Henry VIII
August 1535, 1-10

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Institute of Historical Research

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James Gairdner (editor)

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1886

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1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19

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'Henry VIII: August 1535, 1-10', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 9: August-December 1535 (1886), pp. 1-19. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75662 Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


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August 1535, 1-10

[1 Aug.]
R. O.
1. [The Earl of Northumberland to Henry VIII.]
Repaired by the King's command to Northumberland, and kept a warden court at Newcastle on the 28th July, where seven persons were arraigned and six condemned for March treason. Sir Humphrey Lisle of Felton, and Alex. Shaftowe of Skremerston, in co. Durham, were indicted for treasons done in the East and Middle Marches. Sent to arrest them, but they fled, and the Earl directed a proclamation to be published against them at Newcastle. Has sent a gentleman to report to the King the state of Northumberland. When the justices come, will proceed further in ministering justice. Northumberland is now in as good quiet as any part of the kingdom. Signed by the Earl: H. N.
Copy, pp. 2.
1 Aug.
R. O.
2. Northumberland to Cromwell.
Thanks him for his goodness. On Wednesday, 28 July, kept a warden court at Newcastle. Refers to his letter to the King, of which he encloses a copy. Desires credence for the bearer. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: To, &c. Master Cromwel, principal secretary [to] the King's Majesty. Sealed. Endd.
1 Aug.
R. O.
3. Richard Layton to Cromwell.
We have so much to do at the abbey of Evesham that we cannot attend you tonight, but will see you tomorrow. We must take Tewkesbury in our way, and peruse the inventory, appropriations, and other muniments. Evesham, Sunday, 1 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
1 Aug.
R. O.
4. Sir Will. Fitzwilliam to Cromwell.
I have received your letter dated Winchcombe, 26 July, with a bill for a commission to me and others concerning Calais. I have sent the bill to my Lord Chancellor to be written and sealed, and we are ready to start on our journey when we know the King's pleasure at your return to London. As winter will shortly draw in, and I would have all things touching the Commission so far accomplished that I might meet the King at his coming to Winchester, and my fellow Mr. Controller might have a fortnight before the term to see his buildings which he has to do at home, please to advertise me, if you do not intend to be at London, of the King's pleasure in the premises. I and my fellow justices of the peace of the shire of Surrey have been sitting for the assessment of the spirituality of the shire, and we have so handled the matter that I doubt not a much larger sum shall be raised than when the spirituality was assessed by the Bishop. We have done nothing with the abbeys and priories, because Masters Weston and Danaster informed us that you had appointed two of your own auditors for that purpose. Now we are told that your auditors will only meddle with Martyn Abbey, St. Mary Overy's, Bermondsey, and the Spital in Southwark. Let us know what we are to do. My wife, who was well amended, has fallen sick again with the stitch. The physicians say her liver is corrupted, and she is in great danger. Whatever it shall please God to do with her I shall submit, and not fail to serve the King. Chobham Court, 1 Aug.
If you make our despatch before coming to London, let the bearer have your letter to Sir Brian Tuke for our diets. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
1 Aug.
R. O.
5. William [Moore], Prior of Worcester, to Cromwell.
Dr. Lee, who was with us this week in the King's visitation, departed on Saturday to Much Malvern, commanding me to be with you on Monday night, and bring with me three of my brethren, concerning causes in this visitation. Dr. Lee will be with you, and John Prysse, your registrar. Worcester, this Sunday ad Vincula [S. Petri].
Hol., p. 1, mutilated. Add. Secretary. Endd.
1 Aug.
R. O.
6. William Fordham, Monk of Worcester, to Cromwell.
Your visitors have been with us, and taken great pains. I trust their books will show that I have lived religiously, else it would have been reported before in the visitations of my lord of Canterbury. At both visitations the saddest men of the monastery wished me restored to the cellarership; "for in my time they had their whole meat and wages and all reparations kept, and all causes of our house being in law I did my diligence. God be thanked, none went against us"; whereas, during the last seven years since I had the ministration, there has been a loss of 200l. If your Lordship will restore me I will pay you 100 marks. Worcester, "in Advincula S. Petri."
Hol., p. 1. Add.: To his most right honorable lord Secretary (fn. 1) to the King's most excellent Grace be this delivered at Gloucester town. Endd.
1 Aug.
R. O.
St. P. v. 29.
7. Bishop of Aberdeen to Cromwell.
According to his other letter sent by Rothissay, James now sends lord Erskyne as his proxy to be installed at Windsor. On St. George's Day he intends to wear the tokens of the order. And for eschewing of all unkindness, although he was counselled otherwise, he is going to treat of marriage with some one near of blood to the king of France,—their common friend,—other than the French king's daughter first contracted.
Has not yet received the safe-conduct to pass and repass which he was promised when in London. Edinburgh, 1 Aug. Signed.
Add. Sealed. Endd.
1 Aug.
Vit. B. xiv. 135.
B. M.
8. Prior of the Charterhouse to John (fn. 2) Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield.
" Humillimam cum ....................................................... nobis referun[t] ....................................................... constitutis a ....................................................... per excellentiss ....................................................... alarum suarum ....................................................... sine difficultat[e] ....................................................... ordinis, quæ ad cap ....................................................... venerunt nec scripserunt ....................................................... audemus scribere negotia ....................................................... defunctorum quam alias, metuen ....................................................... ut nobis dicitur, et causam ac rationem ............................................ regia Majestas clementissima ignoramus, lice .................................. valide commendetur, et pro ejus profectu pace et pros[peritate] .......... et alia suffragia in singulis domibus nostris ubique terr[arum] ......... Quod forsitan ignoratur. Nunc, reverendissime pater, viscera nostra...... nostris commota cogunt importune et humillime rogare genib[us] .......... clementiam Reverendissimæ paternitatis vestræ pro nobis et filiis nostris inter......ipsam benignissimam regiam Majestatem, et de nostra bona [voluntate] et effectu certioratam facere, licentiamque nobis ......... impartiri invicem scribendi, ne defunctorum animæ ulterius ......... hincinde debito frustrentur, et ordo noster in suo rigore ........ confortetur et ruinam non patiatur. Sed continua oratione .......... ad Deum pro ipso serenissimo rege, Fidei Christianæ Defensor[e] ......... nostros vel alios informaremur de ejus benivola volüntate .................. nostris adimpleremus et adimpleri mandaremus. Ne ampliu[s] ......... filii nostri errantes inter hæc tempora nubila clementissima ..... facie privemur. Valeatque quam diutissime felix Rma D. V ...... veneranda. Cartusiæ, 1 Aug. 1535."
