Henry VIII
December 1536, 11-20

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James Gairdner (editor)

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1888

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'Henry VIII: December 1536, 11-20', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 11: July-December 1536 (1888), pp. 520-541. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75491 Date accessed: 23 July 2014.


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December 1536, 11-20

11 Dec.
R. O.
1281. Charles duke of Suffolk to Cromwell.
In behalf of his old servant Ric. Baas concerning such suits as depend against his wife in the Court of Arches, which the King has referred to Cromwell. Lincoln, 11 Dec. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal.
11 Dec.
R. O.
1282. John Husee to Lady Lisle.
I received your letter by Mr. Marshal's servant. Mr. Arundell promised both Mr. Skryven and me not to depart till he had entered the statute. He also declared the matter between lord Beauchamp and him, and said if he went through with him, he would enter the statute, and, if not, he would enter immediately. But he left without a word. Yet Mr. Skryven left orders that on delivery of the said bond two of his friends should have entered ; and the money and everything was got ready. As to Fristock, I hope the Chancellor and the Council (fn. 1) will this week determine what my lord shall have. Mr. Pollard and Mr. Rolles have been 10 times already about it within these eight days, but we have more ado to get Mr. Only thither than all the rest. Though your Ladyship wishes me to write no more for Holt, I am bound for it, and with a gentle letter you might ease it. He has complained to my father and threatens he will compel me to pay. I send the reckoning of what I paid for you, and had never more need of money. The torches and quaryers are made. The latter I send in Toby's boat by Henry Porter, but had no room for the former. I doubt not they will be sent before Christmas. The torches weigh 137 lb., the quaryers, 21 lbs. Total, 158 lb. at 7d. per lb. I have sent you also a quarter of ling containing 31 fishes, costing 50s. 6d. Mr. Wynsor delivered me the rents of Soberton, 3l. 7s. 9d., of which I paid 50s. 6d. Mine hostess sends my lord and you a kilderkin of ale. Mr. Basset means to tarry here this Christmas. I hope all danger of the plague is well nigh past. This business requires money. I send my lord the auditor's book and Mr. Wynsor's letters. He paid Mr. Treasurer 141l. 1¾d. No news here please me so well as that your Ladyship has "so well sped in advancing the name of the noble Plantagenet. If I thought it should not be painful I would never cease praying unto God that your Ladyship might have two goodly sons, as I have full hope that God will show his handiwork." London, 11 Dec.
News has just come that the Northern men have obeyed the King's proclamation, and submitted to mercy. The wine and herrings are come, and will be delivered to Mr. Sulyard.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.
[12 Dec.]
R. O.
1283. Rich. Crumwell to Cromwell.
After the dispatch of my soldiers from Newark towards London, I came this morning to Lincoln to my lord of Suffolk who has commanded me to abide with him till his coming to London and to write to your Lordship that though he is commanded to abide here with 1,000 men, he desires to see the King at "this high feast," to do his duty and declare what he knows of the late rebelllon. His Grace desires your Lordship to obtain the King's letters to him to repair to his Highness; and meanwhile he will leave here sufficient men to keep the prisoners and country, and will return when the King commands. As I have none of my servants left but Myles, and cannot depart without his Grace's licence, I beg your Lordship to be a mean to the King for his letters in form abovesaid, for gladly would I see the King and your Lordship. Lincoln, this Tuesday. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
12 Dec.
R. O.
1284. John Dakyn to Wm. Tristram.
"I have remembered your fashion of intreating me, being unworthy in place of your ordinary, whom you might have heard somewhat more patiently." Rebukes him for offering to go to war, which is forbidden to a priest. Knows he was not compelled by any captain or councillor to go, especially in this journey, but only those whose counsel and learning were requisite for the preferment of peace and the common wealth. Though it stands with his conceit by this means to get favour of the parishioners, he ought rather to do as God's laws command and instruct others thereof. Is bound to speak thus, having cure of his soul. " What is that to your charge, whether my master contribute 40l. or 40d. to this commotion, or what doeth it serve to your soul's health or your neighbours' if he pay anything or nothing, seeing it belongeth no way to you?"
Ever offered reason in his master's name, which would have been taken if Tristram had not meddled; "wherein you show yourself uncharitable, to consent that your neighbour, yea your ordinary to whom you be sworn, were he never so rich, should have anything done against him." No doubt there are many who might and would have been made rich by this tumult had not God's laws and conscience, and fear of restitution restrained them. Wishes Tristram had followed the example of good men who might and would not. Advises him to show himself in his conversation like a priest, and not like a man of war; and to execute his duty, which is prayer, study, and virtuous living. Kyrkby, written 12 Dec. last.
Copy, pp 2. Add: To Sir William Tristram, chantry priest at Lyrtington in Romaldkyrke parish.
1285. [Corporation of Hull to Henry VIII.]
R. O.Have received his letters by John Candisshe concerning their ships and goods stayed by his orders for certain rebellions supposed in "us poor merchants in your Grace's town of Hull." Resisted until the poor people of the town, being much more numerous than the rest of the inhabitants, daily cried out that their wives and children would perish for lack of victuals, though they gave them daily wages to keep watch and ward. Were credibly informed also that the rebels intended to have fired the town. Let them in on appointment without giving up the town to prevent this, but when they were in, they kept the town forcibly, against our minds, and put us to silence, holding us in subjection. Feared daily to have been spoiled and destroyed by them. Thank the King for the pardon. According to the order taken at Doncaster the captains dissolved the forces, and the town and inhabitants are now in the King's hands. Will henceforth spend their lives in defending it. Ask for men, ordnance, and munitions. Desire credence for Candisshe as to the state of the town, and ask to know the King's pleasure by Wm. Knowles the bearer.
Pp. 2. Not signed.
12 Dec.
R. O.
1286. Aske's Rebellion.
Report of Richard Perkys, of Bromysgrove, husbandman, before Hugh bishop of Worcester, in presence of Dr. Taylor, Edward Tyndale, John Combz and others, in the manor of Hartilbury, 12 Dec., 28 Hen. VIII., upon the delivery of a letter by Robert Aske to the commons persuading them against their prince under pretence of a pilgrimage. At his late return from London he heard from Chr. Bradely, servant to Sir Gilbert Talbett, that Sir William —, (fn. 2) parish priest of Bromysgrove, had such a letter. Got it from Sir William and, seeing it contained treason, brought to the Bishop.
Pp. 2. Endd.: William Horwood, curate of Bromesgrove.
12 Dec.
R. O.
1287. Dan Robt. Castelforth to Robt. Aske.
When Aske was last at Pountfreth, asked his favour for the priorship of Blyth. Asks to have his letters back. Pountfreth, 12 Dec.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
12 Dec.
R. O.
1288. — to —.
"I have sent you a copy of my lord of Suffolk's letter written to the King with your letter."
[Suffolk to Henry VIII.]
"Please it your Grace," &c. Learning the order taken by the lords of your Council at Doncaster, I discharged your army here, all but 500, which I retain till I know your pleasure touching ordnance and prisoners; after which I will wait on your Highness at Christmas. Lincoln, 12 Dec.
"This letter you have answered."
Copy, p. 1. Endd: Copy. Sealed.
12 Dec.
R. O.
1289. Ralph Broke to Lady Lisle.
I have received by this bearer your loving letter, dated Calais, 22 Nov. As to the proposed marriage of Anne Spurstowe and Barth., son of Rob. Baynham, her father is very well pleased. As to money, I have written in my lord's letter, according to her father's mind. I am sorry for the trouble your Ladyship has had since my departure, and I have caused John Bradfylde of Guysnes, to tarry for me till I come. Dondertoun, 12 Dec.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: At Calais.
