Henry VIII
March 1535, 11-20

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

James Gairdner (editor)

Year published

1885

Pages

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Henry VIII: March 1535, 11-20', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 8: January-July 1535 (1885), pp. 149-161. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75528 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

March 1535, 11-20

11 March.
R. O.
372. Ric. Wharton to Cromwell.
I thank you for allowing me to sue to you for myself and my friends. Complaint has been made to you of a friend of mine, the prioress of Flyxton, against whom, it is said, you intend to send a visitor to depose her. If such is the case, I beg you will be so far friend to her as to respite the matter until I speak with you. These complaints arise from her enemies. I send you "4 pheasants hens and one cock. The cock and one hen is very tame. My wife brought them up in her chamber." I have kept these for you this twelvemonth in the mew, and will send as many as you command me. 11 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
11 March.
R. O.
373. Edmond Harvel to Cromwell.
I thank you for your good-will to put me into the King's service, of which I am informed by Mr. Farmer and other friends. I was disposed to show my gratitude by writing, whatever my base wit shall appear to the chief governor of that noble realm most flourishing in eloquence, for which cause it is no marvel if most ample honors and dignities have followed. Cannot find words worthy of the nobleness of your mind, &c. Need not write news, as Cromwell has news at all times from the ambassadors, but the Turk seems to be ruined in this Persian war. It is rather the opinion the Emperor will come to Italy with his army. Venice, 11 March 1535.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
11 March.
R. O.
374. Brion to the Deputy of Calais.
Thanks him for the hackney sent by this bearer, and for his honorable offers, which he hopes to requite. Pont Ste. Messana, 11 March. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
11 March.
Corp. Ref. ii. 860.
375. Melanchthon to Joachim Camerarius.
Wrote after his return from Cassel. There is no news but a report of the Emperor's arrival in Italy, and great military preparations. Many think the preparations are made against the Turks, others suspect he is arming against the king of England and those opposed to the Council. The Landgrave of Hesse (Cattorum Princeps) is going to Ferdinand.
Camerarius perhaps is told that England is open to the purer doctrine of religion. A stranger has been sent to him from England, talking only of the King's second marriage, the King caring nothing, as they say, about the Church matters; but no cruelty is exercised against those who are zealous for better doctrine. Hears the French are furious. This corresponds with prophecy.
Is reprinting the Apologia and Loci. 11 March.
Lat.
12 March.
R. O.
St. P. ii. 231.
376. Jas. Boys to Cromwell.
On the 8th March received his letter dated London, 16 Jan., conveying the King's order for him to deliver to the countess of Kildare or Thos. Houthe, her attorney, all her apparel remaining in his custody, and to certify the King what other goods he has belonging to the earl of Kildare.
Immediately after Thos. Fitzgerald's rebellion, surrendered the constableship of Maynooth, and the said Thomas conveyed all the Countess's apparel and the property of the late Earl to the castle of Ley. Dublin, 12 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
12 March.
R. O.
377. John Husee to Lord Lisle.
Has received his letters by Nethersalle, with the licence of victualling. Sends the obligation by Buck, as the seal is broken, and must be renewed, as you will see by Smethe's letter. You must thank Mr. Secretary for his pains, and request Mr. Kyrton to allow Sir Edw. Saymer to take possession. Mr. Densill shall have the hogshead of wine. The matter moved by Cotton to my lord of Richmond will not take effect, nor can I speak yet with Mr. Bryau. I have moved Mr. Secretary for the Staple Inn, but can get no answer. London, 12 March.
I have spoken again to Harry Clerck, the pewterer, about the dishes.
Hol., pp. 2. Add. Endd.
12 March.
R. O.
378. John Husee to Lady Lisle.
I received your letter by Buck, but he brought the obligation so pressed in his bosom that the print of the seal went clean out; so it is now sent to be sealed again. Your Ladyship will see by my Lord's letter what is to be done. If it be not sent at once the award can take no effect. As to the Portingal's spices, he has nothing good but cloves. The Queen likes your kersey specially well. Mr. Receiver says you shall have a livery. He sends you a letter within Mr. Gaynsford's letters, which Netherhall hath. Mr. Locke delivered me a bill touching Mr. Hackett's testament. I moved Mr. Secretary for your cup, who answered well.. I send two yards velvet from Mr. Locke. If I can get a good gentlewoman I will bring her with me. Mr. Basset is in good health, and is a good lawyer. I will do my best to get Bremylcome a gown. The taffeta gown you sent will not make up for Mr. Basset, except as a coat. If the obligation were come I would soon be at Calais. I was never so weary of London since I first knew it. London, 12 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
12 March.
R. O.
379. Jacques de Coucy [Sieur des Vervins] to Lord Lisle.
Last Sunday, in the field, I lost a hawk (sacre) belonging to the seneschal, (fn. 1) which I have not been able to recover. I think it went towards your quarter, and you will greatly oblige us if you can get it back for us. Describes the bird. Boulogne, 12 March. Signed.
