Henry VIII
April 1535, 1-10

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1885

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'Henry VIII: April 1535, 1-10', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 8: January-July 1535 (1885), pp. 188-202. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75530 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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April 1535, 1-10

1 April.
Le Glay, Analectes Ilist. p. 198.
482. Henry VIII. to Mary of Hungary.
"En faveur de Thomas Thurmubal [Turnbull?], marchand Anglais, à qui l'on retenait un navire." Richmond, 1 April, 1535.
1 April.483. Shaxton Bishop of Salisbury.
See Grants in April 26 Hen. VIII., No. 1.
1 April.
R. O.
484. Richard Layton to Cromwell.
I sent for the master of Burton Lazer as you desired, advertising him of the King's pleasure commanding him to be here by Easter eve, and desire you to intercede for him with the King that he might obtain other lands for his lands of St. Giles's. He came, and I have been with him divers times. I have persuaded him to put his sole trust in you, and that he shall not go to the King in anywise before you bring him to his Grace. He is content to do so. When you wish that I should bring him unto you to make further declaration to him of the King's pleasure, let me know. I have been at the Rolls every second or third day since the beginning of your sickness, but did not dare ask to see you for fear of disquieting you. If you were in health I should trust to see you once within two or three days, "mogre tout le monde." Paternoster Row, Thursday, 1 April.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Chief Secretary.
1 April.
R. O.
485. Res Manxell to Cromwell.
Has received the King's letters, and thanks Cromwell for his. Has not written, because, amongst others, his clerk was slain, and he himself has lain abroad in the country, and knew not the time when the Lord Deputy or any other did send to Cromwell. Is sure the Lord Deputy, Mr. Pawlett, and Mr. Treasurer of the King's wars, will have certified Cromwell of the siege and winning of Menoth. Trusts shortly to write of the winning of other fortresses now in the hands of the traitor Thomas Fyz Garald. Menoth, 1 April.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Secretary. Endd.
1 April.
R. O.
486. John Bishop of Carlisle to Lord Lisle.
Commendations to Lord and Lady Lisle. Sends by Lisle's servant Spygott a tun of March [beer]. From my poor house and yours at London, 1 April.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
[1 April.]
R. O.
487. Sir Wm. Kyngston to Lord Lisle.
I am glad to hear of your good health and my lady's. There is but small news here. The King's army in Ireland has won Mynehoth (Maynooth), one of the strong houses of the earl of Kildare, by assault, after 10 days' siege. More than 100 Irishmen were slain, and only two Englishmen. God knows whether we shall see Calais this year or not. All your lovers and friends are well. Carlisle Place, Thursday in Easter week.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
1 April.
R. O.
488. [John Husee] to Lord Lisle.
Excuses himself, on account of urgent affairs, for not returning to Calais as early as he promised at his departure. If he left England he would lose the chief part of his living. As yet Mr. Secretary keeps his chamber, and suitors have no time to speak with him. Hopes he will shortly get abroad. Hopes for a good end of his business if he can once confer with him. London, 1 April 1534. (fn. 1)
P. 1.
1 April.
R. O.
489. John Husee to Lord Lisle.
Mr. Secretary is still sick of his fever, and till he mends nothing can be done about your desire in the Staple Inn. Doubts not his Lordship will have it and the bill to be signed for victualling his household. The award was delivered [to] Sir Edw. Saymour on Easter eve, "the same day he did receive his rights, which he accepted and took." The other part, when Mr. Densill has perused it and seen what shall be requisite for your Lordship's assurance, I shall bring with me in one with his obligation. Has been with Mr. Bryan, but can get no answer from him to Lisle's letter. Will do his best in his Lordship's affairs, and not forsake him as long as Lisle accepts his services; "and I trust, whatsoever is reported, Calais shall not be of me forsaken while your Lordship is there deputy, and further will I not promise." London, 1 April.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
3 April.
R. O.
490. Richard Ryche to Cromwell.
I am glad of your amendment. I beg you will have me in remembrance for the mastership of the King's liveries, and I will give you 40l., and pray for you, as I ever have done. Schelley, 3 April.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
R. O.491. Robert Chapman to Cromwell.
Is glad to hear of his amendment. As his servant, would be glad to do what he could in his behalf.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
3 April.
R. O.
492. — to [Cromwell].
"The certificate of the privy seals with the letter to Master Thomas Gray, the which came to my hands the 17th day of March, sealed in a box with your honorable letter to me addressed."
Delivered to Mr. Farefax, sheriff of Yorkshire, a privy seal and a tachement, 19 March. To John Redshaw of Gyffvyndaill, Yorks., a privy seal, 18 March. Two privy seals to Will. Briggham and John Brigham of Mynskipe, 19 March. One to Rauf Esthorp, of Merton in Holdernes, 3 April. Delivered your letter at Edderstone Castle, Nthumb., 22 March, to the wife of Mr. Thomas Gray. Delivered a privy seal to Launcelot Lowther, of Lamersyd, Westmor., ... * * *
"Also I have sent my lord of Cumberland privy seal, the which Lord hath been in London, and yet is," because none of his council would receive it. I have sent to your mastership Lionel Graye's privy seal, because he is in London likewise, and also that directed to Sir Ralph Fenwike's executors, as his will is not proved, though he has made his sons John and Anthony his executors, who came up to London the second week of Lent, and are not yet returned. I have also sent you the privy seal against Thos. Witham, of Cornburghe, as I find no such man, though there are others of the name, as Matt. Witham, of Brytanby, Yorks., and Will. Witham, of Derneton, [Durham]. * * *
Memorandum for the master of the wards to send down all privy seals for appearances in Mich. term directed to the bpric. of Durham, or cos. Nthumb., Cumb., and Westmor., by the eighth day before St. James's next, and all processes for Easter by the second week in Lent.
