Henry VIII
August 1535, 11-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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James Gairdner (editor)

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1886

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19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40

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'Henry VIII: August 1535, 11-20', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 9: August-December 1535 (1886), pp. 19-40. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75663 Date accessed: 31 October 2014.


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August 1535, 11-20

11 Aug.
R. O.
65. John Gostwyk to Cromwell.
I have received your packet this Wednesday, 11 Aug., with a letter to my Lord Chancellor and Ponynges' Act; on which he can give no opinion, as he has not had time to look it over. He has appointed me to wait on him Friday next, and says he does not know what you mean, because you have not written to him more at length. I will re-deliver the Act to Thakker. I have sent your letter to the King's almoner now at Otford with the bishop of Canterbury. I have given your letters to Wyatt's servant to convey to his master. He left on Monday for the Court. I have indented and received all the obligations of Polstede, your servant, and put them in a bag, which he will deliver you on your return. Direct him to deliver them to me to have them registered. Let me have the King's warrants for discharge of such money as I have paid for his use, and which I delivered to Ralph Sadler, your servant, at your last departure from Stepney. Nedam and John Whalley want money. London, Wednesday. Signed.
P.S.—Give me licence to go home to my poor wife, that I may be there on Bartholomew even, and stay there till Saturday following.
Pp. 2. Add: Secretary. Endd.
11 Aug.
R. O.
66. Thomas Thacker to Cromwell.
This Wednesday, 11 Aug., I received your letter dated Berkley Herons, the 9th, and have sent you the Act in a box. Your households at the Rolls, Friars Austins, Hackney, and Stepneth, are in good health. The stair there from your lodging down to the gallery is finished with a window where the jakes was, very well done. Your building at Hackney goes forward. The brickwork of the kitchen, with the chimneys, is finished to the roof; the roof set up, and tilers upon it; the enlarging of the buttery and scullery brought up above the ground. The roofs thereof are framing with all speed; your lodgings trimmed with windows, glass and hangings,—a goodly place, in my opinion. The pay on Saturday last for 74 workmen, &c., was 44l. 14s. 6d. At Friars Austins the wall of the kitchen towards the street, with the windows of freestone, with the scullery and other offices, is clearly finished. The carpenters are raising the roofs, and all is complete except the windows of the side of the hall towards the court. Your own lodging, with the chamber and gallery above, are finished and plastered, and want only the glazing. The pay there for 46 workmen, on Saturday last, was 20l. 14s. 7d. On Sunday last I went to Ewhurst, and viewed there the goodly frames. The double floors of your hall, and solar under it, are finished; also the two sides of your hall, and part of it carried from the frame to the water-side. Carriage is scarce because of hay time and harvest; but the parson of Ewhurst, who is diligent in your business, says we shall have carts next week. Your frame is the goodliest and mightiest I ever saw. Your foundations thereof are substantial and strong enough to bear it. They are now in hand with the roof of your hall. They have received 600 loads of timber of Dandy, and he had been paid by Webster and Chr. Roper 100l. in your behalf. He is, I suppose, dead by this time. The pay on Monday last, for carpenters and sawyers, for 14 days ending 24 July, viz., 67 persons was 25l. 0s. 11d. On Saturday the 21st there will be another month to pay. Mr. Steward intends to commence household at Hackney against your coming home, as soon as the house is ready, unless he receives from you contrary commandment. Mr. Williamson and Ric. Lee are diligent. Your folks at Canbyry are well. At Mr. Gostwyk's place in London, 11 Aug.
Sir Thos. Grene tells me that Dandy is full paid for his timber at 3s. 4d. the load.
Hol., p. 1 (broad sheet). Add.: Secretary.
11 Aug.
R. O.
67. Roland Lee, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, to Cromwell.
I have sent my servant to inform you of the coming in of the Bastard Stradlyng after he was proclaimed rebel, and would be glad to know the King's pleasure in the matter. Beaudeley, 11 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd. Sealed.
11 Aug.
R. O.
68. Walter Devereux (Lord Ferrers) to Cromwell.
I have received your letter dated Tewkesbury, 29 July, by which it appears that my friend Wm. Edwards, parson of Englyshe Bykenour, has complained to you that I have taken from him parcel of his glebe land, called Culverhouse Close, and certain of my demesnes, which, he says, belong to his benefice by a lease not yet expired.
He never showed me of any such lease; but, according to your pleasure, he shall have the foresaid grounds, and if he desires a lease he shall have years therein as you shall appoint. Yerseley, 11 Aug. Signed.
P.1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.; My lord Ferrys.
[11 Aug.]
R. O.
69. John Heryng to the Bishop Elect of Rochester.
Great spoil is made of your woods. Your carpenter, Bowmer, was there the 8th of St. Dominic (fn. 1) , and told me that at Bromley park a commission came from the King for nine-score trees; and on Tuesday before this writing, they had cut down 19 in one place and 23 in another; "and the lengyth off a pale off the byggyste ys karyed away;" and some, of 19 foot timber, is cut for tallwood for the profit of the officers. By an older commission 100 trees are marked for the King, and if these be taken away nothing will be left. The carpenters prevented them cutting down trees till Wednesday next. The same spoil goes on at another park. Your frame proceeds apace. Peter has spoken for six loads of hay. The arbiter is Percival, servant of Mr. Kyngyston. He has also laid in two hogsheads for you of white wine and claret, and got the sour wine in your cellar exchanged for one of them. My lady and Mrs. Castell beg to be recommended to you. So do your tenant Dr. Heryng, Master Gryffyth, your vicar-general, and friar John Pycton.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
11 Aug.
R. O.
70. Thibault Rouault (Sieur de Riou) to Lord Lisle.
Thanks him for a present of hawks (oiseaux). Hopes soon to send him something in return. My wife and I were anxious lately about some illness Mademoiselle Anne had taken, but she is quite recovered. Will do as much for her as for their own child. Mademoiselle Marie, who is with my sister, (fn. 2) is very well, and is the prettiest girl possible. My wife thanks Madame for her present. Pont de Remy, 11 Aug. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
12 Aug.
Vienna Archives.
71. Princess Mary to Queen Mary of Hungary.
Cannot express the joy and comfort she has received from her kind letters; which, together with what the Imperial ambassador has told her, enable her to live in hope. Begs a continuance of her compassion in these melancholy circumstances, and that she will pardon the delay and insufficiency of her thanks, which could only be fully expressed by a more eloquent spirit than her own. Written in haste and fear, 12 Aug.
Fr. Modern copy, p. 1.
12 Aug.
R. O.
72. Sir Richard Graynfeld to Lord Lisle.
But for your counsel I had not gone to London, and have so missed my purpose. Will be prevented by his business. from being at Calais on Bartholomew Day. Has sent this bearer to desire Ringeley to furnish the Marshal's room till October. He shall be at no loss if Ringeley surrender 6 Oct. This letter shall be his discharge. 12 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
R. O.73. Sir Thos. Wentworth to Lord Lisle.
It is said with us, that my lord Edmond was very sore acrased. (fn. 3) If you will assay whether he will leave his office upon a pension, I shall be glad to perform whatever your Lordship thinks, as Mr. Cromwell says if there be any change I may trust thereto. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais. Endd.
12 Aug.
R. O.
74. Treason.
12 Aug. 27 Hen. VIII.
Ric. Fulke of Crowle, Worc., wheelwright, and Johan, wife of John Danyell, husbandman, voluntarily declared before John Russell, Esq., J.P. for Worcestershire, that Edmond Brocke, husbandman, about 80 years of age, while going home from Worcester Market on Saturday before St. Thomas's Day in the rain with Margaret wife of Thos. Higons, said, "It is long of the King that this weather is so troublous or unstable, and I wene we shall never have better weather whilst the King reigneth, and therefore it maketh no matter if he were knocked or patted on the head."
