Henry VIII
September 1535, 6-10

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Institute of Historical Research

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James Gairdner (editor)

Year published

1886

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96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114

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'Henry VIII: September 1535, 6-10', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 9: August-December 1535 (1886), pp. 96-114. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75667 Date accessed: 02 August 2014.


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September 1535, 6-10

6 Sept.
Vienna Archives.
287. Chapuys to Charles V.
Received on the 28th ult. the Emperor's letters of the 13th July, with the news of the capture of La Goulette, of which he had been already informed on the 14th ult. by Likerke. The Emperor will learn by his letters of the 25th the pleasure which the King professed to have at it, and likewise all this people. Sent lately a servant to Court to request the King to send his physician to the Princess, both on account of a certain rheum, and to provide against a return of her ordinary complaint, which she dreads, in the coming winter. I sent letters written to me from various quarters about the capture of Tunis to Cromwell, who on the aforesaid two points made me the reply of which a copy is enclosed. While my man was in Court there came a servant of the English ambassador in France, who brought the news of the capture of Tunis, as the King himself told my man; not considering it, however, for certain, as it only came from Rome, and requesting that I would inform him as soon as letters came from his (your) Majesty. Afterwards Cromwell declared the news to be perfectly certain, whatever the King his master might have said, who had only used those expressions in order that I might not forbear to inform him, and that I should do him great pleasure by imparting to him all the news that came. The King is equipping three ships to send to Lubeck and Denmark under charge of the gunner (fn. 1) who was there last year. To cover the affair they give out that these ships are going to Holland, and so the said gunner told one of my men; but I think that he will soon not only confess the truth of the said voyage, but some particulars of his charge besides; for he has several times told my men that in any case before his departure he will come and dine with me to take leave. The King is sending in these ships some artillery and powder, pikes and harquebuses, and, as I am told on good authority, 60,000 ducats in ready money. I am told the ambassadors lately sent to Lubeck carried more than 30[000?] ducats. The King has lately countermanded certain English ships which were ready to go into France; and this, as I hear, from a fear that they would be taken or detained by virtue of the decree promulgated by His Holiness against him and his kingdom. Certainly the King and those of the Concubine's party fear nothing more than the obedience of your Majesty's subjects to the commands of his Holiness, because it would give rise to the greatest mutiny and confusion in the world, as Cromwell has several times confessed to me, and more now than ever, because the season has been unfavourable (la saison a este fort petite), and there is great probability of famine; and application is continually made to me from all quarters to urge the carrying into effect of the Apostolic censures, which every one here believes would be a speedy remedy, especially considering the great dissatisfaction of all men at the life and government of this King. London, 6 Sept. 1535.
Fr. From a modern copy, pp. 2.
6 Sept.
Lansd. MS. 989, f. 133.
B. M.
288. John Claimond, President, and the Scholars of Corpus Christi College, to Henry VIII.
Received on 6 Sept. his mandate, and have accordingly cited the fellows and scholars to be present at his visitation.
Datum in collegio vestro prædicto, 6 Sept. 27 Hen. VIII.
Lat., pp. 3. Modern copy.
6 Sept.
R. O.
289. Jane Gyldford to [Cromwell].
I thank your mastership for your great goodness, and beg your continuance. Injunctions have been given to the master of the Gawntes in Brystow that no woman shall come within their precincts. I have a lodging there, chosen as meet for a poor widow to serve God in in her old days, and I trust no inconvenience shall ensue thereof. I have also been used to go to church through the cloister of that house to a chapel within the choir, but I shall be content to resort to the common place as others do of the same church. If I may be a suitor in the matter, I request you will license the master of the house with a chaplain to go abroad for the common weal of the same, as you have done to others. At Hill, 6 Sept. Signed.
P.S. in her own hand: Begs credence for the bearer.
P. 1. Endd.
6 Sept.
R. O.
290. Thomas Godney and four other Merchants, to Henry VIII.
Arriving at Copemanhaven were seized by the duke of Holst, the king of Sweden, and their adherents; our thirteen ships were taken and spoiled. As you have ambassadors here in this country we hope you will command them to obtain redress from the Duke. "At the leger of the duke of Holst, elect king of Denmark," 6 Sept. Signed in the same hand as the text by Thomas Godney, John Bysshope of Harwich, Thomas Laws, John Wright, and Roger Watson.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
R. O.2. The Same to [Bonner and Cavendish.]
Ten days before the date of this we came with our ships before Copemanhaven, and were commanded to come to anchor by the Admiral, "and took all our victuals" and ordnance. We went to the King's Admiral to know his pleasure. Were ordered to abide the King's coming. Since the coming of Oliver, your servant, we have had the worst treatment, for the Admiral of the King's ship took our sails and much of our raiment; and it is said they will have our ship and goods. We trust at your coming hither you will have spoken to the King and obtained our licence to depart. Elsenor, 6 Sept. 1535.
P. 1.
6 Sept.
Nero, B. iii. 128.
B. M.
291. Robt. Legge, Thos. Gyggs, and Will. Bolle to Cromwell.
At Coomanhavyn, 6 Sept. 1535.
Complain that on arriving at Elsanowr on Whitsun even, after paying their custom, and on the Monday following at Commanhavyn, all their ordnance and artillery was taken from them, their victual spoiled, tankards thrown at men's heads, and merchandise taken away. Were detained three weeks, and then compelled by Hart Van Meken Borrowe to take passports, paying a gold gyldon apiece; but when the money was paid, they were told they should not pass. Were fain to labour to Uryn (Jurgen) Wolweffer, borow master of Lubeck, who procured them a general passport from Greve Crystover, captain of the castle of Copmanhavyn, which cost a gold gyldon and a half. They promised them a ship named the Samsson, but sent them in their own ship, without ordnance; so that if they had met their enemies the Swethens, they would have lost their ships and been taken prisoners. Arrived safely at Danske, where Hans Van Werd, the head ruler, told them that they should be much better treated, so that the King might know the people of Danske were his friends. After selling what little goods the Lubecks had left them, were not allowed to buy wares, but were ordered by Hans Van Werd to ballast their ships with pitch, tar, and osmondes, and were kept with flattering words for seven weeks. Might have passed the Sound before the ships of the king of Denmark, the king of Swethen, or the High Master of Sprus had come into the Sound, but they would not let them go till they knew that the Lubecks had lost all.
Dared not venture then, and sent a man to the High Master of Spruse at Conyborowe for a safe-conduct, but he could get nothing but light answers and small comfort. Obtained from Van Werd a bill to the king of Denmark; trusting to which they started home, but have been taken and spoiled. There are of them 12 ships of Englishmen. Signed.
Pp. 4.
6 Sept.
Nero, B. vi. 152.