Fr., p.1.Add.
12 March.
Add. MS. 8,715, f. 22 b.
B. M.
380. Bishop of Faenza to Mons. Ambrosio.
The Grand Master says that he does not think the interview with England will be held. From the manner in which he said it, supposes, as he has heard elsewhere, that the king of England is not too well satisfied with the French king, especially because he has promised to give his eldest daughter to the Scotch king. Although this was done with the knowledge of the king of England, he perhaps does not wish it now to take effect, though he still shows friendship towards Scotland, and the king of the England has sent him the Order of the Garter (fn. 2) without the knowledge of the French king. The "practice" of promising the new daughter of the king of England to the duke of Angoulemême, goes backwards and forwards.
A rumor has originated from a great man in the Court that perhaps there will be war this year against the duke of Savoy, if the Emperor is busy.
"Da Serpon, a li 12, ut supra."
Ital., pp. 11. Modern copy, headed: Al Sig. Monsig. Ambrosio, &c.
13 March.
R. O.
381. Sir Wm. Weston to Lord Lisle.
I have received your letters desiring the farm of the parsonage of Rodmersham in Kent. It was let in my predecessor's time to Sir Ric. Stable for a term of years, of which 10 are yet to come, and mistress Bell, widow of Fras. Bell, (fn. 3) pretends to have in farm in her husband's right the whole commandry of Peckham, of which Rodmersham is parcel. St. John's nigh London, 13 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais. Endd.
13 March.
Lamb. MS. 607, f. 14. St.
P. ii. 232.
382. Skeffington to Sir Edm. Walsingham.
No journey has been made since he came to Ireland, but he was the setter forth in person. Was at the intended siege of Drogheda and the journey to Trym, where Thos. FitzGerolde was put to flight. On the Sunday before St. Katherine's day, while coming home from Tryme, there was such rain that the footmen were up to their middles, and every man made haste to Dublin, leaving the foot. The lord Chancellor, the bishop of Mith and Gormanstown, with Dakers and other gentlemen, tarried with Skeffyngton to defend the foot, for their bowstrings were wet and most of the feathers of their arrows fallen off. Gives an account of his driving off some of Thos. FitzGerolde's men, who were laid at the wood end of Killmaynam. Was taken ill that night, and 100 more besides, of whom he thinks 40 are dead. The King's attorney (fn. 4) is in as evil case as the Deputy. Sends letters from all the Irish lords of the North, except O'Neill, promising their service. Asks for the letters to be returned. Hopes in 10 (fn. 5) days to make the traitor so that he shall not know where to abide. During his illness. Sir Rice Mansell, Leonard; Skeffyngton and 160 of his retinue were the first who entered in garrison at Trym. The rest of his company have attended on the Treasurer, who has shown himself of good courage and conduct. Has divided the army into garrisons. The lord Chancellor, the bp. of Mith, baron Delven, Ric. FitzGerold, Sir Rice Mansell, Leonard Skeffyngton and Ogleebe lie at Trym, Kenles, the Navon and West Mith. At the northern border, as at Newcastell Lyons, Tassagard and Tallaught, there lie Sir Wm. Brewerton. Salisbury, Dakers, Sir Jas. FitzGerold and Musgrave. Sir James shows himself a true man, as do the Tolles and O'Brynnes. On 13 Feb. John Griffen and Robt. Browne attacked and put to flight Thomas FitzGerolde, and on Saturday, 6 March, Paulett, the Treasurer, with Brewerton, Salisbury, Dakers and Musgrave, slew 100 of his gallowglas at the Nase. Begin today to lay siege to Maynooth. Pawlett's coming has reformed the army. Asks him to solicit his causes with Sir Wm. Kingston's assistance. Sets forward today to Maynooth. Dublin, 13 March.
Asks him to keep this very secret, as it includes all his letter to Mr. Secretary. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add.
Lamb. Ms.
601, f. 32 a.
383. The Same to Cromwell.
To the same effect as the preceding.
Copy, pp. 4.
13 March.
Melane. Ep. i. 26.
Corpus Reformatorum, ii. 861.