Fragment, pp. 3. Endd.
3 April.493. Robert Whetehill.
See Grants in April 26 Hen. VIII., No. 4.
4 April.
R. O.
494. The Royal Supremacy.
Renunciation of papal jurisdiction (similar to those in Nos. 190, 311,) by
Richard bishop of St. David's, 4 April 1534, (fn. 2) 26 Hen. VIII. Seal good.
4 April.
R. O.
495. Adam Becansaw to Cromwell.
Sends his servant to learn his pleasure in that which Cromwell desires him to accomplish. If anyone should complain that the law is unjust, although many escape notwithstanding their abominable lives, begs Cromwell will not hear them until Becansaw has had opportunity of answering their complaints. Whereas there be knights and gentlemen in the diocese of Chester "which do keep concubines and yearly compound with the official for a small sum"; wishes to know what he is to do in that case. Doubts not he shall be able to reform such enormities, and the King sustain no loss. Thinks that the jurisdiction of the Archdeacon should be suspended till such time as the King, being caput Ecclesiœ, has done his pleasure, during which the members are to have no place. At Bryngton, in Huntingdonshire, the 4th day of this present month.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.: iiijth day of April.
R. O.496. [Adam Becansaw] to [Cromwell].
Writes as [Cromwell's] poor orator and chaplain, in obedience to his commission to set forth such offences as require correction in Cheshire, and hopes [Cromwell] will not credit evil reports of himself.
There was a cruel murder committed in Budworth by John Werburton, son of Sir John Werburton, kt., and brother to Sir Peter, about this time twelvemonth. Werburton, though married, had lived in adultery with the wife of Ric. Kynderdale, and, after pretending to be reconciled to the husband, stabbed him one night when his wife had induced him to go out bare-legged with a sleeveless jacket to take a pot of ale to him. Randolph Venables, household servant to Sir Peter Warburton, was at that time coroner, and procured a verdict that John Warburton had killed Kynderdale in self-defence. Some said he was quit by the King's pardon; but, however it was, he is at liberty, and still keeps Kynderdale's wife. Another murder was committed three years ago "betwixt Master Massy, of Podyngton, and one Master Howe; their other names I know not." These parties are agreed, and Massy received a great sum of money in recompense. Also a servant of Sir John Doannys (Donne's ?) was killed in the forest of Delamer about 23 July last, by whom I have not heard.
"Touching adultery." Sir Peter Werburton, though he has a good and beautiful wife, keeps the wife of Laurence Frenche of Budworth. Master Will. Venables, "barne of Kynderton," is said to live in adultery with the wife of Sir Jas. Stanley, and yet he keeps a bastard daughter of Sir George Holforth, by whom he has one or two children. Thus he and his wife are in such strife that their riches are much decayed.
"Touching fornication." Sir Will. Hardwar, vicar of Budworth, keeps in his house a single woman named Margaret Kynderdale, by whom he has had several children. Sir Thos. Flecher, vicar of Runchorn, has had 10 or 12 by Agnes Habram. Both of these were canons of Norton, and obtained their benefices by a bull from the bishop of Rome, called a general capacity. John Dutton, bastard son of the late Master Laurence Dutton, keeps a young woman, by whom he has several children. He had a great sickness a year ago, and I sent one of my canons to make him promise to marry her on his recovery; which he agreed to do, but has not done. He says he will live and die as his father did; who, indeed, had many bastards, so that the land of Dutton came to Sir Piers Dutton. His father was "swech a beste in hys lyffvyng in every poynte of nouztynes (naughtiness) as never was in an holl reeme," and the son delights in his great riches and vicious living, to protect himself in which, he names himself servant to my lord of Wiltshire.
Pp. 7.
R. O.2. Information against certain persons in the archdeaconry of Chester for unclean living. Headed: "Theas as notable persons and slaunderouse lyvers I present unto your maistershipe, which are detecte in visitacion within th'archdeaconrye of Chester, and yet not reformede, for I ne durst procede to reformacion for fere of complayntes, to the tyme I knewe your further pleasur therin, for so moche as suche said persons have not bene accustomede to be reformed by inferior ordinaries as the Busshope and the Archdeacon; and nowe in the King's gracioux visitation ffrendes unto the wiffes, as many worshipful folks greved of such persons, trustethe to be releved by the King's graciouse visitacion as they say. Wherfor I pray your good maistershippe to shewe your further pleasure in this behalffe."
The names mentioned:—
Peter Lee, Esq., Sir Robert Hesketh, kt., Sir Thomas Halsall, Lee of the Bothes, Esq., Sir Peter Werberton, Gerard of the Brynne, Damport of Calveley, Robert Bostocke.
