Henry VIII
September 1535, 11-20

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James Gairdner (editor)

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1886

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'Henry VIII: September 1535, 11-20', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 9: August-December 1535 (1886), pp. 114-133. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75668 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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September 1535, 11-20

11 Sept.
R. O.
339. John Wylliamson to Cromwell.
I received yours of the 6th inst. Thos. Thacker and I send you such things as ye wrote for. Ric. a Lee is busy about your buildings. Your place at Hackney is in a good stay, except the garden, which is in digging. I send you letters from John Whalley, of Dover, and from Steph. Vaghan. As I wrote to you in my last, I delivered to Thacker, on the 4th, 140l., which he has laid out, and now wants money for three weeks' pay at Ewhurst, and I have delivered him 60l. more without waiting for your commandment. On Saturday next, the 18th, the pay for Hackney and Friars Austins will be due. We have had from Mr. Williams, of Hampton Court, 50 loads of timber, and yet we want more. Please write to him for another 50 loads. The Rolls, 11 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.. Secretary. Endd.
11 Sept.
R. O.
340. Thomas Thacker to Cromwell.
Your households are all in good health. Your buildings, though chargeable, go forward. I trust for your place at Hackney the pay for next Saturday, 11 Sept., shall be at a good point. The pay there on the 4th inst. for 68 persons with emptions and necessaries was 58l., and at Friar Austins to 43 persons 30l. For the two pays I received of Mr. Williamson 140l. For three weeks' pay at your frame, ended this Saturday, 11 Sept., and other things I have received of Williamson, 60l. I have received from my fellow Will. Laurence, from Ipswich, Our Lady's coat, with two gorgets of gold to put about her neck, an image of Our Lady in gold, a tabernacle of silver-gilt with the Father on the top in gold, a little relick of gold and crystal with Our Lady's milk in it; also from St. Peter's a cross of silver and gilt with Mary and John, a pax of silver and gilt, a pix of silver and gilt, a chalice silver and gilt, a censer parcel-gilt, and a ship to the same parcel-gilt, two cruets of silver, parcel-gilt. The Rolls, 11 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
11 Sept.
R. O.
341. John Gostwyk to Cromwell.
This day I received your letter on horseback going home, and have delivered the three merchants the 20s. as the King's reward, as I am not to break the sum that came from York. As to your marvel that I have not received from the archbishop of Canterbury and the abbot of Westminster the money due to the King, I cannot see how I shall get it till next term. The Abbot's money is not yet due. On my return I shall quicken the Archbishop and other debtors with sharp letters, as you command, to pay up instantly. Concerning the killing and bestowing of your stag in the duke of Suffolk's park, I have already advertised you. By the Lord Mayor's certificate which I send you will see that the plague increases. London, Saturday, 11 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
11 Sept.
R. O.
342. Harry Polsted to Cromwell.
On Tuesday last I received your letter by my fellow Dodds, with the King's letters for the sheriff elect of London. I delivered them on Lady Day to Mr. Munmouth, and in the afternoon I repaired to him and Mr. Cotes, his companion. They told me that not only the nomination of the under-sheriff of Middlesex, but that they and all they have shall be at the King's disposal. They regretted that they have not granted it to you, on the sight of your former letters, as they intended to do if they could have revoked their promise to my Lord Chancellor. The bishops elect of Worcester and Rochester have been with me and my companion Mr. Hales, but are not yet through with their first-fruits, as we could not arrive at perfect notice of the profits of their promotion. We have taken order with the bishop elect of Worcester that he shall pay 900l. for his first-fruits, and more if the Commissioners certify it of greater value; and he has promised to sign new obligations after his consecration. We wished to know if we should proceed with the bishop of Rochester for 411l. 0s. 11¾d., certified by the Commissioners, and now in Mr. Pollard's office. He intends to have three religious houses bound for the payment, viz., Rochester, Dartford, and Children Langley. Rolls, 11 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Right worshipful.
11 Sept.
R. O.
343. John Gresham, Mercer, to Cromwell.
I have bought for your store the parcels of diaper mentioned in the enclosed pamphlet. I am riding into Norfolk shortly, where I can deliver it as you may command. I send a letter directed to Sir John Cornewallys, which you will do me a great favor to sign. London, 11 Sept. 1535.
I have just received a letter from Will. Cleye, dated Antwerp, the 7th inst., which the bearer will show you.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
11 Sept.
R. O.
344. Dr. Thos. Legh and John ap Rice to [Cromwell].
Today, at 9 o'clock, we came to Horwell, (fn. 1) and intend to visit the house and wait for your pleasure by the bearer. Horwell, 11 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Endd.
11 Sept.
R. O.
345. Thomas Broke to Cromwell.
Trusts that the King and Queen are in good health. William Marshall, whom you know, has printed a book against the worship of images, wherein every reasonable body knows how to order himself, and especially against the Mass. The people greatly murmur at it. I therefore thought it my duty to send you the same, for ye know what Marshall is. Begs he will be good to Thos. Wynter, "which, God knoweth, hath a very small living." You promised me to remember Mark and Oye. The people greatly rejoice that Garrard, the rebel, is at the King's mercy. Mr. Richard's folks are in good health, and your buildings are advanced. London, 11 Sept. Signed.
Desires to hear from him.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
[11 Sept.]
R. O.
346. S. Vaughan to Cromwell.
The bearer, Rob. Pakyngton, goes to you for the express purpose of reporting all that is passed in Flanders. "Cherish him, and give him thanks; ye shall find he deserveth them." The King has no truer subject or honester merchant. It will be Tuesday before our ship is ready "to vale downe." We can get no mariners. "The knaves prested hide their heads and run away. Punish evils, or they will increase." Again, farewell. London, Saturday.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
11 Sept.
Lamb. MS. 602, f. 130.
347. John Talbot, of Dardyston, to Thos. Agard.
Requests a remedy against the lies told about him by Sir Will. Darcy, of Platyng, who dwells in Drogheda, at the Grey Friars. He said Talbot was indicted of treason for going to the siege of Dublin, and that he was named in a bill as one of 12 who were to suffer death. This made him go beyond sea, though there was no such bill. Darcy sent his counsel to Thos. FitzGerrot, as the latter, if examined, will show. Explains the alliances, by marriage and otherwise, between the Darcys and the FitzGerrots. When Drogheda was "closed upon," Darcy conveyed Gerald McGerrot McShane, a servant of Thos. FitzGerrot, over the town walls with ladders. Denies that he ever gave counsel to FitzGerrot. The deputy is rearing two great holdings upon Meath, amounting to 40s. on every ploughland; and he is displeased with the writer for speaking against it. Dardystown, 11 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: To my right heartily-beloved master, Thomas Agar, being with Master Secretary in the place [of the] Rolls, in Chancellor Lane, [in Lo]ndon. Endd.