Mutilated. Add. Sealed. Endd.: Prior Cartusiæ, 1535.
1 Aug.
R. O.
9. John Husee to Lord Lisle.
Received his letter on Friday last by Edw. Skarlett, with one for the Chancellor, who lies 12 miles off. He was not well pleased with it, and after reading, asked me if I knew the contents; which I denied. I send his answer. He will not consent that any cause commenced here should be tried at Calais; but if any cause be commenced there, he will not allow it to be tried before him, but refer it to you. Touching the deputy of Guisnes, will procure a remedy, as Lisle wishes. Will solicit Mr. Secretary for Skell's pardon. Has been ill of sciatica. Will go to the court tomorrow. London, 1 Aug.
Hol., pp. 2. Add. Endd.
2 Aug.10. Commission for Calais.
See Grants in August, No. 3.
2 Aug.
Cleop. E. iv. 54. (fn. 2)
B. M.
11. Andrew Bord to the Priors of the Charterhouse.
The Father of the head Charterhouse advises you to love God and obey the King, being sorry to hear that there have been wilful and sturdy opinions amongst you to the contrary. If any of your friends die, he desires the obit of them to be sent amongst you, that the Order of Charity be not lost, pro defunctis exorare. He sends the obit of his predecessor, but will not write other letters; and wishes you not to write, lest the King should be offended. Though I had license before record to depart from you, my conscience was not satisfied, and I visited the said reverend father to know whether father John Batmanson obtained for me, from the general chapter, the licence that Dan George has. When Dan George was dispensed with the religion, I and another were also dispensed withal, considering I cannot nor never could live solitary, and "intrusyd" in a close air among you, could never have my health. I was received among you under age, contrary to the Statutes; wherefore, now I am clearly discharged, without the dispensation of the bishop of Rome, as you who received me have dispensed with me for lawful causes. The said reverend father has made Master Cromwell and my lord of Chester brethren of the whole religion, praying you that you do nothing without their counsel. In the cell of the reverend father called John, and with his counsel. 2 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: To Master Prior and the convent of the Charterhouse of London, and to all priors and convents of the said Order in England. Endd.
R. O.12. Andrew Bord to the Prior of Hinton.
Desires his prayers, and those of the whole of his convent. "If I wist Master Prior of London would be good to me, I would see you more sooner than you be ware of." Is not able to bide the "rugorosyte" of the religion. "If I might be suffered to do what I might without interruption, I can tell what I had to do, for my heart is ever to your religion, and I love it and all persons therein."
Hol., p. 1. Add.
2 Aug.
Faustina, C. vii. 191.
B. M.
13. University of Oxford to Henry VIII.
Beg that the University may be exempted from the payment of first fruits and tenths, which has lately been decreed by Parliament. The colleges are poor, and dependent on the liberality of benefactors. Oxford, postridie kal. Aug.
Lat., pp. 2. Add.
2 Aug.
Faustina, C. vii. 197.
B. M.
14. University of Oxford to Cromwell.
On the same subject. Oxford, postridie kal. Aug.
Lat., p. 1. Add: Clarissimo viro domino Thomæ Crumwello regiæ Majestatis primario secretario.
2 Aug.
Add. MS. 28,588, f. 1.
B. M.
15. Dr. Ortiz to the Empress.
Congratulations on the taking of Goleta by the Emperor, and remarks on the execution of Fisher and More. The French king is displeased with the king of England, who asked him to separate him from the Church. He also asked Henry for the Princess as wife for the Dauphin. Both requests were refused. The Pope and Cardinals are very angry at the death of Fisher, and willing to procure the King's punishment by depriving him of the kingdom. The Pope has sent briefs about it to the Emperor and all Christian Princes, and now consents to the despatch of the executorials. Rome, 2 Aug. 1535.
Sp., pp. 5. Modern copy.
3 Aug.16. Bishoprics of Worcester and Rochester.
See Grants in August, Nos. 4, 5, 12, and 13.
3 Aug.
Vienna Archives.
17. Chapuys to Charles V.
Does not write at length, having written several times lately. Dr. Adam, who is here ambassador for the Lubeckers, sent to me yesterday, by a man whom I had sent to a place he commonly frequents to discover anything he might be getting up here, to say that if I would promise him the favor of the king of the Romans and that of Your Majesty so that he might freely dwell in Germany or elsewhere in Your Majesty's dominions, he would bind himself to secure the kingdom of Denmark either for the duke of Holstein, or for any other whom Your Majesty pleased, without much difficulty. It was in his power to obtain the consent of the Lubeckers, and if he did not perform what he promised, he renounced the liberty which he demanded. He said also that those whom this King was sending to Lubeck and Denmark carried certain articles of peace to reconcile the Lubeckers and the duke of Holstein, which only showed English vanity; also that the courier who came from Lubeck four days ago requested the King, among other matters, not to put forward articles of peace, for the Lubeckers would not hear of it. The said Doctor is now waiting some assurance from me upon the subject, on receiving which he will disclose matters further. I intend to send and tell him that on his doing or declaring something worth while, I will do my best to obtain what he desires, and as to the said matter I could make no promise. I hear that the King is very ill pleased at the rumour of the interview of the Queens, and has since sent in great haste two couriers into France. Cromwell, going to Court lately, left here his steward (mâitre d'hotel) and principal servants, a treasurer of the King, and other gentlemen, to conduct me to the chase, whither he invited me to go; and proclamation has been made by several Councils that no one should go to hunt in the forest until I had been there. By this means they have published almost everywhere the favor that this King wishes to show me, all to spite the French ambassador (a la barbe de lambassadeur de France), and to give the people the impression that Your Majesty is on good terms with this King, and satisfied with what he is doing. I have not yet wished to go to the chase, nor do I know that leave would be given me to visit the Princess, seeing that the chase is round about her, and that I am not allowed to send my men to her. The Princess and the Queen, her mother, are of the same opinion. Cromwell told me at his departure that he would immediately let me know the King's will touching these two points, but the Princess being tired of waiting I have sent to desire an answer; of which, as soon as it comes, I will inform Your Majesty. London, 3 Aug. 1535.
Fr. From a modern copy, pp. 2.
3 Aug.
Vienna Archives.
18. Chapuys to [Granvelle].
This doctor Adam is a crafty fellow (fin gaulthier). Will try to make something out of him without binding himself too much. He confesses to having committed certain errors in religion and other things, but not all they accuse him of. He wishes to print his confession, and make what amends he can. He only wishes to live safe in Germany or Flanders, with which duke George of Saxony would not be much pleased.