Ends: "Many other ther be also detecte in the said visitacion, which be delyvered unto Master Price your regestor, not reformede."
P. 1. Endd.
4 April.
R. O.
497. John Husee to Lord Lisle.
Has received his letters by Goodalle. It were well that Goodalle came with a good company. I hope God will send you somewhat more quiet living. Dover, 4 April.
Goodalle landed here after a rough passage.
4 April.
R. O.
St. P. vii. 590.
498. Sir Gregory da Casale to Cromwell.
The Pope has suddenly determined to send Latino Juvenale to the French king.
The Imperial ambassador, the Imperialist cardinals, and others of the same faction, have urged the Pope to refer the case of Camerino to the Emperor, hoping to make him subject to the Emperor as Clement was while the affair of the duke of Ferrara was in the Emperor's hands. The Imperialists are anxious, for the French say a plot has been detected for betraying Marseilles, so that they have a pretext to increase their fleet, which will consist of a great ship called the Francisca, 10 galleons, and six galeasses, besides galleys, and will shortly arrive at Marseilles. If this happens, the Emperor will not dare cross to Italy, nor will Andrew Doria be so mad as to leave Genoa; so that the expedition, whether to Africa or Greece, will be in vain, and a great expense notwithstanding, for Doria has 10,000 foot, beside the Germans. These things have caused Latino's sudden departure. It is supposed that he will explain why the Pope wishes to refer the affair of Camerino to the Emperor, and he may ask for securities from the French that the expedition into Africa may be carried out; but Casale does not think he will obtain them. The Princes have such mutual distrust that he does not see how the Pope can find security among them. Rome, 4 April 1535. Signed.
Lat., pp. 2. Add. Endd. Sealed.
4 April.
Otho, C. ix. 107.
B. M.
499. Sir Clement West to [Cromwell].
The xx .... ult. the Commander La ...... arrived with an answer from the King, for [which] the present master sent him, "in which ...... wey my trust was to have had some recommen [dations] whereby I have been restored. My lord master [for] that intent prolonged to make none other Tor[coplyar] till news came from his Highness, or till ...... general chapter here." Speaks about his case as in the letter to the King, of 28 March (No. 459.) Thanks [Cromwell] for advancing his right. Asks him to move the King to write to the Council for his restoration to his office and Sir Oswald to his .......... "besides (fn. 3) presumes to have recommended that o ... man John Story, who so much hath done f[or me], being a stranger to me, the last time he [was] here the master that was would a dysstr[oyed] him, laying to his charge he had delyvy[red] the mace to his Highness, which of trut[h he] did not, nother none of us can tell wha[t is] be comyn of it amongst them they ha ..... and was kept in prison 14 months for other cause that he laid to me. The spe .... Spaynys, Italyan, and wryght them, and sum Fre[nch] very honest and few words I presumed to wr[ite] to his High Grace for him, considering th[at what] he did was for the honour of his Highness [and] of his realm, and I being so ill entreated for the same could do no less for discharge of honesty besides conscience than to advise his Highness." Malta, 4 April 1535.
Hol., mutilated, pp. 2.
4 April.
Add. MS. 8,715, f. 44 b.
B. M.
500. Bishop of Faenza to M. Ambrogio.
The King is going to see his great ship, and perhaps to see if he can obtain the interview with England, which he ought to know at the return of the Admiral's Secretary. "I Roano, alli 6."
Ital., pp. 2. Copy. Headed: Da Roano alli 4 d'Aprile 1535, al Sig. M. Ambrogio, &c.
5 April.
Vienna Archives.
501. Chapuys to Charles V.
Received on the 1st instant your letters of the 26th Feb., which I think are sufficiently answered by mine of the 23rd ult. Nothing more has been said of negociating on the affairs therein mentioned, owing to Cromwell's illness, which has not only prevented him coming to me as he desired, but even from giving me audience. He is beginning to get better, and I will not let any opportunity slip to get to the bottom of the King's intentions,—of which I hardly know what to think, considering his obstinacy against the Church in the matter of this second marriage, which increases daily, though God will avenge it soon (fn. 4) if men will help. I will keep watch on the stirring up of practises commenced, so as at least to hinder or suspend any combination of these two Kings. On the 25th ult. the treasurer of Brittany returned from France. He had audience on the 29th, and was despatched by the King on the 31st. It is said he would have left by this time, but that he has not yet been able to say good bye to Cromwell. Nothing is known of the particulars of his charge, except as to the diet of which I lately wrote, which is deferred to such time as shall be arranged in the court of France when the Treasurer arrives there. The duke of Norfolk and the admiral of Franco are already named as ambassadors, but there is no report as yet who are to be their colleagues, and still less of the matters which are to be treated. I will endeavour to find out something in talking with Cromwell, who ought to be one of the deputies, and who sent to tell me lately "qu'ilz feroient bon office." The Treasurer's clerk lately reported that his master was charged, among other things, to speak with the Princess, and to propose the marriage of the Dauphin with her, and of the duke of Angoulême with the little Bastard; but I do not attach much credit to it. He must have brought something more acceptable than formerly, because Cromwell, in conversation with an Italian physician two days ago, said the Italians were in the habit of exaggerating affairs very much, as they did your Majesty's army, which would not be by any means so strong as they had reported; and then began talking of the king of France, saying he was a virtuous, gentle, powerful, rich prince. This might have been dissimulation, as the physician is familiar with the French ambassador. Whatever Cromwell may have said to me touching the meeting of the foresaid Ambassadors, it is the English who have solicited it, not the French. The Princess, in order not to be altogether shut up, has remained 10 or 12 days at Greenwich since the little one was removed thence. On the 1st instant she left for the house of which I wrote formerly. She wished to go on horseback, but as three of my servants were mounted to accompany her, those who had charge of her made her enter the litter, and her gouvernante along with her, and there she remained till my servants took leave of her, six miles from here. She might have altogether about 30 horses. The litter was covered with velvet, and was by far the most honourable that she had had since her misfortunes. This favour has been allowed to her this year, besides that the King, her father, has sent her since Christmas on two occasions about 60 or 80 ducats.