11 Sept.
Add. MS. 11,055, f. 5.
B. M.
348. Edw. [Foxe], Bishop Elect of Hereford, to John Skudamore and Mr. Warmecombe.
Has received from the president and chapter of Hereford by the bearers, their servants, the following plate, over and above 213l. 11s. 5¾d.; viz., a bason and ewer with 3 boars' heads, parcel-gilt; 2 silver pots, parcelgilt, and a nest of white goblets with a cover; weighing in all 30811/16 oz. In gilt plate a nest of goblets with a cover, a cup and cover with a flowre de lice in the foot, a standing cup, and cover with the half rose, and another pounced, another with three boars' heads, another with a rose, another without a flower, another branched with azure, a goblet with a pounced cover, and another with the sign of the rose, weighing in all 2953/16; oz. Thanks them for sending them. They value the gilt plate at 4s. 4d. an oz., but Foxe thinks it too much by 3d., and desires them to obtain some abatement from the president and chapter, or else that they will be content to receive gilt plate at the same price. Has not weighed the plate, but will take it according to their certificate. If there is any error, will certify them on arriving in London. Okeborne St. George, 11 Sept. 27 [Hen. VIII.].
If he had had leisure, would have written more at length concerning other matters, and sent a more formal acquittance. Meanwhile these are sufficient warrant for the receipt of 500 mks. Signed.
P. 1. Add.. To, &c., Mr. John Skudamore, one of the gentlemen ushers of the King's most honorable chamber, and Mr. Warmecombe.
12 Sept.
R. O.
349. John Bishop of Lincoln to Cromwell.
On the 11th Sept. received the King's letters dated Wynchcombe, 24 July, and Cromwell's, dated Bromeham, 3 Sept., about the matter of Sheryngton. From these it appears they are informed that he continually refuses the benefice of Sherington to Sir Chr. Rookes. Rookes came to him the Wednesday after Assumption, and showed him the church was void, but showed no letters, and did not even ask for the benefice, though most probably he had the King's letters. Upon this, sent Master Robertson, his chaplain, to Cromwell, to "asserteyn" him how it was bestowed. Robertson, who has preached notably against the bishop of Rome, has compounded for the first-fruits of the benefice, and paid 10l. towards them; upon doing so he refused another benefice almost as good. Last time he was at Court he helped Rookes to a benefice; still he makes continual suits for more, though he is 'but a bare clerke and of slendre lerenyng." His chaplain, the bearer, is, on the contrary, a man of great learning and virtue. Will do, however, as the King wishes, though admitting Rookes would be "to the grete hynderance of my tytle." Lydyngton, 12 Sept. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: "Master Secretary." Endd.
12 Sept.
Faustina, C. vii. 205.
B. M.
Ellis, 2 Ser. ii. 60.
Wright's Supp. 70.
350. Richard Layton to Cromwell.
In Magdalen College we found stablished one lecture of divinity, two of philosophy, moral and natural, and one of Latin tongue well kept. To these we have adjoined a lecture in the Greek. In New College we have stablished a lecture in Greek, and another in Latin, with an honest salary and stipend; and so also in Allsowllen College. In Corpus Christi we found two lectures established by the founder of Greek and of Latin, public for all. We have also established public lectures in Latin tongue at Marten and Queen's Colleges. The rest of the colleges not being able to maintain lectures, we enjoined them to attend the public lectures, and every scholar must attend at least one lecture a day on pain of loss of his commons for the day.
We have set Dunce (fn. 2) in Bocardo, and banished him Oxford for ever, "and is now made a common servant to every man fast nailed up upon posts in all common houses of easement." The second time we came to New College we found the quadrant full of leaves of Dunce, and Mr. Grenefelde, a gentleman of Buckinghamshire, gathering them up for "sewelles or blawnsherres to keep the deer within the wood, and thereby have the better cry with his hounds."
We have, in place of the canon lecture, joined a civil lecture in every college, hall, and inn.
We have further enjoined every religious student to enter no house whatsoever in the town or suburbs, on the pain of being sent immediately back to his cloister. We hear this act to be greatly lamented of all the "duble" honest women, and specially their "laundres" that may not now enter the gates, much less their chambers, as they used. No doubt, the honest matrons will sue to you for redress.
This Sunday, by night, we shall make an end here; and tomorrow, by 6 a.m., I trust to be in the chapter-house at Abingdon; and on Wednesday night at latest to be with you at Winchester. Oxford, Sunday, 12 Sept.
Hol.
12 Sept.
R. O.
351. John Tregonwell to Cromwell.
Dr. Leyton and I have made an end of the visitation of the University of Oxford. Tomorrow Leyton goes to Abingdon and I to Godstowe, to execute our commission. Leyton will bring you the professions of Oxford, one from the university, and one from every college, under seals. The halls of art and of law, and every scholar in them, have made the same profession without any objection, likewise the oath of succession. Leyton will inform you of the injunctions given by us for the increase of learning there. Let me know if I shall visit the monastery of Reading. Oxford, 12 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
12 Sept.
R. O.
352. Sir Will. Fitzwilliam to Cromwell.
I have no news to write but what was contained in my last. The post that arrived here at 2 o'clock wished me to certify his arrival. Calais, 12 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary.
12 Sept.
R. O.
353. John Whalley to Cromwell.
Wrote to Cromwell on the 9th. Much grain is leaving the county. "There ys certayne regraters of corne in these parties that will suffre no grayne to be unbought." Their names are, one Huggan and Oliver Goderd of Estree, Wm. Mathew of Wingham, Thomas Frenche, George Webbe, and John Ugden, of Canterbury; and of Westgate Street, near Canterbury, Stephyn Barbett; of Wykeham Breux, Androwe Trapps; and of Dover, Raffe Bussekyn; and Hungerford of Sandewyche. Raffe Bussekyn has just loaded 40 or 50 qrs. wheat for London, where it is worth 14s. and 15s. a quarter. If the King is to have workmen at Dover a remedy must be found, or else wages raised. Recommends that a commission be sent to himself and the master of the Masondewe to make restraint in the county of the grain required for Dover, "for the mayre of Dover that was this last yere ys nowe chosen agayne, and all is because he is a vyttler and brewith, the said vitlers hath chosen hym agayne." Cromwell must also send a commission to Mr. Attourney, Sir William Hawte, and Sir William Kempe to view the country, and see that such bargains as have passed between the regrators and the poor husbandmen be cancelled. Asks Cromwell's help for two prisoners now in the dungeon of Dover Castle, by Mr. Treasurer's command, that their punishment may be commuted for the pillory. Dover, 12 Sept.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: "Secretary." Endd.: "John Walley."