384. Melanchthon to Henry VIII.
Although there were urgent reasons why he should write to the King, yet shame would have deterred him had it not been for Dr. Antonius. who has been so loud in the King's praises. Much is due from students and men of his order to the King. Never has England produced so many men of genius. Letters in Germany are despised by the prejudices of men, and are brought into odium in consequence of religious controversy. Hopes the King will use his influence for good, as certain abuses have crept into the Church, and monarchs have not used their efforts for establishing a simple and certain form of doctrine. Antonius has asked his opinion on certain articles on which he sends his judgment in writing. Wittemberg, 13 March 1535.
Lat.
R. O.385. [Barnes] to the Archbishop of Canterbury.
In Seleswye, 20 miles from Wyttemberg, there has been a hailstorm which broke the decking of the houses and killed many folks. The stones lay three days before they melted. The Duke's castle there is so destroyed that it must be rebuilt. The whole town is broken and torn as though it had been "schotyn with gunstones." Twenty persons were killed. Great wagons were east upon the houses, and woolsacks carried two Dutch miles. "These things be true, and all this is done to learn us for to fear God and to love His word, sed traditi sumus in reprobum sensum, ut non cognoscamus diem visitationis nostræ."
Send this or the copy to Mr. Secretary.
In Barnes's hand, p. 1. Add. At the foot is written: "Anto. Angl."
14 March.
R. O.
Letters, 300.
386. Cranmer to Cromwell.
On the 13th March I received a letter from my brother the archdeacon of Canterbury, (fn. 6) concerning Dr. Benger, (fn. 6) of Wingham, which I think fit to send to you; sc.:—
On last St. Matthew's eve, Dr. Benger, at my table, affirmed the authority of the bishop of Rome, and after many arguments said, "These new laws may be suffered for a season; but in time they will cause broken heads and set men together by the ears." Then I said, "Take heed what you say, for I am sworn to the King, and will not conceal anything from him."On which he said, "I mean not here, but somewhere else out of this realm."
The Archdeacon does not write who were present, so I have sent to him for the whole process in writing with the seals of witnesses.
To day my lords of Wiltshire, Burgavenny and Cobham were with me at Knoll, to consult about the King's commissions for the subsidy directed to us and others. We have fixed Tuesday after Palm Sunday for all the commissioners to meet at Maidstone; and as the same persons, except eight that be altered, are in another commission for the valuation of tenths and first-fruits, I have sent for those eight also to be at Maidstone at the same time. Knoll, 14 March. Signed.
Add.: Secretary. Endd. by Wriothesley.
R. O.
Cranmer's Letters, 301.
2. Depositions against Dr. Benger. Headed "1535."
(1.) By Thos. Shellmore, curate of Wyngham. That he said we might as well deny the authority of Paul and of all Scripture as of the Pope.
(2.) Edw. Lacy, the provost of Wyngham's servant, witnesses the same.
(3.) By Will. Nores. That he said the Pope had authority to make laws; and when it was answered that this was against the law of God, he said this new learning had set men together by the ears already, and in time coming it would cause broken heads. Being reproved for this by Mr. Provost, he qualified it, saying "I mean not here but somewhere else." He said by what authority we denied the Pope by the same he would deny the Scripture and say that Christ is not yet born.
(4.) Mr. Attfelld witnesses that Dr. Benger said this new learning would set men together by the ears.
(5.) By Thomas Lawney. Dr. Benger came suddenly into the Archdeacon's parlor, and began to pick a matter; "taking his purpose upon a fire that was there," he said, "This fire, masters, is good for to roast and to seethe and to warm but not to burn no men, Sir Thomas, I trow." I said, "Whom would you have burned ? "He said, "All these new learned men." A merchant who stood by asked, "Whom think you new learned men, —they that speak against the Pope or any other ? " The doctor said they were no good men that would speak against him. I then said, "Take heed, master doctor, what ye say, for ye are bound by your oath to speak against him." He said he was sworn to the Church. I said, Yes, but to the Church of England, not of Rome. He said again he would never speak against the Church of Rome, nor would any good man, and left in a fume. Signed.
Also friar Brencheley, after many railing words in his sermon, said, "Masters, take heed, we have nowadays many new laws. I trow we shall have a new God shortly." At the next preaching came a doctor of the monks of Canterbury, who prayed for the King, but did not name him head of the Church, and introduced a story of a covetous king who reserved goods to himself that he took from certain trangressors, wherefore he lost his kingdom and never recovered it; "and thus left it undeclared. By the which many gather opinion that he meant it by the King to move the commons to insurrection."