Since the little bastard removed from Greenwich, considering that one of the galleons of La Renterie was on the other [side ?] of the river (en lautre de ceste riviere), and that there were some other Spanish ships here, by means of which the Princess might be saved, I sent to her to know if she would agree to it. She gave ready ear to the suggestion, saying she desired nothing else, and has since sent two or three times for my man to solicit the matter; but her sudden departure broke off the enterprise, to which also I did not dare commit myself, not having commandment from your Majesty, considering the practises put in train, since it pleased you to charge me to write what means there might be of withdrawing her. Nevertheless the said Princess continues in her purpose to go away, and has sent to desire me by my servant, who has just come from seeing her, that, for the love of God, I will contrive to remove her from the danger which is otherwise inevitable; adding, where she is now there is no means of saving her by night, and that as soon as it was fine weather she would go out walking to see what arrangement could be made to come upon her by surprise in the daytime, and so that it should appear as little as possible that it was by her consent, for the sake of her own honour, and the less to irritate, the King her father. The house where she lies is 12 miles from this river, and if once she could be found alone it would be easier to save her than it was at Greenwich, for we could put her on board beyond Gravesend, past the danger of this river. The matter is hazardous, and your Majesty will take it into due consideration. London, 5 April 1535.
French, from a modern copy, pp. 3.
5 April.
Vienna Archives.
502. Chapuys to [Granvelle].
A fortnight ago the duke of Norfolk said at the table of the French ambassador, either that he expected or he wished to be soon in Italy with 1,000 English, 6,000 Swiss, and 4,000 French adventurers. Does not know for what purpose, and there is no need to make much of it. He may have said it in return for the pension of 3,000 ducats which he has from France. Will speak of it to Cromwell without mentioning names, except that it was a pensioner, to see what he will say, and repeat his hatred of the pensioners. The following day the French ambassador sent a messenger to France, having first enquired whether the King spoke to the Princess when he went to Greenwich. Lately wrote of a Scotch doctor who had been told by the Scotch king himself that two marriages were proposed for him, either with Denmark or Portugal, of which he would prefer the latter, as there would be less chance of Scotland being infected with heresy. James further told him that he was very desirous of being married, both to provide for his succession and to give up his present liaisons, and if his Council did not soon find him a wife, he would marry in his own kingdom. The doctor told Chapuys also that the King was for a time so vexed at the refusal of the wife promised him that no one dared speak to him about making another match in France; but now he was calmer, and had sent a reply by the secretary of the duke of Albany, as Chapuys wrote to the Emperor. Hears also that two days ago a Scotchman went to France to speak of the marriage.
Granvelle will see what he has written to the Emperor touching the removal of the Princess. It is very hazardous, but would be a great triumph and very meritorious. Thinks it would not be impossible, considering her own desire for it, and her great prudence and courage. If I were to tell you the messages she sent me at her leaving Greenwich, and again this morning, you could not refrain from tears, begging me to have pity on her, and advise her as I thought best, and she would obey. These matters are hazardous beyond his humble capacity. If the scheme is to be attempted, would like to go to Flanders, and instruct those who are to execute it. If the Princess, going out to sport (à l'esbat), were once seized and put on horseback, and there were ready a great ship or two, and a rowboat, the thing would be done. Except her guards and some of the other side, the people would help her, and those sent in pursuit would shut their eyes, and bless those who had carried her off. If it were known that this was talked of, it would be bad for him. The English (ceulx cy) have got their pension from France, which is a sign that they do not mean to spend it in Germany, like some former payments. The interview at Calais between the English and French deputies will begin about Whitsuntide. Norfolk, Cromwell, and Fitzwilliam will be sent, with either the Chancellor or Dr. Fox. London, 5 April 1535.
Fr., from a modern copy, pp. 2. There is also a decipher at Vienna.