12 Sept.
R. O.
354. Roland Lee, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, to Cromwell.
Your comfortable letters have made me strong and whole and able to return to the King's service. We delivered by Thos. Moreton, one of my assistants in the Commission, the taxation of the churches in Staffordshire, in the course of last term, when there was not one except Kent that so did. The Court of Exchequer was well satisfied. Let me know your pleasure concerning Stradling. Beaudesert, * 12 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
12 Sept.
R. O.
355. Martin L[uther] to D. Pontanus, Chancellor.
Antonius Anglicus (i.e. R. Barnes) is coming, sent by his King, and desires, as you know, a secret hearing of the Elector, which, if you will promote, my Lord will not object to, especially as he knows the man of old, and that he comes in quite a different fashion (viel anderer gestalt kompt) from the French embassy. However the King may be inclined to accept the Gospel, and to publish our confession in his kingdom, I think if his proposal were honorably accepted it would put the Papists in the wrong, both as to the Council "und allen furnemen." For since all this has come without our seeking it, God may have something better in store than we think. Moreover, we should not let a great opportunity go by, or show ourselves ungrateful to a King who sends us a gracious message.
As to the matter of the King's marriage, the other ambassador (fn. 3) is shortly to treat of it with us divines, —a thing which cannot be refused to him. That does not concern the princes in any way; and I would gladly myself hear what ground they may have for being so certain of the matter (was sie doch fur grund hetten, weil sic der sachen so gewis sain wollen).
I should be almost glad to see Master Philip [Melancthon] either go to England himself or be sent thither, because he has promised it already. If he should be again geheimnet (kept at home ?) his moderation will be too heavily burdened, and it might perhaps lead to a breach; which, however, I trust would be after my good Lord's return. He has done much and labored hard, as we all know. "Solt man denn auch widderums nichts im (i.e., ihm) gut lassen sain, oder in (ihn) ein wenig tragen, das were allzustrenge, und seine verdienst mit traurigheit belohnet." But all lawyers and physicians are free, and go over to foreign masters when they please. I write this that the good man be not overburdened with evil thoughts.
Copy, German, pp. 2.
ii. The Divines of Wittemberg to the Elector.
Requesting a private audience for the English ambassador Dr. Antonius. The Elector knows the man, and he has done excellent service with the King on Master Philip's promise, so that the King is in great need of Master Philip, and has dissuaded his journey into France. Hope that if the Elector cannot comply with this request before his journey into Austria, he will on his return. 12 Sept. 1535. Signatures (copied) of Martin Luther, Justus Jonas, Joh. Bugenhagen, and Caspar Cruciger.
Copy, German, p. 1. Endd.
13 Sept.
Vienna Archives.
356. Chapuys to Charles V.
Immediately after sending off my last letters of the 6th I received yours of 23rd July, containing the happy news of the miraculous and immortal victory of your Majesty against Barbarossa, and the capture of Tunis; of which, as requested by himself, I informed the King, who made answer to me by Cromwell, copy of whose letter is enclosed, and gave my man 8 ducats. God knows how much more he would have given for the contrary news, whatever good-will he pretends; of which there appears very [little] for the good ladies, in whose treatment there is no amendment or appearance of it.
The ships which I lately wrote the King meant to send to Denmark will go to a certain castle (fn. 4) on the frontiers of Sweden and Norway, which the captain of Lubeck, (fn. 5) whom this King has made a knight, means to put into his hands, and which he has already long held in the name of the said King. The said captain, as I am sure your Majesty knows, being kept prisoner in the said castle by the king of Sweden, found means to kill the guard and make himself master of it; but, not being able of himself to keep it, has called this King to see to it. The said ships, among other munitions of war, carry "fonce"(?), yet they only talk of sending thither 100 English soldiers, of whom a muster was made a few days ago, and there never was such a sorry sight. They have no gunners here to send thither, and they mean to compel a Flemish joiner and farrier to go thither, but I will dissuade it with all my power lest the poor ménage die of hunger. The ships are only two, the one of about 200 tons, and the other of 60, and it is believed they carry much money. The bailly of Troyes is not yet come, who has been expected every day for a fortnight. The French ambassador does not know the cause of his delay, but they presume it is not for the advantage of the English. The Princess has been visited by the King's and Queen's physicians, and, thank God, is well for the present; but the said physicians doubt that this winter she may relapse into a worse condition than ever; and, as she detests all medicines, they see no other remedy except that she should be placed somewhere where she can have recreation, as she would with the Queen her mother, or elsewhere, without being in the servitude and captivity in which they are. I have laboured long for this end, but to no purpose. London, 13 Sept. 1535.
Fr., from a modern copy, pp. 2.
13 Sept.
Vienna Archives.
357. Chapuys to [Granvelle].
Remarks on the Emperor's military achievements. The English are much pleased at his victory, in accordance with the incredible affection which they almost all bear to him; except the King, the concubine, Cromwell, and some of their adherents, who, as a man whom he sent to the Court reports, are astounded at the good news, like dogs falling out of a window. Cromwell could hardly speak.
It is commonly reported that the earl of Kildare has been taken by the brother of his belle mere, (fn. 6) whom the King had sent into Ireland as captain-general. Is surprised that Cromwell has said nothing of it, unless it be that he is ashamed of the way he was taken, as the other had given him a safe-conduct to come and parley. Refers him to his letters to the Emperor, and asks him, when at Naples, to remember his affairs. London, 13 Sept.
A book against images has lately been printed with royal licence. It also is directed against mass and canonical hours. There is a report that the King intends the religious of all orders to be free to leave their habits and marry, and that if they will stay in their houses they must live in poverty. He intends to take the rest of the revenue, and will do stranger things still.
Fr., from a modern copy, pp. 2.
13 Sept.
Titus, B. xi. 429.
B. M.
St. P. i. 445.