B. M.
292. G. Lily to Starkey.
Has read his letter to Bernardinus. Agrees with him in his advice that Lily should come to England, but cannot do it. When a boy, his friends thought that, following his father's example, who had obtained no moderate praise for his goodness and learning, he, being alone left of so many children, would come by a sort of hereditary right into the best part of his paternal possessions; but now this all seems to have come to nothing. Does not wish to write what makes him feel thus. Does not see anything left to him but to throw himself into this new school of Chieti (Theatinensium).
Asks him to salute Morison for him, and to deliver the accompanying letters to John. Padua, 6 Sept.
Lat. Hol., pp. 2. Add.. Londini.
6 Sept.
Calig. E. ii. 145.
B. M.
293. Sir John Wallop to [Lord Lisle].
Requests that the packet addressed to Mr. Secretary may be sent over with all speed in his accustomed manner. The Muscavitts have defeated the king of Pow[le], and he hardly escaped to Crakavia. They never before invaded the realm so far. The duke of Sproice, who was accustomed to send the King hawks yearly, was killed, and all the best of the realm. It is an evil thing for king John of Hungary, for the king of Poland was his chief aid, and his first wife was king John's sister. (fn. 2) Asks him to show the news to Master Treasurer, and to tell him that he has nothing else to write but what was in his last letter, "saving in these may "be pickid owt more sweter things then in my last, not very much to [be] "trusted unto." The King's money will not be paid till November, and then the French king promises he shall be paid for both, and says Henry "is agred to the [sum]me." Does not wish him to tell this to any man but the Treasurer. Has advertised the [King] thereof, so "you" need not write. Janievill, 6 Sept.
[I p]ray you [reward] this bringar.....here who [is th]e Frenche [king's] servaunt, and [has] taken payne [in c]onveying these [letter]s." Signed.
P. 1. Mutilated.
6 Sept.
R. O.
294. Luther to Spalatinus.
* * No news except that Dr. Antonius (fn. 3) is here, that black Englishman sent by his King to our Prince (the Elector), and he invites Philip [Melancthon] to England to a conference with the King. * * 6 Sept. 1535.
Lat.
6 Sept.
Add. MS. 28,588, f. 20.
B. M.
295. Viscount J. Hannart to the Empress.
The queens of France and Hungary met at Cambray on 16 Aug. There were present the daughters and daughter-in-law of the King, Madame de Vendome, the cardinals of Borvon (Bourbon) and Tornon, the Admiral, the duke of Albany, and the marchioness of Zenete. The Empress probably knows that the king of England has separated from the Church of Rome, and put to death many persons who will not obey him as head of the Church after God. Since the death of the Cardinal of Rochester and More, twentyeight persons have been executed, among them nine Carthusians. The King has given the Carthusian Monastery in London to his new wife for a palace, and others to his daughter and father-in-law.
The king of Scotland has sent ambassadors to conclude his marriage with the daughter of Mons. de Vandôme, and to conduct her to Scotland.
* * * 6 Sept. 1535.
Sp., pp. 3. Modern copy.
7 Sept.
R. O.
296. John, Master of the Gaunts, to Cromwell.
I have received the King's injunctions and yours, and as I am governor of this poor religious house of the Gaunts of Bristol, and must ride from place to place about the profits of the house, I beg that you will dispense with me, that I may not only oversee the works, but ride to and fro on such business as shall be necessary for the sustentation of this place. Fro the Gaunts of Bristol, 7 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Secretary and Visitor-General.
7 Sept.
Harl. MS. 604, f. 117.
B. M.
297. Inventory of the Priory of [Worcester].
* * * kitchen stuff, &c.
The Tumbar .. office.—" St. Oswalde and St. Ulstan's hede with selver and gylte." A mitre for St. Oswald's head. An arm of St. Edmund the Bishop, "ij. woode covered with silver gilt." .... An arm of St. Roman the Bishop, covered in certain places with silver. 2 small "srym .... gilt with little stones, in which are certain relics of St. Oswalde and St. Wlsta[n] .... covered with silver." A monyle of St. Oswalde. Una vitta circa caput S. Margaretæ ... with silver, with other garnishing, with silver about the head. 11 thousand virgins, in part of a skul[l] .... of Herfford's comb, garnished in silver and gilt, with 2 rings. 2 old pans of 16 gallons a pe[ce] .... bason to temper wax therein. A trivet.
The Master of the Chapel.—Surplices for the master of the children and the children. "A maske booke of .... with pricksong, wherein is five parts and 4 parts." Four pricksong mass books of pawz. 2 other books—one with antems and "salnes" in him; 4 little pricksong books of masses; 5 mass books of 5 parts; 5 bo[oks] with Salve festa dies, and scrolls belonging to the two "pauper" books; in them be the five parts of other songs. A sis .... note book, "burdyde" (boarded). A parchment book of salnes (psalms) boarded. 2 masses in five parts in parchment scrolls. A "pauper" book of 4 parts. A "pauper" book with the Vitatoris Benedictus, Te Deum in pricking, 3 or 4 anthems in scrowes. A brass lamp hanging in Our Lady Chapel. 3 coffers with locks and keys. A table, trestles, &c.
The Ostyllar's office.—Spoons with images of Our Lady, and other plate. Bedding and furniture in Wm. Deane's chamber, the second chamber, the pantry chamber, the second chamber, and the chapel chamber.
The Fraterras office.—12 great silver bowls. 42 spoons. 10 masers with gilt bonds. 2 silver salts. A horn for the whassell, with a cover garnished with silver and stones. In the Misericorde, a table board, forms, &c., a pall before the fire chimney, and fireirons. In the little house, a bason and ewer. In the fratry, 3 bells, 8 candlesticks, a lamp, cloths, pots, &c.
"The stufe of Bevery".—In the hall: tables, forms, and an iron screen. In the pantry: a cupboard, &c. In the buttery: 2 planks to set ale upon. In the kitchen: an iron bar, chains, and a chair. In the cook's chamber: a moulding board and a painted cloth. In the dortour: 6 bedstocks, with planks; a form; a coffer, containing candlesticks, chargers, and other articles, some of silver fashion and some of the old fashion. In the Ryves chamber: a bedstock, tester, &c. In the Butler's chamber: an iron-bound coffer, pots, a chafferne, a garlick mortar, &c. In the chapel: A holy-water stock of lead; 4 kneeling forms; a pan painted of the Good Lord; 10 images. At Robt. Avverde's: a great pot, a kettle, broches, &c. At James Avverde's: a standing kettle. At home: a great pot in the custody of Benet.