Brocke, being "an aged wretched person," confesses to saying "that it was a heavy and grievous weather, and that there was never good 'wedringes' since the King began this business." When asked what business, and what he meant, he said he could not tell. As to the rest of the words, if he so said, he was mad or drunk, and wist not what he said; and otherwise would not thereto answer.
P. 1.
12 Aug.
Royal MS. 18 B. vi. f. 21.
B. M.
75. James V. to Charles V.
Thanks him for his letters which he received at the end of May. Earnestly desires the assembly of a Council of the Church. Prays that God may restore his aunt and her daughter to their former splendor and freedom. Would have said nothing about the marriage of the Emperor's niece, the daughter of the king of Denmark, if he had known what had been done, but feels bound to express as much gratitude to Charles as if it had been accomplished.
Would have been glad to marry the daughter of the king of Portugal, but heard that the Emperor was going on a long voyage. The necessity of settling the succession admitted no delay, and he was obliged to send an answer into France, where he met with a very favorable offer. No alliance that he may make, however, will impair the goodwill he bears to the Emperor. Stirling, 12 Aug. 1535.
Lat. Copy, pp. 2. Other copies at ff. 44, 194.
2. The original of this letter is among the Vienua Archives, endorsed as received at Randacho (Randazzo) in Sicily, 19 Oct. 1535.
12 Aug.
Royal MS. 18 B. vi. 44 b.
B. M.
76. [James V. to Paul III.]
Has heard of the danger in which the cardinal of Ravenna is at present placed. Cannot believe in his guilt, but fears that he is suffering from the envy of others. Asks the Pope to show him favor. Stirling, 12 Aug. 1535.
Lat. Copy, p. 1.
12 Aug.
Royal MS. 18 B. vi. 45.
B. M.
77. James V. to the College of Cardinals.
On behalf of the cardinal of Ravenna. Stirling, 12 Aug. 1535.
Lat. Copy, p. 1.
12 Aug.
Royal MS. 18 B. vi. 20 b.
B. M.
78. James V. to Francis I.
Desires credence for Robt. abbot of Kinloss, as well as the other ambassadors, although his name is not inserted in their commission, the ships having already sailed when he was appointed to go. Stirling, 12 Aug. 1535.
Lat. Copy. Other copies at ff. 43 b, 194.
12 Aug.
Royal MS. 18 B. vi. 44 b.
B. M.
79. James V. to Odulph Lord of Vere.
Requests him to forward the accompanying letter to the Emperor. Stirling, 12 Aug. 1535.
Lat. Copy, p. 1. Another copy at f. 195.
12 Aug.
Royal MS. 18 B. vi. 45 b.
B. M.
80. James V. to the Primate and Council of the Carthusian Order.
Desires them to restore Hugh prior of "Vallis Virtutis," whom they have removed in consequence of calumnies, but to whose labors the house owes its present good estate. Perth, 12 Aug. 1535.
Lat. Copy, p. 1. Add.
Royal MS. 18 B. vi. 21 b.
B. M.
81. James V. to Charles V.
In favor of Quintigern Tennand, Jas. Makgill, and Alex. Lambe, whose ship was plundered near Bordeaux about two years ago by John Martin, captain of a ship from a town in Biscay, belonging to the magistrate of the town. They have in vain attempted to obtain restitution by law.
Lat. Copy.
12 Aug.
Lettere di Principi, iii. 134.
82. Nicholas Cardinal of Capua to Marino Cardinal Caracciolo.
Sends him an account of the death of Sir Thomas More just received from England. (The same narrative as in Vol. VIII, No. 1,096).
Nothing new about Tunis since its capture, except that Barbarossa has escaped to Bona with more than 8,000 Turks. Antonio Doria is gone after him either to carry him off or burn 15 galleys there. The Emperor is coming to Palermo and afterwards to Naples. Rome, 12 Aug. 1535.
Ital.
13 Aug.
R. O.
83. Victualling of London.
Permit, from the collectors of customs in the port of Ipswich, to Thomas Bekensall, of London, salter, to lade in a monger of St. Osys, John Frebarne, captain, 29 weyes cheese, to be discharged in London. Dated Colchester, within the port aforesaid, 13 Aug. 27 Hen. VIII.
ii. Certificate, added by Sir John Champeneis, of the delivery of the above to Thomas Bekensall, 20 Aug.
P. 1. Small slip.
13 Aug.
R. O.
84. Accusation of Treason.
Information against Sir Gilbarte Rouse, parson of Rouselynch, Worc., by Robt. Wensteley (elsewhere Westeley), laborer, and Harry Englesshe, husbandman, that about three-quarters of a year ago Rouse called the King and his Council "lowlers," on which they immediately informed Sir John Russel, justice of the peace.
The same persons, and Wm. Lenche, of Chirchlenche, say that Nic. Horewell and John Pole told them on Friday, 6 Aug., that Rouse said that the monks and others who were put to death at London were martyrs before God, and saints in Heaven.
ii. Answer of Rouse:—that Westeley told him that, at the market at Evesham, he had heard Cokesey, the under-sheriff, proclaim that tithes were not to be paid till the tiller had sowed his ground, found his house, and paid his debts, and other such regulations. To which he said that if the clergy were so dealt with, they were worse dealt with than Turks or Jews, and as evil as if they were heretics or "lowelers."
As to the second article, he says that within a week after putting the monks and others to death at London, Horewell spoke of it at the cross at Rouselenche; and Rouse said he thought them unfortunate and unwise for taking opinion against the King, and if their opinion had been for the Faith of God they had been martyrs.
iii. Beaudeley, 8 Aug. 27 Hen. VIII. Examination of Robt. Westeley, Henry Englesshe, and Wm. Lynche, the informers.
iv. Beaudeley, 11 Aug. 27 Hen. VIII. Examination of Nic. Horewell and John Pole as to the second article.
v. Beaudeley, 13 Aug. 27 Hen. VIII.
Declaration by Ric. Sheysby, Roger Hybbold, and seven other parishioners of Rouselenche, before the King's commissioners, that they have known Rouse as parson there for 20 years; that he is a good churchman, and they believe him to be a true man to the King, and that he spake no such words. Westeley is a light person and a picker of quarrels.
vi. Statement by Sir John Russell that on the Sunday before the Assumption, 25 Hen. VIII., Robt. Westby (sic) and Horwell laid information against Rouse. Charged him to be ready to testify the same when called upon, but, after hearing the parson's denial, and knowing of old grudge between the parties, respited the matter, and never heard more spoken of it till now of late.
Pp. 12. Headed: To the right worshipful the King's Grace's Secretary.
13 Aug.
R.O.
85. John Gostwyk to Cromwell.
I received your letters this Friday, 13 Aug., and sent your packet to my Lord Chancellor, but cannot send the answer till Monday. I have also delivered your letter to the Lord Mayor. The plague has well ceased. It was very violent where I lie, and I was much afraid. How it will be about Bartholomew-tide I know not, for that is the most dangerous and contagious time. I have delivered the Queen's letter to Mr. Denny, although he was in London on the Queen's business. I beg you will make a stay in the advowson of St. John's, Bedford, for which you have written to the mayor there, in favor of one Deye, of the King's buttery. I have had the grant these two years for a friend of mine. London, Friday. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
13 Aug.
R. O.
86. Tristram Teshe to Cromwell.
Has conferred at large with the dean of York, who is quite content to resign his deanery for a reasonable pension out of the fruits. Before Teshe came he had already communicated on the subject with the treasurer of York cathedral. York, 13 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.. Mr. Thos. Cromwell, secretary to the King's highness. Endd.