5 April.
R. O.
503. Rowland Morton to Cromwell.
Has received the King's letters for the counties of Worcester and Gloucester in the dioc. of Worcester, for taxation of the spiritualty according to the Act of Parliament. As the charge is weighty, especially as to the tenth of the spiritualty, and concerns the perpetual inheritance of the Imperial Crown of this realm, and the time for the return is brief,— in the octaves of the Trinity,—and the number of religious houses is large in these parts, and a large portion of the work will fall to my share, I beg you will take these things into consideration. I am now fully employed with the other commissioners, all the other business laid apart; but though we labour day and night, time will scarcely suffice to perfect the work. But forasmuch as I and other 12 are bound before Sir Thos. Englefylde in the sum of 100l. to appear in the Star Chamber on Thursday next before the Ascension for a like matter, I beg this may be taken for a truth. Twelve men, of whom I was one, in a case of murder, found only two of seven near principals and the others accessories. I wish to know, therefore, whether I am to proceed with the said commissioners as I am now doing, or else to give over and appear in the Star Chamber. Let me know your answer by the bearer. Twynnynge, 5 April. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
5 April.
R. O.
504. Sir Thos. Newporte to Cromwell.
I received by Roger Grome your letters, stating that you perceive with pleasure my loving mind to the same Roger, and that after the receipt of your letters I pretended to have furthered them accordingly. Enters into some detail of marriage arrangements made with one Will. Felton, who had two daughters, by which Grome's title to certain property is affected. Erkalewe, 5 April.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
5 April.
R. O.
505. John Dosen, the King's Smith, to Cromwell.
Sends him as a present a carp baken and a spaniel. Calais, 5 April.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
R. O.506. Edw. Planknay to [Cromwell].
I have studied to delay and bring into contempt all such as have been rightly judged to be authors of sedition and adversaries to the King. For this I have suffered intolerable persecution, and put my whole trust in you. I desire you to remember how unmerciful a persecutor "he" has been in all his past life, and a defender of the Roman bishop's prerogative; and now he suddenly turns from the sweetness of maintaining the old and blind pomp, and lets the course of my persecution. You will find him a lion in a sheep's skin, and a dangerous enemy to the King, though he now clothes himself in a shallow coloured garment. The King will have his tongue, but certainly not his heart. It will encourage others to fight for the King if his adversaries are depressed. As my poverty cannot sustain this costly suit, allow me to remain among the servants of your household. I will instruct Mr. Gregory, your son.
Hol., pp. 2. Endd.
6 April.
R. O.
507. Edw. Plankney to Cromwell.
Christopher (fn. 5) is well and daily progressing in learning. In the hall (Physices hospitium) over which he presides, gives three lectures daily, on Horace, Rhetoric, and Æsop's fables. He and Christopher are sometimes with Alexander Alesius, a man not less pious than learned and upright. He lectures on the Psalms. Cambridge, 6 April.
Lat., p. 1. Hol. Add.: Nobilissino suo domino do. Thomæ Crumwello.
6 April.
R. O.
Cranmer's Letters, 302.
508. Cranmer to Cromwell.
Begs him to suspend his judgment respecting the proceedings of Jesus College, Cambridge, touching their interest in certain farms. Hopes to have communication with him at St. Stephen's, and do his duty to the King and Queen. Otford, 6 April. Signed.
Add.: Master Secretary. Endd. by Wriothesley.
6 April.
R. O.
509. Roland Lee, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, to Cromwell.
Thanks for your goodness shown in answering my letters concerning the acquittal of the Vaughans, which is a pernicious example, and also for my abode here. I heard from my servant that you were acrased of a fever, and send him to learn of your recovery. Your servant, Mr. Popley, wrote to me to send the light Welshman who spoke words of the King. Sir Ric. Herbert's letter is enclosed touching the matter. Hereford, 6 April. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
ii. Sir Ric. Herbarte to the Commissioners in the Marches of Wales.
At the Castle of Montgomery, on the 15th of this March, Sir Roger Mason, chaplain of the parish church, and David Lloyd, of Chirbury, deposed that one Philip ap David ap Ledo, of Chapel Forden, in Cauresland, said to them, "The Devil take the King and his acts." I have therefore committed him to the custody of David ap Jevan ap John in the Castle of Montgomery on pain of 300l., where he remained till 17 March, when I sent him to you. Montgomery, 17 March.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
7 April.
R. O.
510. Ric. Caundyshe to Cromwell
Perceives, from a letter received on April 3 by Dr. Adames from Chr. Mounte, in Cromwell's name, that the King and he think long to hear from these parts. Received from Dethek, who arrived at Rostoke on Feb. 10, Cromwell's letter bidding him and Chr. Mores accomplish their instructions with all diligence. Complains that Cromwell did not write to him of Dr. Adames' coming as the King's ambassador, so that he might give him credence. When Detheke arrived had written to the King, but Dr. Adames' coming changed the case, so that till now he could never have ground to write upon.
The Council of Lubeke have written to the King concerning the answer of the articles sent by him. Advises Cromwell to give no faith to them nor their friends till the coming of Adames and Caundish, "which shall be with the first that comes, by the grace of God." Would have written to the King, but it were too tedious to write how his Highness has been handled by the city of Lubeck. Trusts that his pleasure will yet be accomplished without giving any thanks to the Lubecks or their friends. Hamburgh, 7 April. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Master Secretary. Endd.
7 April.
Nero, B. vii. 102.