Ornaments belonging to St. Oswolde and St. Wlstan, and other:—
A cope of yellow satin, the picture of pearls set upon gold. A chasuble of yellow satin; another of black silk, with the Holy Lamb, a cross on the back. A stole of "nylde' (needle) work, set with stones and pearls. A girdle of changeable silk, platted at the ends. An alb of cloth of gold, the fore part set with pearls and stones. A cope of St. Wlstan and chasuble of yellow satin, embroidered about the collar with needlework and gold. An alb of story work. A cope and chasuble of crimson satin, broidered about the collar with needlework and gold. 2 stoles; one blue satin, with pearls at the ends and gold; the other changeable satin. A fannell of blue satin, the ends pearl and cloth of gold. 2 girdles; one green silk, the other knit net-wise. A stole and a [sta]mell of St. Dunstan, red silk, wrought with gold and needlework, the ends cloth of gold. A stamell (?) of St. Alphege, the ends cloth of gold set with pearls. A stole of St. Aldulfe.
ii. An inventory made upon St. Dunstan's Day 1535 of certain parcels of iron work and others being in a coffer at the Prior's manors.
A stock saw. A framing saw. A hand saw. A little saw to set on a lock. "A great yocke nawger." 3 other less "nawgers." An axe, an adze, a wimble, all of iron. A hombre. A hacker. 2 iron parsers, with a hombre and a socket at the end to put in candles. A snotter for candles. A fire-ball to warm hands. A pair of little "shysers." A briar scythe. A drag of iron to "clans polles" (cleanse pools). 2 swan hooks. 2 brushes. 2 rubber brushes. A purse of 89 counters. A box, with dust for writing. An ivory comb. A glass of styll (steel) gilt. A hay net with bells to take foxes. 6 fox nets, with bells. 2 lanterns. A bowlt. A lovynge bell. 2 lovynge nets for partridge and larks. A bowe net to drive partridges. 3 leather bottles. 4 bearing bills. Shovels, spades, and "skolpis." 2 wheel barrows.
Pp. 3. Large paper.
7 Sept.
R. O.
St. P. vii. 627.
298. Chr. Mont to Henry VIII.
Yesterday Langius took him to dinner with the bishop of Chalons, who told him how vexed the cardinal of Lorraine was at the Pope's conduct towards the King, and at the impudent brief he had written to the French king. The Cardinal intends to send one of his household to Rome, to warn the bishop of Rome and the cardinals, who are his friends, not to think that they can decree anything against princes, for it would only make them a laughingstock. The Bishop said also that this Pope cannot long survive, and his successor may be more friendly to both Kings, for now more than 18 cardinals belong to their side. He asked Mont to assure the King that the cardinal of Lorraine was devoted to him. Langius said that he might come to England from the duke of Gueldres, for the ambassadors of Lubeck and of the duke of Holstein are expected to meet at Gueldres to treat of peace; and if they come, Langius thinks that he will go also in the name of the French king, and go from Gueldres to Germany. He very much desires to see the king of England, and receive instructions from him before going to Germany. He will endeavour to prevent the Germans from consenting to a General Council, and has no doubts of succeeding. Jainvil, 7 Sept. 1535.
Lat. Hol., pp. 2. Add. Endd.
7 Sept.
R. O.
St. P. vii. 629.
299. Chr. Mont to Cromwell.
Two days ago sent two letters to England by Master Barnabe, whom Mont met as he was going to Wallop. Has received the King's letters ordering him to go to Melancthon and persuade him to come to England, where he is much more likely to accomplish something for the spread of the Gospel than with a King most Christian in name, but very different in reality. Fears he will not be able to accomplish this, for Melancthon's coming to France does not now depend on agreement with the articles sent by Langius, but articles have been already sent by the Germans to Francis, and returned with some alterations which they promised to adopt. Langius has accordingly sent on his kinsman Mons. de la Fos to Germany with money to bring Melancthon to France with five other learned men. Francis has sent him a safe-conduct, a gold chain, and money. All the Lutheran doctors and rabbis have written to Langey that they will accept any terms of agreement not absolutely unjust and impious; and Melancthon would have already gone to France, unless Langey had dissuaded him. Thinks it would be difficult to turn his course towards England. Fears Foxe will not find Melancthon in Germany.
The second part of his charge was to find out from Melancthon whether the articles lately sent by Wallop were sent by Melancthon, or drawn up by the University of Paris, and to inform the King of Melancthon's opinion about them.
Has shown them to the Venetian ambassador. To the first article, "Admittitur potestas Pontificis Maximi," replied, "Hoc Latinum magis sapit Sorbonam Parisiensem quam Vitenbergensem Minervam." Has also written about them to Foxe.
Was told by Langey that the Lutherans had sent more than 20 articles about religion to the French king, and he had sent them back, asking them to adopt certain alterations. This they agreed to do for the sake of concord. One of these was that they would endure the primacy of the bishop of Rome to preserve an agreement about doctrine, if he would judge according to the Word of God. Everyone sees that this is more simple than the other.
Langey confessed that it was impossible to prove the primacy of the bishop of Rome from the Word of God, and Clement had consented to refer it to positive law. The more learned Cardinals, especially cardinal Trivulcio, were of the same opinion. Does not think that these articles sent by Wallop are an answer from the Doctors of Paris to the Lutheran articles, for the Lutheran articles were given at the King's order by Langey to the faculty of Theology at Paris, and 20 doctors were appointed to examine them first; but no one had yet seen their opinion, for which alone he had come to the Court, and one of the doctors was going to bring it under the University seal in two or three days.
Thinks, therefore, that the articles in question are not the reply of the Parisian doctors. Langey says they will grant anything rather than agree with the Germans. Whatever the articles are, will show them to Philip. Has asked Langey for a copy of the articles he exhibited to the University, and he has sent for them to Paris. Stopped at Reens by advice of Wallop and Heyns, and took occasion to thank Langey (fn. 4) for his letter to Wallop from Villicutre, offering to come shortly to some place where he will be able to do good service to the king of England; adding that Henry had accordingly sent him and Wallop hither to confer with him. As Mont must leave this immediately Langey has promised to deliver to Wallop the copy of the articles he promised to him. Jainvil, 7 Sept. 1535.
Hol. Lat., pp. 5. Add. Endd.
7 Sept.
R. O.
300. Christopher Mont to Cromwell.
Mr. Heyns and I have left letters with Wallop on our instructions, which, as some of the news in them is doubtful, we thought it better to delay till he can send them to England by his own servants; for these letters Wallop sent to Calais by a servant of the French king. As to my diet I was paid 28 cr. on leaving England, 1 Aug.; but I must go to Wittenberg, which is about 100 German miles hence, and the journey will take nearly a whole month. I shall also have to stay a month there to confer with Melancthon and others, and the return will occupy another month. As it is difficult to send money to Wittenberg, begs a remittance by Fox, who, he believes, is going thither. Wallop promised him 80 cr., of which he has spent 22 on a horse, and two months' diets are due to him. Leaves today for Germany, and Heyns for Paris. "Ex Jainvil," 7 Sept. 1535.