13 Aug.
R. O.
87. John Worth to Lady Lisle.
"Your son, Master James, co[me] to Parys in good health and merry." The Lord President was very glad of his coming, and [so were] Master Bekynsall and Master Renoldes. They will do their utmost for the furtherance of his learning and good manners, but will take no charge of his apparel. They advise that he should have some one continually waiting on him, to keep his apparel and make answer for it, to "ray" him in the morning, see to his meat and drink, and wait on him wherever he goes; for they say it is dangerous for him to go alone, for there are so many ungracious lackeys in Paris that he may soon have a displeasure amongst them if he have not one waiting on him. I will wait on him myself for six weeks, as long as I may be from Calais without any check of my wages, at my own cost, and will write to you daily how he does in his learning, and how he is intreated with them, and whether there is any sickness here, or wars towards by which any danger might happen to him. I will wait on him at my own cost for three years if you or my Lord will write to Mr. [Norris], Sir Fras. Bryant, or lord Rochford, to get a bill signed by the King for the check of my wages for that time. John..... yche has made all haste to return homewards. Be good to him if any room fall in my Lord's hands. Paris, 13 Aug.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.
14 Aug.
R. O.
88. Northumberland to Cromwell.
Has received his kind letter, with report of the credence of Sir Thos. Wharton and of his own servant, Sir Thos. Johnson. Under the King, is most bound to Cromwell. Trusts always to his mediation, and especially now, as he has some enemies of late, owing to what he has done according to justice. Has of late obtained from a spy the copy of an indictment against the lord of Buclugh, in Scotland, which he encloses. Newcastle upon Tyne, 14 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Master Cromwell, secretary unto the King's Highness. Sealed. Endd.
R. O.2. Copy of the indictment of Walter Scot, of Branxhame, kt., for treasonable intercommoning with Sir Cristell Dakir and other Englishmen for invasion of Scotland, &c. Signed by Northumberland.
P. 1.
14 Aug.
Vit. B. xiv. 136.
B. M.
89. Eustace Chapuys to Cromwell.
"S. P., vir o ....................................................... ipsum ser ............................................................................ Ecquid ............................................................................... fratri chariss[imo] .................................................................. tantam prosperitatem g ............................................................... re comperta habeo, ................................................................... tarum inscriptio ac minister meus..................................................... spem atque omne bonum quam fidem certam præ se ferebant......................... mitto, nempe ipsius Cæsaris autographi transumptum......... putate quam quod ex tripode ut ajunt, ibi plura hic cer........ minime rerum suarum jactitans Cæsar, intelligetis ............ speramus uberiora fortunante ac propitio ut hacte[nus Deo]. Hæc jam superioribus diebus per ministrum meum quem ....... nisi spes fuisset Præ. V. quemadmodum pollicita fuer ....... remeaturam, quod ubi fieri non video, neque enim ignar ...... remoris impeditæ sint res aulicæ, ubi ceu ansa an..... negotium trahit, non placuit ulterius vos vestro deside[rio] ....... ubi aderit Præ. V., uberius fusiusque commentabi[mur] ....... optime Deo commendata sit incolumis ac lubens. R[ateleti, pridie (fn. 4) ] Assumptæ Virginis Matris, 1535."
Mutilated. Add. Endd.
14 Aug.
Titus, B. xi. 425.
B. M.
St. P. i. 439.
90. Sir Thomas Audeley, Chancellor, to Cromwell.
Has put the following Irish Acts in order:—The Supreme Head of the Church in Ireland; the King's Succession; the declaration of treasons; licenses and dispensations; the annates and election and consecration of bishops; appeals in spiritual matters to be made to the King, and not the bishop of Rome; first-fruits, which does not extend to abbots and priors, for this time; Kildare's attainder; subsidy; resumption of the lands of the duke of Norfolk and his coparceners, the earl of Shrewsbury, the heirs general of the earl of Ormond, and divers abbots and priors in England. Wishes him to ask the King whether that Act is to be set forth without declaring his pleasure to the Duke, Earl, and heirs general of the earl of Ormond. Has seen the Act made in Ponynges' time, and delivered it again to Mr. Gostwyk. Does not take that Act as they take it in Ireland, but has made a short Act that everything done in this Parliament shall be effectual, notwithstanding that or any other Act. These Acts should be sent to Ireland with a letter ordering the Deputy and Council to return a transumpt under the seal of Ireland. Asks whether the commission to hold the Parliament is to be made to the Deputy alone or to others, and what day it is to begin. Asks him to remind the King of the barons he wished to make to increase the number of temporal lords. They shall be all ready written by Monday next. Does not think the Acts of heresy and submission of the clergy necessary for that land, for the Statute of Henry IV. was never put in execution; and as to the submission, after the laws for the spiritual jurisdiction are ratified here in England by the 32 assigned by the King, and confirmed by Parliament here, it were necessary they should be received in Ireland by authority of Parliament there. Advises that the Acts of probate of testament, mortuaries, and pluralities of benefices should be spared at this time. The earl of Wiltshire has asked that the Act for the earl of Ossory may be deferred till he and his coparcener Selenger may search their evidences, and declare what prejudice they might take. If the King wishes the Act to go forward, he should write to the Earl, and cause him to make a sufficient proviso. The King might also order the Deputy to take a bond from the earl of Ossory not to take any advantage of the earl of Wiltshire by the Act.
Sends a commission of oyer and determiner concerning the prior of Wurcetter and his monk. Thinks the words spoken in March last by the monk touching appeals will hardly bear treason but misprision, for there is no express mention of the King nor Queen. The words spoken of the King and Queen at Christmas or before February would have been treason if they had been spoken since February 1.
It were best to have them indicted truly upon the fact, and then let them remain in ward till further opinions be known.
Christchurch, in London, Saturday, the eve of the Assumption. Is going to Colchester on Tuesday; there is so great death in London.
Hol. Add: Chief Secretary.
14 Aug.
R. O.
91. James Bettes to Cromwell.
I thank you for your letter dated 6 Aug., giving authority to my neighbour, Weldon, for ordering the chantry here. I have provided that the crop and tithes belonging to the same shall be lodged in your hands. Hampton, Saturday, the even of the Assumption of Our Lady.
Hol., p. 1. Add: To the right worshipful Mr. Thomas Crumwell, in London.
14 Aug.
R. O.
92. Robt. Shorton to Cromwell.
I received your letter in favour of Gilbert Latham, canon of our college, to be restored to the dividents of our college, in as ample a manner as his predecessors have had. He cannot have a penny either by statute or laudable custom, for by them he shall have nothing except deductis expensis et reparationibus. In one year and a half they have spent in reparations only 4l., where, according to custom, they should have spent 14l. Latham has got into his hands 17l., and Westby as much, against the statutes of the college. This cannot be suffered. Moreover, if we divide equally, each share does not come to as much as 5l. or 6l.
The bearer will tell you more. Stoke College, 14 Aug.
Hol. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
14 Aug.
R. O.
93. Thomas Thacker to Lord Lisle.
I thank you for your kind letter. As to my friend Thos. Tychet's demand to be my tenant in Great Frere Street in Calais, by virtue of a lease made by my late attorneys, Ric. Lacy, John Pygot, and others, to John Knolles, deceased, they had no commission from me to alien or let, but only to recover and defend my rights, and I deny that I gave them special authority for this act. The Rolls, London, 14 Aug.
I beg you to remember my kinsman, Ric. Wall, for the exchange of his room.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais. Endd.
14 Aug.
R. O.
94. R. Vauchop to Lord Lisle.
On Thursday last I returned from without (de dehors), and yesterday morning I received your letters, and rejoiced to hear of the prosperity of you and Madame. As to your son James, president Poyet had already put him to the college of Calvy with his nephews. I have recommended him to the principal of the college, who will see that he gets no harm (qui nayt mal). Today I took him to college myself, and recommended him again to the principal. They have been at their inn (Il ont este a leur hostelerie) till his chamber should be furnished. I shall see that he take no ill while I am here. I thank you for the honor you did me there. If I can serve you in anything command me. From your house at Paris, Saturday, 14 Aug. Signed. (fn. 5)
Fr., p. 1. Add.