B. M.
511. Harvel to Starkey.
If I were moved by your example, I should not write unto you of a great long season, for it runneth upon three months since we received your letters. "Siccine te honores mutarunt, vel potius te nobis philosophi ademerunt?" By other men we hear that you are in the King's family. What will you say if I come one day to the Court to keep you company? Mr. Cromwell has counselled me to come to England, and I am determined to seek my adventure in those parts as soon as I can despatch my business here. Nothing gives me more courage than you do; for I shall not lack your counsel, help, and favour, which will be much to my furtherance, for the friendship that I reckon you to have, specially with Mr. Cromwell. I owe much to Mr. Winter, as I hear from Mr. Farmer, for his advancing me to Mr. Cromwell. Thank him for his humanity. The common voice is that the Emperor is coming to Italy. There are evil rumours of the Turk. It is thought Barbarossa will leave Africa. The Emperor's fleet and army is in the highest order. Commendations to Mr. Perkins and John Walker. Venice, 7 April 1535.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
7 April.
Harl. MS., 1968, f. 20 b.
B. M.
512. Peter Stanley.
Lease for 40 years of the manor of Ewlowe, Flintshire, by the King, to Peter Stanley, gentleman usher of the chamber. 7 April 26 Hen. VIII.
Modern copy, p. 1.
7 April.513. Dr. Skyppe.
See Grants in April 26 Hen. VIII., No. 9.
8 April.
Vienna Archives.
514. Katharine of Arragon to Charles V.
Hopes God will reward him for the good he has done in getting the Pope to give a definitive sentence in the matter between the King and her. Has forborne to reply to the Emperor's letter in the hope of being able to report that some good had resulted from it, and to give him the thanks which so great a kindness deserved. But as she perceives that God for our sins has permitted otherwise, and as she knows He will not desert her in so just a cause, aud that she should offend Him gravely if she did not use the help of those who could apply a remedy in a case so scandalous, cannot forbear to trouble his Majesty, as she has always hitherto done, to bear in mind our Holy Catholic Faith, and the peril in which this realm is standing for want of it (qu. the Catholic Faith ?) I entreat for this as earnestly as possible; for, as a Christian woman, I am bound to do so, seeing the need for it that I do. My daughter has been ill, and has not yet recovered. Her treatment would suffice to make a healthy person ill, how much more to cure a sick person (sic). If she perish, it will be a double sin. Your Majesty will think of some remedy. I have no need to dwell upon my own case, for I am accustomed to bear whatever burden, but I cannot forbear to show you that I am as Job, waiting for the day when I must go sue for alms for the love of God. The ambassador, as she has before written, does all in his power in her behalf to bring the matter to a good conclusion. Kimbolton, 8 April.
Sp., from a modern copy, pp. 2.
8 April.
R. O.
515. William Maunsell to Cromwell.
Thanks him "for the release of such injuries as against me was objected." Mr. Bawldewyn, justice of assize, has enjoined master Sheriff and me to appear before you and the Council at Westminster in the quinzaine of Easter next. Cannot keep the day, and obey the King's letters to inquire of liberties in Yorkshire. Has therefore appointed 13 sheriff turns to be kept in several parts of the shire, to inquire by the constable and four men of every town the names of their chief lords, and the authority by which they claim liberties in derogation of the King's rights. This is done through the whole shire. Cromwell's late punishment of offenders has done great good. It is time to see reformation, for commissious often do little good in these parts by reason of their affinities and confederacies. York, 8 April.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Mr. Cromewell, secretary to the King's highness. Endd.
8 April.
R. O.
516. John Husee to Lord Lisle.
Has received his letter by John Broke. As for the 100l. the King is cessed at, has delivered his Lordship's letter to Mr. Treasurer, who is in doubt how the King will take it, and says Mr. Secretary knows not but that his Lordship has paid the 135l. already. Will do his best to show Mr. Secretary the full contents of his Lordship's pleasure; but Fowler refuses to meddle with the account if Lisle's request be granted, as it will have to be audited before the Commissioners. Smyth is in the country. Will ask Hidd's bonds of him on his return. The patent of 10l. is at your pleasure. Mr. Densell has promised I shall have by Sunday next the minute for the assurance of the 120l. Mr. Saymer must pay you yearly. Will endeavour to get it finished before he departs, and bring Lisle's part of the award and Saymer's bond with him. Has spoken for six pair of hose to be sent by next ship. Has received the King's letter and Mr. Secretary's, touching Oye Sluice, and will do his best therein. As for Buck's confession against Fryer, he goes now with my Lady to Calais, and cannot tarry to depose before my Lord Chancellor. He will always abide by what he has said. Cannot get Lisle's bill of victualling signed, but hopes to have it on Saturday. The King was at supper with Mr. Secretary on Wednesday last, and is now at Hackney; will be here on Saturday, and so to Hampton Court, whither the Queen is removed, as one of her gentlewomen has got the measles. Mr. Secretary says you shall have the Staple Inn, and he will cause the King to write in it. Can get no answer of Bryan touching your patent. The saddle and harness is ready to be sent by next ship. Thinks it will turn out that Norfolk, Mr. Secretary, Mr. Treasurer, and Mr. Almoner or Mr. Comptroller of the King's house, go to the French king about Whitsuntide. London, 8 April.
Hol., pp. 2. Add. Endd.
8 April.
R. O.
517. John Bekynsaw to Lady Lisle.
On 4 April I received a letter from you, dated Calais, 30 March, by a Scotchman, doctor of this University, by which I am glad to find that you continue your good mind towards me, and took my letters kindly. I am sorry my first letters did not come to hand, along with which was a letter of Mr. Thos. Raynoldes, priest, whose name you desired to know of me, who will, I assure you, be diligent in seeing your son whenever you please to send him hither. Please mention whether he should be at school within his house, or whether he may ride with him about his progresses; to which I think you will not agree, his age being so tender. Paris, 8 April. Signed: Joan. Bekynsaw, scholar.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: At Calais.