R. O.387. Thomas Lawney to Master Marbere. (fn. 7)
I commend me to you and my mistress your wife. It fortuned me to preach at Wingham before the Archdeacon, where I inveighed against the Pope, according to my duty. Dr. Benger, LL.D., canon of Wingham, was so offended that he came to the Archdeacon's house, and began to invent a matter to me by the occasion of a fire that was there, saying "This fire is good to burn one, and good to seethe meat and to roast, but no men, Sir Thomas, I trow. How say you?" "Marry," said I, "and if they deserve it," said I, "why should they not ?" "Marry," said he, "I would all these new learned men were burnt in as good a fire as I could make," said he. Then this bearer answered and said, "Who call you new learned men ? They that speak against the Pope ?" Then answered Dr. Benger, saying, "There is no good man will speak against the Pope, for I will never while I live," said he. "Then," said I, "take heed, master Doctor, what you say; for ye are sworn to the contrary." Then he said he knew as well as I whereto he was sworn. Then this bearer said he had heard of late one that preached that he was the Anti-Christ. and the Doctor said there was no honest man that would say any harm of him nor yet of the Church of Rome; to which he would ever hold withal. And I said he was more to blame, for he was sworn to the Church of England. If you promote this matter you will do the King service, for he is a marvellous enemy to God and His word. Commend me to Mr. Whawley and his wife.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Unto Master Marbere, in St. Laurence Lane in London. Endd.
14 March.
R. O.
388. George Lord Cobham to Cromwell.
My lord of Canterbury sent for me to Knell on Saturday last for a commission concerning the King's subsidy, my lords Wiltshire and Burgayne with him. The justices of the shire on that commission will be at Maidstone 23rd inst. There is another commission to the Abp., Wiltshire and me to tax Rochester and Canterbury. As neither of them will be there, asks for instructions, as he is but a young man. Wishes to serve the King. Knoll, 14 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
14 March.
R. O.
389. Wm. Lord Sandys to Cromwell.
I have received a letter from my lord of Norfolk and others of the Council that the King is informed that warlike practises are used on the frontiers of Flanders, and that the castle of Guisnes is not so kept either with deputy or soldiers as it ought to be, and that the woods are much wasted. Though there is no deputy, there is one whom I trust as such, and I will send one before Easter. or go there myself if the King desires it. It is furnished with soldiers according to my duty. I know of no waste of the woods except such as have been taken for burning of brick necessary for repairs at Calais and Guisnes. I send you news received from Guisnes yesterday. The bearer should have attended upon my lord of Winchester for the King's commission. He has been at Guisnes every year, and can give you full information. The Vine, 14 March. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
14 March.
R. O.
390. John Yardley, Prior of Stodeley, to Cromwell.
I have received your letter in favor of Francis Grant, servant to the Master of the Horse, for the farm of Skillis. Our poor house is maintained by husbandry, and this farm is the chief of our demesnes, and was never let from the house. If it be taken from us we cannot live.
As the King is our supreme head and you our visitor, we trust you will have pity upon us and not see our living diminished. Stodeley, 14 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
[14 March.]
R. O.
391. Antony Waite to Lady Lisle.
Received on March 8 her letter dated Feb. 20. Showed it to his master (Sherburne, bishop of Chichester), who was glad to hear from her, and desires to be recommended. He wishes the writing under his seal to be sent to Antony Wyndesore or some other to be sealed. He is content to take Wyndesore as one surety. She will show no little kindness to Coke and Gyberishe in releasing them. Confesses to slackness in writing, but denies that he has distrusted her, from whom he has always received kindness. Is glad that she has spoken plainly and given him an opportunity of answering. Respited Butteler's matter for a season that he might make search in the Exchequer, according to her last letter.
Cannot come to Calais. His master took his last journey heavily, "for that if I had miscarried by the way, how he should have comen to such matters as I have of his." Expresses his readiness to serve master Basset.
Commissioners are assigned in Sussex to sit upon the value of spiritual possessions, being his master, Sir John Gage, Sir John Dawtry, Sir W.Goryng, Sir Roger Copley, Mr. Sherley, Mr. Palmer and others. Chichester, Passion Sunday.
The dean of Chichester desires to be recommended to lord and lady Lisle.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: At Calais.
15 March.
R. O.
392. S. Vaughan to Cromwell.
Excuse the writing of my last letters. Proclamations have been made here that men should not go eastward, because the Lubeckers are confederate with the duke of Holst. The bruit, once so hot, of the war between these parts and the French king is now ceased. I noted that the people spoke of it as if they did not fear France. The country is everywhere well fortified, the people rich and wealthy, munitions of war abundant, and their Emperor the prudentest prince in the world. Trust me they are not afraid though the Geldres were one with them. The strangers speak much of an Act made in England against exchanges. They say it will set the whole world against us. I will write to you my poor mind in certain things, but the experience of your late unkindness discourages me. The bishop of Palermo is persuaded by some here that I am no papist, which offends him much. He weeneth Hell hath no other devils. Antwerp, 15 March.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
[15 March.]
