Henry VIII
May 1535, 1-10

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1885

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'Henry VIII: May 1535, 1-10', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 8: January-July 1535 (1885), pp. 242-262. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75533 Date accessed: 17 September 2014.


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May 1535, 1-10

1 May.638. The French Pension.
See Grants in May, No. 1.
1 May.639. Sir Henry Wyatt.
See Grants in May, No. 2.
1 May.640. Sir Arthur Darcy.
See Grants in May, Nos. 3 and 4.
1 May.641. Rob. Feron.
See Grants in May, No. 5.
1 May.
Vesp., F. xiii. 125 b.
B. M.
642. Anne Dowager Lady Berkeley to [Cromwell].
Complains of the delay of the master of the King's wards (fn. 1) in sending out the writs concerning the office to be found after the decease of her husband. (fn. 2) It is great loss to her, for she can get nothing from her jointure. Asks him to move the King in this behalf. Acknowledges that the fee of Silebe is unpaid, but very need causes her to be slack. May 1.
Hol., p. 1. Endd.
1 May.
R. O.
643. Wm. Fyldyng to Cromwell.
Sends a bill of information by Ric. Woodwale, of Rugby, delivered on the Wednesday in Easter week last past, of the sayings of Geo. Cobbe, of Hylmerton, which may or may not be treasonable. Waits for his further commands. Newnham, 1 May. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
1 May.
R. O.
644. Sir Richard Bulkeley to [Cromwell].
Sends him a bill exhibited by Ric. Gibons against Robert Oking, LL. D. I have bound them to appear before you on the 15th inst., and required Gibon to produce all such papistical muniments and writings as he had against Oking; but he refused, and said he would exhibit them to you himself. Has known Oking as commissary of the bishop of Bangor for more than a year, and has always heard him speak for annulling the bishop of Rome's authority. Thinks he has accused him in malice, as Gibons was of the party of Dr. Glynne, commissary to the late Bishop, who wishes to obtain his old room. Desires an answer to the letters sent by the writer's servant Geffrey, touching the priory of Penmon, and will fulfil all that he promised to Cromwell. Beaumaris, 1 May.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
Cleopatra,
E. vi. 384.
B. M.
2. Richard Gibbons to [Henry Norris], Chamberlain of North Wales.
Complains that although the power of the bishop of Rome has been abolished, Robt. Okynge, commissary to John bishop of Bangor has authorized the feigned proctor of St. Lazar to publish the feigned indulgence of St. Lazar, heretofore granted by the Popes. Gibbons, being registrar to the Bishop, went with the bailiffs of Caernarvon on Palm Sunday, and took away from the said feigned pardoner the papistical muniments and Okeyng's letter, for which Okeyng suspended him, and caused him to be "declared" at Easter. Okeyng has also written to John Robyns, calling Gibbons "a rebellion." Requests the Chamberlain to interfere. Signed: Richard Bulkeley,—per me, R. Gibbons.
P. 1.
1 May.
Royal MS. 18 B. vi. 37 b.
B. M.
645. James V. to the Cardinal of Ravenna.
Received his letters on April 1, with apostolic letters commending Jas. Stewart to the monastery of Calco (Kelso). Heard from John Lauder of the difficulty the Cardinal experienced in obtaining the letters, and thanks him. Holyrood, 1 May 1535.
Lat., p. 1. Copy.
1 May.
Royal MS. 18 B. vi. 38.
B. M.
646. James V.
Letters patent promising protection and favour to any one willing to work the mines of gold and other metals in Scotland. Edinburgh, 1 May 1535.
Lat., p. 1. Copy.
1 May.
Royal MS. 18 B. vi. 38.
B. M.
647. [James V. to Paul III.]
Hears that Jas. archbp. of St. Andrew's has attempted much against the royal privileges, and that, having resigned the monastery of Abirbrothok to David, the present incumbent, with reservation of the profits and his right of re-entry at David's death, he is now endeavouring to procure from the Pope his reinstatement. The monastery is consistorial, and in such cases, by papal grants to our ancestors, nothing can be done without the Prince's consent.
Requests him to rescind anything that may have been granted to the archbp. Holyrood, 1 May 1535.
Lat., p. 1. Copy.
1 May.
Royal MS. 18 B. vi. 38 b.
B. M.
648. James V. to the Auditors of the Apostolic Chamber.
To the same effect as the preceding letter to the Pope. Holyrood, kal. Maii, anno supra.
Lat., p. 1. Copy. Add.
1 May.
Royal MS. 18 B. vi. 38 b.
B. M.
649. James V. to the Cardinal of Ravenna.
To the same effect as the preceding. Holyrood, kal. Maii, &c.
Lat., p. 1. Copy. Add.
1 May.
Royal MS. 18 B. vi. 39.
B. M.
650. James V. to Francis I.
Asks Francis to pardon Francis de Legondez, who was in James' service under the duke of Albany during his minority, if it is found that he has transgressed the laws. Edinburgh, 1 May 1535.
Lat., p. 1. Copy.
1 May.
Royal MS. 18 B. vi. 39.
B. M.
651. James V.
Requests bailiffs and other officers of Denmark, Sweden, and other friendly countries to assist the bearer, whom he sends to procure hawks. Edinburgh, 1 May 1535.
Lat., p. 1. Copy.
1 May.
R. O.
652. George Collyns to George—.
The stathowar of Barrow told Mr. Flygge, in the church, that a commissioner from the procurator general of Brussels had come to take three Englishmen, of whom Dr. Barnes was one. The Statholder wished Flyge to give Dr. Barnes warning of this, and "forgot to know" who the two others were. Collins will send the names of the two others, by his next letter, and desires that "Mr. Docktar" may be informed hereof. Dated at the top, Andwarp, 1 May 1535.
Hol., p. 1, part cut off. Add.: To the w ..... George ...... mercer, thi[s be delivered], in Lon[don]. Endd.
2 May.
R. O.
653. To Thos. Crumwell, Chief Secretary and Treasurer of the Jewels.
Warrant for the payment of the following sums, viz.:—to Thos. Agarde 3,000l., to be delivered by him to Will. Brabason, the King's treasurer in Ireland; to Will. Tyrrell, to be delivered to Sir Edm. Bedyngfeld, 333l. 6s. 8d. for the lady Princess Dowager's household; to Will. Bukstede, bowyer, by way of prest, 100l. for bowstaves in the Tower of London; to Thos. Adyngton, skinner, by way of prest, 100l. as part of his debt, due out of the Great Wardrobe; to Hen. Hoberthorne, merchant taylor, for certain liveries for the household of the King's daughter, the lady Princess, 49l. 15s.; to Palamydes, the treasurer of Brytayne and secretary to the Admiral of France, as reward, 200 cr. of the sun = 46l. 13s. 4d.; to one that brought bowstaves and bows from the French king, by way of reward, 100 cr. of the sun =23l. 6s. 8d.; to Courte Webkyn, merchant of the Steelyard, 50l. for money delivered to Ric. Cavendyshe and Chr. Moryce, by exchange; to the ambassador of the duke of Holste, as reward, 35l.; to Thos. Wrythesley, one of the clerks of the signet, reward 10l.; Ralph Sadeler, reward 10l.; to aid the post for conveying the King's letters to the sea-side to Palamides, 20l. 2s. 6d.; and to John de Bowlemonte, for his pension, 20l. Greenwich, 2 May 27 Hen. VIII.
2 May.
Cleopatra, E. iv. 307.