The arrangement which the King is trying to make between the duke of Holstein and the Lubeckers is not much advanced, except for the fear he has that the Count Palatine will get him into his clutches. One of the ambassadors who is going on this business will complain of Cochlæus's book against the King. Supposes it will be [to] duke George of Saxony. He will also speak to the elector of Saxony; on what subject Chapuys does not know. Asks for a pension on the bishopric of Burgos.
A person of consideration coming yesterday from the Court said that no one was thought much of there, or held a good Christian, who would not speak ill of the French, and Cromwell was chief in this. Thinks the report of the interview between the two Queens has increased their rage. London, 3 Aug. 1535.
Fr. From a modern copy, pp. 2.
3 Aug.
R. O.
19. Cessell Manxell to Cromwell.
Whereas the King commanded my bedfellow Mr. Manxell to repair to Ireland, and he, without regarding his wife, children, lands and goods, left all to do his duty; and whereas most of his living is encumbered with jointures and other charges, so that, if God should take him, I and my children are undone, for I am a stranger in these parts, and should obtain little favor; and as things are not done to his profit he sustains many losses:—please, therefore, to obtain liberty for him to come home that he may set his things in order. If he continues there during the winter, the pain and cold will be so dangerous that he will not be able to bear it. Few of his retinue have escaped the sickness. Bewpeer, 3 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.: My lady Mawncell.
3 Aug.
R. O.
20. John Bishop of Lincoln to Sir Francis Brian.
Thanks him for his favor towards this good man, Master Day, for his preferment to the place of St. James besides Northampton. The appointment will please the whole country, for he is learned and virtuous, and God will reward Brian both for this and the good order he has taken in Buckinghamshire in redressing the heresies hitherto used in this woody country of Chiltern. Woburn, 3 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
3 Aug.
R. O.
21. Richard Riche to [the Duke of Suffolk].
I have, by the King's commands, received a letter from Mr. Secretary, which I beg you to consider and follow the King's pleasure. As one who is much interested in your welfare, I advise you to desire no recompense for the reversions, but to surrender them frankly. 3 Aug. 27 Hen. VIII.
Hol., pp. 2. Endd.
3 Aug.
R. O.
22. Cinque Ports.
Writ by Geo. Boleyn lord Rochford, warden of the Cinque Ports, to the bailiff and jurates of Lyde, to produce a jury on the seashore at Lyde at 10 a.m. on 12 Aug. Dover Castle, 3 Aug. 27 Hen. VIII.
P. 1.
2. Panel of the jury. Twenty-three names.
P. 1.
4 Aug.
R. O.
23. Bonner and Cavendish to Cromwell.
A pursuivant arrived with the King's letters on the 4th inst., with a copy also of Marcus Mayre's letters in Latin, an English translation of the same, and the King's letters to the said Marcus. Will endeavour to carry out the King's wishes. Left London 27th ult.; arrived here on the 29th. Have been compelled to tarry here for want of a ship and a good wind. Trymley, 4 Aug. 1535. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
4 Aug.
R. O.
24. Thomas Bedyll to Cromwell.
I beg you to remember me at this change as one devoted to your service. We hear that Mr. Almoner (fn. 3) shall be a bishop, who had many good promotions. I have been at much charge keeping household since I came to London, and I would be loth to break it up now. Much of my "lyvelode" was turned into pensions, "which were sore wonded at the last Parliament to my great hindrance;" and you were good enough several times to promise me something to repair my losses. London, 4 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
ii. On a slip of paper attached:—Mr. Almoner has the prebend of Osbaldwik in York, the hospital of St. Nicholas in Salisbury, the archdeaconry of Leicester, and many other hospitals of good value.
4 Aug.
R. O.
25. Ric. Gwent, of the Arches, to Cromwell.
At my return from the diocese of Chichester I find that men, like loving subjects, endeavour to follow the King's order. Some things remain unredressed. Some books are not well razed or cancelled with diligence. I am answered that they think that bulls under lead for pluralities and dispensations, &c. ought also to be cancelled. I think they should be called in and returned under the King's seal, for I see not why books should be cancelled and not bulls. Priests which are abroad for a great part, and religious houses, where there are not more than three, six, or nine, are unable to execute the King's command for preaching and declaring as they are commanded, much less their duty to God. Such unlearned persons should not henceforth be admitted to holy orders, nor bear rule in any house. It were better that such small houses should be united, and the master be bound to teach the others. "It would pity your heart to know, as I do, in some covent, nother brother nor master that can constre his rule, nor understand verba sacramentalia, yet being priests." London, 4 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Sealed.
4 Aug.
R. O.
26. William Lelegrave to Cromwell.
The Mayor of the Staple of Calais has sent an order, with Cromwell's letter, to the treasurer of the Staple, to pay 1,000l. towards the King's works, to Thomas Fowler, deputy of Mr. Fowler, the vice-treasurer. Desires licence to come to England at "Holland tyde" to make account of his expenditure. Sends the copy of his patent, in which he is disturbed. Desires credence for the bearer, who has been at Gysnes and elsewhere, and can give an account of the state of the King's works. Calais, 4 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretarie. Sealed.
4 Aug.
R. O.
27. Sir Brian Tuke to Lord Lisle.
I have received your letters of the 1st, with one to the King from Mr. Walop, which my clerks at London, in my absence, sent in by the posts. I suppose Sir John Walop, when he desired John Broke to be sent with it, did not know that wherever the King is posts are laid from London to his Grace, and there are always ordinary posts between London and Dover; so that John Broke's coming has only been a double cost to the King, from which neither Mr. Walop's writing, nor any other man's, can discharge me if I pay it. I never object to special messengers, unless asked to pay for them when I am not privy to their journeys. Nevertheless, on your letter I have paid John Broke his journey to London and back. I thank you for the puncheon of wine and the 4 doz. and 10 quails you sent some time ago. Portgore, 4 Aug. 1535.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
5 Aug.
R. O.
28. The Mayor and Aldermen of London to Henry VIII.
Have received his letters dated 21 July, concerning the payment of wages to two persons to be appointed by the head officers of the household, for the provision of carriage for the household, as by composition made between the City of London and the Lord Steward, Treasurer, Comptroller, Cofferer, and another. Will apply themselves to the provision of carriage for victual for the household as previously; but there has been no such composition as mentioned in the King's letters; the persons who have provided for carriage have been appointed by the officers of the City and Chamber of London, until lately one or two persons of the King's countinghouse have been admitted in consequence of intercession, but by the mayor and aldermen, and not by the King's Council. Beg that this may not be taken as a precedent, but that they may enjoy their liberties and free customs. London, 5 Aug. 27 Hen. VIII. With fragments of a large seal.
