster." Haytfeld, Thursday, 8 p.m. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add. Endd.
On the back: Received your Grace's letter the 9th "day of this present moone" about 12 at night and another the same day at 6 p.m.
9 Nov.
R. O.
1027. Sir Brian Hastings to Sir Geo. Darcy.
I was with my lord of Shrewsbury 6 Nov., and certified him that you had received his letter thankfully, of which he was right glad. My lord wishes you to warn all your friends to come to him on the sight hereof to ask the King's pardon; "and of his honor ye shall have it, for the King hath made my said Lord his leeffetenantt generall, to give pardon for life, land and goods." If you like I will be your safe-conduct to his lordship. It will be the greatest comfort that ever came to me. Haytfeld, 9 Nov.
Copy, p. 1, Endd. by lord Darcy.
9 Nov.
R. O.
1028. G. earl of Shrewsbury to Henry VIII.
Perceives by the King's letters, sent by his son, that if the commons in Yorkshire again assemble, he is, with all the force he can levy, to advance as far as Derby only, and there see to the keeping of all waters, bridges, and passages, and to the safeguard of victuals, mills, &c. There is no water to be kept at Derby; there are so many fords, and the ways are so strait that few will pass there. Four miles from Derby is a river called Trent "where is a common way, a great cawsey, and a bridge in a plain country," which, if they come by Derby, as he does not think they will, must be kept. There is also a bridge at Burton-upon-Trent and divers fords. Thinks 10,000 men will scant furnish the keeping of these bridges and the fords between Nottingham and Burton.
Has learnt that day that in the castle and town of Pomfret are 500 men ready, when the rebels "arise again, as it is supposed, to enter into the town of Dancaster," besides the neighbours there beyond the water of Doon also ready. Encloses a letter which he begs may be kept secret, for if it were known it would endanger the life of the sender. Begs to know the King's pleasure in that behalf. There is such strait watch laid that it is hard to have letters. The credence and the letter are, in effect, one. Begs credence for his friend Anthony Nevyle, the bearer. Wynfeld, 9 Nov. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add. Endd.
9 Nov.
R. O.
1029. Earl of Shrewsbury to Cromwell.
Thanks him for his kindness, which he has heard of from the report of his son and servants, and by his loving letters. Has received the King's orders to advance to Derby and defend bridges and passages if the rebels in the North assemble again. Asks Cromwell to get him excused, as he is very feeble and weak, but that he may serve under some nobleman whom the King will appoint. Desires credence for Antony Nevile, the bearer. Wynfeld, 9 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
9 Nov.
R. O.
1030. Thomas Holland to Cromwell.
Thanks him for his kindness while he was in the late duke of Richmond's service. Is too old to serve Cromwell, but would like to put his children in Cromwell's service, and has sent up his son and heir. Swynshed in Holland, 9 November.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
10 Nov.
Hist. MSS. Com. Report vi. 446.
1031. Henry VIII. to the Earl of Derby.
Notwithstanding his clemency since the retirement of the rebels, he thinks some of their captains may be held in esteem, and a new rising be attempted. He thinks it right to have a main army there, and take order for the direction of the people. He has appointed the earl of Shrewsbury lord Steward of the Household, to supply in such case the room of his lieutenant, and has sent him the letters patent. 2ndly. To have the picked men in readiness at an hour's warning in case of a new attempt. 3rdly. He has sent letters, according to the minute inclosed, to the gentry of Lancaster and Cheshire, and some to be sent to such as Derby shall think fit.— He (the King) will provide money when required. Westminster, 10 Nov. 28 Hen. VIII.
10 Nov.
R. O.
1032. Cromwell to Sir Ralph Evers, Jun.
The King will remember his good service done at this time. If the rebels continue longer in rebellion, he shall see them so subdued as shall be a fearful example to all subjects while the world lasts. Westminster, 10 Nov.
Copy, p. 1. Mutilated, and in two parts. Endd.
10 Nov.
Faustina C. vii. 189. B. M.
1033. Chancellor (fn. 8) and University of Oxford to Cromwell.
Are compelled to trouble him with their writings, as the mayor and citizens disobey Cromwell's late letters to let them hold assizes of bread, beer, and meat. Both scholars and townsmen complained lately that things were sold too dear, and their commissary fixed a reasonable price, which gave the sellers sufficient profit. As some resisted they were fined, but the commissary's men were restrained by force when they attempted to arrest goods. Await instructions what to do. "E domo congregationis nostræ, x° Idus Novembris."
Lat., p. 1. Add.. Clarissimo viro, D. Crumwello, Regis Secreti Signaculi custodi.