358. Lord Chancellor Audeley to [Cromwell].
Has drawn a proviso for the surety of the King, the Queen, and the earl of Wiltshire, &c., and inserted it in the end of the Act that the earl of Ossory desires to have pass, because if it were in a schedule it might be craftily withdrawn. Sends the Acts, with the commission to the Deputy for holding Parliament after the old custom. Sends also a copy of the proviso to the earl of Wiltshire. Has drawn up the commission for the Deputy only, else it might take away part of his reputation among the people. Desires him to report to the King the number of Acts annexed. Has also made two patents for barons for Sir Richard Power and Thos. Ewstace; and, hearing from Cowley that the old course is to have letters from the Chancery here in England, has sealed them, and sends them to Cromwell. Has been lately informed that Thos. FitzGarrald is taken, but the fame is that he has submitted on condition of coming to the King free. Does not believe the Council would take such an appointment with so arrant a traitor. If he is to have mercy, marvels that some of the Council should have told the King that there would never be peace till the blood of the Garroldes was extinct. It was also said that the Irishmen were not diligent in persecuting him because they heard he would be pardoned, and would then revenge, and now they would procure him mercy. Does not think he should be allowed to come to the King's sight, for the evil example and encouragement it would give to traitors. The very good way were to send him to the Tower. Though his treasons were done in Ireland, he can be indicted by the new statute in any shire, and the indictment sent to the King's Bench. This way he may be shortly sped after his deserts, which would be a good example, unless by his keeping alive there should grow any knowledge of treasons.
Hears that the sickness in London rather increases .. Will, therefore, stay at Old Ford, beside Stratford. Two only of the commissions for the spiritualty have come to his hands. Asks him to find out whether the King will prorogue the Parliament and adjourn the term till Hallowmas, or prorogue Parliament, as it was last, till Feb. 4.
Sends a book, lately printed, touching taking away images. In the parts where he has been there has been some discord and diversity of opinion touching worshipping of saints and images, creeping at cross, and such ceremonies, which discord it were well to put to silence. This book will make much business if it should go forth. Intends to send for the printer to stop them. It were good that preachers and people abstained from opinions of such things until the King has put a final order by the report of those appointed for searching and ordering the laws of the Church. A proclamation to abstain until that time would do much good.
Wheat and rye have risen to a mark and 16s. a quarter. There is plenty of old corn and new barley, oats, pease, and beans. Encloses a minute of a proclamation he has made in Essex. Has also made commissions for search of old corn. Has not done so in other shires till he knows the King's pleasure. Advises that the King should order that buyers should not sell again at a greater profit than 12d. or 16d. Asks for an answer to his other letter sent by Coly, and to this; also when Cromwell will return, and whether he shall survey the certificates for the tenth of the spiritualties.
Dares not go back to his house at Brittons, as a woman has died there. Would have borrowed the Queen's house at Havering, but knows not how his suit would be taken. Old Forde, 13 Sept. Signed.
Pp. 4.
[13 Sept.]
R. O.
359. Harry Polsted to Cromwell.
I received your letter concerning the patent of the Jewel House on Monday, and have sent you a copy of the same. Advertise Mr. Hales or me how we shall compound with my lord elect of Rochester according to the letter I lately sent you. The Rolls, Monday before Holy Rood Day.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : Secretary.
R. O.360. John [Hilsey], Elect of Rochester, to Cromwell.
Since I came to London, I have done nothing and can do nothing in the matters you appointed me. I have conferred with Mr. Gostwyke, and he says you have not appointed him to take my sureties for the first-fruits, nor can Mr. Polsted tell what they are.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
13 Sept.
R. O.
361. St. Alban's Hall, Oxford, to [Cromwell].
We beg your Mastership will redress the injury done to Rob. Huycke, our principal, by the commissary of Oxford, only because he is a man of substantial learning, who inveighs against Dunce, Antonie, and other barbarous authors, calling them the destruction of good wits. The Commissary has deprived him of his office. We wish to have him restored, and that henceforth he should not interfere with our principals. 13 Sept. Signed by Joannes Merye, M.A., Thomas Bewshyn, M.A.; Robert Yere, Thomas Wytherus, Thomas Christoferus, Joannes Cuffus, Thomas Eyer, Gulihelmus Bycknoldus, B.B. of Arts; and 10 others.
P. 1. Endd.
13 Sept.
R. O.
362. Jane Basset (fn. 7) to Lady Lisle.
Desires her commendations to my Lord. Finds from her letter that she has not received the large piece of canvas left by the writer at Subberton. Has made out of a smaller piece four pair of sheets and a cupboard cloth. Through the counsel of Mr. Vicar and divers others my sister Thomasine is gone from me to my brother Marrys before my rising in the morning, when I was asleep. There was with her the smith, a little boy, "and Maystrys Thomasyne sumtyme Thomas Seler ys harlett, and now Godys holy vycary here yn yerth, as he may be without devocyone,. as all the hole countre sayes. And here the seyd Thomasyne ys cowveryd underneyth Jone Bremelcomb, the which men thynke hyr well nere as unthryfty as the other." They have "rede" away my sister in hope to "rede" me also, and keep their bawdy and unthrifty rule without further trouble. I keep her clothes, which she has sent for, until I hear from you. The vicar told me he had a letter from you, that she should go where she pleased, and that you should not have my letters, and what you did have you should not answer. He will not allow me to superintend your stuff, which is putrefying for want of care, and says I want to keep my brother's evidences, and don't regard your profit. The vicar made search for my father, John Davy, from whom you had your jointure, but could not find him. I have given him the jointure and other papers. He has dispraised your fishing, that no one might take it. As you are determined to let it, let me have the offer of it, as you promised you would befriend me; it is necessary for me dwelling here, and for the advancement of my poor living. Will find sufficient securities for the rent. Remember the words that were spoken in the parlour at Subberton by Water Cawse. This bearer, John Bere, can say somewhat herein. Send me word of your pleasure as to the lamp in your chapel; "he burnyth never day yn the weke and schant holy dayes excepte that y do lyzth hymselfe." Am I to maintain your taper in the chapel of Our Lady at Alston? Your servant, John Bere, can ascertain you of the cleanly keeping of your house, "the which ys very unclenly, as knowyth God." Womberlezch, eve of Holy Cross.
My uncle and aunt Hache desire their commendations. Commend me to good Mrs. Frances (fn. 8) and my sister Phelyppe.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.
13 Sept.
Corpus Reform. II. 938.
363. John Frederick Duke of Saxony to Dr. Bruck (Pontanus).
Has already told him that Dr. Antonius, (fn. 9) an Englishman, has come to Wittenberg. Will be ready to assist him.
Asks him to receive the other expected English embassy at Wittenberg, and send him word at Weimar.
As he hears that the said embassy is about to declare their errand in Latin, asks his opinion whether Melancthon or Spalatinus should be employed. Monday after the Nativity of the B. V. M.
German.
14 Sept.
R. O.
364. Robert Baynard to Sir Edw. Baynton.
I have received the King's letters concerning the pulling down of locks and weirs upon great rivers. They are directed to Edward Baynard, sheriff of Wilts, which is not my name. Please move Mr. Secretary to put in Robert for Edward. In the mean season I will proclaim the King's pleasure. Lacham, Tuesday, 14 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Vice-Chamberlain to the Queen's Grace.