13 Dec.1290. Monasteries exempted from Suppression.
See Grants in December, Nos. 12, 13, and 18.
[13 Dec.]
R. O.
1291. Sir William Poulet to Cromwell.
The King is content my lady Mary's house be kept till after Christmas ; yet yesternight when I moved to have that household removed, his Grace marvelled we had not discharged the same ; but was content when I had shewed the causes of your let and mine, and also with their remove to Kaio, after his departure from Richmond, which is appointed on Tuesday next to Westminster, and thence on Friday to Greenwich. "And the said Tuesday my lady Elizabeth and the rest of the household not pointed for the King, and the Queen and my lady Mary, to Greenwich that night." Remember Mr. Cofferer with money as I desired at your last going from Court. Let it be had this week and full 1,000l., to be repaid next term. Else we can have no longer provision from brewers and purveyors; for they have borne with the King as long as they may. Praying you to take this in good part and consider our needs. Richemont, Wednesday.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
13 Dec.
R. O.
1292. Aske's Rebellion. (fn. 3)
The saying of Sir William Horrwode, alias Peter, parish priest of Bromsgrove, 13 Dec. 28 Hen. VIII., before Hugh, bishop of Worcester, Dr. Taylor, John Combes, Edward Tyndale and others.
On Sunday the 10th inst. after dinner, one Christopher Bradeley gave him a letter in Christopher Raskell's house, which he wished him to look upon at his leisure, saying, "I trust to God we shall have the old world again." Horwood took home the letter without looking at it until Monday night, when Richard Perkes asked him if he had any news, and took the letter away, promising to copy and return it, but seeing the contents, he brought it to the Bishop. Signed by Horwod.
P. 1. Endd.: "Confessions."
13 Dec.
R. O.
1293. Darcy to Shrewsbury.
"Yesterday came to me . . . . . . . . . . . . Tynmowth Abbey in Northumberl[and]. . . . . brethren there who shewed . . . . . . . . . . . . that, as well divers of . . . . . . . . . . . . and their own tenants did . . . . . . . . . . . . cattell, corns and sheep but also witheld the rents by force and threat to enter into their house, which as now is without a prior." It has many discreet brethren therein, and is a house of very great strength. I wrote to my cousin Sir Thos. Hilton in their favour to take some good order for them till the coming down of my lord of Norfolk. The said Elys, who is credible, also showed me that spoils are daily made by Tynedale and Reedsdale men within Northumberland, so that above 24 score ploughs are laid down. This is confirmed by one Selby, who came today from my nephew Thos. Grey, my deputy of Bawmborough, and who adds that the most part of Northumberland is broken amongst themselves, and open forays made by Sir Ingram Percy and others against the Greys and their friends, besides the danger of the Scots: also that my lord of Northumberland intends to go thither.
". . . . . . . . . . which was . . . . . . . . my lords at Doncaster for . . . . . . . ken under the time of the pointment . . . . . . evyll but going to hir market." [I beg] you to give credence to good Mr. Archdeacon, this bearer, whom I requested to carry this letter, as he was going to your lordship. Pomfret St. Lucy's Day.
Draft in Darcy's hand, pp. 2, mutilated. Endd.: "My letter to my Lord Steward's letters (sic) the 13th day of December Ao. 1536."
1294. State of the North.
R. O."For credens of novelles occurraunt."
1. The Percies and their friends, and the Grayes and their friends, take contrary parts and make contrary proclamations, who shall be sheriff, so that by the daily spoil and evil acts of Tyndale and Redesdele men the county is clear out of frame and had great need of good stay. The Scots keep good rule. 2. Cumberland and the West Marches and the neighbours are far out of frame. 3. About Rypon, Mydlam, Richmondshire, Cleveland, the bishopric of Durham, Beverley, Holderness, and Howdenshire, the commons have been busy, and will not pay rent, and is needed much pains used by lords and gentlemen to stay them. 4. The going up of lords, knights, and gentlemen hath, and by their bruits is likely to make, the commons begin a new commotion. 5. Seditious words and bills have lately been set up against all lords, knights, and gentlemen, both of the South and North, "saying that under the meetings at Doncaster and now by counselling above, all is to betray them, therefore none they will trust unto." 6. They say plainly they will not pay tenths, firstfruits, or other money granted at the last parliament, nor suffer any suppressed house to do, till the next parliament, nor in many places, any fermes.
P. 1.
R. O.2. Another copy.
P. 1. Mutilated.
R. O.3. Another copy.
P. 1. Endd. by Wriothesley.
13 Dec.
R. O.
1295. Robt. (fn. 4) prior of Gysburne to Sir John Bulmer.
Asks him to come to Gysburne and advise him, as several of the brethren are using themselves very unreligiously to the great inquietation of him and other brethren and the harm of the common weal of the house. Asks him if he cannot come to send to his brother Sir William, that he may have his authority to supply his place in his absence, though his personal presence would do much good. Gysburne, 13 Dec. Signed.
P. 1. Add.
13 Dec.
R. O.
1296. John Hutton to Cromwell.
Received on the 10th at Brussels his letter dated London, 5th inst. As munitions of war cannot be exported hence without licence, asked the Regent for licence to export to England 500 pair of Almain rivets. She asked if the King had commissioned him to speak with her, and hearing that it was not so, said she must take her Council's advice. Their answer was a refusal, on the ground that the Emperor was in great need of harness. My lord of Barrow said the Queen was loth to have said him nay, for she favoured him so much that she wished the King would give him Hackett's place. Does not think any great substance can have been conveyed, for the "tolnars" are very particular. There are divers men here from York and Newcastle, and but one from Hull. Three ships left Zeeland for Newcastle a month ago, so that if they conveyed any such thing, it is past his help. One ship of Newcastle is here still. Will take care she carries none. It is agreed that the duke of Geldar is to have 14,000 gildyrns in hand and 25,000 a year for life, and after his death the Emperor to be his heir. News has come of the Emperor's arrival in Spain, having left Genoa on Nov. 15. The government of Friesland is given to one Geo. Kyng, brother-in-law of the duke of Geldar. A truce for 18 months is hoped for, in consequence of the labour of the bishop of Rome to have a general council. Here is a great bruit that the French king has sent 15,000 men to aid the king of England. Hears that the duke of Holst will permit no ships to depart "from by Est" unless they are bound not to come here, but to England. The Regent is greatly desirous to hear that the trouble of England is well quieted. Reminds Cromwell of the leash of greyhounds he promised for the Regent. Dr. Adamys (fn. 5) is judged to suffer death by being drawn in pieces with four horses. They speak much of the patient suffering of Mr. Tyndale at the time of his execution. The duke of Hattilbrughe and his wife are at Brussels. It was he who kept Copynhavyn against the duke of Holst. Antwerp, 13 Dec.
Hol., pp. 3. Add.: Lord Cromwell, lord Privy Seal.