Harl. MS. 6,148, f. 50.
B. M.
Cranmer's Works, ii. 302.
393. [Cranmer to ——.]
"Sustre." Has appointed Mrs. Creke, widow of one of his servants, to come to her in three or four days. She is in great need, but has been wealthily brought up after an honest manner, and so the rather unmeet either to serve or labor for her living. Desires her to entreat and entertain her with all favor, and he will see her paid for her board. She must be content to forbear her chaplain, Mr. Rix, whom my lord of Wiltshire wishes to come to him at Maidstone on tomorrow week, which is Tuesday, and thence depart with him home for all togethers.
Desires her to discharge him against the same day, that he shall not need to return again to her.
From Cranmer's Letter Book.
Harl. MS.
6,148, f. 50 b.
B. M.
Cranmer's Works, ii. 302.
394. [Cranmer to Mr. Rix.]
My lord of Wiltshire is fully determined for him to abide with him in his household, and on Passion Sunday (fn. 8) desired Cranmer to send him word to meet the earl at Maidstone on Tuesday week, and thence depart with him.
From Cranmer's Letter Book.
15 March.
R. O.
395. Ghinucci to Cromwell.
Knows that Cromwell is disposed to help him. Is compelled by necessity to remind him of his affairs. Rome, 15th March 1535. Signed.
Lat., p. 1. Add. Endd.
15 March.
Add. MS. 8,715, f. 28.
B. M.
396. Bishop of Faenza to M. Ambrosio.
* * * * *
The Admiral's secretary, who was expected from England, came four days ago, and does not bring back all that they wished, but the particulars are not known, as the negotiations are secret. The king of England shows himself a cruel enemy to the Church as far as he can; so it may be that the French mean to offer me some hope of peace, (fn. 9) because they are not so sure as they were of the king of England, who is "entertained" (intrattenuto) here by the Admiral. Hears that the Admiral gave the French king clearly to understand that he must not trust the Grand Master; with justice, the Bishop thinks, for he said expressly that he would give his body and cloak for his master, but not his honor and his soul.
* * * * *
Hears by letters of the 4th from England that this Gherardo, who has seized Ireland, has fortified himself, and has overthrown many weak fortresses (lochetti) so that they may not be occupied by his enemies. However, the king of England intends to defeat him this season.
Ital., modern copy, pp. 8. Headed: 1535. Da Eurosi al S. Mons. Ambrosio, a li 15 di Marzo, &c.
16 March.
R. O.
397. Thos. Fitzsymon to Cromwell.
The Deputy is at the siege of Maynothe, whither they went on the 13th. The resistance made by the ward cannot continue. The traitor is abroad, doing what harm he can, but his power daily diminishes. The country is sore oppressed by the holding of Jas. Fitzgerald and Richard with Irish horsemen. Their service was never yet true to the King. Disapproves of taking Irishmen for the defence of the English. Advises the King to send 100 or a half of northern spears with Mr. Bowmer, who was here before, and to allow them free horse meat and man's meat, and a groat Irish a day upon the King's subsidy. Dublin, 16 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary and M.R. Endd.
16 March.
R. O.
398. Will. Popley to Lord Lisle.
My master has written to you of late to give your old servant, Alex. Long, the room of 8d. a day for his sake; and I beg for my sake that you will forgive his having left your service without licence. My master has received your letters by Husee and me, and has promised to get you a warrant for your provision, as I suppose Husee will write by the next, for he is not privy of this man's departure. The Rolls, 16 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Deputy at Calais.
16 March.
Add. MS. 8,715, f. 31 b.
B. M.
399. Bishop of Faenza to M. Ambrosio.
* * * It is thought that the French king will send Mons. d'Angoulême to England, and promise him as a husband to that "puttina," so that England will be sure of France, and they will run the same fortunes. It is also understood that the king of England will consent (si vada accomodando) that the Scotch king should marry the French princess. Here they evidently mean to raise as much money as possible from the temporalities of the Church, because the Emperor intends to attack them; but they have no thought of displeasing the l'Pope, because it is lawful in such cases, even without his consent. The King's doctors have persuaded him of this, but the Bp. has always found him well disposed towards the Pope, as the Grand Master is towards the affairs of the Church. The latter says that, though the interview with England is spoken of as about to take place, there is no certainty about it. * * *
The Admiral tells him that when he was in England the King spoke well of his Holiness, thinking that he would be a good pope. He believes the case of England is not so desperate as is thought; but it is true that the King will never submit to the sentence against him. They say here that unless some remedy is applied, the Emperor will soon be master of everything, and that the Pope ought to see to it; but when they are answered that the Pope must be, and ought to remain, neutral, they make no reply.