Hol. Lat., p. 1. Add. Endd.
8 Sept.
R. O.
301. John Gostwyk to Cromwell.
I thank you for the buck out of my lord of Suffolk's park. I have delivered the sides of the stag to your steward to bake against your coming, and half the haunch to Ric. Gresham. I beg your favor to Dr. Call, provincial of the Grey Friars, in his suit. He has asked me to write, "and for the same has promised me that I shall lack no rosewater." I purpose to ride home on Saturday, and return in eight days. London, 8 Sept., Nativ. of Our Lady. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
8 Sept.
R. O.
302. Rowland Lee, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, to Cromwell.
I have received by my servant Lewes the King's letter about putting down weirs upon the Wye. I have ordered it to be done between this and Friday. I have appointed Mr. Holte and Sir Edw. Crofte to repair thither on Wednesday next, and would have been there myself, but I have been ill of a fever. Beaudeley, Lady Day. (fn. 5) Signed very feebly.
P. 1. Add. Mr. Secretary. Endd.
8 Sept.
R. O.
303. Richard Abbot of Winchcombe to Cromwell.
I thank you for your letters. Ascertaining you that since we have received certain injunctions, we beg your favorable interpretation of them, especially where they seem obscure. Give credence to my brother dan John Gabriel. Wynchelcombe, 8 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
8 Sept.
R. O.
304. The Sub-prior and Cellarer of the Monastery of Worcester to Cromwell.
According to your writing we have delivered to the bearer Ric. Chylde, 7l., to the use of the prior. There remains over and above the said sum 55s. in our custody. At the fetching of the money Mr. Chancellor and Mr. Evans, my lord Bishop's registrar, were present. Worcester, 8 Sept. Signed: John Lawerne, sub-prior—Thomas Sudburi, cellarar.
P. 1. Add.: Master Secretary. Endd.
8 Sept.
R. O.
305. Sir. Ric. Ligon and others to Sir John Brugge.
You are to appear before us at Gloucester, 16 Sept., to answer certain articles we have received from the King. 8 Sept. 27 Hen. VIII. Signed: R. Ligon—Ed'e Tame—Jamys Clifford—Robert Wy—John Arnold—Thomas Lane.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
9 Sept.
Lansd. MS. 989, f. 134.
B. M.
306. The Royal Supremacy.
Declaration by John Claimund, the president, and the fellows of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, that they will henceforth refuse obedience to any foreign prince, and will never consent to treat for the re-establishment of papal supremacy, but will make known to the King any communications the bishop of Rome may make to them either by nuncio or letters. Dated in margin at the beginning: Sept. 9, 1535. Hen. VIII. 27.
Lat. Modern copy, pp. 6.
9 Sept.
R. O.
307. Victualling of London.
Certificate by Lewes Thomas, bailiff in Southwark of the archbishop of Canterbury, that, on the 8th Sept. 27 Hen. VIII., John Bone discharged and delivered 28 wayes of cheese in Southwark. Sealed with his official seal, the day and year aforesaid. Seal.
P. 1. Small paper.
R. O.2. Certificate by Lewis Thomas, bailiff of the archbishop of Canterbury, that Thomas Bekensaull, of London, discharged at Southwark, 9 Sept. 27 Hen. VIII., cheese and butter from a monger of St. Osyth's, John Frebarne, master, and butter from another monger, John Assheman, master.
P. 1. Small slip.
9 Sept.
R. O.
St. P. ii. 276.
308. Duke of Norfolk to Cromwell.
Wishes to know, if the bailiff of Troyes has come, how Cromwell thinks matters between the King and the French king will fare Thinks of sending his younger son (fn. 6) to France for a year, but not unless the love between the Kings is like to continue. Since coming here, hears that the inhabitants of Norwich made certificate to the Commissioners concerning the tenth, and none of them were assessed more than 100l., which the Commissioners would not accept. Intends to hunt at Ersham Park on Holyrood Day, and will have with him Litleprowe, Edw. Rede, and Austeyne Steward, and will make them bring the certificate. Advises the King to write a letter complaining of their unjust certificate. Little is done yet about sewers, and this matter should also be touched in the King's letter.
"As concerning the traitor's (fn. 7) taking, I am sorry as ye be that it had not be of another." Doubts not Cromwell will strictly examine him of his confederates, and especially of his answers from the Emperor and the king of Scots.
Does not advise his being put to execution yet, for lord Leonard and lord Butler would for ever lose their credit in Ireland, and the Irish would never after put themselves into an Englishman's hands. If they do not, the King would be forced to proceed to the general conquest of the land. Does not advise pardon, for it would be a bad example. Has already expressed his opinion about imprisonment. Kenynghale, Thursday, 9 Sept., 11 oclock.
Hol. Add.: Master Secretary. Endd.
9 Sept.
R. O.
309. Marcus Meyrus to Henry VIII.
Thanks him for his letters. Is not used to writing, and has no time; has therefore explained everything to Edm. Boner and Master Richard (Caundish). Is ready to serve the King with this castle or his life. Ex arce regia Wordberga postridie Nativitatis Mariæ(?), 1535.
Lat., Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd. Sealed.
9 Sept.
R. O.
310. Sir Thomas Audeley to Cromwell.
As we lately directed the auditors to bring in their books of the tenth of the spiritualty by the 12th instant, I leave my house beside Colchester today, for London, where I hope to see you. If you cannot be there, let me know, that I may travail therein till you have opportunity. I sent you letters by Coly touching the matters of Ireland. I thank you for the good news you sent me from time to time of the mirth and good health of the King and Queen. Colchester, 9 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary.
9 Sept.
R. O.
311. John Whalley to Cromwell.
Received today, by a servant of Sir Wm. Fitzwilliam, Cromwell's letter, dated from the Court at Bromeham, the 2nd inst. Wrote "at large" four days ago. Since coming here we have made, at the Old Pier Head, a frame of elm wood, filled with stones, and have sunk rocks at the end of the chapel, &c., to prevent the shifting of gravel by the sea; also at the Old Pier Head we have made an entry for ships. At present the harbour will hold 12 or 20 crayers and ballingers of 40 or 50 tons, but in another month we hope it will be large enough for "200 shipps of 50, 60, and 100 tonne of pece," and, before "All Holland Day," for great ships of 6 or 7 score tons.
Intend within 14 days to set forward the "molde" of stone to seaward. If the King be in this part he will see the beginning. Dover, 9 Sept.
Hol., pp. 2. Add. Endd.