Pp. 2. Add. Endd.
5 Aug.
Cleop. E. vi. 255.
B. M. Strype's Ecel. Mem. I. ii. 213.
29. Thos. Bedyll to [Cromwell].
As I have altered some things in the treatise for preaching and setting forth the King's title of supreme head (wherein I have counselled with Mr. Almoner, who is, as you know, very busy at Lambeth), I send the said alterations to you. 1. Instead of "they shall preach and declare," I have written "I declare unto you," or "Ye shall understand," for many of the curates be so brute they would read these very words, "as a talk runs of a collier that did so in a stage play." Has brought in a reference to Tertullian, and left out the allegory of the repairing of the [temple], &c. Has drawn up a title to be set before the book. London, 5 Aug.
The common sickness waxeth very busy in London.
Hol.
5 Aug.
R. O.
30. Edward Archbp. of York to Henry VIII.
Has received the King's most honorable letters wishing him to grant the advowson of the prebend of South Cave to Mr. Riche, solicitorgeneral. Such advowsons of promotions spiritual are against the law, and the Archbishop has never granted any except that to the King for Mr. Shorton's prebend. Begs Henry to pardon him, and will provide Mr. Solicitor's clerk, if named, with a competent promotion as soon as he conveniently can. Bishopsthorpe, 5 Aug. 1535. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
5 Aug.
R. O.
31. Edward Archbp. of York to Cromwell.
To the same effect, adding that the writer's good friend, the master of Savoye, might not like his promotions to be given away during his lifetime. Has various poor chaplains to whom he has given little or nothing, and South Cave is one of the best promotions in the church of York. Bishopthorpe, 5 Aug. 1535. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: "Mr. Secretarye." Endd.
5 Aug.
R. O.
32. John Abbot of Whalley to Dr. Bekensall.
I received letters from Master Secretary with yours. I reply that I received one locked casket from my late lord of St. Asaph, not knowing its contents, and I gave him a bond not to deliver it, except to the Bishop or his assigns, on production of my indenture. Sir Randle Poole and Will. Standyshe, brother of the Bishop, came to me at Whalley, about the feast of St. Mary Magdalene last, with the will of the Bishop and the indenture; on which I delivered them the casket. Lathome, 5 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
5 Aug.
R. O.
33. J. Batcok to Cromwell.
Wrote on 21 June. Writes now to send the news of the Emperor's having left Sardinia on his way to Tunis; a copy of the Emperor's letter to the marquis of Canetta, his Viceroy in Navar, and to a captain at San Sebastian, and a copy of a letter to the bishop of Palencia from his son. "This copy a nyce of myne that resydieth in the Emperis (Empress's) cort with his maister that is one off the principalist of her conseyll."
A friend also sent him a clause from Victory on 29 July, which he received 31 July, which he does not believe, for if it had been true more would have been heard of it. This ship, which is going to Bristow, is in such haste that he cannot put these copies into English, and he has never a child that can write English. Those who have come from the Emperor's army say that Barbaroxa has 10,000 Turks and renegades, who do not fear the Emperor or his army. They have hitherto had no advantage of the Turks, but at length Barbaroge will be destroyed, and his galleys taken, for they cannot come out of the port. Cromwell must cause Wm. Prat to set out one of the letters into English, and Ric. Copper another, and some other friend the rest. The Rendre, 5 Aug. 1535.
Asks for some reward for his continual good service, and an acknowledgment of his letters.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
R. O.2. The news letter above referred to, giving an account of the capture of Goletta.
Spanish, pp. 4. Endd.: "This is copy off a lettre that my nyce, John (Joan) Batcok, dud send ffrome Cort, the which was a lettre that the sone off the bishopp off Plasencia dud send un to his ffather."
6 Aug.
R. O.
34. Adam Becansau, Priest, to Cromwell.
Has delivered the letters to the pretended executors of the late bishop of St. Asaph, for deliverance of his goods. Sir Randolph Poole will deliver those in his custody. The other, Will. Standish, brother of the Bishop, and like him in conditions, is ill of the gout at Kendall. He will resort to you to compound. If he does, you will lose much more than is contained in your bill. He is the richest man of his promotion in England. If you will let me handle him, I will bring plate, money, and jewels to your hands; for the law is plain, that when a religious man is made a bishop he cannot make a will. I will send you the plate and money I received from Poole. I send you the abbot of Whalley's letter. I do not believe he would receive a casket, and not know what was in it. He admits he had a basket of plate, which he delivered to Poole and Standish. Whatcroft, Cheshire, 6 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
R. O.2. The same to Richard Cromwell.
On the same subject. Whatcroft, Cheshire, 6 Aug. Begs him to be good to the abbot of Hylton.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
R. O.35. Adam Becansaw, Priest, to Cromwell.
On Thursday last I met with two priests in the forest of Dalamere, in Cheshire, who complained to me and to Dr. Vaughan that the official of Chester, their pretensed ordinary, "arcted" them to answer to positions and articles they had not been accustomed to answer to the Archdeacon. I doubt about this, as it is one of our chief articles of visitation that no man is subject to any ordinary immediately but the King as supreme head. Sir Randolph Pole does not keep promise about the delivery of the late bishop of St. Asaph's money, plate, and jewels, and I am obliged to have recourse to my commission to obtain them. Pole is the great factor to Mr. Will. Brerton in our parts, and trusts to his favor; but I have sent him a citation to answer touching the King's prerogative. At Vale Ryaall, Friday. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary.
6 Aug.
R. O.
36. [Sir] Henry Knyvet to Lord Lisle.
I thank your for your kindness to my poor kinsman this bearer, whom you have admitted to the room of a soldier according to the King's grant. As he has been at cost in suing for it, I beg that he may continue with your Lordship in house for a season, as he did before, having his meat and drink there. I have moved master Secretary in his suit, who, I trust, has written to your Lordship, so that he need make no further labour. Gloucester, 6 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
6 Aug.
R. O.
37. Chr. Jenney to Cromwell.
This Friday, 6 Aug., Mr. Spelman and I made an end of the assizes at York, where many gentlemen appeared and were very conformable to justice. There were in the jail 42 prisoners,—two guilty of murder, and four other felons. We sent for the monk of Jarvase, Geo. Lasyngby, indicted for high treason. He has set his hand to the articles, was arraigned, and found guilty, and his execution will speedily follow. He is a wilful fool of little learning. More were indicted of treason, but as the words were doubtful whether they amounted to high treason, we have foreborne to arraign them till we communicate with you and other of the Council. I never saw so many complaints of women and so small effect. We leave York tomorrow. If we examined all complaints we should have had to tarry there these four days. I trust we shall make some good end between Tasshe, the archbishop of York's farmer, and the mayor, touching the pastures. Alane Heye has declared to me, by means of Sir Ric. Tempest, that Dr. Haldesworthe found 300l. in his parsonage, as will appear by Alane's bill, which I send you. You may do as you like here, for the King's general pardon does not pardon treasure trove. I will advertise you more upon my return to London.