14 Aug.
R. O.
95. Thos. Rainolde, priest, to Lady Lisle.
Thanks her for her letters and a gold cramp ring, brought by her son, who arrived in Paris on the 12th inst. in health and merry. Will rather forget himself than her son in anything that will do him pleasure or further his learning. After Bekynsaw and Rainolde had opened her mind to Mons. Poyete, the latter determined to put him into a college. Does not know what he means thereby, and therefore judges the best. He gave as great a charge to the principal of the college which is called the College of Calvy, and to the man who will teach him, as if he had been the King's son, declaring the honor of lord and lady Lisle and how greatly he was bound to them. Went to the college, and saw the chamber he will have, which is not to be contemned after the manner of Paris. He will have his bed alone, and dine and sup with the principal. As the child is tender, and has come into a different air, his diet must be altered. As he is out of Mr. Poyete's house, and in a place where there are many rude and wild children, thought it best to retain lady Lisle's servant, Mr. Worth. If anything mislikes them, as he suspects the manner of the college will, she shall be informed thereof. Did not think it advisable for either himself or Mr. Bekynsawe to meddle in that point, as she gave them no such commission. Mons. President commanded the principal to provide what was necessary for the child, saying he would content him for it. Her servants Smith and Goodale would have returned sooner if they could have got all things despatched and had a determinate answer. Paris, 14 Aug.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: At Calais.
14 Aug.
R. O.
96. Guillaume Poyet to Lord Lisle.
I have received our little man, and will take all possible pains to make him, and make him do, what you and his mother desire. He is lodged in a good house and good company, where he will learn both letters and good manners. I thank you and my Lady for your presents. Paris, 14 Aug.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. Add.
15 Aug.
R. O.
Letters 309.
97. Cranmer to Cromwell.
I send you two letters,—one addressed to my lord of Wiltshire, the other to me,—as they concern you and treason against the King. I understand the priory of Worcester is to be shortly void. If so, be good to Mr. Holbech, (fn. 6) D.D., of the house of Crowland, or to dan Ric. Gorton, B.D., of the house of Burton-on-Trent. Otford, the Assumption of Our Lady. Signed.
Add. Secretary. Endd. by Wriothesley.
15 Aug.
R. O.
St. P. ii. 261.
98. Lord Leonard Gray to Cromwell.
Arrived in Ireland on 28 July, but his horses and servants not till Aug. 14. There is few good news. On Aug. 3 the Treasurer of the King's wars, with Wm. Sentlowe and the companies of Master Bruerton, Master Dacre, and Master Mussegrave, nearly took Thos. Fytzgarret in the country of Allon. Believes he was taken by Irishmen and let go again. Burnell was taken that day by O'More, who has not delivered either him or Phelim Boye. Many Irish were slain, and also one Decka, a Welshman, who was Mr. Bruerton's servant and went to Fytzgarret. Desires credence for Thos. Agard. Nasse, Our Lady Day at night, the Assumption. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
15 Aug.
R. O.
99. John Bothe, Priest, to Cromwell.
Has done his best to perfect the inventory of my lord of Herford's goods. Cannot get at those in his house in London, as Gostwick has broken up the coffers, and will not suffer an inventory to be made. Cannot know the debts till the next "auticte" (audit), which will be at the feast of All Saints. Would have been with him before, but has been "blend" (stayed) in his house by certain who have died of the plague there. When he was last with Cromwell, informed him that one Smythe, sometime underalmoner, had obtained from the King a bill for the writer's house in Hereford, which he has had nine years, in which he lived continually until he was taken into the Cardinal's service and thence to the King's. Cromwell had stated that he should not have it, and desired Mr. Schidmore to speak to Smythe to desist. Has been continually employed in dissolving my Lord's household, and taking an inventory of the goods; in which time Smythe has detained the King's letters, and threatened to put the writer out of his house. "From my poor house Sagthon, the Assumption of Our Lady."
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Secretary.
15 Aug.
R. O.
100. Thomas Clerk and Will. Vowell to Cromwell.
On the 14th the vicar-general of Wells sent for us to the cathedral, and showed us that Sir Oliver Bromeley, curate of Exton, spontaneously admitted that he had not fulfilled the Bishop's command in declaring the usurped power of the bishop of Rome, nor put out the name of Pope from the service book. He said that his conscience would not allow him, because he heard that the bishop of Rochester and the father of Sion had suffered death for it. He confessed that he prayed every Sunday in the pulpit for the King as supreme head of the Church of England, for queen Anne and the princess Elizabeth; and in the afternoon he confessed to us that he repented his lewdness, and was willing to declare the usurped power of the bishop of Rome. We have committed him to ward. Wells, 15 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
R. O.101. [Moryson] to Starkey.
You see the power of love or poverty on me, O most faithful of all my friends, when I, an unlettered person, venture to enter the temple of the Muses. Great is the presumption, but nothing seems difficult or disagreeable to me if by so doing I can augment your goodwill, and overthrow the kingdom of poverty. Apostrophises his miseries and despair; yet Hope remonstrates with him for rejecting her, tells him that Cromwell, Winter, and Starkey flourish, and that he must not abandon her. Hopes for better days, and that he may also rejoice on Starkey's account. Trusts it will not be in vain that Pole and all his servants speak of Starkey as the patron of his studies. Commendations to Thos. Jones.
Hol., pp. 2. Greek and Latin. Add.: D. Thomæ Starchæo, utriusque juris excellentissimo Doctori. Londini. Sealed with an antique gem.
R. O.102. [Moryson] to Starkey.
You have put me in great hope. You cannot imagine in what misery I have been; but that is past; and how great it would have been in winter if the kindness of Signor Polo had not rescued me from hunger, cold, and poverty. My books, good as they were, are a prey to the cruel Jews,—for very little truly. They would have been worth twice as much if I could have sold them. My clothes are all gone. I am wearing Mr. Michael Throgmerton's breeches and doublet. I am his man, for I wear his livery. Philosophy can do much, but it is too great a trial to have nothing, and to be in debt besides. I am not so much ashamed of poverty as of being forgotten by my patron. I wished at least that you would have written (che scrivessi) something, which would have excused him, or the misfortunes which often befall him; but the more cruel (crudo, qu. crudele?) he has been, the greater will be my praise for having been not less kind to him than before. Perhaps he wished to prove my love. The proof has been severe enough. Certainly he will have no cause henceforth to call me ungrateful. Nevertheless, I shall love him as long as God gives me life. Urge him to aid me, if it be in his power; that our friendship, which is not of yesterday, may not perish before our deaths. The blame on my part is very great, but I think it a punishment that one should say to me "Such a one was thy friend; he was my friend; he lives, and he is not a friend."Such insults deserve to be wiped out in blood. I know of no one who was ever my friend who is not one now. Whoever was a friend, is and ever will be one. But may we not abandon a friend who gives himself to vice? The moment such a thought enters, friendship is at an end. You fly and leave your friend to enemies; you betray him in danger. I have offered him medicines, which he has refused to take; but though he does not today he may tomorrow.
Commits to Starkey the safety (salute) of his studies. Mr. Cole, to whom you will see by my other letters how much I am bound, has sent me this letter to be forwarded to his most liberal patron. This is the only favor I can do him in return for a thousand on his part. You, an Englishman, can write to him in English. I, for so many years, thanks to my misfortunes, have been an Italian, and will not write in my own tongue. Restore me to myself, and you will restore a tongue to me and my pen. Protests that he lost the greater part of his wit by poverty.
Ital. Hol., pp. 2.
16 Aug.
R. O.
103. Moryson to Starkey.
I had long doubted which of us was most in fault,—you, who write daily to everybody, for not writing to me, or I, for my impatience in seeing others preferred to me. But your letters brought to me by young Shelley fill me with shame, and make me accuse myself. I was measuring your regard for me by my own for you, without considering how many older friends you had; but if I have offended you your letters give me cause to hope that your anger will not be implacable. I can well believe what you tell me that my master complains to Cromwell of my insufficiency (meæ tenuitatis). He has conferred many benefits on me, and you also. Yet I cannot but complain of both of you until by your means I have expelled from my house filth, want, hunger, and nakedness. Are you two ashamed or afraid to maintain the life and studies of one? Has your love of letters and learned men grown so cold? Pole has returned Aristotle to me, but I am in great want of the Greek Commentaries. Three months ago Cole, who is nearly as destitute as myself, relieved me by a loan. I have had so much borrowed money that I shall have none of my own this year unless I have a better crop than usual. I am in need of nothing but money. I have lately made friends with M. Polonus, with whom I hope to read the whole of Aristotle. He is very learned both in Greek and Latin. The Emperor has been making war on Barba Russa, and will shortly come to Rome. 16 Aug. Signed: "Tuus Morysonus, cognomento inops."