B. M.
654. Stephen Gardiner, Bishop of Winchester to [Cromwell].
"Master Secretary," I send by my servant the bearer the certificate of what has been done by me and others according to the King's commission for the valuation of the spirituality in this county, which I thought best to send first to you, asking your judgment in the perfection, as I required your advice in the beginning. Anything wrong can easily be amended. Neither goodwill nor diligence has been wanting. We delivered the charge into two parts,—to know the true value, and to grant allowances and deductions. No fault will be found in the first part; every promotion is extended to the uttermost. In the other part, we have followed our judgment according to the words of our instructions, disregarding what was said about the words of the Act being more favorable than we have showed ourselves. With the advice of my colleagues I have made an entitulation, which I send you to be weighed as you shall think fit. As to the title of alms, we have made allocations thereafter for the finding and nourishing of old impotent and lame men, but have not included therein the finding of children at school, which is not a necessity as the other.
Satisfied them and ourselves with the reflection that if we made the value of the lands too great, it would grieve them, but in the allowances we could neither do good nor harm. If we allowed more than we had commission for, it would be controlled there with our rebuke; and if we allowed too little, the remedy lay open to be sued for. We have passed over everything without miscontentment. You will see in the valuation of my bpric. a goodly portion, but I shall have little more than half to my own use. Some men think I am too strait in charging myself, but I will have my own way. My servant will show you the books. Marwel, 2 May. Signed.
Pp. 2.
2 May.
R. O.
655. Geo. Awdelay to Cromwell.
Advertises him that whereas it was determined by Cromwell and the Chancellor that nothing should be done on the lands at Audeley until Cromwell's pleasure touching the suit between the writer's father and Sir John Mundy was known, Mundy warned the tenants to appear at his court on Monday, 10 May, and appointed new officers. Richard Bedle commanded the rents to be paid at the next court, although the writer was empowered by a letter from the Chancellor on Christmas last to receive them, which his adversaries disobeyed as a forgery. Begs his assistance, and that Bedle's proceedings may be stopped. Was in his youth a henchman to the King, and if the estate were taken from him would have only a very bare living.—Heley Castle, 2 May. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary.
2 May.
R. O.
656. Thomas Jhons to Cromwell.
I received your letter dated the last of Feb., signifying the King's pleasure that the iron delivered to me by John Bartlet should be delivered to Joyce van Prate and other merchants at Bruges, on proof that the iron was their property. Roger Huskar, servant to Joyce, brought sufficient powers, but not proof. Thos. Whitt, of Waterford, claims the iron. Please to examine the parties.—Haroldiston, 2 May. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary.
[2 May.]
R. O.
657. Degore Graynfyld to Lady Lisle.
I intended to have come to see you within 10 days upon Easter, "but y tooke a mysfortuen off my horses that I was yn the casse that I was never abbell to lept apon my horses never senne and hade grett payne ever senn," as Berry can show. I trust to be with you before Midsummer, and will bring anything you want in this country. My hurt has hindered me in doing divers things of yours and other men's, and now all shall tarry before I see you and my Lord. I had lever than 20l. that I were with you, for I lack company to play with me, and I can do no other service because of my hurt. I am glad you have removed my cousin John Bassyd to the (?) of court, that he may have learning, for there will be nothing so necessary for him. If you write to him to apply his book he will take more heed to your words than to 20 others.—Kylhamton, Sunday before Holy Thursday.
My wife desires you to provide some apparel for her against I come.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
2 May.
R. O.
658. Sir John Bonde, Priest, to Lady Lisle.
I have received your letter touching the advowson of Aische Reigny. I suppose it is for Sir Richard Blynsham, or some friend of his who has "labored" Mr. Rolle. I have made Sir Richard an answer, which I hope will content him, but I have no reply from him yet. I hope your Ladyship will be content that I take some advantage thereof. When my Lord and you were in this country, you were pleased to give me the advowson of the chauntry. I have often solicited Sir Harry Clerke for a resignation of it, and at last he is willing; but I await your pleasure before going further. Sir Harry expects you to grant him another advowson. I have shown my mind therein to John Bure. I have paid Rob. Brytte 3l. 15s. 4d. His demand was 4l. 5s. 4d., but I have a full acquittance. Mr. Aclande is paid 6l. Mrs. Aclande said she hoped your Ladyship would let her have somewhat as well as others. Your weir will require repair this summer. There have been great waters this winter, such as have not been for 20 years. Desires instructions about the timber at Idyslehe, paling of parks, &c. Reports matters about pannage and account books. His sight is not as it has been. Can see nothing with the one eye. Begs her to keep Mr. Bassett substantially to his learning. Hears "he shall need of cunning in time to come." Hopes her place will be kept henceforth with little charge. Mrs. Jane Bassett is displeased with him for not letting her have the keys of every chamber. "Madam, I wolle gette my fyngers unto th'elbow before she or any other have such keys" till you command me.—Womberleh, 2 May.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.
[2 or 3 May].
Arundel MS., 152, f. 294.
B. M.
More's works, p.1451.
659. Sir Thos. More's to his daughter Margaret.
Supposes, by the councillors resorting hither, that these fathers of the Charterhouse and Mr. Reynolds, of Syon, are adjudged to death for treason. Does not know their matters. As she is perhaps in trouble and fear of mind about him, especially as it is not unlikely that she has heard that he was brought before the Council, wishes to tell her the very truth. On Friday afternoon, the last of April, Mr. Lieutenant told him that Mr. Secretary would speak with him. Shifted his gown, and went to him in the gallery with Mr. Lieutenant. Met many persons on the way— some known, and some unknown. On coming into the chamber where Mr. Secretary was with Mr. Attorney, Mr. Solicitor, Mr. Bedyll, and Dr. Tregonwell, was offered to sit; which he refused. Mr. Secretary said he doubted not that More had seen, by means of his friends who had resorted to him, the new statutes made at the last sitting of the Parliament. Answered that he had: but as, being here, he had no conversation with any people, he thought there was little need to bestow much time upon them, and so returned the book shortly, and never marked nor studied to put in remembrance the effect of the statutes. He then asked if More had not read the first statute about the King being Head of the Church, which he said he had. Mr. Secretary then declared that since it was now ordained by Act of Parliament that the King and his heirs are, have been, and should be Supreme Head of the Church of England under Christ, the King desired them to demand his opinion. Replied that he had trusted that the King would never have commanded such a question to be asked of him, considering that from the beginning he had truly declared his mind to his Highness, and since that time to Mr. Secretary also; that he had discharged his mind of all such matters, and neither would dispute Kings' titles nor Popes', but is and will be the King's true faithful subject, and will pray for him and his, his Council, and all the realm; otherwise than this he would not meddle. Mr. Secretary said he thought this answer would not satisfy the King; that the King was a prince, not of rigour but of mercy and pity: and though he found his subjects obstinate at one time, he would show mercy if he found them conformable at another time; as to More, the King would be glad to see him take such conformable ways that he might be abroad in the world again. Replied that he would never meddle in the world again to have the world given him, and that he had fully determined neither to study nor to meddle with any matter of this world, but his whole study should be the Passion of Christ, and his own passage out of this world. Upon this, was commanded to go forth for a while. When he was called in again Mr. Secretary said that though he was a prisoner condemned to perpetual prison, he was not discharged of his obedience and allegiance to the King. He asked More if he thought the King might not exact of him what is contained in the statutes, and on like pains as he might upon other men. Replied that he would not say the contrary. To this he said that as the King would be gracious to those whom he found conformable, so he would follow the course of his laws to those whom he found obstinate, and that perhaps More's demeanor made others as stiff therein as they are. Answered that he gave no man occasion to hold any point, one or other, nor gave any man any advice or counsel therein, and could go no further, whatever pain came thereof. Said he was the King's true faithful subject and bedesman, and prayed for him and his, and all the realm; he did no one any harm, said no harm, thought no harm, but wished everyone good; if this was not enough to keep a man alive, longed not to live; was dying already; and since he came here has divers times been in such case that he thought to die within the hour, but was never sorry for it, but rather sorry when he saw the pang past; and therefore his poor body was at the King's pleasure, and he wished his death could do him good.