Before I came to York I kept the assizes at Hull. Mr. Spelman came not, as he durst not take the water of Humber. A young boy of 20 was indicted for unnatural crime, for carnal meddling with a cow, and put to execution. 6 Aug. Signed.
Pp. 2.
R. O.2. Allan Hey to the Justices of Assize at York.
I, Allan Hey, was with Dr. Haldesworth, my cousin, at his rectory of Blockley, co. Worc., where I saw all his buildings. We came to a stair's head, when he said to me, "I have cast my vicarage of a new fashion." Then he told me, in pulling down the walls he found 300l. in gold. I was of late sworn to the King, and fortuned to have communication with certain persons concerning the premises, who considered that the Doctor had a right to this money, as he found it; but I now understand it is an escheat, and for discharge of my conscience I certify you of the premises. Thursday after the feast of St. Peter ad Vincula, 27 Hen. VIII. Signed.
Pp. 2. Sealed. Add: To, &c., Master Secretary. Endd: Cristofer Jenny.
6 Aug.
R. O.
38. Charles [Duke of Gueldres] to Henry VIII.
Desiring a safe-conduct for the bearer to bring two good horses from Ireland. Arnhem, 6 Aug. 1535. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.: Au Roy. Endd. wrongly: "Charles Lengaigne."
6 Aug.
Add. MS. 8715, f. 105 b.
B. M.
39. Bishop of Faenza to Mons. Ambrogio.
Refers to the war in Africa, and the projected interview between the two Queens, to which the Admiral, the duke of Albany, and "Barbone" are going with the French queen. The French are willing to act against the Turk and England, if they may have Milan, or, at least, it is put in the Pope's hands. "Da Rein," 6 Aug. 1535.
Hol., pp. 5. Copy. Headed: Al Sig. Mons. Ambrogio, &c.
7 Aug.
Add. MS. 8715, f. 108.
B. M.
40. Bishop of Faenza to Mons. Ambrogio.
The English ambassador with the Emperor writes to the other here and to England, where this victory will have the effect it ought, the King showing himself every day as hostile as he can to the Church.
Ital., pp. 2. Copy. Headed: Al Sig. Mons. Ambrogio, alli 7d'Agosto, &c.
7 Aug.
R. O.
St. P. I. 438.
41. Lord Chancellor Audeley to Cromwell.
Hearing that Cromwell would have returned to London by Saturday, Aug. 7, went thither to meet him and finish the subsidy, but hears now that he will not return for 9 or 10 days. Will therefore go to his house at Colchester for a month, as they are dying of the plague in divers parishes in London. Desires to be recommended to the King and Queen. There will arise many difficulties about the acts for Ireland, but he will take some pains with them.
As to the Act of Dispensations, advises that the subjects of Ireland should take their dispensations here in England from the archbp. of Canterbury, with confirmation under the Great Seal, as English persons do; England being the chief part of the Crown, and Ireland a member appendant to it. Thinks this more honorable than allowing any prelate of Ireland to grant such dispensations.
Wishes to know the King's pleasure. At my house at Christchurch, London, Saturday, 7 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd. Sealed.
R. O.42. Richard Layton to Cromwell.
We have visited Bath. Found the prior a very virtuous man, but his monks more corrupt than any others in vices with both sexes; some of them having 10 women, some 8; the house well repaired, but 400l. in debt. At Farley, cell to Lewes, the prior had only 8 whores, the rest of the monks fewer. The place is a very stews, and unnatural crimes are both there and at Lewes; especially the subprior, as appears by the confession of a fair young monk, a priest late sent from Lewes. I have matter sufficient to bring the prior of Lewes into great danger, si vera sint quœ narrantur. I send you vincula S. Petri, which women put about them at the time of their delivery. It is counted a great relic, because St. Peter is supposed to be the patron of the church. It is a very mockery and a great abuse that the prior should carry it on Lammas day in a basin of silver in procession, and every monk kiss it after the Gospel with great solemnity, though they have no writing to show how they came by it. I send you also a great comb called Mary Magdalene's comb, and St. Dorothy's, and St. Margaret's combs. They cannot tell how they came by them. This day we leave Bath for Kensam, where we shall make an end by Tuesday, and then go on towards Maiden Bradley, within two miles of which is a charterhouse called Wittame, and Bruton abbey seven miles, and Glastonbury seven miles. The prior of Bath has sent you for a token a leash of Irish "laners," bred in a cell of his in Ireland. There are none hardier. I send you a book of our Lady's miracles, well able to match the Canterbury tales, which I found in the library.
If you tarry with the King eight days we shall despatch all the houses above named.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Chief Secretary. Endd.
7 Aug.
R. O.
43. John Gostwyk to Cromwell.
On Tuesday last I delivered to the Emperor's ambassador as fat a stag as I have seen in my life, for which he has given you and the King hearty thanks. I send you a packet from my Lord Chancellor, and another from Dr. Bonner and Ric. Candisshe. London, Saturday, 7 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
7 Aug.
R. O.
44. Anne Lady Berkeley to Cromwell.
Thanks him for his favor. Begs Cromwell to get her bill signed as he promised "for my lord's special livery"; also to speak to the master of the wards for her writs. Caloughdon, 7 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd. by Wriothesley.
7 Aug.
R. O.
45. Thos. Abbot of Abingdon to Cromwell.
Mynne, Smythe, Noote, and Fuller, who have a commission out of the Chancery to examine the accounts between John Audelett and the Abbot, are to be here on Friday. Cannot tell if the King desires these auditors to examine the matter, seeing that he has taken it up himself, and we are bound to abide his decision. Abendon, 7 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. Crumwell, chief secretary to the King's highness and master of his rolls. Endd.
[7 Aug.]