Shelley sends salutations.
Hol., pp. 3. Add.: Doctiss. viro Thomæ Starkeo in Aula S. Regis Angliæ, &c., Londini. Endd
16 Aug.
Harl. MS. 6,989, f. 53.
B. M.
104. John Campensis to Starkey.
Thanks for his letters. Received yesterday letters from old friends in Flanders. Is going to leave Pole in a few days, and go to his own country. Asks Starkey, if he writes, to send the letters to Pole, who will know where he is. Will write again on his arrival in Flanders. Venice, 16 Aug. 1535.
Hol. Lat. Add.
16 Aug.
R. O.
105. John Wylliamson to Cromwell.
On Sunday, 15 Aug., I received your letter by a servant of Mr. Treasurer, and have had two coats made for you, one of a remnant of velvet in my custody, the other of green, taken of Mr. Hobylthorne. I do all that I can for the furtherance of your buildings at Hackney. At Friar Austins your buildings go well forward. My mother and all your household there are in good health, as they are at the Rolls, Canbury, and Stepneth. Friar Austins, 16 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
16 Aug.
R. O.
106. Thomas Thacker to Cromwell.
Your households at the Rolls, Austin Friars, Canbyry, Hakeney, and Stepneth are all in good health. Your buildings go forward. This Monday I received from Mr. Gostwyk the Act of Parliament passed in Ireland. Mr. Treasurer of the King's household (Fitzwilliam), being at Dover, intends this 16 Aug. to cross to Calais with a fair wind, W. by N. The plague rages in every parish in London, but not so bad as in many places abroad. I will send the number of the dead. The mayor of London keeps his chamber. Some say he is sick of an ague; others, that he was cut about the " broes" for the megrims, which vexeth him sore. " Few men come at him but women." The Rolls, London, 16 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
16 Aug.
R. O.
107. A. Castelnau, Bishop of Tarbes, to Cromwell.
Received, Sunday, 8 Aug., letters from the King, his master, to be delivered by himself to the King. Set out next day with a merchant named Alain, whom Cromwell knows. Alain fell ill, and was left at Huugerford, where he has since died. Tarbes has consequently put off going to the Court till he has Cromwell's advice. Marboro, 16 Aug. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.: "Monsieur le Secretarie." Endd.
17 Aug.
R. O.
108. Sir John Russell [of Worcestershire] to Cromwell.
In answer to your letters received last night by my son. In Lent last, the sub-prior of Worcester, Damp John Langharn, came to me in my parish church, and showed me, on behalf of the Prior, of certain seditious words and unsitting demeanour of two monks of their priory. He did not tell me what the seditious words were. Advised him to keep the monks in safe ward, and advertise my Lord President, Mr. Englefield, and others of the Council of the Marches, then near Hereford, of the whole affair. The sub-prior was again sent to me, and said the monks were in ward, and the Council advertised; he also said he knew "their mynde therein," but did not disclose it to me. St. John's beside Worcester, 17 Aug. 27 Hen. VIII.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
17 Aug.
R. O.
109. John Bishop of Bath to Cromwell.
On Saturday last my vicar-general sent word from Wells that a certain parish priest of Exton, Sir Oliver Bromley, had not spoken to his parish against the bishop of Rome's usurped authority, nor done anything in execution of the commandment given for that purpose. My vicar-general had him examined before two justices of the peace, Will. Vowell and my servant Thos. Clerke, and on his confession he was committed to prison. The bearer can tell you more of Sir Oliver, who must be either very simple or very lewd, otherwise the King's commandments would have been obeyed throughout the diocese. Banwell, 17 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
17 Aug.
R. O.
110. Sir Will. Fitzwilliam to Cromwell.
Please order Rob. Fowler to repair to Calais immediately, as we shall have great lack of him, especially for showing us the records. As I was to have money for the fortifications of Calais, it would be well for the same to be sent by Fowler. Certain lewd persons working on the King's works here refuse to work any longer except they may have 6d. a day, and they have named one person among them to be a lord. I have therefere staid a day here to see the works, and hear what the laborers would say. The works are well done; and before Haloutyde there shall be harbourage for as many ships as belong or have belonged to this town, and even more, without impeachment of the haven royal. This morning the workmen and their lord said they would not work for less than 6d. a day, and he that touched one of them should touch them all. On this we examined the matter, and found four persons chief movers in it, whom we have committed to prison;—two or them in the castle of Dover, as seditious and naughty persons, who were of the black guard of the King's kitchen, and two, who were repentant, to the mayor's prison. I wait to be advertised of the King's pleasure herein.
Certain naughty persons have razed out the French king's arms from a table that stands upon the altar in the chapel built by M. de Vaux, late ambassador in England. I have pacified the French friar, who found himself aggrieved thereat, and am making search for the authors of the mischief.
Corn and barley is meetly fair in these parts. Certain Londoners have bought up a great quantity of corn in the isle of Thanet, about Sandwich, and between this town and Canterbury, which will raise the price, and the victuallers will not be able to victual the workmen. It will please you therefore to command that no corn may be conveyed out of the said places. Dover, 17 Aug. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add.: Principal secretary. Endd.
17 Aug.
R. O.
111. Thomas Abbot of Abingdon to Cromwell.
On 17 Aug. (fn. 7) Mr. Notte and Mr. Fuller, commissioners appointed by the King 20 June last, between the Abbot and John Audelett, sent a precept to the latter, admonishing him that they would be there to hear and determine the matter on Saturday last. They were accordingly at his house that day, when he was content to enter into account; but today he refused to make a corporal oath, as the King was going to appoint arbitrators. Your last letter (returned enclosed) was read to him, but he asked day to make answer, and said he would send to Court to know the King's pleasure. It is clear he means to make delay, so that no end be taken by Christmas next. Desires the King's letters to the Commissioners to tarry till they have examined the accounts. Has sent like letters to Mr. Norres, who he hopes will favor him. Abendon, 17 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. Crumwell, chief secretary to the King's Highness and Master of his Rolls. Endd.
R. O.2. Declaration of the account of John Audelett, of Barton, as steward of the monastery of Abingdon, before ........... Mynne and John Notte; auditors assigned by the King by [commission dated] 16 Aug. 27 Hen. VIII. "to them three and Hugh Fuller in that behalf," for a period of 22 years ending at Michaelmas 26 Hen. VIII.
A paper roll of 5 broad sheets. Mutilated.
17 Aug.
R. O.
112. John Notte and Hugh Fuller to Cromwell.
We sent a precept to John Audelett on Wednesday last; and because of his feebleness we visited him on Saturday after at his own house, where we found Latton, one of his Council, with him, who read to him the King's commission. On the Tuesday after we required him to be sworn to account according to our Commission, which he utterly refused, unless we would discharge him of such bonds as he is bound in. He desired respite till Friday next, and in the meantime would send to the Court to know the King's pleasure. We have given him till Thursday next. Abingdon, 17 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary.