After this Mr. Secretary asked him, as he found no fault in that statute, whether he found any in any of the statutes after. Answered that whatever seemed to him otherwise than good in any of the other statutes, or in that statute either, he would not declare what fault he found, or speak thereof. Finally, Mr. Secretary said, full gently, that of anything More had spoken "there should none advantage be taken; and whether he said further that there was none to be taken," does not well remember, but he said report should be made to the King, and his pleasure known.
Was delivered again to the Lieutenant, and brought to his chamber, and is in such case as he was, —neither better nor worse. What shall follow lies in the hand of God, whom he prays to put in the King's mind what may be to his pleasure; and in More's mind, to mind only his soul; with little regard of his body. Prays for his family, and desires them to pray for him, and take no thought whatever may happen; for he trusts that though it seems never so evil to this world, it shall in another world be for the best.
Hol., pp. 3. Mutilated. The printed copy is headed as follows:—A letter written and sent by Sir Thos. More to his daughter, Mistress Rooper, written the second or third day of May 1535, 27 Hen. VIII.
3 May.660. Henry Marquis of Exeter.
See Grants in May, Nos. 10 and 11.
4 May.
Vatican Archives.
661. Reynolds, Feron, and the Carthusians.
On the 28th (fn. 3) April 1535 the Lords of England met in the Great Chamber, with many officials and ministers of justice, to hear the defence of certain monks and secular priests who had been prosecuted for writing and giving counsel against the King. Among them a D.D. of Sion Abbey of the Order of St. Bridget (fn. 4) was interrogated by the Chancellor why he had persisted in an opinion against which so many lords and bishops in Parliament and the whole realm had decreed. He replied, "I had intended to imitate our Lord Jesus Christ when he was questioned by Herod and not to answer. But since you compel me to clear both my own conscience and that of the bystanders, I say that if we propose to maintain opinions by proofs, testimony, or reasons, mine will be far stronger than yours, because I have all the rest of Christendom in my favor:—I dare even say all this kingdom, although the smaller part holds with you, for I am sure the larger part is at heart of our opinion, although outwardly, partly from fear and partly from hope, they profess to be of yours." On this he was commanded by the Secretary, under the heaviest penalties of the law, to declare who held with him. He replied, "All good men of the kingdom." He added "As to proofs of dead witnesses, I have in my favor all the General Councils, all the historians (scriptori), the holy doctors of the Church for the last fifteen hundred years, especially St. Ambrose, St. Jerome, St. Augustine, and St. Gregory; and I am sure that when the King knows the truth, he will be very ill pleased, or rather indignant against certain bishops who have given him such counsel."
He was ordered to speak no more, but merely to reply to the question why he had, against the King's authority, maliciously counselled many persons within the kingdom not to be of the King's opinion. "From the time I was first brought into court," he said, "I answered as if I were before God, that I would never declare my opinion for malice against the King or any other person, unless it was asked me in confession, when I could not refuse for discharge of my conscience. It is true I am much grieved that the King should be in such error. Therefore I have never said it in public, nor have ever spoken of it except as I have said above; and if I had not done so I would do it now, because I am so bound to God and my conscience; and in this I do not mean to offend God or the Prince or any one." Here he was ordered to hold his tongue, and he added "Since you do not wish me to speak further, secundum legem restrain judicate me."
After hearing his sentence he said with the greatest constancy "This is of the things of this world." He then prayed the judges to obtain for him two or three days of life considering that he had been eight days "come irregular" in the Tower of London, and in those three he proposed to prepare his conscience and die like a good religious man. They answered that it was not in their power, but in the grace of the King. He then said, "Credo videre bona Domini in terra viventium."
The prior of the Grande Chartreuse of Flanders (qu. of London?) went to the King's almoner and two other doctors and desired them in discharge of his conscience to let him ask them three things:—1. Seeing that our Lord gave power to men upon earth by the words Et tibi dabo claves Regni Cælorum, which no doctor understood to be addressed to any other than St. Peter alone, then to the Apostles, and consequently to the Popes and bishops, how could the King, a layman, be Head of the Church of England? The Secretary replied, "You would make the King a priest, then?" and commanded him to speak no further.
The arrest was then made, and execution followed 4 May in the following manner:— (fn. 5)
First, the "said" four monks and one of the secular priests (because the young man (fn. 6) was pardoned) were drawn from the Tower of London to the place of execution (about a French league distant) and without respect for their Order hanged with great ropes. While they were still alive the hangman cut out their hearts and bowels and burned them. Then they were beheaded and quartered, and the parts placed in public places on long spears. And it is believed that one saw the other's execution fully carried out before he died,—a pitiful and strange spectacle, for it is long since persons have been known to die with greater constancy. No change was noticed in their colour or tone of speech, and while the execution was going on they preached and exhorted the bystanders with the greatest boldness to do well and obey the King in everything that was not against the honor of God and the Church.
Ital., from a modern copy, pp. 3. The original is endd.: "Anglia. Mors monachi unius S. Brigittæ, trium Carthusianorum et unius preshyteri secularis in Anglia, 1535."
4 May.
R. O.
662. Thomas Prior of Michelham to Norris.
My Lord Warden (fn. 7) has obtained of the King the manor of Oteham, amongst other lands of Begham Abbey, lately suppressed by the Cardinal. The Prior and his predecessors have been seised of this manor for more than 200 years, and have received 25 marks yearly rent, which was paid when the Cardinal held it, and while it remained in the hands of the King. Has also received 25 marks for one year's rent, my Lord Warden being owner. The clear value is 34s. 10½d. The Lord Warden has now sold the manor to William Kenslye, reserving to himself the rent of 25 marks, unless the Prior or his successors recover it by lawful judgment in the King's courts. Asks him to assist him so that the Lord Warden may reform his indenture, and desires credence for the bearer. Michelham, 4 May. Signed.
P.1. Add. Endd.
4 May.
R. O.
663. John Husee to Lord Lisle.
Received his letters by Goodall touching the death of Leonard Mell; on which I visited Mr. Norres, who has spoken to the King about it, and consents to your wish, if it be not of greater value than you state. I have endeavoured to get the bill signed, but none will meddle, saying the property belongs to the King's almoner. Mr. Fowler, however, asserts the contrary. Would be glad of some precedent. The King has granted to you two serplers and two pockets of wool; but I must have a bill, with all particulars. Draper, Mr. Nores's servant, has earned a good reward. The marshal is come, but he has not yet usurped the room of Tytevill. (fn. 8) Has received his letter by Blunt's man. My lord of Rochford is to go in Mr. Secretary's stead. I have delivered your letter to Mr. Treasurer, who thanks you for appointing his lodging in lady Garnish's house. He will be there with the other Commissioners on the 13th, and said if the Marshal laid anything to your charge he should find those that would answer him. Holt will provide your liveries, but will have Wyndsor's bond. I expect him tomorrow, for so he appointed Mr. Edmond Winsor, his nephew. Will send the spices, torches, squaryers, and hose. The pewterer is but a knave, and will not serve you without ready money. Will provide him with the money received from Mr. Secretary. "God knoweth how I have been handled in the payment." Goodall shall bring the fringes with Speccot, who is not yet well. This day, three monks of the Charterhouse, one of the brethren of Sion, and a priest, were drawn, hanged, headed, and quartered. The vicar of Thistelworth has been pardoned. London, 4 May.