R. O.
46. Humfrey Schokborough to Sir Thos. Inglefield, Justice of Assize in Co. Oxon.
Information against Sir Ric. Crowley, curate of Broughton, Oxon, for calling the bp. of Rome Pope, and saying that the sun is the head of the spiritualty, by which he means the Pope, and that the moon signifies the King, and the stars the people, and the moon takes her light from the sun, and as the light of the sun is taken from us, so the world is dark and the people in blindness. Last Sunday he showed his parishioners of the Feast of Jesus, (fn. 4) and advised them to come to service at that feast, and they should receive pardon during the Utas. He says the Pope's power is as much as ever it was, and that the bp. of Rochester, the father of Sion, and Sir Thos. More, died for the true Faith, and so would I if it were put to me.
Hol., p. 1.
R. O.47. S. Vaughan to Cromwell.
I gave your letters to Mr. Gostwike and John Freman, telling them what sort of gilt plate it was your pleasure should be given to the ambassadors of Scotland. It seems that Mr. Gostwike would prefer some other friend of his to the sale thereof instead of Freman. Freman tells me he has provided the plate as you desired, and he trusts to you. Your buildings go forward at the Augustines and at Hackney. Your old servant, Williamson, in whom you have a jewel, spares no trouble. There is no death at the Court, but only in certain places in the city. I fear these great humidities will engender pestilence at the end of the year, rather after Bartholomew tide than before. If you lie near London you must avoid confluence of people. You may command me as you will. I trust you will upon no displeasure forsake me. London, Saturday.
Hol., p. 1. Add: Secretary.
8 Aug.
Vienna Archives.
48. Katharine of Arragon to Queen Mary of Hungary.
Not to trouble her Highness, has forborne to reply to the letters she lately wrote, but is compelled by the offence given here to God, the danger of her husband's conscience, and the scandal to Christendom, to implore the persons who can help to remedy it. Is informed that there is to be a meeting shortly between her Highness and the queen of France, and, hoping that some good may be done at that time, begs her earnestly for two things; first, to inform the Emperor of the extreme urgency of the matters of this kingdom; and, secondly, when she sees the Queen her sister, to beg of her, with Katharine's recommendations, to use her influence with the King her husband to be a good friend to Henry in getting him to abandon the sin in which he stands. Knows well her Highness is in much trouble seeing his Majesty is in lands so remote. Is troubled at it herself, but restrains herself with the thought that he is engaged in a holy cause in spreading the Christian religion. Hopes, therefore, that God will give him the victory and health to his kingdoms. Thanks Mary for her good offices. Kimbolton (Quyboltun), 8 Aug.
Spanish. From a modern copy. P. 1.
8 Aug.
R. O.
49. Edward Archbishop of York to Cromwell.
As he wrote by his registrar Teshe, the prior of Mountegrace has admitted that it does not beseem him to oppose the opinion of many learned men and of many fathers and convents of his religion. Mr. Bigod, the bearer, confirms this, and has been requested by the Prior that Dr. Horde, a prior of their religion in whom they have great confidence, may be sent there to "allure" some of his simple brethren. This will do more good than any learning or authority. Thorpe, 8 Aug. 1535. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: "Secretarie." Endd.
8 Aug.
R. O.
50. Sir Will. Fitzwilliam to Cromwell.
I have received the King's letters and a warrant to Sir Brian Tuke for the diets of me and part of my colleagues in our journey to Calais, and with them your letters. Although Geo. Poulet is left out of the warrant, yet I have taken him with us, as he was appointed by the King one of the commissioners, as you showed to me in your house at London, as well as to him, to the baron Walshe, and the Attorney of the Duchy. As he was also mentioned in the King's bill I suppose his name is omitted by oversight, I beg, therefore, that his name may be inserted in the warrant. Whereas my diet is appointed 33s. 4d.; since I have been a K.G., in all my journeys it has never been less than 53s. 4d. I had that in my last journey to Calais, and never saved a groat, as my colleagues and the town council must be with me. If the King has appointed the 33s. 4d., say nothing about it; but if it be a fault in the writer, please to have it amended. At the receipt of the King's letters I was sick of my old disease, the colic and stone; but by the comfortable words of the King, and your kind letters, I am perfectly recovered, and will set forward on Wednesday. My wife is still very sick. I have given order to the justices of the peace of this shire to seize the small religious houses as you direct, leaving you to visit St. Mary's Overy, Bermondsey, &c., as I wrote before, and Chertsey, and the Charterhouse of Sheen, according to your last letter. If you cannot visit these houses before the day of the return in Sept. next, please advertise the justices. Guildford Manor, 8 Aug. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add. Secretary. Endd.
8 Aug.
R. O.
51. John Musard, Monk of Worcester, to Cromwell.
With heavy heart, being in prison, I beg your compassion. If I were ever so unreasonable a creature as Dr. Lyeth (Leigh) and Mr. Price (John ap Rice) say I am, it were pity of my life; but I desire, in visceribus Jesu Christi, that you will not accept their false accusations at this time of your visitation. It was chiefly procured by my unkind master for my faithful mind and duty to the King in publishing their misdoings against him. If my imprisonment comes from you I am content to suffer; if to produce me at the King's command, it will not be needed. I shall be ready at an hour's warning to justify the letter that was delivered you. I have procured the president of our monastery sufficient surety. 8 Aug. 1535.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
R. O.52. John Musarde to Henry VIII.
Your benignity as Supreme Head of the Church, and the goodness of your father, to whom at his first coming to this land my father, with three of his brethren, promised their lives in defence of his title, causes me to address you. For their true service your father made two of them yeomen of the Crown, and gave the other two honest men's livings. They continued in his wages to Bolen, where one of them was slain. Soon after, when the King came home at the "brannying" of Richmond, one of them did so comfort your Grace's mother that she gave him 10l. fee, with all the wages for the Crown, more than a year after your coronation; whose name was Robert Walker. My brethren and my uncle's sons and their children, to the number of 16, are ready to set upon 24 of your Grace's evil willers. As a religious man I felt bound to send the words of treason, and the cloaking of them by my master, to master Secretary at Winchcomb; for which certain of my brethren conspired against me, and they have procured master Secretary as under visitor to put me in prison at Worcester, where I have been ever since I was before you at Gloucester. I desire your pardon that I may continue to be your true beadsman, and that gracious lady queen Anne's, "the which hath the name to be as mediatrix betwixt your Grace and high justice."
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
R. O.2. A paper by John Musarde touching an accusation of treason which he preferred to Bachelor Lawarne, sub-prior, Dr. Neckam, and Father Hodyngton, against Richard Clyve, for railing against the King and queen Anne, and upholding queen Catharine and the authority of the Pope. Gives names of witnesses. Also wishes the convent to be examined "of the statutes ward (award) upon the which he (qu. the prior?) have stand objuryd fro the first day of his installation usque ad hodiernam diem: whereupon he deposed two discreet men, Mr. Doctor Neckham fro the sub-prior's office without any cause alleged lawful, also he put William Fordam fro the cellarer's office for standing unto the right of the house." Begs "your mastership" to wrap the King's letter, the Lord President's, and this roll together, and that the griefs therein may be rehersed to the convent.