13 Dec.
R. O.
1297. The Bishop of Faenza to Mons. Ambrogio.
Signor Rainaldo's man (fn. 6) arrived on the 11th, and I coming on the 12th, and having learnt all his despatch both from himself and from your letters of the 19th, went to Court yesterday, keeping him here a day, to see if there was anything new from England; but as there was nothing since my letters of the 4th, I determined that he should go this morning with the second despatch, sending me word as soon as possible of the good or ill that may be hoped or feared. He seems determined to do his utmost duty, and ready even to die for it if necessary. Thinks at present he can encounter no harm by going alone with the second despatch. But as he has been seen by many persons in this Court, even if not personally known, and it has been noted that he went seeking the nuncio with a courier, thinks it better that he should see the English ambassadors at Paris, and say to them by his master's orders that he was commissioned to speak to them of this despatch as of a thing bearing on the service of their King; which ought to be agreeable especially to Wallop, who is a good Christian and very friendly to Signor Rainaldo; and carrying letters from the French court for his greater security, he should tell them plainly, and merely for the service of their master, that the Pope had the censures here ready to issue if his only object had been to do them injury,—which would have been irremediable in these late occurrences.
Thought it advisable that the nuncio in Scotland, who arrived here on the 10th, should be entertained here, in order that if by means of these men (the French) a safe-conduct from England can be obtained (which, from all he hears of that country, is not likely, unless the King, influenced either by past fears or by the things now to be done by Signor Rainaldo, be a little submissive), he can pass that way, because, being a person of great ingenuity and zeal in the service of his Holiness, he must take the opportunity of bringing to perfection, as far as he can, the good which has been commenced; and seeing that the distances of the countries are so great, the fickleness of the King not small, and the impiety and malice of his ministers infinite, it would be in the highest degree fitting, if the King showed any sign of amendment, to have here ready such an instrument, so well qualified to urge him on with all the medicines and remedies imaginable, so as to bring him back to perfect health. But if (which God forbid) the King persist in his blindness, even though he grant the safe-conduct (for I hear from all sorts of persons the man will come to mischief after the fashion they use in England, where they have men assassinated on the highway by persons with masks, and afterwards say that it was done by robbers, of whom there are a great number, especially on the Borders), I would not dare to counsel it, although I find his Lordship most willing to encounter any danger at the least hint from his Holiness.
Modern copy, (fn. 7) from the Vatican MS., pp. 3. Headed: Di Mons. di Faenza delli xiij de Decembre 1536.
[14 Dec.]
Vesp. F. III. 196. B. M. Hearne's Sylloge, 133.
1298. Princess Mary to [Cromwell].
"My lorde." As she cannot conveniently thank him with her mouth for his daily goodness, she writes to advertise him of her good will, considering that it is all she has to repay his perfect friendship, of which she desires the continuance, "which, besides the purchasing of my tedious suits, wherewith I do ever molest you, shall be my great comfort." Richmond, Thursday night.
Hol., p. 1.
14 Dec.
R. O.
1299. Hen. earl of Cumberland to Henry VIII.
Sends a letter from his son, dated Carlisle, 9th inst., about the demeanor of certain light persons. Since the appointment taken at Doncaster, bills have been set on the church doors of Gargrave, Rylston, Lynton, and Burnsall in Craven, of which a copy is enclosed. About 200 persons assembled, but the Earl sent his household servants and others, and caused them to go home. Will apprehend the heads when he discovers them. These "assemblies" past began with writings set upon church doors. As far as he can yet discover the setters forth of this were certain gentlemen, some of them the King's servants. Skypton Castle, 14 Dec. Signed.
Pp. 2. Sealed. Add. Endd.
ii. Copy of the bill mentioned in the letters. It is from the commons of Craven to the priests of Gargrave, bidding them tell the constable of Gargrave to charge his parishioners to be at Rylston on Tuesday next at 9 o'clock, to kill all the deer they can find.
P. 1.
14 Dec.
R. O.
1300. Edw. Lee, Archbishop of York, to Lord Darcy.
I am informed that one Lisle, passing through York from Pountfrect, at the last meeting reports that he heard lord Darcy say of something spoken by me in my sermon at [Pount]frect "By God's mother, that is not true." I answered that I was sure lord Darcy would not speak thus of anything I said in a sermon, nor would think me so simple as to utter anything in the pulpit that I could not well avow; but I rather thought that Lisle either heard no such words, or else mistook them.
As I answered then so I think now, that you would not take upon you to condemn anything I said in that place. I trust you have a better opinion of me than to think that I would say anything in that place but what I know to be true, "or else would have enterprised to speak any such thing as I did there with so great adventure, but that otherwise I could not quiet ne discharge my conscience, which charged me rather to adventure my body than you should my flock adventure bo[th] bodies and souls."
When I came into the pulpit I came into it indifferent to live or die, "and [tho]ught I could not spend my life in a better cause than to save so many lives, both bodily and ghostly, and that after this rate I came. I can bring forth some sufficient tokens. If I had not done so, if anything had happened of you, I had been afore God guilty of the death both of bodies and souls; wherefore I have no cause to repent that I have said, although the death should follow of it. Our Lord make me worthy to die in so good a cause. [I] think the noblemen and gentlemen found n[o harm] in my saying, only I hear of Sir Robt. Constable . . . and cruel words, far unsitting to be uttered b[y his mo]wthe against me that h[ave the] cure of his soul, and [no man] hath less cause to gru[dge] . . at these words tha[n he, for] the same words I spake to him at Hampoll, the [heral]de that came from Do[ncaster] being present, at [which ti]me he not only did . . . . . . them, but also said that he would do all his best that . . . . . . to stay, that there should be not (sic) battle, and what h[e sayd] moreover, I do well [rememb]re, which I need not to write. My good lord, I pray you write to me frankly, and I doubt not to satisfy you. And [so I] trust to do also Sir Robert Cons[table], when I may speak with him. My duty is as much as is in me is to satisfy men in such cases; and so will I do." Cawood, 14 Dec. 1536 (?). Signed.
Pp. 2. Defaced and mutilated. Add.
R. O.2. Mutilated copy of the preceding; probably made by Darcy's clerk.
14 Dec.
R. O.
1301. Bawdewen Willowbe and Robt. Kyrke to Cromwell.
We have received the King's letters dated 12 December, and also your Lordship's of the same date. On the 14th inst., we being riding at the North Foreland, there came by two balingers, an Englishman and a Fleming, in the wind of us. We waved them to speak with us, and shot two or three small pieces at them, but they would not. "Whereupon we weighed and went after them into an harbour called the Eest Swale," and sent our boats aboard them, which they resisted with guns, marispikes, handguns, and drawn swords. Howbeit our men entered, "and x. or xij. of them hurt, and v. or vj. of them hurt:" and then come leaping out of hold of their prize five or six Englishmen, which they had kept and would let no man know of, "nor as yet their Admiral," though they had them 10 days ere we thus rescued them. Signed.
P.S.—Most of the goods are one Cokkerell's, of Garnesey, and his brother's and other Englishmen's. We send your Lordship Cokkerell and the master of the Flemish ship. We found in the Flemish pink "a last herring," which they confessed to be one of 12 taken out of one Olyver's, of Calais, ship by their Admiral. We detain as yet both the men of war and their ship, and the English crayer laden with linen cloth, which they call their prize, and the men of the same, worth about 1,000 marks. We beg answer by the bearer, who is also a suitor for our victuals and wages, which end the 17th inst. Written upon the sea, 14 Dec. 28 Hen. VIII.
Pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
14 Dec.
R. O.
1302. Wm. Lok, Mercer, to Lord Lisle.
Sends by the bearer, Mr. Corbett, a stomacher of cloth of gold for my lady. "I pray Jesu, if it be his pleasure, it may cover a young lord Plantagenett, as I do understand by divers is well forward, of the which I am very glad." London, 14 Dec. 1536.