Has spoken to the cardinal of Lorraine about the cavalier Casale, but he has not yet made up his mind. The English ambassador is at Paris, but neither he nor the Imperial ambassador has been to the Court since it left St. Germains.
They are sending back to England the Admiral's secretary. Hears that the King has gone to see a new ship launched at Havre de Grace (Porto di Grassa) in Normandy. Lutherans are being burnt every day in Paris, and many alive. Da Eurosi, alli 19, (fn. 10) ut supra.
Ital., modern copy, pp. 8. Headed: Al Signor Mons. Ambrosio, alli 16, ut supra da Euosi (sic).
17 March.400. Sir Ric. Greynfeld.
See Grants in March, No. 25.
17 March.
R. O.
401. Thomas, Abbot of Abingdon, to Cromwell.
Thanks him for his kindness to himself and his brethren. Cromwell desires him to appoint a day before Easter for the auditors to examine the matter between him and Audelett. Has been busy with his council, making up books and accounts of it, which are not yet finished, but will be by Easter. The duke of Norfolk and Mr. Norres have commanded him to give knowledge to the King of his readiness therein. Next week he is bound by his religion to attend daily to the service of God; so he hopes Cromwell will defer the matter till after Easter. At my monastery, 17 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Master Thomas Cromwell, Councillor and Secretary to the King's grace. Endd.
17 March.
R. O.
402. The Prior of the Charterhouse of Henton to Cromwell.
I thank you for your letters sent me by the father of Shene, by which I perceive that all such words as you spoke to me at Sir Walter Hungerford's "rose upon mine untowardness in certain things which ye willed me to do concerning the King's majesty," and that in other matters I might trust your favor. Charterhouse, Henton, 17 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
17 March.
R. O.
403. Sir John Huddylston, Kt., to Cromwell.
I desire you to be good master to these poor men, the King's tenants at Gretton, who ought to have a priest singing in a chapel there, which hath had a vicarage sufficient to find one or more priests. The abbot hath all the profits, and will not find one. If you will let me have the "wosoun" (advowson) of the same I will find them one; and, as I hear say, they shall have no such vicarage "properat" to the house given by the bishop of Rome. 17 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Sealed.
17 March.
R. O.
404. Henry Earl of Cumberland to Lord Lisle.
Thanks him for kindness to the bearer, Wm. Clifford, the Earl's cousin, the King's servant under Lisle at Calais. Requests that Lisle will give him the first promotion that falls vacant. London, 17 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
18 March.405. Nicholas Shaxton, Bishop of Salisbury.
See Grants in March, No. 26.
18 March.
R. O.
406. Thos. Skypwyth to Cranmer.
Sir Thos. Kyng, curate of St. Andrew's in St. Alban's, came here from the examination of your Lordship on certain articles you objected against him, and reported that you were a man of small learning, and could not answer him in such points of Scripture as he brought forth in his defence. He stops the word of God, which is preached by our curate, Mr. Wakefield, your chaplain, who tells us how we have been deceived by the bishop of Rome. Of the priests under him, one called Sir John Mathu, a man of little knowledge and less judgment, handled in confession one Thos. Mallarde very un[go]dly, this week, when he asked his advice. The priest answered, "It is a thing that may be looked upon, but as for me," said he, "I [will n]ever look upon it; for when the King is dead, all these fashions will be laid down, and if I had known that thou had been such a one, I would have sent thee to Mr. Kyng to have thee shriven." At the end of the confession the priest said: "Whatsoever I have said unto thee, report it not, but speak like a ghostly child by me, and I shall report likewise by thee." Notwithstanding, the priest reported that he smelt of heresy.