9 Sept.
R. O.
312. The Fellows of Magdalene College, Oxford, to Cromwell.
We have received the good and wholesome device directed to us by the King for the reformation of study, and cannot thank you sufficiently for setting it forward. Whereas our youth were heretofore brought up very corruptly for lack of the Greek tongue, and were so blindly instructed in the principles of logic that they could not tell whereabout they went when they learned, or what profit they got by it; after a great loss of time now they have that way and order prescribed to them, that in a few years this town, that hath hitherto been rejected as a place that maintained no learning nor profited the public weal shall be able to bring forth those that shall serve the Prince and the community. Although, in consequence of the labor of certain others that have always been led in this ignorance, and will see no better way, your commissioners have suspended some of these articles until the statutes be examined, we, who are the greater part, desire you not to give ear to sinistral information, for there is nothing in our statutes prohibiting these ordinances, but what allows "a lecture of Greek to be read to the company as the abolishment of their sophistry, Duns, and such like stuff, you so appointing who knoweth what you do in this thing better than they the contrary that would stop it." Although our college is well provided with lectures, it can provide a competent stipend for a Greek lecture. If among so great a number as we be in this college, other corrupt glosses of Duns should continue, and the study of Greek be neglected, a great part of the youth of this university would be deprived of the ordinance you have provided for them. If children and other young company be let to run to seek better learning abroad out of their own house, in other colleges, besides the danger in the time of plague, they will not return again without loss of time. We hope, therefore, you will continue beneficial to us in seeing these ordinances put in force. Oxford, Magdalene College, 9 Sept. Signed by 20 fellows.
Pp. 3. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
9 Sept.
R. O.
Ellis, 3 Ser. ii. 349.
313. Richard [Whiting], Abbot of Glastonbury, to Cromwell.
According to the King's commandment and yours, I send you the corrody of this monastery, which Sir Thomas More lately had, wishing it were a better thing. I send you 5l. of the arrears of Sir Thomas More, due Michaelmas last, and 5l. due at Michaelmas next. Glastonbury, 9 Sept. Signed. (fn. 8)
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
9 Sept.
R. O.
314. Richard Abbot of Winchcombe to Cromwell.
On Tuesday last I declared to my brethren the injunctions sent to us, among others that the Abbot should read and declare to his brethren every day one part of the rule which he has professed, and refer it to Christ's doctrine. I showed them that this article pertained to me, and though I was not ready to read it immediately, I should be ready to do so on Monday or Friday following. Upon this, the Wednesday (viz., die Nat. B. M.) because I did not read, my brother dan Peter came to me, requiring me to license him "to cum on [to you]." I demanding why, he said, because I have broken the injunctions in that I have not read this day, and that I had invited one to dinner this day, the prior and also the chaunter. This he has showed to me before all my brethren as the reason why he wishes to come to you. I submit myself entirely to your decision, and so to order my brother, if it may stand with your pleasure, that I may live the more quietly in time to come. Wynchelcombe, 9 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Of the Council.
9 Sept.
R. O.
315. William Abbot of Kyngeswodd to Cromwell.
On the Sunday before the Nativity of Our Lady a friar preached in my church, and he spake certain propositions contrary to God's Word. As this is not to be suffered, and as you are immediately under the King, who is supreme head of the Church of England, we send the friar to you. Kyngeswodd, 9 Sept.
The propositions complained of are:—1. Petrus erat princeps apostolorum. 2. Peter was head of the Church; 3. upon whom Christ builded his Church. Testes Wyllm, abbot, Thomas Redinge, prior, with the whole convent; Wyllm. Spicer; John Rowbrowe; Thos. Americke; Nycolas Taylour, cum multis aliis.
Hol.,p. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
9 Sept.
R. O.
316. Harry Lord Daubeney to Cromwell.
I have received your letter, by which I learn that you were at my park of Mursshe, "where was no good game to make you." For the mastership of the game my promise has been past to Edw. Rogers. For the herbage and pannage I will make such reasonable answer as shall content you. White Lakynton, 9 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Master Secretary.
9 Sept.
R. O.
317. Sir Walter Stonore to Cromwell.
I beg you to be favorable to my brother Edmund, who lately struck a servant of mine, John Appowell, who laid in the way to fight with him. He died 11 days after. The curate of the parish went to shrive him, and on his confession he said openly that he sought his own death, and laid wait for my brother two miles out of Watlington, where the quarrel began, for the space of two hours. Then, thinking that my brother might pass some other way, he removed to a house to which my brother would come, for it is a farm that I gave him. There is a narrow lane by the house, which is on the high way to Stonore. He set there a sparrowhawk that he kept of mine, upon a stile, and tied her fast, and, at my brother's coming, called him "A light coward knave, for I will have a piece of thy flesh." My brother desired to pass, and, on his opposing him, alighted and said, "Powell, meddle not with me; I will not meddle with thee for thy master's sake." But he said he would fight with him. Hereupon my brother said, "Powell, thou hast no buckler," and threw him his own buckler; and he said, "I defy thee and thy buckler," and threw him his buckler again. He suffered my brother to take it up, and then struck at him three times. Then Powell cast a foin at him; and my brother, seeing it was his intention to kill him, struck him over the head; of which wound he died. All this he confessed on Thursday, and lost his speech on Friday till the eleventh day, which was Saturday, 4 Sept. Stonore, 9 Sept. Signed.
P.1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Sealed. Endd.
9 Sept.
R. O.
318. Cessell Manxell to Cromwell.
I beg so much of your goodness to Mr. Manxell, my husband, that he may come home now that the King's enemies (fn. 9) are subdued. You shall be assured of our services. Unless you grant this favor, I and his poor children are utterly undone. 9 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.: My lady Manxell.
9 Sept.
R. O.
319. Sir Will. Fitzwilliam to Cromwell.
I received the King's letters dated at Bromham, the 2nd inst., and also yours. We will redress such things as are out of order in this town and marches. Have impanelled juries of different trades, who have presented their verdicts, and expect others. The King has been so badly served here that I am grieved to see it. Begs indulgence for those who have admitted their negligence. This morning Rob. ap Raynolds, a spear, told me that Will Johnson, an alderman of the town, had brought him a letter from David Lloyd ap Owen, dwelling in Maigham Cloyth, in Powez land, asking news of Jas. Gruffith ap Howell, and to send word to Bosums Inn. This Gruffith has been twice with the Regent in Flanders, and Raynolds will visit him, if it be the King's pleasure, and explore his meaning. He says that David Lloyd is one of the richest men in Wales, and means not well.. I think he should be apprehended; and if it is the King's wish, I will provide means for Raynolds to visit Jas. Gruffith; or if the King wishes to see Raynolds I will bring him over, and Will. Johnson with him. Calais, 9 Sept. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