P. 1. Hol. Add.
14 Dec.
R. O.
1303. Richard Lee to [Lord Lisle].
". . . that it hath pleased God to visit her with a child, he most heartily thanketh her good ladyship for her marmelado." He thanks you both for your many kind remembrances. The bearer brings her ladyship half a yard of cloth of gold, which I had of Mr. Locke. Thanks for their kindness. Desires to be commended to Mistress Fraunces, their daughter, and all the other gentle gentlewomen. I pray God make your Lordship a glad father and my Lady a glad mother. London, 14 Dec.
Asks lord Lisle to favor Mr. Palmer's suit. Lord Privy Seal favors him with all his heart. Signed.
P. 1. Imperfect at the commencement.
14 Dec.
R. O.
1304. Henry Lacey to Cromwell.
Has spent over 300 mks. on a beer house called the Castle of Oye, which he holds of the King, and Mr. Rocwoode, baley of Marke, will not suffer him to occupy it without giving him 80l. st. Asks for a letter from the King to Rocwoode in his favor. Thos. Fowler, receiver of Mark and Oye, has purchased some land adjoining, and has brought an action, claiming Lacey's holding. The King's surveyor has been his friend. From my poor lodging called the Castle of Oye, 14 Dec. 1536.
Hol., pp. 2. Add. Endd.
14 Dec.
R. O.
1305. Sir John Wallop to Lord Lisle.
The Emperor is embarked at Genoa for Spain, having promised to return in four months for the quiet of Italy, and to make war next summer against France. This is already published at Milan. He has left behind him as governor there the Cardinal de Garraice, and the duke of Alvey with Grandeville to assist him. The captains of all the fortresses in the Duchy are changed, and Spaniards put in their place. The Emperor has given the duke of Mantua the marquisate of Monferrade. The whole country repines at it, and the chief town, Cassayle, has invited Mons. de Burey, the French King's captain in Turin, to come thither; but the marquis of Guast, hearing of it, sent 4,000 men, who entered the town at night and killed all the Frenchmen. Turin was in great danger but for Guy de Ragon, who entered it with 2,000 or 3,000 Italians. Fortune has not so much favored the French king this winter as it did in summer. They have lately lost in Picardy part of the garrisons of Dorleance and Guyse, and next summer ye are likely to hear of extreme war. God send us peace!
The King of Scots is now in this town; his marriage is to be in the Christmas holidays. Great preparations are made for it in the palace, and the Court has meanwhile removed to the Bishop's palace. The said King is at Tournelles, daily assaying his horse and harness. He is universally praised as very gentle. "My lord of Winchester and I feel little thereof; what he meaneth thereby we know not. His manner of using himself by that we do perceive is after the Northern fashion, as the lords of those parts doth use themself when they come first to the Court, now looking over one shoulder and now over the other, with a beck to one and a beck to another, and unto us nothing. He is a right proper man after the Northern fashion. His being here shall do him much good, and to us little profit; for here he shall learn many things." The French king has paid him 50,000 cr. in part payment of 100,000 he is to have with his wife. "I think he never saw so great a sum of money together before." Commend me to my lady and to Master Porter and the rest of the Council. Paris, 14 Dec. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add.: Deputy of Calais. Endd.
15 Dec.
R. O. St. P. I. 523.
1306. Henry VIII. to Robert Aske.
Learns that Aske repents his offences in the late rebellion. Has conceived a great desire to speak with him, and therefore commands him to come with diligence, "making no man privy thereunto," and has sent Peter Mewtys the bearer, a gentleman of the Privy Chamber, to whom Aske is to give credence. Will perform towards Aske and all others the general and free pardon already granted, and trusts that Aske at his access will, by his plainness and frankness, deserve reward. "Given under our signet," Westminster, 15 Dec. 28 Hen. VIII. Signed at the top.
In Wriothesley's hand, p. 1, mutilated. Add.: "Our trusty and wellbeloved subject."
R. O.2. Copy of the preceding with a memorandum of the credence, which was to show that Aske should safe come and safe go, and return before Twelfth day next.
Pp. 2. Endd. by Darcy: The copy of the King's first letter to R. Aske.
15 Dec.
R. O.
1307. Darcy to Norfolk.
Has sent the bearer Ralph Medilton to the lord Admiral to know the King's pleasure for the surety of Pontfret Castle, especially at Norfolk's coming down and till the Parliament be ended; and to show Norfolk the state of the North parts, and how Northumberland is out of frame, and good men there weary for the Duke's coming thither or to Newcastle. Credence for bearer. Pontfret Castle, 15 Dec.
Copy in Darcy's hand, pp. 2. Small slip add. at foot.
15 Dec.
R. O.
1308. [Darcy to Fitzwilliam.]
I send my servant Ralph Medilton, this bearer, to learn from you, first, of the King's favour towards me, which, both in the King's time of famous memory and since, I have ever sought. Item: I trust you and others of the Council who were at Doncaster have declared how for lack of furniture, for which I thrice wrote to his Grace, I was compelled to appoint with my enemies, which "will never from my heart" as long as a suspicion of an unclean spot "of" my coat armour rests on the King's mind. Item: According to our communication before my lord Steward, let me know the King's pleasure as to the furniture of this castle, which has cost me above 500 marks. As I "departed" last with you, fiut voluntas tua. Give credence to the bearer as to the state of the North. Commendations to you and my lady your bedfellow. Pontfrett Castle, 15 Dec.
Draft, pp. 2, in Darcy's hand.
15 Dec.
R. O. [1536–9.]
1309. Nic. Hervy and Rauf Goodwyn to Cromwell.
Robert Daundy, of Ipswich, merchant, came before us, the bailiffs of the town, and commanded us in the King's name to attach James Crawford, clk., of treason, who was indicted two years past when the said Robt. Daundy and John Butler were bailiffs. He says Crawford was never arraigned upon the indictment, and we have attached him accordingly. Ipswich, 15 Dec.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
15 Dec.
R. O.
1310. Sir Piers Dutton to Cromwell.
There has been a great riot and insurrection in Cheshire between Sir Rondle Maynwaring and Ric. Cholmondley, of which the bearer can give you particulars. I received a letter from your Lordship, delivered by Thos. Brereton, son of Rondle Brereton, deceased, (fn. 8) with certain names enclosed, to be impanelled on the inquisition on his father's death. The persons were his near kinsmen and friends, and the King would have sustained great loss thereby; so I have made a stay to ascertain you of the same. Dutton, 15 Dec. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal.
15 Dec.
R. O.
1311. Robert Fouler to Lord Lisle.
Has received for him of Master Windsor 141l. 1½d. Has told Hussey that he could take no charge of the carriage of it, but would do therewith as with the King's money. Is daily suitor to the lord Privy Seal for money for the retinue. Was never more weary of any suit, for never was a worse time to sue for money. Has delivered 66s. 8d. to Warley. Dares write no news. London, 15 Dec.
After closing the above, received his letter. Will pay Mr. Popley 100s. and Hussey six angels. Appointment is taken with the Northern men, and all is quiet. This day at noon my lord of Norfolk, the lord Admiral, and others that were in commission in the North came to London, the King then being at York Place.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: My lord Lisle, deputy, &c. of Calais.