14 Sept.
R. O.
365. S. Vaughan to Cromwell.
This Tuesday, at 8 p.m., Matthew Kyng brought me your letters, on which I purpose to stay my voyage. I will in the morning convey the money to your house, and be with you tomorrow night. Chr. Mores shall stay also. Tuesday, 14 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
14 Sept.
R. O.
366. Sir Matthew Broune to Cromwell.
I thank you for writing for me to the prior of St. Mary's, Overay, touching the parsonage of Estebecheworthe, which I have held 30 years. But I shall not be able to obtain it without your further help, for the prior sent me word I should not have it, and that if I had not written to you for it I should still have had it. Does not despair of his aid. 14 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
14 Sept.
R. O.
367. John Mille to Cromwell.
The abbot of Quarre sends you a dish of "raylis," thinking you would have been here at Hampton this day at dinner. Hampton, Holy Rood Day.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
15 Sept.368. Monastery of Wherwell.
See Grants in September, No. 4.
15 Sept.
R. O.
369. Piracy in Wales.
Summons to the Bishop of St. David's, Wm. Stradling, his Chancellor, and the Chanter there, to attend the King's Council with all diligence, in consequence of an indenture and certificate lately exhibited to the Council touching piracies committed upon Bretons in those parts. Winchester, 15 Sept. 27 Hen. VIII. Signed with a stamp.
Add. Endd.
15 Sept.
R. O.
St. P. I. 448.
370. Sir Thos. Audeley, Chancellor, to Cromwell.
Has received the King's letters, dated the 13th inst., for writs to be made to all sheriffs to notify the prorogation of Parliament to 4 Feb. Will use diligence. Audeley, the Speaker, and some others, must assemble in the Houses 3 Nov. next, to prorogue the same. Is glad of the adjournment of the term, considering the increase of sickness in the city. His advice, since the King desires it, is that Parliament be prorogued till 4 Feb., and the term till Crastino Animarum, by which time, by coldness of the weather, the plague should cease; if not, it may then be prorogued till Hilary Term. To adjourn the whole term suddenly would be prejudicial. One justice must sit in every Court on the first day of the term to receive the King's writ for the adjournment. Asks whether the Exchequer shall be adjourned with the rest, and advises that all should be adjourned together.
The new sheriffs of London have granted Audeley the nomination of under-sheriff of Middlesex. Hears Cromwell has since written to the sheriffs for the same; and reminds him that last year he (Audeley) had such a grant, but abstained from using it, when Cromwell promised not to interrupt him again. Has few advancements for his servants, Cromwell has many; begs he may enjoy the grant. Humble commendations to the King and Queen. Old Forde, 15 Sept. Signed.
Add.: Secretary.
15 Sept.
R. O.
St. P. v. 31.
371. Northumberland to Henry VIII.
Has received the King's letters dated at Barkley Herons, 11 Aug., showing that he was accused of partiality at the last warden court against Sir Humphrey Lisle and Alex. Shaftowe, and commanding him to have the matter examined by the justices of assize, or, if they had left, by three or four indifferent men. They had left four days before the King's letters came, and will explain to the King what partiality was used; but he commissioned Sir Will. Euyer, Sir Rob. Ellercar, Rob. Colynwode, Lionel Gray, and Chr. Mytforthe to investigate the matter. The King's letters of 8 July to deliver malefactors to the captain of Berwick were only delivered by him 14 Aug., and he gave the Earl no knowledge of their contents till then. Had to short warning of the King's letters of 24 July, directing him and Westmoreland to commit the rioters in Craven to their castles of Skypton and Wresill. Went to Hexham accompanied by the most substantial persons of Northumberland, and took bonds of all the headsmen of Tynedale for the delivery of future offenders. Brainspethe, 15 Sept. Signed.
Add. Endd.
R. O.2. Bonds taken by my Lord Warden at Hexham of the inhabitants of Tynedale, Saturday, 4 Sept. 27 Hen. VIII.; viz., of Edw. Charleton of Hessill Syde, Thos. Charlton of Hawcop, Ryny Charleton of Shytlington, Roger Charleton of the Bowre, and Thomy Charleton of Newton.
Pp. 2.
R. O.3. Certificate of Sir Wm. Eure, Sir Rob. Ellerker, Rob. Collyngwood, Lyell Gray, and Chr. Mitford to [Northumberland] that they had examined the proofs of the indictments against Sir Humph. Lysle and Alex. Schaftowe, and transmit depositions signed by the witnesses. Signed.
P. 1.
R. O.4. The verdict given at Newcastle before my Lord Warden by Sir John Heron and his fellows:—1. That Sir Humph. Lisle and Alex. Schafto absented themselves from the warden court on account of indictments found against them by freeholders of the country. 2. They confirm upon oath two indictments against Sir Humphrey, and other two against Alex. Schafto. 3. They find no ground for Sir Humphrey's allegation that the indictments against him were procured by Sir Reynold Carnaby. Signed: Jhon Heron k.—Philipp Dacre k.—Cuthbert Radelyff k.—John Weddryngton k.—John Fynwik k.—Wyll'm Carnabe—John Heron—Cotbartt Ogle—Thomas Meddellton—Roger Swynburn—Jhon Heron—Chresto Welden.
P. 1.
15 Sept.
R. O.
372. Harry Polsted to Cromwell.
I received your letter last night concerning the elect of Rochester's composition. I have also received this morning by Mr. Vaughan a barrel, but I know not its contents. The Rolls, 15 Sept.
I sent the copy of your patent of the Jewel House yesterday by Dr. Ellis.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Right worshipful.