10 Nov.
R. O.
1034. Suffolk, Sir Fras. Bryan, and Sir Wm. Parr to Henry VIII.
Enclosing a letter which arrived within an hour after they had despatched their letters to the King. Lincoln, 10 Nov., 4 p.m. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
10 Nov.
R. O.
1035. Suffolk to Mr. Persewall (fn. 9) and two others.
Understanding ye have letters and credence from the King into the North parts, we charge you, in the King's name, on your return to Newark, to advertise us of the answer ye receive from them. Lincoln, 10 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: "To Mr. Persewall, servant to my lord's Grace of Norfolk, to Mr. Eldercar's servant, and to Mr. Bows, and to every of them." Endd.: To Mr. Persevall.
[10 Nov.]
R. O.
1036. Rich. Cromwell to Cromwell.
In my late letter I informed you that my lord's Grace had appointed Mr. Brian, Mr. Russell, and me to go to Newark, as yesterday, in the morning. That day we were countermanded, but last night the order was renewed, and this morning discharged for this day. Thus the Council do and undo because they know not what determination the King has taken with them in the North. You will learn more from my lord's letter to the King, and Sir Brian Hastings' letter enclosed in the same. Lincoln, Friday. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
10 Nov.
R. O.
1037. Thomas earl of Rutland to Henry VIII.
At Pipwell Abbey, in his journey towards the King, received the King's letters to return to Nottingham Castle. Returned, and secretly sent for divers gentlemen for advice touching the custody of passages. Also sent out espials from whom he learns many of the rebels are gone to their houses, but are ready at an hour's warning; they are anxious for the coming home of Sir Ralph Elderker and Robert Bowes. Has provided for the victualling of the castle. The bearer (fn. 10) can show the state of the passages and fords. The bridge stands on the south side of the castle and town of Nottingham, so "plain" that it cannot be defended without a great force. As he and the gentlemen with him have" no great experience in the war," he begs the King to send him some expert man to consult with. The bearer knows the country thereabouts very well. Nottingham, 10 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
10 Nov.
R. O.
1038. Thomas earl of Rutland to Cromwell.
Has sent by bearer, Sir Nicholas Sturley, letters to the King: sends him the rather because he knows the "passages, furdis and streitis" of all that country. Lying at Nottingham Castle is very chargeable. At Doncaster his own money and that he had of his friends was almost spent; and the duke of Norfolk sent him 500l., which he delivered, part to Peter Mewtes for conveying up gunners, part to the master of the ordnance here for gunners, part to the posts about Nottingham and Newark, and to divers gentlemen for fortifying fords beside Doncaster; so that he has little over 300l. left. Has daily to lay out money on the castle, and doubts whether he will receive his rents in Yorkshire, a great part of his living, this year or not. Begs Cromwell to move the King for money. Nottingham, in haste, 10 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
R. O.2. "Passages that I know on the water of Dun."
A bridge and a "forthe" at Rotheram. "Forthes" at Aldewark, Thryber, and Connysbrough, a bridge at Doncaster, three forthes at Sandalles, a great forthe at Barneby. Another forthe a mile below. Turne Bridge.
P. 1, in the hand of Rutland's clerk. Endd.
10 Nov.
R. O.
1039. Aske to the prior of Ellerton.
Marvels that the prior would send him "such a letter" without a name subscribed. Asks who sent it, for he would be glad to know his friends and will remember them, and the house of Watton too, from which he has never yet had a penny in this high business. Has the earl of Northumberland's writing under sign manual, 10 Nov., for the spice plate at Watton Abbey. This they shall further when Aske thinks convenient "which peradventure will not sound to their profit nor pleasure." Selby, 10 Nov.
P.S. in his own hand: If you have the spice plate, send it me. It is pity to do anything for that house that so unkindly orders me, who have done more for religion than they can ever deserve. "We have answer from the King this day, that is comfort to you all." Send me the plate by bearer, for if I complained to the lords the house would be spoiled. Signed: "Robert Aske, Capitan."
P. 1. Add.

Footnotes

1 Crossed out.
2 "Sons" in § 2, but this is an error.
3 Percival Creswell.
4 The date of this letter appears to be an error. See another copy, dated 14 Nov.
5 Suffolk.
6 He died on the 24th March 1537 (Inq. p. m. 29 Hen. VIII.). So that the date of this letter is certain.
7 Elizabeth lady Savage, the widow of Will. Brereton.
8 Bishop of Lincoln.
9 Percival Creswell.
10 Sir Nic. Sturley. See next letter.