15 Dec.
R. O.
1312. John Husee to Lady Lisle.
Your ladyship is displeased that I wrote to my Lord about the wardship of Mr. Basset. If you examine my letter you will see I did not mean that my Lord should neither sell him nor put him away; but I see what I do is always taken for the worst, which I must needs patiently bear. Again you write that if Holte will not stand to my Lord that he shall choose. Your Ladyship might have pacified the matter by writing him six words. If he do me any displeasure, I shall work for myself the best I can. Locke thinks I have received the money. He has sent you a stomacher of cloth of gold. I will write about other things by Anys Wodrof. The surveyor will not be here till tomorrow night, when I shall deliver your letter. London, 15 Dec.
It is no little comfort to all your friends to hear that your Ladyship has sped so well. Jesu send you a good hour!
Hol., p. 1. Add.
15 Dec.
R. O.
1313. Loys de Renty to Lord Lisle.
I have been desired by some good prelate, as you may see by his letter sent herewith, to befriend the bearer Charles de Grave in some matter in this town touching his marriage. I have done my best to assist him both for the sake of the said prelate and on account of the good conduct that I have known in the said Charles both at Court and in this town and elsewhere towards the relations of the girl he was suing for. Because she has two uncles in France, those here excuse themselves from having anything to do with the matter. I request your favor to the said Charles, if he should wish for letters from you addressed to the said two uncles. St. Omer, 15 Dec. '36. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Not addressed.
15 Dec.
R. O.
1314. Oudart du Bies to Lord Lisle.
I have received your letter showing that the compagnon of this country named Baudet, is in the hands of your Master Porter, who took him within your pale for certain misdeeds, and that you leave the cognisance thereof to those appointed by the King your master. I understand very well that you are the King's lieutenant. I only ask what is reasonable in desiring you to send back the said Baudet with the charges and informations against him, as I have done in like case with your men, and I will punish him in such wise that you shall be satisfied. Boulogne, 15 Dec. 1536. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
15 Dec.
Add. MS. 8715, f. 315. B. M.
1315. Bishop of Faenza to Mons. Ambrogio.
* * * The king of Scotland is at Paris, to be admitted into the Order, and to practise for the tournament at his wedding. I hear that he wishes his chancellor, the abbot who directs him, (fn. 9) to be made a cardinal, but he has not hinted it to me.
Ital. Modern copy, pp. 4. Headed: Al Signor Ambrogio. Da Melun li. 15 xbre 1536.
16 Dec.
R. O.
1316. First Fruits.
Copy of a privy seal directed to Thos. Marshall, parson of South Molton, to pay 20l. to John Gostwyk, treasurer of the First Fruits. Richmond, 16 Dec. 28 Hen. VIII.
P. 1.
16 Dec.
Add. MS. 25,114. f. 236. B. M.
1317. Cromwell to Gardiner.
Has written sufficiently of the King's affairs in his other letters sent herewith. The King trusts he will maintain the amity. Is unable at present from haste to satisfy Gardiner's request for money, but will take order in the matter with all possible speed. Sends three copies of treaties among which he thinks Gardiner will find what he wrote for. "Our master, our mistress, and all your friends here be merry and in health." Sends commendations to Wallop. Stepney, 16 Dec. Signed.
P. 1. In Wriothesley's hand. Add.: My lord of Winchester. Endd.
[16 Dec.]
R. O.
1318. Thomas Evance to Cromwell.
Mr. Peter would not seal your commission till he had made privy thereof Drs. Legh and Leyghton, and Mr. Price, who upon knowledge induced him to stay. They say it is their limits and they will have Chester dioc. As soon as your Lordship had "consigned" the commission, I sent in your Lordship's name an inhibition to the chancellor, and informed my friends of your goodness in appointing me your deputy; "and if they trip me this I am utterly shamed." I beg you will consider my poor service, and that they have enough besides to do. "In your Lordship's chapel at Rolls, this Saturday Quatuor Temporum, hora octava."
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Cromwell lord Privy Seal. Endd.
[16 Dec.]
R. O.
1319. Sir William Pyrton and John Seyncler to [Cromwell].
"Pleaseth it your Lordship" on Saturday, 15 Dec. (fn. 10) Sir Wm. Pirton, Mr. Thomas Tey, Mr. Edmunds, Mr. Pilborgh, Mr. Forster, and I, John Seyntler (sic), sat at Colchester for gaol delivery. Were afterwards all at dinner with the abbot of St. John's when Marmaduke Nevell came in, with Edmunde Jernyngham, Robt. Goldyngham, Ralph Brekehed, and Robt. Rowse. I said, "How do the traitors in the North ? No traitors, for if ye call us traitors we will call you heretics." He said the King had pardoned them or he had not been at Colchester: they were 30,000 well horsed and wished the King had sent a younger lord amongst them than Norfolk or Shrewsbury. He said, "I am sure my lord abbot will make me good cheer," and, asked why, said, "Marry, for all the abbeys in England be beholden to us, for we have set up all the abbeys again in our country, and though it were never so late they sang matins the same night." He told of the meeting at Doncaster, where it was agreed to hold a parliament shortly to reform specially "the act of uses," for younger brethren would not have it; and said they knew the determinations of the King's Council before Norfolk told them. He said they were "plain fellows" in the North, and Southern men, though they "thought as much," durst not utter it. He said the malice of the commons was chiefly against my lord Cromwell, the chancellor of the Augmentation lands, and the bishops of Canterbury, Worcester, St. David's, and Rochester. Signed.
Pp. 3.
16 Dec.
R. O.
1320. Shrewsbury to Darcy.
My servant "Thomas Wort . . . [and my] cousin his wife in this . . . . . [bu]synes have had xl. head . . . . . . . their pastures at Hems . . . [wh]erof iiij. would not be d . . . . . . . residue were taken a . . . . . . away by Thomas Hougate, Edward Hougate, John Lake, and . . . . . [o]f the which" 10 were redelivered by a servant of the archbishop of York and the rest are still detained. Please aid my said servant and cousin to recover their cattle. Sheffield Castle, 16 Dec. Signed.
Mutilated, p. 1. Add.
16 Dec.
R. O.
1321. Thos. Wyngfeld to Cromwell.
Has received by the Master of the Maisondewe a letter blaming him for his conduct as comptroller of the King's works at Dover. Can prove himself to be a true man. If Cromwell will assign auditors, they will show that it is not true that half the money spent on the works would have served. Has not kept clerks and other idle persons and only 30 labourers; there were 70 labourers, as can be proved by the Master of the Maisondewe's hand, though his tongue would say the contrary. Denies that the paymaster and he take many fat fees of iron, or make spoil profit. Has been against all fees. Denies the complaint of the Master of the Maisondewe that they will let him be privy to nothing. The purveyors are of his (the Master's) putting in, and timber has been the greatest charge, which he has been provided by persons whom he has appointed. Since Wyngfeld's coming there has been but six tons of iron provided, whereof three ton was provided by the master and himself and three by the paymaster and himself. Three tons are ready wrought in the storehouse. Has made no provision without the master being privy thereto. The paymaster has been very little here. Asks Cromwell to send down some men of experience to view the work. Asks that his "adverser" and he may come before Cromwell. Dover, 16 Dec.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
1322. Elizabeth Cressener, Prioress of Dartford, to Cromwell. (fn. 11)
R. O.Has been 49 years governor of this poor house. When my lord of Rochester came to the place of the Black Friars he found he could not live quietly with Mr. Stroodell (fn. 12) and unkindly sent him to me for a time. On his coming he took upon him to be a president and said he had the King's authority, which I find he never had until now, when I understand he has purchased letters of your Lordship under our founder's seal, to be president for life under pretence that he has already governed so well, whereas it was not he but my ghostly father, an ancient doctor, whom he will dispossess.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
1323. Eliz. Cressener, Prioress of Dartford, to Cromwell.
R. O.Begs Cromwell to tender her late petition. Has desired my lord of Rochester to put him in remembrance. Hears that Dr. Stroddell petitions Cromwell that he may continue.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
1324. John [Hilsey], Bishop of Rochester, to Cromwell.
R. O.The prioress of Dartford, who is on her deathbed, has sent word to him and to the provincial to come to her. Supposes it is that she may resign her room to one of her sisters, or if she be dead that they may elect another. Asks Cromwell to write to them to stay proceedings till they know his mind. None of the sisters is meeter than Joan Vane. Though there are many in the house older, there is none better learned, nor more discreet. She is above thirty. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
1325. John [Hilsey], Bishop of Rochester, to Cromwell.
R. O.This morning the prioress of Dartford died. Suggests Joan Vane, a good and virtuous woman, as her successor, though there are others good. London, Tuesday.