8 April.
R. O.
518. Chr. Jenney to John Brampton.
By your late letters I perceive that the tenants of Letton trouble you for the land you purchased of them, and that you suspect that it is by my cousin Ric. Southwell's procurement. I marvel that the tenants should so use you against their own agreements, but much more that my cousin should procure them to do so, which I cannot believe. When I was last at Rysynge, my said cousin, Sir Thos. Lestraunge, I, and others, fully examined the matter. To be plain with you, if I had found that you had invented the report that was common in the country, that they must put away all their church and guild lands by May 1, and else that the King would seize them, I would have declared it to the King and the Privy Council, and I think Southwell and others would have joined me. As I could not perceive this, I was willing to do my best to make a full and perfect end between them and you, and specially for the commodity of the tenants, who had most need of help. I could do no good, and was ready to depart; but my cousin Southwell, and Mr. Robsarde, made the end between them and you, and required me to tarry and draw up the articles, which I did; and Southwell, Lestraunge, I. you, and many other gentlemen and tenants, signed the book. Perhaps the tenants, by light information, will vary from their own acts, as there is little other trust to a number of common people; yet it is hard to make me believe that my cousin should by any means give them such advice. I would not advise you to make any such report of him. 8 April. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
9 April.
Titus, B. xi. 417.
B. M.
St. P. ii. 238.
519. Sir Thomas Audley, Chancellor, to Henry VIII.
Is informed by the Irishman who sued to the King at Mr. Secretary's that a priest is coming with letters to the King from James Desemounde and one Cormoke Ogge, whose daughter he has married, asking that the said James may be earl of Desmond, as heir to the late Earl, his grandfather. He says also that Sir John Decemount, uncle to the said James, pretends to be Earl. In this time of hostilities Sir John assisted the earl of Ossory against the traitor Thos. Fitzgarrard, and took part of the county of Limerick and divers castles of the said traitor. Cormok Ogg and James are daily warring upon him, and prevent him pursuing the said traitor.
This Irishman advises the King to grant the earldom to neither of them, but to give the priest "fair dulce words" till more of their demeanor is known.
He also gave Audley a letter from the Mayor and Council of Youghill asking for ordnance and "power" (powder ?) in consideration of their being the King's true subjects and the pains they have taken in defending their town. They consider themselves sufficiently furnished with men.
Cannot come to the King for 9 or 10 days, being occupied with his commissions, and so sends him this information. Stratford, Friday, 9 April. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
9 April.
R. O.
520. Sir W. Courtenay to Cromwell.
Desires his favor for his cousin Stowell in the matter between him and the lord Zowche, of which Yorke and Ric. Pollard will inform him. Powderham, 9 April. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
9 April.
R. O.
521. Reynold Lytylprowe to [Cromwell].
I am glad you have recovered from your sickness. It will not be long before some receiver is appointed for the fruits of the diocese of Norwich, and I shall be glad of the appointment. Cannot see him till the commission for the first-fruits be ended, and that will be within 20 days if they are diligent. Norwich, 9 April.
Hol., p. 1. Endd.
10 April.
Titus, C. vii. 214.
B. M.
522. Henry VIII. to the Council of Denmark.
Has received their letter of 18 Dec., containing the news of the election of the duke of Holstein as king of Denmark, and asking him not to assist the people of Lubeck. Nothing has happened to diminish his friendship with Lubeck. If they will send some one to explain the quarrel between them and Lubeck, will give a just answer. Hampton Court, 10 April 1535.
The persons named in the salutation are: "Magnificis dominis Inaro, Munck, Ripen', Stigon', Krumpen Burglauen', Avoni Bilde Arhusien', Georgio Friis Vibergen', Canuto de Aurea Stella electo Ottonien', ecclesiarum episcopis, Magno Goye, Magistro Curiæ, Præberno Podebusk, Petro Lycke, Joachino Lycke, Avoni Lunge, Erico Banner, Magno Munck, Magno Bilde, et Erico Krummedige, equitibus auratis, atque Regni Daniæ consiliariis."
Lat., p. 1. Prepared for the King's signature, but afterwards altered. Countersigned by Vannes. Add.
10 April.
R. O.
St. P. vii. 591.
523. Cromwell to Sir Gregory da Casale.
Has received several letters from him since his departure, the last being dated 20 Feb., Rome. Has informed the King of their contents, and he thanks Casale for his diligence in writing. The King especially noticed the Pope's desire to gratify him, and his having sent for two lawyers from Etruria, who have given as their opinion that the Pope ought to approve of the present marriage. If what Casale writes about the Pope's views toward the King is correct, he ought spontaneously to pronounce the former marriage invalid, and the present one valid. The Pope would thus do an act worthy of his office, pleasing to the King, and profitable to his pontificate. Suggests that Casale, without waiting for orders, should induce the Pope to do this. London, 10 April 1535. Signed.
Lat., pp. 2. Add.
10 April.524. George Boleyn, Lord Rochford.
See Grants in April 26 Hen. VIII., No. 13.