15 Sept.
R. O.
373. Thomas Bedyll to Cromwell.
The prior of Langley, Dr. Ingworth, has taken great pains in the King's matters, riding to and fro with and for the provincial of the Black Friars (Dr. Hilsey), now elected bishop of Rochester, whose deputy he has been in many parts of his visitation. Recommends that he be rewarded with the provincialship when the Bishop gives it up. He is a man of good learning and good age. London, 15 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
15 Sept.
R. O.
374. John Gresham to Cromwell.
The bearer, Gennyng the post, will deliver you a packet of letters from Sir John Wallope, the King's ambassador. This is the post I hired for the letters I received from you by Ric. Byllyngford. I first made my bargain with him "to Cumpena," where we heard the French king then was, or at Paris, and that he should have 50 cr. to go and come. On his arrival at Paris Francis was at Januevyll, 19 posts further on, and I find Mr. Wallop has lent him 30 cr. more. At his departure from London I delivered him 35 cr. in part payment; he borrowed 5 cr. more of Mr. Brysley at Calais, and this day I have given him 5 cr. more, making 75 cr. in all from Mr. Wallop and me. London, 15 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
15 Sept.
R. O.
375. John Abbot of Oseney to Cromwell.
Dr. Tregonwell and Dr. Layton, your deputies under the King as supreme head, have visited this house, and have ordered that no canon shall go forth upon any urgent business beyond his precincts. Consequently I cannot visit the lands and tenements belonging to it, or receive the rents as of old times, nor see to the reparation, nor the waste and spoil the tenants will commit if they are sure their landlords will not visit them. As Oseney stands very low, encumbered with waters, and I was brought up in wholesome ground of the King's College, sometimes called the monastery of St. Frideswide, if I should be constrained to tarry always at Oseney, it would no doubt abbreviate my life. I beg, therefore, you will have consideration to this monastery, which has of late been greatly charged, and also consider my health, so that with your licence I may, as well for the wealth of this house as for my health, sometimes having a chaplain and servants, according to our religion, oversee our lands. Osney, 15 Sept. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Chief Secretary. Endd.
15 Sept.
Vit. B. xiv. 144.
B. M.
376. Eustace Chapuys (fn. 10) to Cromwell.
"Ornatissime .................... D. regem vo ....................... illius et imm ........................... quam successu ........................... mearum partium .......................... occasio magis mag ....................... fidissimis amicorum literis proxi ....... in arcem Bonnensem recepe .. au ................................ summa cum trepidatione nec minore cum dedecore ite[r] ..................... incertum ubi nunc delitescat. Cæsar Thunysii re[gunum, ut … pollicitus] est, prius exacto Regi restituit optima fide. Rex ipse ........................... tissimo ac ultroneo animo obtulit Cæsari Golletam alios .................... omnes ac propugnacula maritima, tam quæ nunc sunt in ....................... aut olim fuerunt, quam quæ imposterum expugnabuntur aut .................... jure belli acquirentur. In tuitione Golletæ nu ..................... est Rex Thunysius ducatos annuos xijm. In alterius ......... portus tuitionem, cui Bonna nomen, viijm. Ac insup[er] ................ nomine pendit in singulos annos equos legitimos sex ........................ xij. Quod si ad tertium annum fefellerit regno cadet, Cæsarique .................. repetenda erit. Porro quotquot erant non modo in ........................ sed etiam in universo regno servi ac mancipia Christiana pil ........................ restituta sunt, ita ut posthac nemo Christianus ibid[em] ......................... sit serviturus. Eritque ibidem liberum Christianis in per ...................... Christiano ritu colere, ut spes sit Aphrica quæ initio ad .................... nascentisque ecclesiae tot præclara lumina dedit orbi pa ..................... sensim veluti postliminio redituram ad Christi grem[ium] ........................ compositis solvit e Golleta Cæsar xvij. Augusti ven ....................... ad votum faventibus, invisurus Siciliam, ita tamen ut s ........................ finem Augusti Neapolim appellere." Ex ædibus nostris, 15 Sept. 1535.
P.S.—"Et si ex ministro meo omnia intellectura * * *
Mutilated. Hol. Add.
15 Sept.
R. O.
377. John Atkynson, Priest, to Lord Lisle.
At the making hereof your ship was at Faraham, but your man Candelar is so drunken every night that he causes great trouble, and has hurt one of your chief carpenters; otherwise your ship would have been with you before this. James Hawkysworth has taken great pains with him, as he will tell you at his coming. I gave warning to my Lord Chief Baron of the ship's sailing for Tuesday 14 Sept., and he desired me to go to Porchester for two bucks he wished to send you Thursday following. I am waiting at Faraham for them. The King is merry at Winchester, "whereof Monday last past, the Holy Rood's eve, Thomas Fezgaret was brought to the Court, by my lord Leonard taken; and Mr. Poole, your servant, hath him manacled to him, and carrieth him all the way so; but what further shall come of him I hear not." Faraham, 15 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
15 Sept.
Paris. Bibl. Nat. MS. 3014 fonds français, p. 98.
378. —to the Queen of Navarre.
Madame, the first time I saw the king and queen of England, I made your recommendations to them, and they were glad to hear of your recovered health. The Queen said that her greatest wish, next to having a son, is to see you again. Of this I would have informed you by M. de Morette, but for the uncertainty of your coming to Court, as I feared that my letters after having passed through several hands might be little agreeable to you. Thus I did not dare to write to you until, by letters from your lieutenantgeneral de Berry, I heard of your arrival.
Begs her, when the opportunity occurs, of which M. Bouchetel will inform her, to procure him an office of master of requests, in order that he may on his return be near the King and her, and to get his present office of the "Grand Conseil" for the said Lieutenant-General. Desires her to get the King to send the said Lieutenant hither, by whom he might most safely inform her of some things he has learnt both in this country and before he crossed the sea. Winchester, 15 Sept.
Fr. from a modern copy, pp. 2. The original is endorsed: Double de la lettre escripte à la Reyne de Navarre.
[15 Sept.]
Paludan Muller, Aktstykker, 11. 138.
379. Albert of Mecklenburg to Dr. Adam [Pacæus].
Is glad to hear of his arrival. But, under present circumstances, would like if he could come hither as soon as convenient, or, if not, send a full report of everything, that the Duke may know on whose help to reckon, and, if he should purpose to send money, where it is to be procured until the negociation is set on foot. He must particularly consider how the horsemen and foot soldiers (reuther and knecht) are to be paid. [Copenhagen, 15 Sept. 1535.] (fn. 11)
Provincial German.
16 Sept.
R. O.
380. Harry Huttoft and John Mille to Cromwell.
You shall receive by the bearer your pike which my lord of Bewley presented unto you at your departing. We beg your letters to your deputy in favor of your beadmen about Hampton, the abbots of Beaulieu, Quarre, Letley, the priors of St. Denys, Southwyke, and Motfount. Hampton, Thursday after Holy Rood Day.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
16 Sept.
R. O.
381. William Overbury to Cromwell.
Professions of obedience to him as having ministrations of God next under the King. 16 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Sealed. Endd.
17 Sept.
R. O.
382. Robert Packington.
Account of sums due for cloth by Mr. Ryche to Robt. Packyngton, mercer of London.
28 Ap. 1535, 13 yds. "saye" black,—16s. 3d. 2 yds. "bryges satin yellow" at 2s.,—4s. 6 yds. tawney velvet at 15s.,—4l. 10s. "Sarssenet" black,—4s.