The provincial is come with the Bishop's chancellor to present himself to Cromwell. He wishes to obtain the confirmation of the prioress.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
17 Dec.
R. O.
1326. Dr. William Petre to Cromwell.
This day I have taken the compromise for the election of the prioress of Dartforde, which I now send, sealed with their convent seal. I have also taken an inventory. This day I ride to Rochester and from thence to certify your lordship of my proceedings with all speed. Dartforde, 17 December.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
[17 Dec.]
R. O.
1327. Deanery of Windsor.
Draft grant to John Frankelyn, clerk, of the deanery of the collegiate church in Windsor Castle, void by the translation of Richard Sampson to the bishopric of Chichester. See Grants in December, No. 16.
Lat., in Wriothesley's hand, p. 1.
17 Dec.
R. O.
1328. John Scudamore and Richard Warmecombe to Cromwell.
Thomas ap Hugyn, late of the Stockehouse, within two miles of Hereford, spoke seditious words at the sign of the Antelope, Worcester, 27 November; being present William Seyce of Kilpeck, Heref., gentleman, John Middelton and Thomas Webbe, of Hereford, yeomen, conversing of the rebels in the North. Send examinations of the above named, and have committed Thomas ap Hugyn to the gaol of Hereford Castle. Beg to know the King's pleasure by bearer. 17 December. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
ii. Depositions before John Scudamour, sheriff of Herefordshire, and Richard Warmecombe, J.P., 9 December 28 Henry VIII., against Thomas ap Hugyn, in the city of Worcester at the sign of the Antelope.
John Midelton of Hereford, aged 60, at the Antelope in Worcester, 27 November last, heard the accused say, in presence of Thos. Brugge, Wm. Seyce, and Thos. Webbe, "my lord Privy Seal was but an harlot," and, speaking of the insurrection in the North, "it is an old saying that two dogs striveth for a bone and the third shall come and take the bone away." Thos. Webbe, aged 34, and Wm. Seyce, 30, depose the same.
Thomas ap Hugyn denies speaking of Cromwell, but confesses the other saying, meaning that the Northern men and the Scots were the two dogs and the King the third dog. Signed John Scudamore—Richard Warmecombe.
P. 1.
17 Dec.
R. O.
1329. Sir Richard Bulkeley to Cromwell.
I have received your letter, and perceive that you still continue your displeasure, which is more than a poor wretch like me can bear. Where you say, "all is but words that I do and no deeds," under your pardon, it is not so. Immediately on sight of your former letter, I sent my poor priest out of my house to accompany the suffragan and put him in possession on behalf of your nephew Gregory Williams. The suffragan has put in new farmers, who are bound to answer to the behalf of the said Gregory for all the profits of the benefices of Llangaffo and Llangynwen, according to the instructions of Mr. Price. Also, according to your former letter, I sent my brother William with the said suffragan, to put him in possession of the benefice of Llandorok, which he was kept out of by serjeant Puleston and Edmund ap Robert, and he is now in possession. At your former letter I wrote to Dr. Bulkeley to yield up the benefice, and now, eftsoons, I have written to him again, that if he will claim me for a kinsman he must yield the same without delay. If he refuse, I will take him for my uttermost enemy. Alas! I have lived too long that you should be displeased with me without a cause; if you knew how many salt tears I have shed since Midsummer because of this you would pity me for old acquaintance, for I know you can undo me with a word. Bewmares, 17 December.
Hol., p. 1. Add: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
17 Dec.
R. O.
1330. Sir Thos. Denys to Cromwell.
Has purchased from the abbot of Neubam his part of certain lands lying between them of which the bounds were not known, reserving one penny of rent, so that for lack of heirs male, it will revert to the abbey. The yearly value is 38s. Considering the circumstances, and that he helped to persuade the abbots of Neuham and Mylton to resign, hopes the King will be content with this. Holds also of the said abbey 60 acres of marsh and moor, for which he pays 2s. an acre, and yet it is often flooded in winter. 17 Dec.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal.
1331. The Dacres.
R. O.Remembrance of the demeanor of the Dacres in Cumberland since the beginning of the insurrection of the commons.
Lord Dacre sent, 30 Oct., John Skelton of Armynthwayt to Lord Clifford to offer that, if the commons besieged Carlisle Castle, he would come and aid Clifford if the latter would come to his aid in case he were besieged in Nayworth. Clifford answered he would do so. On Friday, 3 Nov., the commons mustered at Bradfeld, three miles from Carlisle, and there Sir Chr. Dacre stayed them for 10 days from besieging Carlisle. Meanwhile lord Dacre secretly left the country, his tenants of Burgh, Bonys, and Gillesland being unsworn till after his departure. "[And] after the same appointment, the xv. [day of N]ovember, [a ge]neral muster w[as appointed] to be at a p[lace c]alled C . . . dbete, unto wh[ich place c]ome voluntarily Richard Dac[re] and took upon him [to be] grand captain of all Cumberland," and took as petty captains Chr. Lee, servant and kinsman to lord Dacre, Wm. Porter, and Alex. Appulby.
On Saturday, 9 Dec., when the duke of Norfolk was at Doncaster, Richard Dacre came to Carlisle with a company of lord Dacre's tenants, and met lord Clifford in the church door, "and looked upon him with a haut and proud countenance, not moving his bonnet; and, after going out of the churchyard chanced to meet with Sir William Musgrave, and without speaking any word plucked out his dagger and took him by the shoulder, and would have slain him in case he had not leaped back from him and plucked out his dagger, and that one of the sons of the lard Fetherstanhagh had not with his dagger drawn leapen betwixt them." Dacre and Fetherstanhagh drew their swords but were parted. Dacre then went into the market place and cried "a Dacre, a Dacre," and gathered a great company. "And thereupon. . . . . . . . . . . .ends, as the lord [Clifford] had about . . . . . . . . . . Castle . . . . . . . . . . . And the M[ayor], master Aglonby and other . . . . . . . . . n of the town" commanded Richard Dacre to avoid the market place. Dacre would not depart till the mayor and Edward Aglionby commanded the townsmen to harness, and then he went to his lodging and dined, and departed at his leisure, whilst the mayor sought protection of lord Clifford in the castle. Next Saturday, 17 (fn. 13) Dec., Richard Dacre came into Carlisle with some 20 men of Gillesland in harness for some unlawful purpose. Lord Clifford sent the mayor and Edward Aglionby to stay him, but he would not till he "perceived the lord Clifford, well accompanied, come to the market cross and make a proclamation for the k . . . . . . . . . . the . . . tnes of th . . . . . . . ."