17 Aug.
R. O.
113. Will. Sackfford to Cromwell.
There are many things in these parts you hear not of. The King is defrauded in his customs by the merchants here, and, if examined, it would be found that they owed him 100,000l. They rob the King's subjects; for "if he be a Scot's son he shall come to the Steelyard and name himself one of the Steads, or a Turk's son, or a Pole, or a Swethen, or a Lettow, or a Dane, or a Moskavetor; so there they shall be betrosted up on a piece of paper of a hundred cloths or 200; and so he shall show him that do sell him the cloths a fair pair of heels. And so they do rob the King." If an Englishman did this, these merchants would say they were utterly undone. "So all the lands in the world can haylle out England, and so can we not, out of no land." Though these men have got heart of grace because the Lubeckers have lost, they are afraid of afterclaps, and therefore are sending presents to you and the Queen. She has no cause to favor them, if she knew their ungodly and spiteful words of her. They have also slandered you, saying you are the cause why the King lent the Lewpys (Lubeckers ?) 40,000l., and you are the cause of all the wars that the Leups have. The "hartey" (qu. Herzog, duke ?) of Holstein and the king of Swethen and the howmaster have all the rule of Denmark. The Moskavetor has won of the King Pole's lands 300 English miles, and killed 50,000 men in three battles. The Turk wins daily from Poland. Danseyk, 17 Aug. 1535.
Hol., pp. 3. Sealed. Add. Endd.
17 Aug.
R. O.
114. Wm. Popley to his wife, Katharine Popley.
Is surprised at her removing with her children and some of her servants, and at her statement that she is at his brother Pymme's costs, for he left her money sufficient for a season. Desires her to have her servants about her, using such preservatives as cousin Thos. Asshe will counsel her. Thinks she might find room in Mr. Calard's house, and can send some of the servants to Mrs. Clerk's, if it is safe there. Simon must see the hay laid in at Islington and St. Bartholomew's. Commendations to his brother and sister. Thornebery, 17 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: At Islington.
17 Aug.
R. O.
115. Wm. Popley to Peter Bekwithe.
I have written to your mistress. If she is in fear, or my brother Pymme cannot or will not receive you, and if you all dare not continue in my house (which you may do if you go to bed betimes, rise not early, and govern yourselves wisely), then Marget, Jane, Symon, and you may go to Mrs. Clerk's.
Let Symon see my horse well kept, and 22 load of hay housed at Islington and St. Bartholomew's. The rest let Davy sell. Thornebery, 17 Aug.
You may send me letters daily by Mr. Thakker, my master's servant, whom you shall have at the Rolls. Deliver the enclosed letters. Commend me to Mrs. Clerk. Show her my mind, and ask her to commend me to my neighbour, Wotton and his wife.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: At John Johnson's house in Lumbard Street.
17 Aug.
R. O.
St. P. II. 262.
116. Skeffyngton to Henry VIII.
Sends a copy of the peace with O'Neyle. (fn. 8) Intends on Wednesday next, Aug. 18, to invade Ofaly, Ochonor's country, and remain there 21 days. It is said that the great O'Brene, the Kellys, and others, are coming to aid the traitors. Cannot take many men from this land in consequence of the plague, and is obliged to assay his old friends of the North, as O'Doneill, McGwire, Neyle Connelaugh, O'Raylly, Neyle More, Hew Roo, McMahounde, the O'Hanlonis, and others, and O'Neyle, or McDonell in his absence, Wishes to return. Maynoth, 17 Aug. Signed.
Add. Endd.
18 Aug.
R. O.
117. John Bishop of Lincoln to Cromwell.
Thanks him for his continual goodness. A priest named Rookes, chaplain to the old duchess of Norfolk, came to him today for the benefice of Sheryngton, of which the Bishop spoke to Cromwell on Monday last, when Cromwell desired that no presentation should go forth till next term, that the Bishop might show his title. The bishops of Lincoln have been patrons 12 score years. The bearer, his chaplain, is the parson there now. Banbury, 18 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
18 Aug.
R. O.
118. Sir Will. Fitzwilliam to Cromwell.
I received at Dover your kind letter, dated Barkley Herons, the 11th inst. Yesternight I and my colleagues arrived here, and read our commission to the council of the town, who said that the King could never have sent us at any time when we should have found things more out of order, and our arrival would be of great advantage to the town. Calais, 18 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Principal Secretary. Endd.
18 Aug.
R. O.
119. Richard Pollard to Cromwell.
According to your letter from Tewkesbury, 28 July, I, with Rusheton, Polsted, and Bery, have communed with Drs. Thyrleby and Olyver and others of the Arches, respecting divers articles which they ministered to us; and as these articles were all in general and not special, and the crime and causes may hereafter so rise upon the same that in some of them the temporal judges may hold pleas, and in some the ecclesiastical have had jurisdiction, we have arranged that the said doctors should devise a certainty of all such crimes and offences as they think ecclesiastical judges have had jurisdiction heretofore. When that is done we are to meet them again, and show them our minds. We think it advisable that the temporal judges should hereafter have jurisdiction of all such crimes, &c. as the ecclesiastical have heretofore had, and then there would be but one law in the realm, which I think would be better. Both the Temples and Lincoln's Inn have ended this vacation in consequence of the sickness, so that it was my chance to read only 11 days. The sickness is very sore. It has visited my house near Stepney, where my wife lives. License me to depart into Devonshire for such necessary causes as I have. Middle Temple, 18 Aug.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
18 Aug.
R. O.
120. The President and Chapter of Wells to Cromwell.
Whereas you desire us to promise Rob. Hyll the farm of our parsonage of Stokegummer after the death of his father; at the request of Dr. Woleman, our dean, we thought we did the said Robert great pleasure in granting him the reversion, though not in the same terms as his father, as you desired. Beg credence for the bearer, their brother canon. Wells, 18 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
18 Aug.
R. O.
121. William Symonds to Cromwell.
Accept my presumption in good part, to which I am emboldened by your previous kindness in receiving my letters for my brother's (fn. 9) preferment to Lichfield and Windsor. I hear that Dr. Foxe, almoner, will be bishop of Herforde. He has, among other things, the hospital of St. Nicholas, Salisbury, which I beg you to procure for my brother, and he will not trouble you more. Windsor, 18 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Sealed. Endd.
18 Aug.
R. O.
122. Victualling of London.
Permit, from the Collectors of Customs in the port of Ipswich, to John Grene, of St. Osys, to lade, in a monger of which he is master, 12 wayes cheese, 6 seme wheat, and 10 doz. Calys skynnys, to be discharged in London. Dated Colchester, 18 Aug. 27 Hen. VIII.
ii. Certificate by Sir John Champeneis of the delivery of the above to [Den]nis Quicke and Robert Nesam, 16 Sept.
P. 1. Small slip. Endd.: "10 way cheese, 6 seme whete, to London." Mutilated.
18 Aug.
Otho, C. ix. 80.
B. M.
123. Perin del Pont to Henry VIII.
" Serenissime et potentissime Rex, Fidei Defensor, [nostræ] Hierosolymitanæ militiæ unice protector, nobis ipsi rursus, et merito, adstricti novo obligationis genere ...... mur erga majestatem V., Rex potentissime, quæ quod prioribus su[is literis] humanissime fecerat, idem quoque posterioribus, quas attulit fr[ater] Thomas Dingle, summa jucundidate repetit, nullibi mihi non gra ....... supremum hunc in ordine meo Hierosolymitano magistratum, g[ratum] pariter, acceptumque habens quicquid in eo mihi demandando ..... ordine gestum est." Thanks him, as the protector of the order. Their poverty emboldens him to commend their fortunes to him again. If deserted by him, where can they find another refuge? "Quod scripsit majestas vestra .... commenda, cujus gratiam facere soliti sumus magistratum ....... tes, nondum contigit in quo majestati vestræ morem gerere potuerim ....... vacare contigerit, enitar, quicquid agam, factum omne meum [ma]jestati vestræ approbare." The Turk has been led into an ambush by the Persians on the other side of the Euphrates, and defeated. Tauris being recovered by [the Persians], the Turk is at Lebda, recruiting his forces. Barbarossa has fled from Tunis (aufugitTunete) with much booty and several thousand Turks, leaving many guns (tormentorum bellicorum). All his fleet in the harbor was taken and destroyed. "Add [am] unum dumtaxat, quod nec solus, nec falsus prævideo, rem eo deductam esse, ut (quod sibi omnes haud dubie pollicentur), majestati vestræ ubique invictissimæ juxta ac felicissimæ Syriacas et Palestinas victorias, quas ab ejus majoribus adeptas gloriosissime ac triumphantissime legimus, præsentes nunc, et læti videa ....... aliud (quæso) a fidei Christianæ defensore sperare debemus ...... [ma]jestatem vestram Deus incolumem cum pari felicitate diutissime co[nservet]." Malta, 18 Aug. mdxx[xv.]. Signed.