Hol. Roll of paper.
ii. Musarde's petition to the King against Richard Clyne (Clyve ?), who, he says, declared that it was as lawful to appeal to the weathercock as to the Chancery in accordance with the Act of Parliament. Desired licence to go to master John Rossell, of the King's Council, to complain, but was put in prison, where he remained till June, when he promised to renounce the process: after which, as soon as he could get pen and ink, he wrote to my Lord President and the dean of the Arches, but was watched; and on the 8th July, when he was at a "lectyrn, of my lord of Canterbury's commandment," his cell was entered and the letters taken away.
Hol. Large paper roll. Add.: To the King or his Council at Winchcombe.
iii. His memorial to the Lord President of the King's Council [in the Marches], complaining that he and others of the convent had been oppressed for 16 years, and several times imprisoned in the Bishop's prison or in London, simply for telling the truth. Complains of the Father [Prior] for having bribed Wolsey's visitor, Dr. Alen, with 20 angels and a white palfrey, and for not standing to an award made before Commissioners, viz., the Lord President that was, the abbots of Evesham and Winchcombe, Dr. Gwyentt, Dr. Myddylton, Mr. Bonar, and others; and for breaking the statutes of the foundation. He was imprisoned, 2 March, by a party in the convent, for appealing to my lord of Canterbury's visitation. Complains of Richard Clyne as above.
Large paper roll written on both sides. Hol.
8 Aug.
R. O.
53. Sir John Dudley to Lord Lisle.
When the King was at Paynswick he called me to him, and asked if I had knowledge of a wood sale that my lord Lisle should make within the lordship. I said I had heard of such a thing, but not of late. The King said he had been told by Antony Kingston you had made a new sale of wood in the park; "and then he wold nat dwell in yt yf he might have yt for God amercy." The King desired me to ask the bailly if it were true, as he could not believe it; so I called Motley, who said there was no such thing since the sale made to Sutton of 400 trees in the park, which were not yet felled. The King then desired that in anywise Sutton should not have them, as it would ruin the lordship. Gloster, 8 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
8 Aug.
R.O.
St. P. vii. 622.
54. Simon Heynes and Christopher Mont to Henry VIII.
After arriving at Calais, did not hear for certain where the French king was, till they came to Amiens, where they heard that he was at Reynes, 34 leagues from Paris, and as far from Amiens. Rode thither, and told the English ambassador the cause of their coming.
Melancthon has not yet come to France. It is doubtful whether he will, or, if he will, whether he shall.
There is a German named Gervasius in the Court here, whose counsel the King uses in all his affairs with the German princes.
He says that in eight days Langeus and he will go to Wirtemberg to speak with Melancthon, and that a kinsman of Langeus was sent ten days ago to bring Melancthon to reason upon certain articles; and if they can agree upon them, perhaps Melancthon will come to the French king. Gervasius says also that the Princes have sent certain articles, partly concerning the bishop of Rome, to the French king, whom they desire to arbitrate between them and the said Bishop. The King has sent them on to Paris for the judgment of learned men, who approve of many of them. Believes Wallop will send a copy. Many think the Grand Master and Admiral do not wish Melancthon to come to France, lest, if he and the French clergy do not agree, the German princes might be somewhat alienated from the King, and therefore Langeus is sent first to see whether they can agree.
Langeus and Gervasius will meet Melancthon in September, so that he will not come before the end of October. Langeus will also go to the dukes of Bavaria and others.
Francis says he will have nothing to do nor meddle with the King's affairs and proceedings in his realm. Can say nothing about the opinion of the clergy, for they are in a rude country, where there are no learned men; but as far as they can tell, the priests are wholly dedicate to the bishop of Rome. Reynes, 8 Aug. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add. Endd.
8 Aug.
R. O.
St. P. vii. 624.
55. Chr. Mont to Cromwell.
Their letter to the King gives an account of their embassy. Advises some one to be sent to congratulate the duke of Wirtemberg on his restoration, and then he can be present, as if by chauce, at the meeting of Langeus and Melancthon, and persuade the latter on occasion not to go to France and persist in his ancient doctrines.
Advises the King to send friendly letters to George marquis of Brandenburg, brother of the duke of Prussia, who agrees with the people of Nuremberg in the cause of the Gospel. Thinks too much caution may injure the friendship between the King and German princes, who want open and simple friendship. Has often heard the Princes complaining of this, and saying that it prevented others from joining them.
Melauncthon will not come before two or three months. Reenes, 8 Aug.
Hol., Lat., pp. 2. Add.: Secretario. Endd.
R.O.56. —— to ——.
As to the conclusions of Melancthon (Molencton) sent by the King our master (Francis) to the doctors of Paris, the latter have refused to discuss the articles approved by the Councils and the four doctors of the Church. The others they are quite willing to take into consideration. The King is pleased with their answer. Hears this from a doctor of the Sorbonne. No date or signature.
Fr., p. 1. Endd.: "A letter sent in the packet from Mr. Wallop; from whom it came I know not."
9 Aug.
R. O.
57. Roland Lee, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, to Cromwell.
Thank you for your last favor exhibited to Dr. Elis ap Rice. Though I am bold to trouble you daily with matters touching myself and my friends, I beg you to be good master to this bearer, my old school friend. Beaudeley, 9 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Sealed. Endd.
10 Aug.
Vienna Archives.
58. Chapuys to Charles V.
Wrote on the 3rd by the English ambassador's servant, who was returning. Received on the 8th the Emperor's letters of the 13th and 28th June with the joyful news of his prosperous voyage and other successes. Since he wrote, Dr. Adam, before leaving on his return to Lubeck, sent to desire Chapuys to intercede for his reconciliation according to Chapuys' offer. He also informed Chapuys' servant that the gentleman named Bernard Melland was a captain of the duke of Saxony, who commanded the men of the said Duke in the service of your Majesty against the Turk. When he came hither he had been sent to Lubeck, on behalf of the said Duke and of the Landgrave, to treat of peace between the duke of Holstein and the Lubeckers; but finding the latter too obstinate, owing, as he conceived, to their trust in this King, he came hither in accordance with his commission, but got no other answer than that the King would convey his intentions to the duke of Saxony and the Landgrave by his own ambassador. It has been determined accordingly to send Dr. Fox, who has been lately made a bishop, to the said lords. The matter seems to have cooled a little, perhaps because they are awaiting a reply from the ambassadors, who have gone to Lubeck. Dr. Adam says, moreover, that the said Melland had some commission to speak about the evangelistic sect, particulars of which he could not disclose, because the said Melland had communicated the whole to him in great confidence, and that this King wished to make the said Melland Knight of the Order of the Rose (sic), which the said Melland refused, saying he was already made a knight by your Majesty, and that he could not be by a more noble and virtuous prince. The King also proposed to him to give aid against the king of Sweden, against whom the said Melland has a quarrel; but either doubting it was mere words, or something dishonorable, he replied that it would not be honest in him, not having succeeded in doing anything for his employers, to treat of his own affairs. He accordingly left ill satisfied with the English, without accepting anything except 200 ducats for his return, of which he stood in need, and the moment he had received them he mounted horse, leaving behind him two of his pages.