Pp. 3. Mutilated. Endd.
17 Dec.
R. O. St. P. ii. 405.
1332. James earl of Desmond to Lord Leonard Grey.
Edmond Sexton and your servant Henry Hoke have been with me, inducing me to incline to the King's pleasure. I never offended the King, but have suffered much wrong by your Lordship and your army, at the enticement of my mortal enemies. However, I am content to apply myself to the King's pleasure and yours, as Henry Hoke can inform you. Will bring the King to more profit in all Munster than any king has had this 300 years, and do better service. Will give his pledges to the mayor of Limerick, provided he have his pardon under the King's seal. That done, will forsake the earldom of Desmond and put himself under the King's laws. Loghgyr, 17 Dec.
Copy.
R. O. St. P. ii. 404.2. Promise to the King's officers of towns of Munster, as Limerick, Cork, Youghall, Kinsale, and Kilmallock, to restore anything he has wrongfully taken from them since he became earl of Desmond. To be proved before the Deputy and Council. 7 Dec. 28 Henry VIII.
Copy.
R. O. St. P. ii. 404.3. "These are the proffers that my lord of Dessemond doth proffer for, to accomplish himself to unto the King's pleasure and his noble Deputy of Ireland."
(1) To be true to the King as any man of Irish birth; (2) to serve under the Deputy at his own charge; (3) make restitution to the subjects, and (4) to the King; (5) accept James FitzMore's challenge to the earldom, provided he put in sureties to refund the costs incurred in recovery of the earldom by command of the Lord Deputy and Ossory, "whose letters he hath in his custody;" (6) to go at the Deputy's command against any of the King's enemies; and (7) to put his pledges in the hands of the mayor of Limerick.
Copy.
17 Dec.
R. O.
1333. Jacques de Coucy [Sieur de Vervins] to the Deputy of Calais.
I have received your letter requesting me to restore to Marques Maquell two mares that he has lost. I doubt not he is a subject of the King, your master, yet the compaignons maintain that the mares belonged to the enemy, and were taken in their country. I have ordered them to prove this in a few days, when Marques can put forward his claim. Boulogne, 17 Dec.
Fr., p. 1. Signed. Add.
18 Dec.
R. O.
1334. Assault on Frenchmen in London.
Complaint of Charles de Castelnaw, brother to the bishop of Tarbes, the French ambassador, and of "John Boterel, escuyer sieur de la Mote," and of John de Serrate, chamberlain of the said ambassador, sworn 18 Dec.
On 6 Dec. last, the three complainants and Bernard Delasus, the ambassador's steward, made a wager to shoot with the handgun. The following morning they went to De la Mote's lodging at the sign of the Cock and Key in Fleet Street, there being with them John Duval, Castelnaw's page, Hen. [Ne]vell, son of Sir Edw. Nevell and the ambassador's la[ck]ey, called Charton. There John Martin, Gilbert de Coste, and a tailor came after them; and on coming out they were assaulted by Englishmen with bills, clubs, and staves. Serrate was cut in the sleeve with a dagger, De la Mote defended him and Coste, one of the ambassador's servants, using a target and the flat of his sword, though he might have killed them. He retreated to Bridewell, being wounded in the head and face with a bill, and they left him at St. Brigide's churchyard. Wm. Pyed, another of the ambassador's servants, died the next day of his wounds, and John Martin was like to die.
ii. Depositions of witnesses examined, by my lord Privy Seal's command, by Dr. Peter and Thos. de Soulemont, 18 Dec., 28 Hen. VIII.
John le Rowsse, of Normandy, printer, dwelling in the parish of St. Brigide deposes that he saw Wm. [le Pyed] running down the lane to Bridewell pursued by men calling out "Down with the French dogs!" One Stondal, being constable, took him and delivered him to certain men to bring him to the Counter, who struck him and handled him cruelly by the way.
Gervase Sohyer, of Normandy, a cutler, dwelling near the Conduit in Fleet Street, and John Domenger, a Gascon, combmaker, who was breakfasting at the Rose tavern by Fleet bridge at the time, give similar evidence.
Joan, wife of John Arnold, waterman, says she was struck and threatened for rebuking the constable for allowing him to be illtreated after he was taken. Peter Tylly, Breton, who is here suing for the recompense of a depredation by one John Carter, deposes as to the beginning of the fray. John Plot, of Lancashire, servant to the bishop of Tarbe, deposes that the boy of the kitchen told him he thought there would be a fray, for the sergeants would arrest Mons. de la Mote. Saw Serrate under the King's printer's stall. Helped to rescue de la Mote.
Pp. 8. Mutilated. Endd.
18 Dec.
R. O.
1335. Lord Darcy to Laurence Baynes.
Orders him to pay 49s. 4d. to Edm. Granger, late headman of his late hospital beside Whytkyrke, in full payment of his yearly stipend and right for surrendering his grant. Templehyrst, 18 Dec. 28 Hen. VIII. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Receiver and baily at Rowndhay Park. Endd.
18 Dec.
R. O.
1336. [Darcy to Archbishop Lee].
At your servant Mr. Markham's I received your letter dated Cawod 14 Dec. In answer to which:—1. Lisle or any other from Trent North who says I allowed or disallowed your late sermon at Pontfret, which I heard not, says untruly, as I will justify for my own truth "and as none excuse to you or any that is of such light credit anempst me." 2. Where you write you could do no less than enter the po[u]pytt, indifferent as well to die as live, praying you may be worthy to die in so good a cause, I cannot believe your sermon can save our souls, but I know that from God your goodness cannot be hid and reckon that the King and his honorable councillors will accept you after the true meaning of that and all your sermons, without your seeking the King's favor by desiring, in letters, to die for it. Whoever desires such high perfection may, with the King's licence, be sped in Africa or Turkey. 3. I warrant my brother Sir Robert Constable will answer his part of the letter himself, "and I never heard him say but as your friend." Finally, as your Lordship desires me to write to you frankly, I am bold to answer you like a knight and neither as an orator nor lawyer nor dissembler; and so, when last at Pontfret, I answered good Dr. Bransbe when he brought me your message to have my mind in writing as to how the clergy should show their learning, wherein you noted greater lightness in me than I deserved or expected. Your letter and hasty groundless credences requires no further answer. Written [at m]y cabin of Tempylhirst, 18 Dec. 1536.
P.S.—I send by bearer a letter signed by the King which, my lords at Doncaster affirmed, was sent to my lord of Canterbury, wherein all true Catholics may joy, and you and other clerks take comfort to set forth the truth with his Grace's favor.
Copy, p. 1. Endd.: Copies of my lord Archbishop's letter and my Lord's answer thereunto.
18 Dec.
R. O.
1337. Darcy to Shrewsbury.
The people here pay their rents, and the stir, caused by example of those of the "high and wild countries" who cast open parks and closes and make spoils, is appeased. Until Norfolk's coming Northumberland, Bishopric, Cumberland, Kendal, and all other dales will be at no sure stay. As for my lord of Northumberland and my son Sir George Darcy, give credence to my son Dawnay, your servant the bearer, for whom Jesu reward you. My cabin of Templehirst, 18 Dec. 1536. T.D.
Subscribed in Darcy's hand: To my lord Steward deliver this.