Lat., pp. 3. Mutilated. Add.
19 Aug.
R. O.
124. William Body to Cromwell.
Received his letters, dated Thornbury, the 16th of this August. I have paid Henry Polsted 1,067l., and have still in my hands as much plate unbroken as amounts to 50l. It shall be saved till you see it. I have not written, as you expected, of your affairs, because the matter is too difficult to explain; I mean the coining of your plate. When you return I will give you a reckoning to the last farthing. I am not wont to crave, yet I pray God I be not forgotten, for since I was 27 years of age I never led so "pensifull" a summer. 19 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Chief Secretary. Sealed.
19 Aug.
R. O.
125. John Gostwyk to Cromwell.
I have received your letter, and send you a warrant for Garrard Meares, received from my Lord Chancellor, who left this Tuesday last; also a letter from the deputy of Calais. I have received from my Lord Chancellor Ponynges' Act, and delivered it to your servant Thakker. I am called upon by Nedam and Whalley for money. Sir Edmund Bedingfelde has sent unto me for more money, as well for present provision as to pay certain creditors of the household, whom he has promised to pay at this feast of St. Bartholomew. Let me know your pleasure, and remember the warrants I delivered to Ralph Sadler at Stepney for my discharge. London, Thursday, 19 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
19 Aug.
R. O.
126. Roland Lee, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, to Cromwell.
Give credence to my servant concerning the destruction of the weirs. I am in such a case that I cannot "beweylde my self." Therefore, I was so bold as to write to you for a physician. I beg your favour for Stradling. You wrote to me in favor of one Turberville and his uncle Matthew, who are in one part, and Lowther and Robert Stradlyng on the other part, touching the late inheritance of Turberville. Forasmuch as Stradling's party was the stronger, and Turberville was outlawed for killing a man, Englefield and I at Gloucester made an arrangement with the parties. Gives further details of their proceedings in the matter. As Stradling is a proper man and a good archer, and willing to pay a reasonable fine, I recommend him for the King's pardon. You shall receive by the bearer the copy of the book of hunters (fn. 10) with annotations in the margin, and also the process against the parson of Rowslenche, with Sir John Russell's answer. Beaudeley, 19 Aug. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
19 Aug.
Nero, B. VII. 101.
B. M.
127. Bernardino Sandro to Starkey.
Has received his letter. M. Alvise Priuli will go to Rome with the Cardinal at the end of the month. "Jonys nostro" has not yet returned from Mantua. Does not think "II Signor" (Pole) wished to send him these news of his father. If he go to England, will send part of these writings by him. Have come to Venice for the vacation, but are much concerned to hear the case in which lord Montague is. II Signore thinks certainly that he is dead, but tries to hide his grief. The Emperor has taken Tunis, and reinstated the former king, who was expelled a year ago by Barbarossa. The latter has fled with 300 horse. The Emperor has put a price of 50,000 ducats on him if brought alive, and 10,000 if dead. The King will pay a certain tribute to the Emperor, who has demanded Goletta as security. It is said that he is coming to Naples, and also that he is going to Constantinople, which is left with little guard. The cardinal de Medici is dead, leaving a revenue of 50,000 or 60,000 ducats, which the Pope has given to one of his nephews. It is thought that his brother Alexander, duke of Florence, caused him to be poisoned. Some of his household have confessed that he was poisoned. Campense is going to the bishop of Verona in three days. Venice, 19 Aug., 1535.
Ital. Hol., p. 1. Add.
19 Aug.
R. O.
128. John Heliares to Master Palmes.
Facts will show how rightly anxious I am to claim your intimacy, for adversity proves a friend. You know better than I, as being near at hand, in what disorder our affairs stand. For my part, I am conscious of no crime, unless it be one to have gone over sea to study, as many Englishmen have done these many years. Dominus Pallatus will shortly visit you, who, I believe, favors me, and to whom I have written. Let him be entreated in my name and yours, to keep our boat steady, that it may not be engulfed by the waves, for he is very influential, both with Master Secretary and with all your friends, especially with Dominus Wyndsorus. Matters must be settled before Holy Cross Day, when all the priests of that deanery are to appear before Cromwell at Southwick, though I cannot be present without danger, as I caught a fever seven days ago. Paris, 19 Aug.
Lat. Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
19 Aug.
Poli Epp. i. 425.
129. Pole to Aloysius Priolus.
Grief, I perceive, makes you eloquent, though it is not grief but piety to God and love to me that your letters declare. Urges him, however, to keep the fountains of his eloquence open, either for these times, if they can have any communication, or for some happier occasion. Dislikes to speak, write, or do anything about the matters referred to in their correspondence, but awaits an opportunity which he trusts God will soon supply. Yesterday the bp. of Chieti sent for him by Cantonus, that friend of our friends the Hermits, to ask what answer he had made to the letters which "Lombardus noster" had written to Pole in his name and in that of Lipomanus and Priolus. Said he had made no answer yet; and the Bishop said he was very anxious about the matter of the Hermits, and was ready to go to you; but being told that Lipomanus was daily expected, he deferred everything till his coming. Venice, 19 Aug.
Lat.
20 Aug.130. Bishopric of Hereford.
See Grants in August, No. 15.
20 Aug.
R. O.
131. Thomas Thacker to Cromwell.
I received your letter of the 16th to my great comfort. According to your writing, Mr. Williamson and I send you, by Ric. Swift, a black damask gown, new made and lined. We sent your coats on the 17th by John Tyny, who was then leaving London. Your buildings go forward with all diligence. The Rolls, 20 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
20 Aug.
R. O.
132. Ric. Tomyow to Cromwell.
Before receiving your letters I charged Roger Apleyerd with keeping a cast of falcons brought by Mr. Chesolme's servant, who is as yet unregarded (unrewarded), as I have not seen him since. Your household here is well, though death has been very near us, and one of Lincoln's Inn conveyed thence by night died of the plague in a poor man's house right against my chamber. The house is shut up, and all other in this lane clear. Such as lodge in your gate seldom go out, and will have less occasion if, before greace time pass, you will appoint from Endevill, or elsewhere within your rule, some venison for the household, that men may be the better contented with their fare. Your victuallers repairing hither for their monthly payment look at this time of year to see a venison pasty, no dainty in your house. Also Mrs. Prior, thinking that we have abundance, often sends to me for venison when we have none. Nothing has come here in your absence except "a buk di' (demi)," and two pasties of red deer from Mr. Pollard, and a buck from Mr. Twissill, whom I beg you will thank. The Rolls, 20 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
20 Aug.
R. O.
133. Ric. Tomyow to Berthlet.
I beg you to call upon Mr. Roper for an answer to his brother's letters which I conveyed to him of late by Mr. Goodale. His brother sends every other day from Chelsea here to know if any word has come from him. Deliver to Mr. Richard a bill of my old fellow Mr. Morton, which the poor man trusts Mr. Richard will solicit unto my master; for on making his piteous moan to the King when his Grace was last with my master at the Rolls, he bade Morton deliver his bill to my master, who would give him an answer. He says Mr. Richard promised to do so. I fear it will be a cold suit, but I would not omit anything on my part. When you and I last talked of warrants "that I would fain have as niere Winton as might be, I trusted to have been bold upon Mr. Dr. Buttes for procuring of them," but I have not succeeded. The Rolls, 20 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: To Mr. Berthlet, attendant upon Mr. Secretary at the Court. Endd.