Begs him to write to my Lord Chancellor touching the warrant dormant for the victualling.
Hol., pp. 2. Sealed. Add. Endd.
4 May.
R. O.
664. John Husee to Lady Lisle.
Mr. Marshal (fn. 9) is come, and I cannot yet hear anything of his doings. I think he will not be very busy Although Mr. Secretary is not going over now, "I think if he hath oft to say he will be so much the bolder; but I trust all shall not provaylle."Mr. Basset desires your blessing. He learns daily, "proceeding far beyond any in that house for his time." I have taken 2¼ yards taffeta of Mr. Lock, at 8s. 6d., very good silk, and 7½ yards black say, for a jacket and doublet, and have had to give a bill binding me to payment in your Ladyship's name. When Bury comes I will cause him to leave 3l. with Mr. Basset. About the liveries and spices I will do my best. The gentlewoman is coming over with Hugh Cotton or Harry Drywry. I will solicit with Mr. Receiver about your kirtle. He has been in the country these 15 days. John Skarlet desires your favor. He is now Mr. Bryan's servant. Your ladyship would gladly have me home; and so would I, as my being here is expensive. No news, "but of certain which were put to death; "and your Ladyship is so pitiful, I would not write unpleasant things. London, 4 May.
Hol., p. 1. Add. An endorsement crossed out.
4 May.
Add. MS. 8,715, f. 51.
B. M.
665. The Bishop of Faenza to the Nuncio in Spain.
* * * The Admiral is going to Calais to meet Norfolk, and the interview between the two Kings will be decided according to what they conclude.
Ital., pp. 3. Copy. Headed: Al Signor Nuntio in Spagna, alli 4 ut supra.
5 May.
Vienna Archives.
666. Chapuys to Charles V.
It seems, as I lately wrote to Granvelle, that Cromwell is anxious to know the result of the negotiations at Calais before making me any overture, notwithstanding what he has several times promised me. It is true that since he was ill he has not been in Court till within these four days, and I believe he had then no opportunity to speak of the matters for the multitude of other business. When he comes back from Court a second time we shall be able the better to judge if there is any dissimulation; but I have never had great hopes that the English could be brought by gentle means to accept any terms compatible with reason and honesty. The King's deputies to the diet of Calais are to leave on the 11th. Rochford, the Lady's brother, will go in place of Cromwell. Many think that Cromwell excused himself of the charge in despair of the issue. Three days ago there arrived here two doctors, sent by those of Lubeck, to solicit money, as I have been told, from this King, to protect themselves against an alliance of the Count Palatine and the duke of Holstein. I will try, in speaking to Cromwell, to learn about it, without forgetting to intimate in passing that the continuance of these intrigues is not in accordance with the proposition for the confirmation of friendship, nor even with former treaties.
The enormity of the case, and the confirmation it gives of the hopelessness of expecting the King to repent, compels me to write to your Majesty that yesterday there were dragged through the length of this city three Carthusians and a Bridgettine monk, all men of good character and learning, and cruelly put to death at the place of execution, only for having maintained that the Pope was the true Head of the universal Church, and that the King had no right in reason or conscience to usurp the sovereign authority over the clergy of this country. This they had declared to Cromwell, of their free will, about three weeks ago, in discharge of their own consciences and that of the King; and on Cromwell pointing out the danger, and advising them to reconsider it before the matter went further, they replied they would rather die a hundred times than vary. Eight days ago the duke of Norfolk sat in judgment on them, as the King's representative, assisted by the Chancellor and Cromwell, and the ordinary judges of the realm, and the knights of the Garter who had been at the feast (solempnite) of St. George. The monks maintained their cause most virtuously. No one being able to conquer them in argument, they were at last told that the statute being passed they could not dispute it, and that if they would not alter their language they were remanded till next day to hear their sentence. Next day, in the same presence, they were strongly exhorted to recant, and after a long discussion they were sentenced by lay judges and declared guilty of treason. Nothing was said about degrading them, or changing their habits. And the same fate has overtaken a priest for having spoken and written concerning the life and government of this King. It is altogether a new thing that the dukes of Richmond and Norfolk, the earl of Wiltshire, his son, and other lords and courtiers, were present at the said execution, quite near the sufferers. People say that the King himself would have liked to see the butchery; which is very probable, seeing that nearly all the Court, even those of the Privy Chamber, were there— his principal chamberlain, Norres, bringing with him 40 horses; and it is thought that he was of the number of five who came thither accoutred and mounted like Borderers (accoustrez et monstez comme ceulx des frontieres descosse), who were armed secretly, with vizors (?) before their faces, (fn. 10) of which that of the duke of Norfolk's brother got detached, which has caused a great stir (que esbranle grandemen laffairez), together with the fact that while the five thus habited (vestuz et bouchez) were speaking all those of the Court dislodged.
It is commonly reported that the King has summoned the bishop of Rochester, Master Mur, a doctor who was lately his confessor, a chaplain of the Queen, and schoolmaster of the Princess, (fn. 11) to swear to the statutes made here against the Pope, the Queen, and Princess, otherwise they would be treated no better than the said monks, six weeks being given to them to consider the matter. They have replied that they were ready to suffer what martyrdom pleased the King, and that they would not change their opinion in six weeks, or even in 600 years if they lived so long; and many fear they will be despatched like the aforesaid. And it is to be feared that if the King is getting so inured to cruelty he will use it towards the Queen and Princess, at least in secret; to which the concubine will urge him with all her power, who has lately several times blamed the said King, saying it was a shame to him and all the realm that they were not punished as traitresses according to the statutes. The said concubine is more haughty than ever, and ventures to tell the King that he is more bound to her than man can be to woman, for she extricated him from a state of sin; and moreover, that he came out of it the richest Prince that ever was in England, and that without her he would not have reformed the Church, to his own great profit and that of all the people. Some time ago the Queen suspected that foul dealing had been used towards the Princess, as appears by a letter which she caused to be written to me, and which I send to Granvelle.
I forbear to write about the Queen and her affairs, as I presume she is doing so herself. London, 5 May 1535.