Another of his priests, named Sir Wm. Phelip, also of small learning, Kyng's ghostly father, said to Wm. Fannyng he trusted to see these new fashions put down. Also the said Kyng advised his parishioners to have nothing to do with the books of Luther, Melanchthon, Tracy, Tyndale, Frith and others. He said also that he was so brought up in the old ceremonies that he told his parishioners he could not forsake them; "and where," said he, " I owe you a little money, I must desire you to spare me till Easter, as I expect every day to be sent up to the Council." He and his priests trouble those that love the word of God, and call them heretics. He has also deflowered a maid called Crane's daughter, and caused Thos. Saunders, his parish clerk, to convey her away. As I was wr[iting this] letter Robt. Hyx showed me that he was confessed by the said Kyng, who asked him whether he did not believe as his fathers did before him, or believed in the new learning, and Hyx answered he believed in Christ, as he ought to do. All such lewd conditions well pondered, I can but certify your Grace of them in discharge of my allegiance. St. Alban's. 18 March.
Hol., pp. 2. Mutilated. Add. Endd.
R. O.407. Thos. Skypwyth and Gregory Waren to Cromwell.
We have written to the archbishop of Canterbury touching the demeanor of Sir Thos. Kyng and his priests of St. Andrew's in St. Alban's, and his ungodly preaching and living, to the hindrance of the pure word of God and the setting up again of the bishop of Rome. We are informed that the liberty of St. Alban's is exempt from the Archbishop, and that you under the King have authority to redress all such causes, and that the Archbishop has sent you our letter.
We beg that the said Kyng and his priests may be punished for an example to others, or else great dissension will ensue. We have a gentleman with us to our curate of St. Peter's in St. Alban's, ealled Mr. Wakefield, the Archbishop's chaplain, who doth set forth plainly the word of God, and how we have been deceived by the bishop of Rome, so that everyone might perceive and smell the same, were it not for the crafty juggling of Kyng and his priests. They state that when the King is dead, these new fashions shall be changed, as one of them told John (fn. 11) Mallard in confession, a young man of 17, and also Robt. Hyxe and Robt. Styll. We beg you will remove Kyng. He is no vicar, but a farmer of St. Andrew's Chapel to the abbot, and "mercenarius," called in their bulls "custos capelle sancte Andree." Therefore he scrapeth and shaveth to the bone, and has hindered our curate. We hope you will appoint true preachers among us, certifying you that, with the exception of the Archdeacon, a monk of St. Alban's and our curate, there is never one to our knowledge within this liberty that manifests the full truth in their preaching, but rather smelleth of their old mumpsimus. So the people are in doubt whom to believe.
In Skypwyth's hand, pp. 2. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
[18 March.]
R. O.
408. John Audelet to Cromwell.
Will pay 2,500l., although it is a marvellous great sum, as appointed by the King, in order to have an end, his convent seals and leases to be expressed in the award, that he may enjoy them without further molestation. Will pay 1,000l. before Midsummer with the 860l. owed him by lord Audeley and 25l. 2s. 8d. owed him by the King, and other sums at intervals. Begs Cromwell's assistance to have a quiet end. Desires certain privy seals. Barton near Abendon, Thursday before Palm Sunday.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
R. O.2. "Articles for the party of John Audelet."
A request to his mastership (Cromwell) to move certain articles to the King on the part of John Audelet, to be expressed in the award, viz., that he may enjoy certain leases, of which a list is given, granted to him under the convent seal by the abbot of Abingdon and his predecessors; also that he may have a general pardon from the King.
P. 1. Endd. as above.
R. O.3. Wm. Button and Ric. Andrewes to Richard [Cromwell]. Desire him to move "my master your uncle" that Mr. Audelett's award may be ready by Tuesday or Wednesday after Easter week. That Audelett may enjoy his leases, patents and copyholds according to this draught; that he may have reasonable days of payment according to his late letters to "your uncle"; that he may have the King's general pardon, and a favorable letter from the King.
Hol., p. 1.
R. O.4. Award by the King of the variance between Thos. abbot of Abingdon and John Audelet, esq., concerning lands leased by the convent to him. Audelet is to hold the office of surveyor of the lands of the monastery according to a patent thereof made to him dated 16 March 24 Hen. VII., and to retain certain lands mentioned in indentures of 15 March 24 Hen. VII., and 5 Dec. 15 Hen. VIII., and other provisions.
Draft. Paper roll.
18 March.
R. O.
409. Sir Richard Graynfeld to Lord Lisle.
Hears that a nephew of Lisle's (fn. 12) has the King's seal to be marshal of Calais. London, 18 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.