24 May 1535, "1 roll bock[ram] black," by your servant Thomas Nevyll,—3s. 4d.
27 Aug. 1535, by your servant Thomas Wombell, "1 roll bock[ram] blacke,"—3s.
17 Sept. 1535, for Mrs. Anne Ryche sleeves in russet satin,—6s. Lining of the same in "bock [ram],"—4d.
Sum,—6l. 6s. 11d.
Mem. (in another hand). "That Mr. Packyngton owes my master for 3 yards of tawney velvet."
P. 1, mutilated.
17 Sept.
R. O.
383. Clerk Bishop of Bath to Cromwell.
Sends him the book of taxes of this diocese, where we have laboured as much as we can for the King's profit, even exceeding the interpretation of the statutes. Desires that Keynsey and other auditors may be thanked and rewarded for their trouble. Thanks him for his comfortable letter, removing from his mind the trouble occasioned by a somewhat vehement letter from the King for redress of certain "skorynges" of waters, of which complaint was made. Admits there has been some negligence of his tenants in that respect, but it is mainly due to others who lie between him and the sea. Enlarges on the difficulties in the avoidance of the fresh water lest it should let in the salt water. The remedy for one is the poison of the other. Nine of the last twelve months there has been constant rain. The commissioners employed are not all of them favorable or impartial. Will be glad, if he is grieved, to apply to Cromwell for redress. Has viewed the ground with Pallet, Ken, and, amongst others, Brown the learned man of Bristol. Banwell, 17 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary.
17 Sept.
R. O.
384. Sir W. Courtenay to Cromwell.
I tarried no day after my repair into Devonshire without visiting all the weirs upon Exe, and found them all faulty. No work can be done upon them for the present, in consequence of the rain. Thinks that God has provided for the people by sending this rain; for if they had been suddenly pulled down, as I thought, about the town of Exeter, 2,000 persons should have died for want of bread. As to our commissions for the tenth, we must desire you they may be received the first day of the next term. Exeter, 17 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
[17] Sept.
R. O.
385. John Warner to William Laurens.
Your wife and household, Mr. Goldinge and Leche, are in good health. I did not receive the letter for you from your wife, which she promised. She had one from you yesterday, Thursday next after the Exaltation. Your harvest is well in. Get my obligations of Mr. Polsted. It will be Lady Day before I can enter upon my fruits. I must take possession, or else I shall lose my right, but am bound to the King for firstfruits, which is 11l. I beg you and Mr. Lee to be bound for me. Mr. Marten, controller of the King's (word omitted), offered Mr. Polsted to be bound for me. He will do as much for you as any man. I must be presented within three months, and two are passed already. Please instruct my brother, the bearer.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: William Laurens, porter, with Mr. Secretary.
[18 Sept.]
R. O.
386. Suffolk to Cromwell.
It has pleased God to send me a son. (fn. 12) I beg you will ask the King to be so good to me as "to make a Corssten solle," and that you also will be one of the godfathers.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Master Secretary. Endd. Sealed.
18 Sept.
Harl. MS. 7033, f. 219 b.
B. M.
387. John Cotworth, ll.d.
His Will, dated 18 Sept. 1535. Proved 24 Sept.
Modern copy, p. 1.
18 Sept.
R. O.
388. Lord Leonard Gray to Lord Lisle.
Thanks Lisle and my Lady for their kindness to his friend and fellow William Pole, who has done the King good service in Ireland, "where I have been." Will be glad to do Lisle any pleasure in Ireland or elsewhere. Winchester, 18 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: The lord Lisle, deputy of Calais.
18 Sept.
Corp. Ref. 11. 940.
389. Pontanus (Dr. Gregory Bruck) to John Frederick Duke of Saxony.
Informs him that Dr. Antonius (Barnes) has come from England to Jena, and has asked whether he is to proceed to the Duke. Has told him to wait here. Philip (Melancthon) and the others have also come to Wittenberg. Jena, Saturday after the Exaltation, anno xxxv.
German.
Corp. Ref. 11. 940.390. John Frederick Duke of Saxony to Antony (Robert) Barnes.
"Responsum ducis Saxoniæ Johannis Friderici, &c. ad mandata serenissimi regis Angliæ exposita per venerabilem et doctissimum virum Doctorem Antonium Barnes."
Has received the King's message and letter with pleasure. Will gladly receive the Ambassador (fn. 13) whom Barnes says the King proposes to send, and will write to the Governor of the duchy of Saxony to entertain him when he enters the duchy, and on his road to Wittenberg. Is obliged to go to other parts, and desires Barnes to ask the Ambassador to wait for him at Wittenberg, during which time he can converse with Luther and the other doctors according to his instruction.
Would have replied immediately to the King's request for permission for Melancthon to visit England, but the professors are scattered in consequence of the pestilence at Wittemberg, and therefore Melancthon must remain. Will, therefore, postpone answering this point until his return. Touching Barnes' charge,—that the King will not refuse to join the league with the princes of Germany for the defence of the Gospel, a fit place being assigned to him, if he is informed what articles they will uphold in the Council, and they will agree to nothing in the Council without his consent,—thanks the King for his offer, but cannot answer without consulting the other confederates, with whom he will communicate in a few weeks. Will never desert the doctrine which his father, himself, and others confessed before the Emperor and other Princes of the Empire at Augsburg. The other confederates are of the same mind. Offers his services to the King, in accordance with the old union between the kings of England and the dukes of Saxony. Jena [18 Sept. 1535]. (fn. 14)
Lat.
19 Sept.
R. O.
391. The Sweepstake.
27 Hen. VIII. Soldiers mustered, and paid prest money and wages for one month, on 12 Sept., in the Tower of London, by Chr. Morres, captain of the Swypestake.
Among the names are Sir John Vaughan; Wm. Wortes, mason; Thos, Yarke, carpenter; Hugh Fluellyn; Rich. Sleighton, trumpet; John Fursar, smith.
Total, 92. The sums paid very from 18s. 8d. to 5s. 4d. Total, 27l. 16s. 10d.
Besides this, on Sept. 19, Chr. Mores gave 5 marks among the soldiers, upon their lamentation made at their discharge and departure.
Pp. 7. Endd.