20 Aug.
R. O.
134. Placet to Cromwell.
The King's Commissioners have been lately here. And whereas my conscience compelled me to speak of certain things, and especially of a certain book one Master Cannonis had of me long since, dwelling nigh Salisbury; I am ready to send it to you. I wish your counsel also touching certain ceremonies for exalting the bishop of Rome, and to have your commandment to bring in books touching his authority, St. Patrick's Purgatory, miracles, &c., confounding simple souls. I am commanded to write this by the late Commissioners, Master Robert Whycom (?), Master Wey, Master Morten. Winchecumbe, 20 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
R. O.135. [John Placett] to Cromwell.
Please let me have authority to take up such books as treat of Purgatory. There is one freshly limned and fair written, but the matter is only dry dreams. 2. Item, Alverius, in which the power of the Pope is magnified, and he is made equal with the Holy Trinity. 3. Item, that my brother Overbury may be commanded to preach the Supremacy every Sunday, and have his chamber, books, and fire. 4. Item, that I may compel every monk to preach it and teach it to others. 5. "Item, that pyuysche (peevish), papysche munkyschenes" be not exalted to be equal with baptism. I have known some fall almost in desperation by overmuch trust in pardon. 6. Item, that the priest use not in absolution these words: Contritis, attritis, oblitis.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary.
20 Aug.
R. O.
136. Thomas Clerk and Will. Vowell to Cromwell.
On the 20th, John Gillinge, high constable of the hundred of South Brent, and John Buckett, informed us that one John Horsey, of Bridgwater, and others, had shown them that David Leonard, hooper, an Irishman, had said, "God save king Henry and queen Katharine his wedded wife, and Anne at his pleasure, for whom all England shall rue." We have sent the accused to gaol to wait the King's pleasure. Banwell, 20 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
20 Aug.
R. O.
137. John Wy[lliamson] to Cromwell.
I received your letter of the 15th. By your servant, Ric. Swift, you will receive your gown of black damask and your two coats, with which your servant, John Tyny, left London on the 17th. Henry Polsted and I cannot see that Geo. Robynson is in London. As soon as he comes we will despatch him as you have commanded. I have received Thos. Avery's key of Mr. Broke. Your buildings go forward. My mother and all are in good health. The plague rages in the city. The Frenchman next your house that was in St. Peter's parish has buried two, but no more. Friar Austins, London, 20 Aug. Signed.
Mutilated, p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
20 Aug.
Harl. MS. 604, f. 65.
B. M. Wright's Suppression of the Monasteries, 56.
138. Dr. Thomas Legh to Cromwell.
According to his instructions, has restrained the heads and brethren of all the places to which he has been from leaving the precincts, which grieves them not a little. Hears that Dr. Laiton has not done this where he has been. Thinks there should be uniformity of action. If Cromwell is going to Oxford as he intended, the bearer can declare to him the state of the University. Laycok, 20 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. Thos. Cromwell, principal secretary. Endd.
20 Aug.
R. O.
139. John Ap Rice to Cromwell.
We have been at Malmesbury, as I advertised you. At Bradstock, after diligent inquisition, we could find nothing against the prior, but two or three of the convent were convicted of incontinency. At Stanley the abbot confessed incontinency before he was abbot, and six or seven of the convent have confessed the same. At Laycok we can find no excesses. Mr. Doctor (fn. 11) everywhere restrains the heads, the brethren and sisters, from going forth; and no women, of what estate soever, are allowed to visit religious men's houses, and vice vesâ. I think this over strict, for as many of these houses stand by husbandry they must fall to decay if the heads are not allowed to go out. He is chosen for his expertness in temporal matters, that he may be a proctor for all the rest, and that they, being provided for by his means, may be released from all outward cares, and serve God the quieter. By the law he ought to be mortified to the world, so as not to be corrupted by outward business; and though divers of them be found otherwise, this can always be remedied by their removal from office. The monks of the Charterhouse devised all the ways they could to keep themselves from outward business, and yet they were compelled to have a proctor as their Martha, and their prior to go forth for greater business. Pray consider whether it will be acceptable or convenient that no noble women, or men or councillors, &c. should come to the abbot's table. It will be for you either to qualify your injuctions or determine the exemptions. Laycok, 20 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
20 Aug.
R. O.
140. Roland Lee, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, to Cromwell.
I have received the King's letters for the indictment of Gola verz Jevan Gayn, lately attainted at Hereford; also concerning the pulling down of weirs on the water of Severn, and the destruction of the fish. As to the first, there were continually abiding these three years in the county of Meleneth, the commotes of Gwerthronyon, Radergoowith, and in Radnorsland, three of the most arrant thieves in all Wales, Lewis Gethyn, Philip ap Howell ap Gwalter, and Rice Enerowe, who were taken and executed in different places, to the no little charge of the King, as this Council would have the late statute in that behalf "sanccyed," especially in the case of Lewis. Sends Lewis's confession. At the last assize holden in Hereford we caused Gola to be arraigned as accessory to Lewis; for if the accessory be not punished as well as the principal, we shall never have good rule in Wales; "and for my part I durst never have been so bold to have moved the King's highness for such a common strumpet and recetter of thieves." The bearer can tell you of my diligence in the weirs. I am better than I was. Beaudeley, 20 Aug. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
20 Aug.
R. O.
141. Exchequer.
Book of the accounts of Rob. Fouler, one of the tellers of the Receipt of Exchequer, showing receipts and payments from 1 to 26 Hen. VIII. Balanced 20 Aug. 27 Hen. VIII. at p. 128.
Pp. 360.
20 Aug.
R. O.
142. John Whalley to Cromwell.
On the 11th of last month (sic) sent a letter, by Mr. Derby, one of the clerks of the Signet, in answer to Cromwell's, dated at Wynchecombe, the 26th of the same month (sic). Mr. Treasurer and other of the King's Commissioners reached Dover on Sunday last, and were set over to Calais on Tuesday morning in three hours. Before leaving he punished certain persons as labourers, " whiche were supersticius and wolde have beytton bothe me and the maister of the Mayson Dew," and such as would go off to harvest in the country and the like. Last pay day, 34 labourers stole away in the night to go to the harvest; he and the master of the Maison Dieu have much trouble with them, as the bearer, John Anthony, can certify. The works go on prosperously. Cromwell may advertise the King that today a crayer of 50 tons, and two smaller boats, arrived, and are moored in the Wyke alongside the jetty, ready to take off Mr. Treasurer's horses, &c. tomorrow. The master of the Maison Dieu takes great pains; asks Cromwell to write him a letter of thanks, and inform the King of it. Is desired by Mr. Sonteleger (sic) to advertise Cromwell that Mr. Carnaby, the earl of Northumberland's servant, has good land in Kent, worth near 200l. a year, and patronage of four or five benefices. Mr. Baker, attorney of the Dowchery, and Mr. Twhaytes, Sentleger's brother-in-law, know the lands well. Carnaby wishes to sell some of it. Baker and Sentleger advise Cromwell to inform Northumberland of this, because they think the land was had from him. "And that done, Mr. Baker will helpe you, if you be so content, to compasse that thing whiche shalbe for your proffytte." Asks Cromwell to send him some money by John Anthony, the bearer. Dover, 20 Aug.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: "Chieffe Secretory." Endd.

Footnotes

1 St. Dominic's Day is 4 Aug.
2 Madame de Bours.
3 See Vol. viii., Nos. 797, 873. This letter may therefore have been written in the end of June or in July.
4 Supplied from modern marginal note.
5 Above his own signature his clerk has written "Robert Vauchop, theologien indigne."
6 Elected March 1536.
7 Sic.
8 See Vol. VIII., No. 1112.
9 Simon Symonds, prebendary of Hansacre, in Lichfield, who was installed canon of Windsor on the 19th Aug. 1535.
10 See Vol. VIII., No. 1048.
11 Dr. Legh.