P.S.—Yesterday morning, the 7th, I received yours of the 20th ultimo; after which I sent to Cromwell, who is lodged in the country, quite near a lodging I have got, to speak with him; and the hour being late, and he much occupied, he desired to be excused till today. This afternoon, about 3 o'clock, he passed by me on his return from Court, and expressed his great desire to complete the negotiations for a stricter friendship, with which view the King would consent to anything, saving his honor, even to the summoning of the Council, provided you would not have the matter of the divorce treated there. On my making the remonstrances I had done when he came a second time to visit me this Lent, and several others which I need not recite, he confessed that they were true and lawful, and that he would report them tomorrow to the King, and on Monday I should have an answer. After much conversation, he observed that even if it could be proved that this second marriage was unlawful, your Majesty ought to dissemble, because you had fully acquitted yourself to God and to the world, and remit the matter to the conscience of the King, who was a virtuous and Catholic Prince. seeing that by such dissimulation inestimable good would follow. not only to both your subjects. but to the whole of Christendom, to the confusion of heretics and the destruction of the Turk and of his friends near at hand, meaning the French; declaring that the king of France, to recover Milan, would not only bring the Turk into Christendom, but all the devils as well; and he desired friendship between your Majesty and the King to abate the pride of the French. and to steady their lightheadedness. Certainly, when they were in need they were "le plus simple nacion du monde," and the King had not derived a crown's worth of pleasure from all the benefit he had done them. After this he said that many good things were suspended, only for the affection you bore to the Princess, who was mortal and of sickly disposition, and if God would take her your Majesty would have no complaint to make against them: and that he had heard from several quarters, to which, however, he attached no credit, that your Majesty and the king of the Romans had proposed to create schism and dissension in England, and then make the enterprise. which many of those with your Majesty, and in Flanders and Germany, thought easy, necessary, and useful for the most part of the realm. But it must be considered that it was not so easy or inexpensive as they might suppose: and even if your Majesty were to conquer. it would be no great honor to you to have thus treated without cause an old and cordial friend, and that you would not gain the kingdom after his death, having thus conquered it, but the disgrace would remain to you. On this I asked him how he heard that your Majesty had intended to create schism in the kingdom. He answered that it had been proposed "de par dela," to forbid their merchants to have intercourse with your Majesty's countries. in order to make the people rebel. Thus he could not dissemble that that was the true means. I know not how he came thus openly to declare it, and still less how he spoke of the persuasions made to your Majesty to invade the kingdom, which is much more than I have written to you. Cromwell gave me to understand that the day before yesterday. Ascension Day. there had been discussion in the King's Council upon the abovesaid matters; and, notice being taken of the marriage of your Majesty with this Princess, the King had spoken as loudly in praise of your Majesty as could be, and Cromwell had said it would be expedient if the articles delivered by Likerke to their ambassador were authorised by your Majesty. that the King should send you an embassy with ample power to make a closer alliance with you, which could not be done if this last marriage was annulled by a General Council. And on my repeating to him that when the said submission was made, matters might be treated in friendly wise more to the honor of the parties, and meanwhile God might enlighten those who were concerned,—he answered that he would like to see to it beforehand for the better assurance of his master.
Cromwell came again to excuse himself that he had not spoken to me sooner on business; and that I must not suppose that it was from any wish to gain time, because they considered that delay was rather in your favor and that of the king of the Romans than theirs; for you increased every day the number of your friends and servants, and that waiting for the result of the diet of Calais did not matter to them a penny. The King had not been able to refuse it, because the king of France had made such [requests] for it, but his master made so little account of that diet that he had not written a single word about it to his ambassador, nor even informed Morette of it; and, as for him, he had got himself exempted from the Commission, and the bishop of Ely ("Yly") would go in his place. He felt almost assured that nothing would be concluded at all, skilful as the French were, who asked of them their daughter for the duke of Angoulême, in order to make their profit of them, while she was under age, and, when they thought expedient, to break all conventions,—which never could last long with them, both by reason of their natural fickleness, and because the French support the Church of Rome, which they will not hear of. In the course of our conversation he said, though he was not commissioned to do so, he wished that, leaving matters as they stood, a marriage could be arranged between the prince of Spain and the little bastard; and that the Princess, if she continued to live, should also have some honorable match provided for her to the satisfaction of your Majesty; in which case the King would give her as large and honorable a dowry as ever was given to Queen or Empress. I replied still that it would be necessary to settle the matter which so greatly touched the honor, reputation, and conscience, first, of the King, his master, and, secondly, of your Majesty. He told me that I should have answer on Monday, and that if I desired to talk with the King at any time and on any subject whatever I should be very welcome. I told him that it would be doing injustice to his good sense and judgment to anticipate the matter which he had in hand, and which he could arrange with the King far better than anybody. Seeing that he spoke so freely against the French, and that he assured me they would not treat with them, I made no mention of what was contained in your Majesty's letter, but only spoke to him of the intelligence they had with those of Lubeck. He acknowledged that the King had lent them a sum, for which he would show me the bond, and said that the Lubeckers were "canailles" and beggars, who had come to seek the King, his master, offering various things, and had then spread reports that the King had sent for them to treat concerning Denmark. It was true the King had given them some audience. Cromwell strongly denied that the King had contributed any money for the restitution of the duke of Wirtemburg, though he consented, at the urgent request of the king of France, to delay payment of his pension for one year, the amount for two terms being 107,000 crs.; which, he says, will give rise to some confusion, for the French have played a trick in making the quittance for the last payment comprise the quittance for terms past. As to what is contained in your last letters about getting away the Princess, my man returned from her this morning, and has reported that she thinks of nothing else than how it may be done, her desire for it increasing every day, especially since the said monks have been executed; for, since then, her gouvernante has been continually telling her to take warning by their fate. Till now she has not been able to see how it could be done; nor I either, as the place is unknown to me. Whatever can be devised I will notify to your Majesty.
The good old lord of whom I wrote has sent to me today by one of my servants to say he was going home immediately, and would lose no time for the advancement of the business; and that he intended, if I thought right, to send a gentleman to your Majesty to inform you of everything. He will send the said gentleman to me in a few days, and then I will inform you of everything. London, 8 May 1535.
French, from a modern copy. Pp. 7.
5 May.
R. O.
667. Edmund Harcocke, Prior of the Black Friars, Norwich.
"Words of the prior of the Black Friars in Norwich which he had in a sermon at St. Leonard's without Norwich upon the Ascension Even (fn. 12) in the year of our Lord 1535."
He said in his prayer, "Ye shall pray for our Sovereign Lord king Harry, of the Church of England chief head so called," and explained the nature of the King's supremacy; viz., that as spiritual men have bodies that must be clothed and have bodily substance, the King is their head in temporalibus; not head in such a sense that he can minister the sacraments. And whereas it was objected that the Friars, at all events, should uphold the authority of the Pope, because it had always been acknowledged by their founders and superiors: he observed that this obedience was just so long as the bishop of Rome was in authority, adding, "I shall put you a familiar example, though it be gross: Father Penyman and other two that he rehearsed, when they were priors here men did well to obey them; but after that such had taken their authority from them, as might well enough, now no man oweth obedience unto them." Signed: "Per me Richardum Hore."
Pp. 2. Endd.
5 May.
R. O.
668. Robert ap Reynold to Cromwell.
Cromwell wrote to Sir Thomas Palmer, knight-porter of Calais, that, in consideration of his loss of horses. Robt. ap Reynold should "spye" something in the King's gift, and Cromwell would get it for him. There is nothing of the kind to desire, and he is falling into greater poverty. Desires a loan of 20l., to be stopped out of his wages by Mr. Vice-treasurer of Calais. This will stop some of his creditors, and enable him to furnish himself as he ought for the King's service. Desires the said 20l. to be paid to his brother the bearer. Calais, 5 May. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary and Master of the Rolls. Endd.