10 April.525. Peter Vannes.
See Grants in April 26 Hen. VIII., No. 14.
10 April.526. Buildings at Calais.
See Grants in April 26 Hen. VIII., Nos. 15 and 16.
Titus, B. i., 425.
B. M.
527. Cromwell's Remembrances.
That I have despatched the money into Ireland. That I have delivered 300l. to Wm. Gonson. That I am ready to send over 1,000l. for the buildings at Calais. That I have made ready 1,000l. to be employed upon the making of the haven at Dover. That Wm. Gonson hath convented with Cavendish for the provision of ropes and cables in Esteland, by which, Gonson says, the cost of rigging the Mynyon will be saved. The expense will be 116l. 15s. for three months. John Whalley to be paymaster at Dover. I have commanded the bp. of London to write his sermon that he hath preached, and to make a book against the authority of the bp. of Rome. Before the receipt of Mr. Treasurer's letter, an Act to be passed in Ireland was drawn up, declaring the King's last conquest, and that lands held of all persons spiritual and temporal within heland ought to remain and revert to him by the equity of his laws. To remember my lord of Richmond.
Pp. 2. Endd.
10 April.
R. O.
528. T. Megges to Cromwell.
I intend to accomplish your order between the other executors and me for our accounts; and I have remembered me of such goods of my late lord and master (fn. 6) as came to the hands of the said executors; and I am informed by your servant Rob. Chapman that there is a book remaining in the hands of the executors, very necessary for you, as in it are written many treaties made by my late lord and master between Henry VII. and the King that now is, and other foreign princes. Which book your servant desired of Edw. Twyfford, one of the executors, who denied all knowledge of it. Then he asked it of Mr. Mynne, who answered, "Trow ye that Dr. Clyff be dead, or on sleep? I doubt not but he shall be as able to occupy that book as any other." As it is not fit it should remain in the custody of the executors, as it contains the King's matters, and it may be of pleasure and service to you, order the executors to deliver it to me, and I shall send it to you. Or send your commands to me for that purpose. Downham, 10 April. Signed.
P. 1. Sealed. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
10 April.
R. O.
529. Walter Harbartt to Cromwell.
Received his letter dated 30 March, by Robt. Clere, of Waterford, who complains that Harbartt has taken certain grain which he had laden to victual the King's army in Ireland. Did not consent to the taking of the vessel, but there is the greatest scarcity here. Forty of the commons, some of them being his servants, took the vessel, and brought the men before him, being the King's deputy in the lordship. They had no docket or license, or other evidence that they were victuallers to the King's soldiers, but alleged a licence from one Gerom Grene of Brystowe for eight weys of beans, and that they had a cockett at Bridgewater. Sent to lord Fitzwaren, who charged him to stay and search the ship. There were found 11½ weys of beans, wool, spice, pewter and silk, more than they had paid customs for. The vessel was therefore arrested, and the King's mark set upon her, but within three days they stole away, and he does not know where they went. Sends an order he made with the parties who seized the corn, which the Irishmen refused. Kerdiff Castle, 10 April. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary.
10 April.
R. O.
530. Antony Waite to Lady Lisle.
Hopes that she and lord Lisle, with all there, are in good health. Does not hear otherwise of her here.
I beg you to remember my Lord (fn. 7) my master's matter with your husband, in which he has charged me to see to his assurance, and to be no less diligent than when I was a mean between you and him for the delay of the first payment till All Holantyde. I beg you to order my Lord for his assurance, according to the writings which I sent to you from London before this last Easter, so that my master may have no cause to think unkindness of your husband, or be discontented with me. I wrote on Palm Sunday, and delivered the letter to Leonard Smyth, disclosing my mind, and excusing myself from the unkindness and mistrust which your late letters suppose, but which, considering your kindness, it would be most unnatural in me to feel. My Lord would be glad to hear from you. He came on Friday in Easter week to Chichester, as the chief commissioner for the valuation of the spiritual lands. He was accompanied by 100 horse, partly gentlemen of the county and partly his own. Such yet is his stomach to honor the King's commission, albeit by his great age scarce able to bear it. He made that day such a dinner of fish, as nor I, nor none that there were, ever saw, as they said, for the quantity and goodness of them. About 700 persons dined in his palace; some in the hall, which is not small; some in the parlour and the great chamber above, where he dined for warmth, with other of the commissioners. I trust to be in London in a fortnight, when I have to do my duty to your son John Basset; for I was never so weary of Sussex, what by wooing, what by labours, what also by the sorrowfulness that I have of my poor mother lying on the mercy of God. I am bold to make my complaint to you; but you are good, and it is said to be an easeful physic for a man to show his grief where he loveth. Chichester, 10 April.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: At Calais.

Footnotes

1 Should be 1535.
2 The date of the year is in the same hand as the text, but a blank was left for the month and day of the month, the document having evidently been prepared long before.
3 The proper punctuation of Sir Clement West's mutilated letters is a matter of great uncertainty, as there is a stop between every word in the original, and the writer's grammar is peculiar to himself.
4 "En peu de heure Dieu la venoe" (qu. vengera?)
5 Christopher Wellyfed.
6 Nic. West, Bishop of Ely.
7 The Bishop of Chichester.