9 Sept.
R. O.
320. William Page to Cromwell.
The vicar of Chytterne All Hallows, Sir Ric. More, has been with me and others of the parish to witness a matter betwixt "the scolers Devanse" and the vicar foresaid. My brother John Page farmed the parsonage of Chytterne, and paid four marks yearly to the vicar, then Sir John Baker, alias Blacke Sir John. When my brother Gregory Morgan farmed it, he paid four marks yearly for augmentation. I have known six vicars, all of whom have been content, except the man that now is. The bearer has been to the bishop of Sarum, and brought him a letter testimonial from divers honest men, insomuch that my Lord prayed Mr. Dudley, master to the "scolers Devanse," to see the vicar paid, but it has not been done. He will bring 10, 20, or 100 hands to depose that he ought to have 4 marks out of the parsonage for his augmentation. Devizes, 9 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
9 Sept.
R. O.
321. Placidus (John Placett) to Cromwell.
For the love you have for the increase of faith and the destruction of Papistical creatures, set forth the Word. The King is Supreme Head of the Church of England next to God, to whom we owe love and obedience, and his dearly beloved wife queen Anne, and all their posterity. This truth is not proclaimed so fully as it ought to be. I am counted a wretch because I have made a little treatise against the usurped power of the bishop of Rome, which I shall shortly send you. Some of my brethren are as glad as I am to do this. At your being here you discreetly declared the efficacy of our three vows, in which we trust too much. 9 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
R. O.322. John Placett to Cromwell.
Whereas it pleased you, considering my infirmity, to excuse my rising at midnight; I am informed by my master, the father Abbot, that this has caused some grudging in the convent. He knows that I cannot endure the straitness of the religion, the customary abstinence, the frayter, and other observances. Will you grant me, then, a capacity to take a benefice without changing my habit, if my master, or any man, can see in my wretchedness an aptitude to take a cure? My lord of Chester knows where I might have had a living if I would have taken it, but my trust is in you and my master, the father Abbot, who is very good to me. I have the cure under him of a little village, 40 souls. "Such a thing were most "quiet for me, which I may serve and keep my bed and board, and go to "my book in the monastery." Nevertheless, the value of this cure is not 4l. a year.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
9 Sept.
R. O.
323. Thomas Laws to Harry Hodson, Merchant in London.
We reached Copman haven, 29 Aug. We have been stopped by the men-of-war, who will keep us till their King comes, who warred against the Lubeckers. They call him king of Denmark. They cannot tell when he will be here, but expect him every day. The King's ship "Mennen" is at Warbere, "4 kennyng here hens," and has been there 14 days or more. Dr. Boner and Candes are on board of her, coming as ambassadors. They have sent for a safe-conduct, and four days ago their man came from the Feld where their Admiral lies before Copman haven. Until they come, and the King and they have done their messages, we cannot tell how matters stand. They have taken from us our victuals and clothes, and part of our anchors and cables. Since this man came they have handled us worse, and have fetched away our mainsails, for which we may thank the Danskers, for they will not let us lade our ships nor depart "till they know that these men had the Sound, for that we could not pass but we must come in their hands. And then they gave us fair words, and said we need not fear, the Sound was open for every man but the Lubecks." Hans Wanward, the principal of the town, gave us a letter to them. We trust the owners and merchants will look upon this, and have their ships arrested till they know how we shall stand. We are 12 ships of London and Newcastle. Here is the false thief who took the crayer of Brekellsay and the "whoy." He is a great captain here, and boasts he will be in England shortly, and fetch as many more as four or five ships. Elsanowr, 9 Sept. 1535.
Hol., pp. 2. Add. Endd.
9 Sept.
R. O.
324. Oudart du Bies to Lord Lisle. (fn. 10)
At the request of Peter Bracq, factor of Maistre Fol, merchant of Calais, I took prisoner one Pierre le Vesque, native of Normandy, whom the said Peter accused of taking at sea a ship belonging to Maistre Fol. As he has been in prison since 5 July, and has not yet been prosecuted, the gaoler represents to me that he is poor, and cannot bear the expense, which already amounts to 11 livres, and wishes me to discharge him; but I do not wish to do so without intimating it to you, requesting that you will tell Maistre Fol and Peter Bracq to send within eight days 11 livres as a contribution to the expenses. Boulogne, 9 Sept. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
9 Sept.
Add. MS. 8,715, f. 115.
B. M.
325. Bishop of Faenza to Mons. Ambrogio.
No news has yet been heard of the gentleman sent to England to show the brief to the King, but they well know that he has infinite fear of a Council. This morning the English ambassador has been in close conversation with the King, who was heard to say to him that it could not be done, and that he would not agree to it in any way; which words he spoke rather warmly. This shows there is little favor between them, as the Bishop has already seen from other signs. The English ambassador here receives every time there are letters from Rome, great despatches; and as I hear that Casale (fn. 11) is not now in Rome I notify this to you. "Da Sant Urbano, alli 9 di Settembre 1535, presso Janvilla."
Ital., pp. 5. Copy. Headed: Al Sig. Mons. Ambrogio, &c.
2. Another copy from a decipher among the Vatican Archives (but omitting the last sentence) is among the R. O. transcripts.
10 Sept.
Vienna Archives.
326. Cromwell to Chapuys.
Expressing the King's satisfaction at reading the letters of the Emperor and Granvelle relating to the storming of Tunis. The King could not have been better pleased if the victory had been his own, and he warmly congratulates the Emperor upon it. As to Chapuys' request, at the end of his letters, to be allowed to visit the Lady Mary, desires him to wait till Cromwell's return, when he hopes to give him satisfaction in this and other things at a personal interview. Wolfall, 10 Sept.
Lat., p. 1. From a modern transcript.
10 Sept.
Nero, B. vii. 96.
B. M.
327. Antony Duodo to Cromwell.
Received on Sept. 6 the patent for the English consulate; for which he thanks the King. Asks that letters may be sent to inform the Signory of his appointment. Recommends his brother Mark to Cromwell. Venice, 1535, 10 Sept. Signed.
Ital., p. 1. Add.
10 Sept.
R. O.
328. John Bishop of Lincoln to Cromwell.
Requests him to give the house of Ellysham licence to have free election of a prior. The patron is Master Wm. Disney; and the sub-prior, John Baxster, alias Richardson, is very fit to be head. Also, that he will allow the Bishop's chancellor or commissary for Lincolnshire to be director of the election. Nettylham beside Lincoln, 10 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
Galba, B. x. 63.
B. M.
329. [Robert Flegge to Cromwell].
"Honourable Sir," I can send you no news except of one occurrence which I trust you have long ago heard of. However, you may not know the perfect truth, and I am the person who began it, and brought it to the point that it is at.