5 May.
R. O.
669. French Treaties.
Notes of treaties sent to the King to Woodstock concerning France. Tractatus perpetuæ pacis, arctioris conjunctionis et belli offensivi. The treaty of commutation of war against Flanders. The confirmations of the first three treaties and of the peace between the ambassadors of the regent of France and the King. The French king's commissions to see oath taken to the treaty of perpetual peace, &c., and to treat for granting privileges to English merchants. The French king's oath to observe certain treaties. Notarial instrument of the French king's oath. His oath to the treaty of perpetual peace. His commission to treat for suspending the war in Flanders. Treaties for not summoning a General Council; for privileges to English merchants in France; and of alternative declaration, and how the King shall not contribute to the war against the Emperor. The instrument of the oaths of the French king and Wolsey at Amiens. The ratification of the states of Languedoc. Treaty of the king and queen of Aragon, with a lead seal.
On 5 May 27 Hen. VIII. the above were delivered into the King's Treasury, and the same day five of them were delivered to Mr. Amner Doctor Fox.
Pp. 2.
5 May.
R. O.
670. Antony Waite to Lady Lisle.
Is glad to hear of her good health and her husband's. It was expected that Mr. Secretary would have been at Calais this Whitsuntide. If so, would have sent over Ric. Butteler, that Mr. Secretary, being informed of the truth by lord Lisle's help, would have redressed his long wrong. Was with John Basset yesterday. He is in good health. Reminds her of his master's cause. Inner Temple, 5 May.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: At Calais.
5 May.
R. O.
671. Thos. Colpeper to Lady Lisle.
I have written to my Lord for a spaniel in Calais, and beg your Ladyship's furtherance in the matter. From the Court, 5 May.
I send by my servant a buck. Let me hear if there is anything I can do for you.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
[5 May.]
Nero, B. vii. 109.
B. M.
672. Harwell to Starkey.
Since writing I have had no letters from you, but only one to Mr. Pole, of the 12th ult.
We have heard nothing of the Venetian ambassador, though it is three months since he left England. Certain news has come of the capture of the prothonotary Cassalis, Andrea Corsin, the Vaivoda's man, and a merchant who had the ambassador's letters and writings. They have been brought to Vienna, where Ferdinand is. Here they make it a matter of great moment, saying that they shall know all the Princes' secrets of Christendom. We have fresh advice from Syria of the loss by the Turk of 150,000 men, most of his horses, camels, artillery, treasure, and baggage. He hath withdrawn himself into his confines, and sent for reinforcements. His chief ruin was caused by cold and hunger, and by the passage of the Euphrates. The Persians slew many of his men in Tauris, and recovered their town. The Sophi did all this on his return from a victorious campaign against "the Tartars of the Green Cape." Everyone is persuaded that the Emperor will embark, but it is uncertain whether he will go to Africa, Italy, or Constantinople. It is thought the navy is now leaving Spain. By letters of the 27th ult. from Naples, 30 of Barbarossa's ships landed beside Salerno. The Spanish garrison took several prisoners, who stated that Barbarossa was fortifying himself in Africa. The Emperor's ships which left Genoa had arrived at Naples, but one ship was lacking, and the galleys were detained at Civita Vecchia by tempest. Venice, [5] (fn. 13) May 1535.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
[6 May.]
R. O.
673. Norfolk to Cromwell.
I have been advertised that since I saw you last you have most lovingly handled me. You will always find me a faithful friend, grudge who will. Kenninghall, Ascension Day.
Hol., p. 1. Add: Secretary. Endd.
6 May.
R. O.
Letters, 304.
674. Cranmer to Cromwell.
In favor of the bearer. Otford, 6 May.
Add.: Secretary. Endd.
[6 May.]
Cleop. E. vi. 252.
B. M. Wright's Suppression of the Monasteries, 40.
675. Thos. Bedyll to Cromwell.
On Tuesday, after leaving Cromwell, repaired to the Charterhouse, and left with the vicar and procurator certain books, "both of mine own and others."against the primacy of the Pope, which they returned yesterday without word or writing. Sent for the procurator, who said that he and Niudigat had examined the books, and found nothing in them which could alter their opinion. Warned him of his danger. Fears both he and other brethren will be obstinate, "regarding no more the death of their father, in word or countenance, than he were living and conversant among them." Supposes that as their religion had a simple beginning, so it will have a strange end. Aldergate Street, morning of Ascension Day.
Is troubled with fever, and fain to keep his house.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Mr. Secretary.
6 May.
R. O.
676. Edw. Wygan, Vicar of Plymouth, to Cromwell.
Whereas it pleased you to write in my favor to the bp. of Exeter for relaxation of the pension I paid to Mr. Gibbons, his kinsman, of which I am now released: I am much bound to you. I hope you will perceive that the parties who disquieted the town of Plymouth have ceased their factions, as you required them to do by Mr. Thos. Treffrye, to whom I beg you will give credence. Plymouth, 6 May.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
6 May.
R. O.
677. [Lisle to Cromwell.]
Has taken order for the freers and despatched three of them, for whom he stands in charge to pay 18s. Keeps the fourth as his surety. "And forasmuch as I can know of him, I send you herein closed of his own handwriting, saving he saith that Peryn Pest, the Emperor's ambassador's servant, carried the copy with him of the foresaid letter which I sent you in English, Latin, French, and Italian." 6 May.
P. 1. Endd. by Lisle: Copy of Mr. Secretary's letter.
[6 May.]
R. O.
678. John Davy to Lady Lisle.
After my letter was sealed on Holyrood Day, (fn. 14) Mr. Hatch sent his servant to me at Bekynton, stating that Lord Daubeney would soon be at Heampton to take away the evidence there. I rode to Heampton to know the truth, but it was a falsehood. I made labor to both the Coffins and to John Butler that it should be kept in surety, and they promised me it should never be delivered without warrant under seal of both parties. That night, one Key, lord Daubeney's servant, came to Adrington to Thos. Seller, with a warrant on my lord Daubeney's part to deliver it; but it will not be done without another warrant from my Lord and you. Wollegh (Womberlegh ?), Ascension Day.
If your Ladyship would make "chevysance" for money to please my lord Daubeney and take the whole land, now is the best time.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
7 May.679. John Gostwick, Treasurer of Firstfruits.
See Grants in May, No. 20.
7 May.
R. O.
680. Robert Bishop of Chichester to Cromwell.
Has received command, on the 7th May, to repair to the King. Desires Cromwell to inform His Grace that the Bishop will make the utmost diligence in his power. Aldyngbourne, 7 May. Signed.
P. 1. Small paper. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
7 May.
R. O.
681. Arthur Lord Lisle to Henry VIII.
I am desired by Henry Johnson to write concerning the pieces of ordnance new cast here. There are 32 finished, and 12 more ready cast, which will be ready by his return. On May Day I heard them shot three times,—once for your Highness, secondly for the founders, and thirdly for the better proof thereof. I never in my life heard vehementer pieces. No man ever came who has done you better service. He has furnished all the towers about the walls here, except the vaults, with hagbusshes and other pieces, and has caused certain iron pieces at Newenham Bridge and Hammes to be stocked. There is no shot in the town for falcons and sakers. Beauchamp and Dyvelyn towers are finished with the platform. Calais, 7 May. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
7 May.
R. O.
682. Roland Lee, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, to Cromwell.
I have sent to you your kinsman, as you desired. He has used himself right sadly here, and I pray you will continue good uncle unto him. And whereas you desire to know who shall answer for the 100l. for the house, I hope you will remember that I never promised any such sum. As freely as ye gave it me, I gave it you; but, considering your goodness to me, my poor sister, and her children, which I cannot recompense to the amount of 100l., I will be content with your help, as my servant, the bearer, will explain to you.