18 March.
R. O.
410. Thomas Speke to Lord [Lisle].
I thank you for the great cheer I had when I was last with you at Calais. Mr. Graynfelde was at Court on Sunday last, where the King gave him the reversion of Rynseley's office at Calais, which he signed on Tuesday. (fn. 13) Within these eight days John Graynfeld will be with you at Calais, to go through with Rynseley for his office in behalf of Sir Ric. Graynfeld, and appoint a meeting between Sir Richard and him at Canterbury. When Rynseley is discharged be good enough to cause John Dylyngcourte to bring my horse home when his leg is whole. As to your house "that you live in," Hastings has sold his right to my lord Chancellor, but I believe another gentleman had more right to it than he. I think my Lord is near at a point with him for it, and John Graynfelde believes you may have it when things are at a clear end between them. Master Scryven on Sunday last told me he had been in hand with my Lord for your said house, and means to be at home in 8 or 10 days. Alex. Longe, an old servant of yours, has a letter from master Secretary desiring you to help him to some living. He has behaved well in my lord Marquis's service, and regrets having left yours. London, 18 March. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add: Lord Deputy of Calais.
19 March.
Vesp., F. xiii. 147.
B. M.
411. The Duchess of Norfolk.
Receipt by Agnes duchess of Norfolk of 13l. 6s. 8d., from lord Henry Fyzewater, in payment of an obligation. 19 March 26 Hen. VIII. Signed.
P. 1.
19 March.
R. O.
412. William Barlo, Prior of Haverford West, to Cromwell.
Whereas you gave me your favorable letters to the bp. of St. David's, to be his suffragan, which I do not desire for profit, but to advance more freely the word of God, I am not a little opposed by certain officers of his: nor could I obtain any favorable answer to your letters. Haverford West, 19 March.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd. Sealed.
[19 March.]
R. O.
413. Reynold Lytylprow to Cromwell.
I commend me unto you, and so does Mr. Hoxon, who hath moved me to send to you, desiring you to be favorable to me, specially for the receipt of the first-fruits in the diocese of Norwich. The prior of Norwich is most indifferent. Mr. Lowmney comes up to know your pleasure at the desire of the commissioners. If I may not have the whole, I beg I may have half. Norwich, Friday before Palm Sunday.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
20 March.
R. O.
414. Thomas Godsalve to Cromwell.
Master Lumner can tell you how the commissioners for the firstfruits, &c. have proceeded in their business. I shall diligently accomplish your commandment. By the next you will receive the just value of the priory of nuns at Carow beside Norwich. No day is yet prefixed for the election of a new prioress. Norwich, 20 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
20 March.
R. O.
415. Alex. Frognall to Cromwell.
I spoke to my cousin Ropar to learn your favorable answer in the matter between Wiett and me. He told me it was your pleasure I should go into the country and resort to you again: I will be glad to know the time. I have remitted all to the King's pleasure, who desires you to make a final end. I am now with my lady princess Dowager, where I tarry till I hear more from you. Kimbolton, 20 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
20 March.
R. O.
416. Geo. Lord Rochford to Lord Lisle.
In behalf of Thos. Tochet, who is called hither upon a complaint made to one Lacy. The matter has been before lord Lisle, and is like to be returned thither again. London, 20 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.. Deputy of Calais. Endd.
20 March.
R. O.
417. Lord Lisle's Shoes.
Account of shoes supplied to lord Lisle, deputy of Calais, for a year and a half, beginning 11 Sept. and ending 20 March.
Prices: Quarter shoes and black shoes, corked, 12d.; boots, 4s.; buskins, 14d., &c. Total, 36s. 8d.
P. 1.
20 March.
R. O.
418. Ric. Caundish and Chr. Mores to Cromwell.
Have received 50l. from the bearer, Curte Webkyne, of the Styllyard, for repayment of which they have given him a bill. Its repayment will encourage him and others to aid the King at need. Lebyke, 20 March. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.

Footnotes

1 Du Bies, seneschal of Boulogne.
2 Gianettiera in MS.
3 Francis Bell was dead in 1534. See Vol. VII. 1675.
4 Thos. St. Lawrence.
5 20 in Carew MS. 601, f. 33.
6 The signatures of Edmund Cranmer, provost of Wingham, and of Richard Benger, occur in the document noticed in Vol. VII. 1025 (2) on p. 110 of the MS. under the head "Jurisdictio de Wyngham."
7 SeeCranmer's Letters. Marbere is mentioned in a later letter as controller to the duke of Suffolk.
8 14th March in 1535.
9 "onde potrebbe essere che questi qui per darmi modo un poco di passe (qu., pace?)."
10 Apparently an error by the heading; and the next letter in the MS. is also dated the 16th.
11 "John" here, "Thomas" in the preceding letter.
12 Meaning himself.
13 See S.B., 17 March 26 Hen. VIII., granting Sir Ric. Greynfeld the office of marshal of Calais, in reversion, on the death or surrender of Sir Edw. Ryngeley.