On the day of the Decollation of Saint [John the] Baptist, which was a Sunday, (fn. 12) a sermon was preached in the Black Friars at Antwerp by an undiscreet friar upon the Gospel of the day. He spoke of the King and Queen by name as living together after the manner of "Herode thetrac" and Herodyas, and said that the truth could not be spoken in England for fear of death. When I knew this I determined to have this lewd friar punished, but thought that if I went to the Lords of the town they might delay me, and perhaps they had no jurisdiction over the spiritualty. I therefore called three or four of the best of the company to go with me to the prior. At first "he made him [self] ignorant," and said he was very sorry that any such thing should be spoken in [his] church; and promised in three days to speak with the friar, and make us such an a[nswer] as we should be content with. I said that the least punishment should be to d[eny] and revocate in the selfsame place all the foresaid slanderous words.
Three days after, when we came for our answer, the prior began to defend the lewd friar's quarrel, saying that, by many men's saying, what the friar had spoken was truth. "Then I [gave] him droyt answer, and told him without any reverence th[at he] falsely lied in that he said;" and that all the clergy in all Christendom have consented to the King's marriage. He answered that he had heard [not] so much of the truth before, but always the contr[ary]. After this, we fell into communication of the Pope's authority and other like matters. Finally, I again required him to cause the friar to revoke and deny what he had spoken. To this he answered that he could not see the way how to recall the said words without greater slander to the King. But the reason he alleged was to no purpose, but only to put us from our desire. Told him that if he would not see otherwise in the matter, I would sue further for the punishment thereof. After many words the prior said he could not devise how the friar might or could revoke or deny the said words. Showed him how he might do it; wherewith he was content, and promised it should be done. Next Sunday I went to the Black Friars. In the [midst] of his sermon the friar did off his bonnet, made a pause, and said to the audience, "Masters, I was in this in th[is] place this day 8 days, and preached to you the evangel[ium] of that day, not pronouncing the same as I should have [done], nor yet according to the truth, but sinisterly and untru[ly], nominating in the same the King's grace of England and the Queen to live together after the manner of king Herode and Herodyas; the which I did by false information, and untruly and falsely belied that noble prince, for now I know the contrary; wherfore here, and before you all, I deny, renounce, an[d] call again all the same words that I have spoken, for now I have perfect understanding that he is a right virtuous and noble prince; and I am sorry that ever I spoke any such words of such a noble prince," and so then proceeded in his sermon.
Hol., pp. 2. Slightly mutilated.
10 Sept.
Titus, B. i. 340.
B. M.
330. S. Vaughan to Cromwell.
Wrote in his last as largely concerning the matter that Cromwell required as he could learn. He may take what the merchants reported of occurrences in Flanders as fables. "He that will believe every nue that is blasted in Flanders amongst merchants shall have a mad head." The friar's preaching against the King is true. The merchants adventurers' ships have arrived here safely from thence. The Emperor's ambassador wished "to have triumphed the Emperor's victory in Affrike" at the Friars Augustines; but the provincial refused any solemn mass or other triumph till he knew the King's pleasure. The Spauiards therefore kept their solemn gaudies at the Crossed Friars.
Has received 10l. sterling for Cromwell from Thos. Legh, for a debt of Hacquett's son. Vaughan's wife will give it him when he comes to London. She will be glad to have occasion to see him when Vaughan is gone. Clarencieux owes him 3l. for Hackett, which he will pay if Cromwell sends for it. Asks him to help Wm. Castelyn to recover his debt from one Fenne, dwelling in St. Laurence Lane. Cromwell's great friend Mrs. Addyngton, to whom Vaughan is much bound, fears that Cromwell's favor is shrunk from her, because of a suit for a farm.
His wife will sue to Cromwell, after his departure, for the auditing of his accounts. Will depart on Sunday or Monday. London, Friday, 10 Sept.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Principal Secretary. Endd.
10 Sept.
R. O.
St. P. ii. 278.
331. William Brabazon to Cromwell.
Since Thos. Fitzgerald's departure, his followers and all his uncles are returned home. If the traitor ever comes back, the King's cost is wasted. His advice is "to discharge this land of all the sect of them." The Deputy is going to Dungarvan Castle, and before him have gone the Lord Treasurer, lord Leonard's company, and Sir John Seyntlaw with his retinue. They will be at the castle on Monday next, and make a running assault. Hears that Seyntlaw has been sent for to England. The King can evil spare him here, though it is more to his profit to be in England. Lord Leonard should come speedily, for the good ordering of the army.
Rides with the Chief Justice about the King's lands, which are most wasted. Advises the banishment of the Tooles, the Burnes, the Cavenaghs, and McMargho and his sect.
The present Lord Deputy is a good man of war, but not quick enough for this country, and somewhat covetous. Advises his recall. Does not think the Lord Chancellor of Ireland, who is now with Cromwell, fit for the office. The lord of Kilmenen would be the best man. Divers abbots and priors in England have great revenues of spiritualties here, which should be put to houses of religion, and the King to have temporal lands for them. Reminds Cromwell that the King should have the temporalities of the bishop of Dublin, who can have spiritual lands for them. By this means and attainders, the King will have 4,000 marks a year more. Thinks the commonalty here to be very true people and conformable to all good order. The Deputy intends to hinder the Chief Justice and Master of the Rolls of Ireland by writing to his friends in England; which were pity, seeing the pains they take in the King's affairs here. Does not now think 500 kerne necessary, but retained them for a time, that they might not be enemies. The captains are all in good health, notwithstanding the plague. Hears my lady of Kildare has a book of the late earl of Kildare's lands. Cromwell should get it and send it hither. 10 Sept. Signed.
Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
R. O.332. Ireland.
Proposals to "your good mastership" (Cromwell) for the pacification of Ireland.
1. The King's letters to be sent to towns and ports for them to be sworn to his succession, and to keep watch against and withstand enemies. 2. To send at the beginning of the year 500 northern men. 3. The most part of the Geraldines should be put to death, except James and Richard, who should be removed to England; and the earldom of Kildare should be seized into the King's hands. 4. To settle 300 of the northern men in the county of Kildare. 5. To appoint a marshal for the English army, and another for the Irishry, and a head clerk comptroller to diminish the wages of those who tarry behind. 6. To forbid the use of hand-guns, except to the citizens of Dublin and Waterford. 7. To forbid Irish apparel within the English pale. 8. To have a parliamentary inquiry into the supporters of Thos. Fitzgerald, by which many would lose their lands. 9. Another inquisition as to the castles, manors, &c. belonging to the King, and to religious houses of which he is founder. 10. To send a well-learned and discreet English judge here.
Pp. 3.