I beg you will not be displeased in the matter of the prior of Tutbury. I have your letters, wherein you desired me not to meddle therein. But now your pleasure known, the bond shall be substantially made, and the penalty sent to you with all diligence. Hereford, 7 May. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
8 May.
Vienna Archives.
683. Chapuys to [Granvelle].
Gives an account of the execution of the poor monks. It seems that the King is envious of the talk about the procession which the French king made, and wished to do something new and strange to make people talk of him. Even if the King wished to give up his abominable obstinacy, the Lady and Cromwell, who are omnipotent with him, would prevent it, knowing that it would be their ruin. There is not much hope of the King's returning to reason, but Chapuys will make what remonstrances he can, which may do good for the reasons already written.
Sends a letter from the Queen. The superscription is incomplete, as her physician, who acted as secretary, did not know how to write it. Sends another from the physician to himself, which he thought he had sent already. It is that mentioned in his letter to the Emperor which caused him to go to Cromwell, who began to speak of the establishment of the peace. London, 5 May.
Received yesterday morning Granvelle's letters of 20th ult. Thanks him for what he said to the English ambassador, which will not only make him more respected, but further the Emperor's service. Regrets the labour of the voyage of which Granvelle writes, but the quality of the enterprise and the hope of speedy victory surpasses the trouble. God preserve all those who go to uphold his Faith.
Since Cromwell left him, the courier has not ceased to ask to be sent. Has written this addition in great haste. London, 8 May.
Fr. From a modern copy, pp. 2.
Ibid.684. [Katharine's Physician to Chapuys.]
Is informed by a person who is convinced of the fact that they will propose the oath to our mistress, and if she will not take it she will be put in perpetual prison or beheaded. This he states in the gravest possible manner, seeing the men of this country so variable,—or, perhaps, because they have found that our mistress will give credit to what he writes, and by intimidating both mother and daughter they will gain their end. It appears to us the thing is feigned. On the other hand, seeing how the King gives effect to his purposes (?), (fn. 15) you may be sure her Highness is in great tribulation. He also desired me to intimate to your Lordship (Vra Sa) what is passing, to see if any remedy is possible. Like persons accustomed to endure, they look for nothing but the worst, unless God help, whom our mistresses say they will not offend for fear of death or any temporal cause, but remain firm to what they have said. I think they will not do what they say; but if they attempt it, our mistress thinks you ought to speak plainly and in public, and leave the kingdom at once. Then business will stop, and thus will be intimated everywhere what her Highness wishes to make known. For the present, what her Highness feels is sufficiently apparent. The rest remains for you.
Our mistress has ordered Francis Philippe to pay the debt. I think he will have done so. I beg your forbearance. They have sent by the gentleman you know, and he says he is ill and cannot come.
From a modern transcript, pp. 2. The original is endorsed by the archivist Wynaert: "A remettre dans la lettre du 8 Mai 1535 de l'ambassadeur de l'Empereur."
8 May.
R. O.
Cranmer's Letters, 324.
685. Cranmer to Lord Lisle.
I am much "beholding" to you for causing your servant, the bearer, to come by me on his way to Calais. I commend me to your good lady, and thank you both for your "well entreating" of my chaplains who were late in Calais. Otford, 8 May. Signed.
Add.: "Deputy at Calice."
8 May.
R. O.
686. John Husee to Lord Lisle.
Has sent by Harry Drywry 6 pair of hose, 2 caps, 1 under-cap of velvet, another of satin, in a new cap case, 1½ yard of violet frysade for Mr. James. 3 doz. staff torches, two doz. quaryes, a chest containing 101 lb. of fine sugar in 12 loaves, 2 lb. cinnamon, 2 lb. ginger, 1 lb. cloves, 1 lb. mace, 1 lb. sawndres, 10 lb. pepper, 1 lb. tornsel, ½ lb. isinglas. Will obtain the 8 doz. counterfeit dishes, if it be possible to have them in all London. Yesterday Hyw Cotton and I searched all London, but could not find more than a dozen in a pewterer's house; but I hope to send them by Gardner, who is freighted with the King's stuff out of the wardrobe for apparelling the ambassadors' lodgings. I have paid for the articles, although Wyndsor is not yet arrived. As soon as he comes I will send the liveries. My lord Rochford goeth not. Mr. Comptroller is appointed in his stead. Must have an answer to the letter sent by Goodall, or no bill can be made of the forfeit the King has given him. Holt must have 30l. on St. Andrew's Day. The Marshal this day leaves for Calais. He has done no one harm but himself. The King refused him audience. London, 8 May.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
8 May.
R. O.
687. [Sir] Richard Deryng to Lord Lisle.
Touching the complaints of Rob. and Jas. Justyce, who had been amerced in certain penalties in the Cinque Ports. These penalties had been adjudged by the Lord Warden, Sir Wm. Haute, and Sir Edw. Ryngeley. At the writer's desire great part of the penalties have been remitted, and May, the claimant, has released half of his demand. Has received strait commandment to call before the mayor and jurats all persons retained by any nobleman or gentleman wearing their cognisances, and compel them to lay them aside. Dover Castle, 8 May. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.
8 May.
R. O.
688. Thomas Bedyll to Cromwell.
Desires his favor for Dan Richard Grene, monk of Bitlesden, to be abbot, as the monks have left the choice to Cromwell, the abbot of Garedon, Dr. Lye, and the writer. Speaks highly of him. Cromwell had already named him for abbot of Bitlesden. When he looked among his scrolls at the intervals of his fever, found a book with articles written when my lady Mary, then called Princess, was to be married to the French king; and as the present treaty is not much unlike that, thinks it may be useful. Begs his favor for Dr. Fynche upon his great oversight and foolishness, "the thing that I promised on his behalf to be performed, for I have writings in my keeping therefor." Aldersgate Street, 8 May.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary.
R. O.689. Richard Andrews to Cromwell. (fn. 16)
Requests him to be good to the monk of Rewley for Bettelesden; "and I have here 60l. in angels, parcel of your 100 marks." Would fain go home to his wife, who is sore sick; and desires to know his pleasure.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Master Secretary.
8 May.
R. O.
690. Sir W. Courtenay to Cromwell.
I desire your favor to my prior of Launceston, who is an honest man, whatever people may report of him. He is guiltless of simony, though since the time that I made him I have had of him 200 marks, but without any promise of him or of any man for him. I was offered by other naughty persons of the house 600l. and 40l. fee of one of the canons, to have made him; he is the greatest procurer of this business against the Prior. His enemies are of no good name or fame, and some of them have been burned in the hand. One of them, Sir Lampery, has been put from the cure of Launceston by the Prior for his naughty conversation. He is a common lecher, a maintainer of thieves, and a thief himself; for he has a kinsman who has long been a thief, who is always "receytted" by him, for as soon as he has stolen in Devonshire or Somersetshire, he repairs to this priest, and has twice or thrice been taken in Launceston for felony. Powderham, 8 May. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
8 May.
R. O.
691. John Lord Audeley to Cromwell.
My old friend, Sir Thos. Denys, has caused you to write to me in his favor "for a title that he pretendeth upon a purchase made of my brother-in-law, John Tuchyt. Sir, it grieveth me that he that I have ever loved and glad was at his instance to help to speed his hearty desire in my lord Cardinal's time for his servant in the same matter, and now to enter so far with my unnatural brother-in-law, I assure you it is sore to my perturbation." If you knew the facts, you would say I should be a fool to yield. I beg that my cousin, Sir Humph. Wynffeld, and Mr. Yowrke, may hear the whole matter, and then I will do what you think right. Wade, 8 May.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: To, &c., Mr. Secretary to the King's Highness.