The bishop of Tarbes, as he told one of my servants this morning, has received no letter from the King, his master, since he came, till yesterday, nor any other news except of the meeting of the two queens, of which the King sent to inform him, and on this he left this afternoon for the Court. The English, as I have before informed your Majesty, have been informed of it otherwise, and it seems that the French have delayed communicating it to them to excite their jealousy the more. The said ambassador affirms that he went to Court for nothing else, but I shall not fail to spy out whether there be any other thing. I think I shall discover the truth when Cromwell comes hither, as he has written to me of late that he will do shortly, when he will probably try and draw me to the hunt and to talk with him; and before leaving the Court he will be fully informed of the King's will touching the permission I had requested to visit the Princess. I shall know also with more certainly how the King takes the interview of the two queens, of which I informed him by order of the queen of Hungary four days ago, and my messenger has not yet returned.
The said French ambassador told my servant lately that many people in France were surprised that your Majesty had made this expedition without wishing the King, his master, to accompany you; and although the contrary is the truth, they wish it so to be understood. He says also that he holds it true that if this King were pleased to say that the money of the bulls and annates should not go to Rome, the French king would agree to it. He also thinks it impossible that a General Council can assemble, and that if everything else were arranged the princes of the Empire would never consent to it, for when they began to reform matters, both spiritual and temporal, the Empire would become far too powerful, and many things would be free (solues) to the churchmen. Perhaps the French have disseminated such sweetmeats in Germany to hinder the Council.
The King is still on the confines of Wales, hunting and traversing the country to gain the people. It is said many of the peasants where he has passed, hearing the preachers who follow the Court, are so much abused as to believe that God has inspired the King to separate himself from the wife of his brother; but these are mere "idiotes," who will soon return to the truth when there is any appearance of remedy. The Queen and Princess are well, and continually pray for your prosperity. London, 10 Aug. 1535.
Fr. From a modern copy, pp. 3.
R.O.59. James Hawkysworth to Lord Lisle.
Has borrowed a barrel of pitch of Thomas Hancoke. Will repay him by Michaelmas, or else 12s. Begs Lisle will send one for him by the next that comes to Portsmouth. There is none to be had in all Hampton. Fears they will want mariners.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
R. O.60. James Hawkysworth to Lord Lisle.
I have received your letters, with one barrel of tar, 2 cwt. of rosin, 500 10d. nails, and 2 cwt. oakum. I cannot send Thos. Pyke to be your master, as he was shipped before I spoke with him. All the good mariners are already shipped. I can make shift for Arnold of Portsmouth to be your master, if you will make shift with him, and send three or four mariners hither. Wm. Blunt will help to get everything in readiness till your coming. I was with Master Wyndsor for your warrant, but I can get no money before the audit. I have made shift for 10l. till then. Thank Master Palschot therefor, for he is bound with me, and I could not make more friends in all Hampshire. The bearer, John Debowrove (?), has delivered 3,000 of your own wood that Wm. Wayte owes you. Edw. Rossell sends you a thousand, and Wm. Wayte gives you as much. I have ten thousand ready of the wood given you by my lord of Winchester, but it was not carried; it lies within a mile of the seaside; thirty thousand more will be made. Send for Candler again, and keep him in Calais. He may well be a good mariner, but truly he is an evil husband. Your ship shall, God willing, [be] launched on the Tuesday after St. Lawrence Day. As soon as I can I will wait upon you.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
10 Aug.
R. O.
61. James Hawkysworthe to Lady Lisle.
I thank you "for my gentle [letter] that ye sent me," and will execute your commands. I trust at my coming you will see that I have done my best, else it were pity I had any life in my body. I will wait on my Lord and you as soon as your ship is despatched, and will bring my account with me. St. Laurence's Day.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
10 Aug.
R. O.
62. Robt. Seymour to Cromwell.
At my coming to Calais I delivered your letters to Sir Thos. Palmer, knight porter, and Robt. Foweller, vice-treasurer. Palmer is charged and his sureties undischarged for your sake. Beg you will have him in remem brance. He has as much need as any man of his degree. Calais, 10 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
10 Aug.
R. O.
63. Edward Archbishop of York to Cromwell.
Last summer the abbot of St. Mary's would not receive his visitation till the Abbot's counsel "see" the power he had "to debarr his bulles." Appointed a day for the Abbot to send in a book on the state of his house; on which day the Abbot sent word that he had Cromwell's letters to prevent the Archbishop from visiting. Saw no letters. Sent his chancellor to the Abbey, where nothing was ready; the Abbot requested to have the day put off till the 12th Aug. Notified this to Cromwell by Teshe, who brought back answer that the Archbishop should do his duty. Has now received Cromwell's letters not to visit the Abbot, so will only give him injunction, and command him to prepare an account of the state of the house against the coming of Cromwell's commissioners. Asks credence for the bearer in something concerning the writer, which is too long to write about. Bishops thorpe, 10 Aug. 1535. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
10 Aug.
R. O.
64. Adam Ottirburn to the Earl of Northumberland.
Has received by the bearer his letter dated 8 Aug., desiring him to obtain the copy of "the dictay" made upon the laird of Bucleuch at this last ayr at Jedburgh. Sends it accordingly. " neyr efftir the forme that it wes consavit." Edinburgh, 10 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Sealed.

Footnotes

1 Above the address the writer has also written "lord Crumwell." But this letter is certainly of the year 1535, before Cromwell was made a peer.
2 Distinctly addressed (although the address is mutilated):—"Joanni Coventrensi [et Lichfeld]ensi episcopo" The Christian name ought to have been Roland.
3 Edw. Foxe.
4 Feast of the Name of Jesus, 7 Aug.


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