10 Sept.
R. O.
333. Thos. Rainolde, Priest, to Lady Lisle.
Her son Master James is in as good health as he wrote in his last letter by Mr. Worth, that is, as merry as possible, as the bearer can show. He was very desirous to see Master James, that he might bring some word of him. He begins prettily to perceive the French tongue, and in a year or little more will be able to teach Rainolde. Paris, 10 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: At Calais.
10 Sept.
R. O.
334. Richard Sparcheford to [Edw. Fox], Bishop Elect of Hereford.
I wrote to you in my last letters, of the 6th Sept., of my joy at your promotion. The diocese of Hereford, wherein I was born, have their desire that you should be their prelate. You may therefore thank God that you are not only ordained to be a bishop by the nomination of the King, but by the hearty consent of the whole diocese. We hope to see you shortly amongst us.
Ric. Lane, the bearer, late baylly of Hampton Shelwyk and Topsley, near the city of Hereford, would needs take pains to see you. I rather encouraged him. He was made bayly, after his father's death, by the late bishop, and was much esteemed for his truth and honesty. He had been sure of the bailiwick for life if my Lord had lived, but now it is in your pleasure, and I desire your favor for him. He collects 100l. a year, and his fee is four marks. There is one Thos. Lorimere, dwelling in Ledbury, a tall man, but a coward of his hands, of an excessive prating and dissimulate fashion, not fit for your service. As soon as the late bishop died he went to Court, and by means of Mr. Knottsford, your acquaintance, obtained the King's grant for the said bailiwick and discharged this bearer; but when your temporalities are restored, you may make what officers you please.
Lorimere dwells 10 miles away, and wishes to serve by deputy. He will poll and bribe the tenants. Divers of the King's servants, as I hear say, have given bailiwicks and other things after this fashion, and offered them for sale, as the park of Presbery was obtained by Mr. Briggs. No good servants can be obtained in this way. Allow no man to be your bayly except on sufficient surety. As soon as I get a little prebend in your church I shall get me to my house there, and feed your people with such learning as God has given me, for your discharge as my bishop, and my discharge as your archdeacon. (fn. 13) I wrote to you for Thos. Sherle to have the oversight of your lands. Sabridgeford, 10 Sept.
Hol., pp. 4. Add.: Bishop of Hereford elect. Endd.
10 Sept.335. Barnes to Henry VIII.
Dedication of his Vitæ Romanorum Pontificum to the King. Wittembergæ, 10 Sept. 1535.
10 Sept.
R. O.
336. Francis I.
His commission to William du Bellay, sieur de Langy, to lay before the diet at Eslingam his proposals touching the time and place for a General Council. Joinville, in Champagne ("Ex Gynvilla, Campaniæ Gallicæ oppido."). 10 Sept. 1535.
Fr., pp. 2.Endd.: The copy of Mons. Longie's commission to the towns Imperial assembling at Eslingem. Also a French endorsement.
R. O.337. [Francis i. to the Diet at Esslingen.]
The Emperor has always pretended zeal for religion as, his ground of action in all his causes, and he hopes to carry on this war with the king of England (Britanniæ), and avenge his private injuries at other people's expense. He desires nothing more than to have a Council, nominally universal, but really imperial; in which will be discussed, first, the justice of the king of England's second marriage; and, secondly, that King's edict, in which he has to some extent arrogated the Pope's authority. If these questions be proposed, the Italians, the Spaniards, and the Scots (who are Scotists), with the greater part of the Germans, the French, and even of the English, will be on the side of the Pope and Emperor, and perhaps a general war will be declared against England for the protection of the Christian religion. If so, many rude and unlearned persons will think they suffer martyrdom for the Faith, by fighting against England contrary to the will of their princes when they are not equal to the labours of war. Even Englishmen who fight for their King will do so against their conscience. For this there seems no other remedy except to delay convoking the Council; but who will create delay in a matter so apparently sacred and so obviously necessary? The calling of a Council, therefore, must not be openly opposed, but must be frustrated by artifices (cuniculis subvertenda est). This person, therefore, who is devoted to that King's interests, has persuaded those called Evangelicals, who are so anxious for a Council, that nothing would be more against their purpose than to have it now, when there is a far greater number of Papists than of Evangelicals, and that they should contrive delays until their won paryt is stronger. In the same way he has persuaded the Papists that there is a danger lest the Evangelicals carry the day in this divided state of the Ecclesiastical order and their notorious evil lives. Thus he has persuaded both parties to dissemble, and give the go-by to the calling of a Council; and meanwhile both parties will come to an understanding.
Lat., pp. 2. Endd.: A matier for the Kyng to rede.
R. O.338. The Emperor, the Germans, and Tunis.
i. Translation of No. 56.
ii. [Translation] of letters from Langey to Wallop.
I send you the copy of the King's letters to the Imperial towns at Eslyngham, with news of the Council and of Germany. [Here follows a translation of No. 337.]
iii. The articles between the Emperor and the king of Tunis not according with my letters in all things concerning the port towns.
The Emperor to have Lagolette and the country within 2,000 paces of it, with 12,000 ducats a year to maintain it. The Christians to have a Council of their own, appointed by the Emperor, and to enjoy civil and religious freedom. The city of Affrick and the castle of Bona to remain in the Emperor's hands with 8,000 ducats a year for the maintenance of the latter. With other articles: in case of default the King is to pay 50,000 ducats the first year, 100,000 ducats the second, and the third year be deprived of his kingdom.
Pp. 4.
R. O.2. French copy of the articles between the Emperor and Tunis, headed:—
"Les articles et chapittres entre l' Empereur et le roy de Thunys, not agreing to my lettre in all thinges concerning the porte townes," (The latter part inserted in the same hand as the preceding document).
Fr., pp. 2. Endd.: "Certayn artycles touching Tonyes."

Footnotes

1 Christopher Morres.
2 This seems to be an error. The first wife of Sigismund king of Poland was not a sister of King John, but Eliz., wife of John, was a daughter of Sigismund.
3 Barnes.
4 A misprint of "Domino" for "Domine" on line 6 of page 632, together with the absence of quotation marks for the whole paragraph, goes far to make this passage unintelligible in the State Papers.
5 Must be Lady Day in harvest (Nativity of the B.V.M.)
6 Lord Thomas Howard.
7 Lord Thomas Fitzgerald.
8 The signature of a man either very infirm or blind.
9 In Ireland.
10 The year in which this letter was written is quite uncertain.
11 "II Cardinale Casale," MS.; evidently a transcriber's error for Cavaliere.
12 29 Aug. was a Sunday in 1535.
13 Sparchford is mentioned by Le Neve as having been collated to the archdeaconry of Salop in the diocese of Hereford, 14 August 1536; apparently the year has been misread.