9 May.
R. O.
692. Sir John Markham to Cromwell.
On the 8th inst. I received your letter dated 29 April, and I have sent up Will. Traford, monk, proctor of the house of Bevall, with the depositions of the words he spoke. 9 May. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
9 May.
R. O.
693. John Horsey to Cromwell.
I thank you for offering my friend, Dan John Barstabull, to be abbot of Shyrborne on the resignation of Dan John Mere, late abbot. The monastery are well pleased with the appointment. I cannot come to you now, as I am appointed to look to the taxing of the clergy. I will come, however, shortly, to make payment secretly between your mastership and me unto you, of 500 marks, according to my promise. Schyrborne, 9 May.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
9 May.
Faustina, E. 1, 13.
B. M.
694. Garter King of Arms.
Grant by Thomas earl of Wiltshire and Ormond of a pension of 53s. 4d. from the manor of Rochford to Thos. Wall, Garter, 9 May, 27 Hen. VIII.
Lat., Copy., p. 1.
10 May.
R. O.
695. Skeffyngton and the Council of Ireland to Cromwell.
Antony Mores, the bearer, with 17 other servants of the prior of Kyllmaynan, did good service in Dublin Castle for 12 weeks, during which time his corn, to the value of 40l., was destroyed by the traitor. Commend the fidelity and diligence of Mores and of the Prior's steward, who is lately dead. When Thomas the traitor assaulted one of the gates of Dublin, Mores was one of the first who went out to resist him, and killed divers of his best footmen with his own hands. Desire Cromwell to inform the King of this, and beg that he may be recompensed with some fee or office. Maynoth, 10 May. Signed: W. Skeffyngton.—J.B., lord of Trymleteston, chaunceler.—Willm. Brabazon.—Patrik Fynglas, justice.—Thomas Luttrell, justice.—John Alen, mr of the Rolles.—Gerald Aylmer Barron.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary.
10 May.
R. O.
696. Council in the North to Cromwell.
Have used all diligence in executing the King's commission for assessing and taxing spiritual promotions. Ask Cromwell to procure a longer time for their returns, as many of them are in divers commissions, and there are but three auditors for engrossment of the books from Trent northwards, one of whom is a very old man. Ask also for an explanation of certain doubts and ambiguities in their instructions in a paper which the bearer will show him. Durham, 10 May. Signed: Cuthbert Duresme—Thomas Tempest— Willm. Frankeleyn—Robert Hyndmer—Robert Bowis—Robt. Meynell—John Metkalff—Richard Crosby.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd. Sealed.
10 May.
Vienna Archives.
697. Charles V. to Chapuys.
Received, 28 April, his letters of 23 March and 5 April. Approves of his prudent conduct with Cromwell, both about the practice of better intelligence between the Emperor and the king of England, and in what concerns the treatment of the Queen and Princess. Cannot write more about the said practice than is contained in his former letters to the ambassador in France, of which Chapuys has had a copy; nor can he abandon the cause of his aunt and cousin, as the king of England pretends. But if Chapuys find that all remonstrances are in vain, and that the King insists absolutely on what Cromwell has told him, he is to endeavour, during the Emperor's voyage, and during the communications for the interview between them, to separate the kings of France and England, or at all events prevent their leaguing together further, so as to secure better treatment for the Queen and Princess. With this view the Emperor has written to the King, informing him confidentially of his voyage and embarkation, as he has done also to the king of France; and Chapuys will make what use of the letters he thinks best. Has caused Granvelle also to speak about it to the English ambassador here, confirming to him what Chapuys had said to Cromwell of the Emperor's intention to cultivate a good understanding with his master by means of the good treatment of his aunt and cousin. Leaves the rest to Chapuys. The English ambassador professed to have no charge upon the subject, but expressed himself very desirous of amity between his master and the Emperor, and said he had already written about it very earnestly, urging the good treatment of the said ladies. He also spoke about the commotions in Ireland, to see if we had encouraged the party of Kildare by suggesting that one of the things which would most incline his master to a renewal of friendship would be the assurance that the Emperor had not caused or favored Kildare's rebellion, and begged that the Emperor would give some explanation, as he knew that some Irishmen had lately been with his Majesty, though he did not suppose that he wished to injure the King. Answer was made to him that Charles had given no support or encouragement to the said commotion, either with men or money, and that if some Irishmen had been at his Court the King was all the more bound to him that he had so acted; and, supposing that the English ambassador will write of it, gives Chapuys this warning to act as opportunity requires, taking care at the same time not to counteract what he has done in the matter of Ireland, or prejudice the party of the said Kildare, whatever course matters may take. As to the removal and getting away of the Princess, the Emperor has carefully considered what Chapuys has written to himself and Granvelle, and agrees with him that it is a very difficult and hazardous matter, not to be attempted without good and sure means for its accomplishment; at all events, it would be unadvisable at this time, and for this reason it would be well with all necessary secrecy to consider all the means, keeping the Princess in good hope till it be seen how the Emperor's expedition and other public affairs succeed. Barcelona, 10 May 1535.
Modern Copy. French, pp. 2. "Copie de la minute dune lettre de l'Empereur à son ambassadeur en Angleterre."
Vienna
Archives.
2. Charles V. to Henry VIII. (fn. 17)
In accordance with what the Emperor declared at Madrid to the English ambassador, and as he likewise writes to Chapuys of his preparations to resist the Turks, and of his coming to this place for the better ordering of the expedition, writes to him that he propoes to visit Naples and Sicily, and take such measures as he finds necessary for the defence of Christendom against the common enemy. Barcelona, 10 May 1535.
Similar letters were written to the king of France.
Modern Copy, French, p. 1. Headed: "Copie de la copie dune lettre del Empr au roi dangleterre."
10 May.
Lanz, ii. 177.
698. Charles V. to Count Henry of Nassau.
* * * * * I quite agree with you that the affair of England is not to be treated with indifference; but we must accommodate ourselves to the time, and watch our opportunity. * * * * Barcelona. 10 May 1535.
Fr.

Footnotes

1 Sir Will. Paulet.
2 Thomas lord Berkley died 19 Sept. 1534. His second wife was Anne, daughter of Sir John Savage of Frodsam.—Dugdale.
3 Should be 29th.
4 Richd. Reynolds.
5 "Et alhora la presa, overo arresto, quale fo exequito alli quatro di Maio in questa maniera."
6 Robert Feron.
7 Geo. Boleyn, lord Rochford.
8 "Titivil. A worthless knave." Halliwell. Tutivillus was a demon who made mischief out of inaccurate speaking, especially in priests saying the service.
9 Sir Edw. Ryngeley, marshal of Calais.
10 "Armes a la secrette pour tous (qu. pourtant ?) cournettes devant le visage.
11 Ric. Fetherston.
12 5 May.
13 The date is cut off by the binder. The catalogue gives 5 May.
14 May 3.
15 "Por otra parte con aver probato al que baze esto saver muy bueno y cierto y los desconeiertos daquy sin terminos y manera y con ver con hazerlo que este dice dan fin a sus deseos."
16 This has been printed already, under a wrong date, in Vol. vii., No. 1214.
17 The letter on the same subject addressed to Francis I. is printed in the Granvelle Papers, ii. 354.