P. 1. Endd.: Afore the par[don] and "Md. these are to sort."
18 Dec,
R. O.
1338. John Scudamore to Cromwell.
Whereas he is appointed sheriff of Hereford for this year, and certain members of the marches of Wales are annexed to the shire, begs to know if he is to "execute the same as shire ground." The people are not well furnished, but seem willing to serve the King if need be. 18 December. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
18 Dec.
R. O.
1339. Sir Thos. Whartton to Cromwell.
Sends his servant with news, as he cannot himself come to the King according to the commandment received from the duke of Norfolk. Wharton, 18 Dec.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Cromwell. Endd.
18 Dec.
R. O. [1536–7].
1340. Sir Thomas Arundell to Cromwell.
My lady abbess of Shafton (Shaftesbury) and the convent have given your Lordship the next presentation to the parsonage of Tarraunt Hynton. I advised them to do so because your letters expressed a wish that she should do so according to a minute of an advowson enclosed; but your Lordship's name was omitted in the minute, contrary to the tenor of the letter. I send the advowson and the minute also. My lady is right glad to do you pleasure. I beg your favor to him who is farmer of the parsonage. Shafton, 18 Dec. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
18 Dec.
R. O.
1341. Hubert Christiaens, Receiver-General of the Extraordinaire. of Flanders, to Lord Lisle.
I have today received your letters with those of the Admiral de Beure, desiring the delivery of 22,000 fagots seized by me in the Emperor's name, which came out of the ship of William Pieterssone, wrecked between Nieuport and Ostende on the 11 Nov. last. It is well known that in like cases the goods of the Emperor's subjects have been confiscated to the King of England, and I have been ordered, therefore, to keep possession of any such goods belonging to Englishmen until some arrangement was made. Nevertheless, as the wood belonged to you who have always been kind to the Emperor's subjects, I will deliver it to Jean Foubert, as you desire, repaying myself with the right of salvage. Ostend, 18 Dec. 1536.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. Add.
18 Dec.
R. O.
1342. Sir John Wallop to Lord Lisle.
I thank you for your letters to my lord of Winchester and me, with the news of my lady's being with child. I rejoice first for both your sakes, and secondly, because it gives hope both to my wife and me, " considering not to be so long married as you two, and either of us being younger, man for man and woman for woman; trusting, if we return once quietly to the castle, such good fortune may ensue unto us, and so much the rather if your abode and my lady's may continue at Calais, which I somewhat have heard the contrary, trusting the same not to be true." Against my lady's lying-in I have sent her two bottles of water which I brought from Avignon, meet for that purpose, especially when she comes near churching time, "for she shall be so much the more readier by five or six days if she will use the virtue of the same, which is restraintive and drawcth together like a purse, . . . . Furthermore, when a woman's breasts be long it raiseth them higher and rounder, which peradventure shall be good for some of your neighbours. As for my lady, needeth not." Your pretty son-in-law, (fn. 14) who has arrived here, is the jolliest and wisest I have seen. My wife and I take great pleasure in hearing him speak, especially French. I sent all my news by my servant Ric. Berd. Paris, 18 Dec. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
1343. Robert Aske to the Lord Mayor of York.
R. O.The mayor's son has broken promise touching payment for the lead at Hull, for which Aske gave him safe conduct. Begs "the premises" may be delivered to the bearer.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
ii. On the back. Md. this letter was delivered to me William Harryngton after 18 Dec. by Chr. Clerk, servant to Robt. Aske. The said Christopher since Xmas came to William and James Herryngton from Robert Aske for money to be paid to the King for the lead of Marton Abbey. Signed by Wm. and Jas. Harryngton.
P. 1.
19 Dec.
R. O.
1344. Felicia Hertforde to Lady Lisle.
I thank your Ladyship for your manifold goodness when I was your poor neighbour at the Blackfriars in London, when it pleased you to have me often in your company. I hear in what case your Ladyship is as to your body, which I know is not so much to your comfort as you hoped. But I trust you will put away all heaviness. The case has happened to many before you. I myself was so for two years and more, and suffered great torments; yet I am now as well as any woman. If my coming to you will do you pleasure I can give you better advice than many others. London, 19 Dec.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
1345. Thos. Pearde to Lady Lisle.
R. O.Thanks her for kindness shown to himself and his wife on this side of the sea, and for her goodness to his poor kinsman John Stryvelhill, born at Towstock. Asks her to favor him, if any chances to his profit.
Memoranda at the foot (in another hand). To write touching a benefice. Md. To Mr. Diggorye Greinfeld and to Hewe Syse. My ladies nurse.
Hol., p. 1.
19 Dec.
R. O.
1346. Barnerdyn Devaloys to Lord Lisle.
Recommends the bearer, "a tall man, cunning in his science." Begs Lisle will take him into his service. He is well known to the garrison of Calais, and has done the King good service here in Ireland.
Headed: 1536. In Dewblyn, the 19 day of December.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Sealed.
[20] Dec.
R. O.
1347. John Perpowntte to [Lady Lisle].
I have received your letter, dated 24 Nov., asking me to take account of your wheat and see the prior of Hyde paid for my young master (George Bassett), the lady Abbess (fn. 15) for Mistress Brygette, and also William Seller, his wife, and the maid. This cannot be done with your wheat, which will not bring more than 5 marks, and Seller asks 4l. 12d. in this matter, being 40s. for his wages, 15s. for his wife's, 12s. for his maid's, 9s. for the wife's livery, and 5s. for the maid's. I desire to know your pleasure. I went to the lady Abbess, but she does not know her duty, and Master Ley was absent. The prior of Hyde was ridden away on business, so I lost my labour. "The Wednesday after St. Luces Day, early in the morrow, kneeling upon my cap and, saving your honor, naked but my shirt and doublet."
The 10s. sent by Brydde to Seller was bestowed upon your cloth. The 9s. was paid to the tailor.
Hol., p. 1.
20 Dec.
R. O.
1348. Guillaume le Gras to Lady Lisle.
You may learn from the bearer the day that your son James arrived in this town in good health. Since you have put him under my charge I will treat him as my own son and take care he wants nothing. I have asked for your girdle and will send it when made as safely as possible. Paris 20 Dec. 1536.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. Add.

Footnotes

1 Of the Augmentations.
2 Blank in MS. The name was Horwood, as shown by the endorsement. Compare No. 1292.
3 See No. 1286.
4 Rob. Pursglove alias Sylvester.
5 Pacæus.
6 Michael Throgmorton, the servant of Reginald Pole.
7 Another copy will be found in Add. MS. 8715 f. 313b, B.M., with the heading "Al Signor Mons. Ambrogio, da Melun, li 13 Decembre 1536."
8 Sir Randolph Brereton died on the Eve of St. Martin in Winter 25 Hen. VIII. (10 Nov. 1533). His eldest son and heir was also named Randolph, and was over 16 when an inquisition was taken for his lands in Staffordshire, 22 March 28 Hen. VIII. See Inq. p. m. 28 Hen VIII., No. 22.
9 David Betoun, abbot of Arbroath. He was not, however, chancellor at this time, but keeper of the Privy Seal.
10 Qu. 16th Dec.? The 15th was a Friday in 1536.
11 It is quite uncertain whether this and the four letters immediately following be all of the year 1536 or whether the last three be of the year 1537. Indeed they may all belong to the latter year. But in any case they were all written between July 1536 and December 1537.
12 Robert Strowdyl, D.D., prior of the Black Friars, London. Hilsey, bishop of Rochester succeeded him, being made prior in commendam.
13 The 17th was Sunday.
14 James Basset.
15 Abbess of St. Mary's, Winchester.