19 Sept.
R. O.
392. Roland Lee, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, and Ric. Strete, to Cromwell.
We have called before us Thos. Agarde, your servant, and Ric. Salte. It appears that the lands are only mortgaged, and the money was tendered in two years after, so that Salte has occupied the lands contrary to his covenant. He is contented to surrender them on a reasonable sum; but as the parties could not agree, as Salte claimed 20l. more than Agard would pay, and we had business in the Marches, we could proceed no further. We think your said servant is wrong. Beaudeley, 19 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
19 Sept.
R. O.
393. Sir Walter Stonore to Mr. Warde.
I received the King's gracious letter with a proclamation concerning the plucking up of weirs. It is his pleasure also that I should appoint some person to supply my place in Lancashire while I am occupied in Oxfordshire, which I beg you will take. Stonore, Sunday, 19 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
19 Sept.
R. O.
394. Thomas Reding, Prior, and Nic. Acton, Cellarer, [of Kingswood], (fn. 15) to Cromwell.
By the authority given you from the King as supreme head of the Church of England, you have tempered mercy with justice. In discharging of our conscience we did acknowledge our offences through the scrutiny made by your commissary and his visitation, submitting ourselves to you, begging that you will regard us with an eye of pity upon our forsaking our enormities. From the monastery, 19 Sept.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary.
19 Sept.
R. O.
395. Florentius Voluzenus to Cromwell.
As the bearer has writings for the King out of Rome, he desires me to address him to you. Captain Jehan Borthuic, who was lately in England, has made marvellous good reports of the state of the kingdom, supporting the King's cause in everything in presence of the King, the cardinal of Lorraine, the Grand Master, and others. I leave this day for Italy, to see if I can win my living in some university. Chalmont, 19 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary, London. Endd.
19 Sept.
R. O.
396. Jacques de Coucy [Sieur de Vervins] to the Deputy of Calais.
I hear that some men-of-war under my charge in the garrison of Autinghes have been taken within your pale, of whom you keep four Englishmen prisoners, who are sworn to our King, and have received his pay. They have done no mischief within your pale. I beg you to send them back. Boulogne, 19 Sept. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add. Endd.: From the captain of Boulogne, for the deliverance of the Englishmen.
19 Sept.
Add. MS. 8, 7, 15, f. 117 b.
B. M.
397. Bishop of Faenza to Mons. Ambrogio.
In conversation with the French king, told him of the Pope's satisfaction at the answer given to the brief for the affairs of England, and that his Holiness counted on his good will in all matters concerning the honor of God and the Holy See; that the Pope understood that the Emperor must be the first to declare against the King. He replied, smiling, that he would be ready to do more than people thought, if the Emperor would cut off English commerce with Flanders. Replied, that if the Emperor did his duty he would use still stronger measures, and Francis might be certain that the Pope would not leave anything untried to avenge the Church of the impiety of the King, who is in great fear of the Council. He might, therefore, feel sure that the Pope intended to hold one as soon as possible. Further conversation about the Council and the Lutherans. * * * The duke of Albany, who went to meet the Scotch ambassadors, is still at Langret, ill. "Vignony (Vignory) a li 19 ut supra."
Ital., pp. 11. Copy. Headed.: Al Sig. Mons. Ambrogio, 19 Settembre. Da Regnor.
[20 Sept.]
R. O.
398. The Duke of Norfolk to Cromwell.
Having good company with me, and beginning to hunt at Frammyngham, I received your letter, which was not pleasant to those who were with me to know that I should be with the King on Sunday next. The news in Mr. Wallop's letter is not to my contentment. I trust God will help the King and the realm, groyne quy vouldra. Kelshall, Monday night.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: To Master Secretary. Sealed. Endd.
20 Sept.
R. O.
399. John Tomson, Master of the Maison Dieu, to Cromwell.
The King's works at Dover go well forward. The south jetty is in length 165 feet, in breadth 24 ft. We have begun the north jetty, to the great surety of all men. The harbour is trenched from the old pier-head to the west inward 400 ft., in breadth 100 ft. in the mouth, and inward 200 ft., in the belly 400 ft., and in the Sound, west to the hills above, 500 ft. and it flows within the harbour a fathom and a half, so that a crayer of 50 tons can lie in it. If we can get sufficient men, horses, and timber, the harbour will be able to receive ships of six or seven score shortly. We have sunk great stones from 9 to 12 tons for securing the King's harbour. I intend shortly to begin the mole. Grain and victuals are so carried out of these quarters that without short redress wé shall want men for the work. Dover, 20 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
20 Sept.
R. O.
400. Sir Thomas Palmer to Cromwell.
Has received Cromwell's letter by Ant. Fenton, Master Treasurer's servant. As he wrote in his last letters, asks Cromwell to move the King to put some substantial man in his "rome." In case the King thinks the priory of Sandyngfeld too great a reward for him, there is the farm of Osterwyke, in the county of Guisnes, now vacant; it is worth only 20l. a year, but is sufficient, and if he gets it will never ask for more. Cales, 20 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: "Secretary." Endd.
20 Sept.
R. O.
401. Earl of Westmoreland to Cromwell.
Asks when Parliament shall begin. We said here that it will not be held before Christmas, as the sickness is so great about London. Hears that the hospital of Shireborne House has been granted to Cromwell. Would be glad to be his farmer, as it is within three miles of the house where he now lies. Finds so much goodness in Cromwell that he and his friends will be ready to do him what pleasure they can. Brauncepeth, 20 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Master Secretary. Endd.
R. O.2. "The copy of a book put to the Parliament House of the lamentable abusion of the hospital of Scherburn, bysides Durham."
The heirs of the founders of the hospital pray that the present Parliament will establish the hospital in good order for the observance of divine service, and for the keeping of poor people, in the manner following:—The proctor or master for the time being to reside on the premises. The ordinances, statutes, &c., made "upon a translation obtained" by Thos. late bishop of Durham, to stand in full force. Number of priests and almsmen defined.
Pp. 3. Endd. by Wriothesley.
[20 Sept.?]
R. O.
402. Geo. Tayllour to Lady Lisle.
Thanks her for her kind letters. Is sorry he was not at the Court when her present of "puettes" came to my lady. (fn. 16) She accepted them very well, and sends thanks. She caused a string to be set to the bow sent by the bearer, and "sayed" it, but it was somewhat too big. Brake to her about the little vessel to have licence to carry beer over the sea, and return with arras and other things. In reply she desired lady Lisle not to require that for certain causes, and she trusted to do her good some other way. Perceives that she favors lady Lisle very well. My lady will go with the King all this progress. There is no news here but after the old fashion. Waltham, (fn. 17) Monday.
Hol., p. 1. Add.

Footnotes

1 The abbey of Wherwell, in Hampshire.
2 Duns Scotus.
3 Fox bishop of Hereford.
4 Warberg.
5 Marcus Meyer.
6 That is to say, by lord Leonard Grey, who was brother of Elizabeth, widow of Gerald,
7 Lady Lisle's step-daughter.
8 Frances Dudley, daughter of Lord Lisle?
9 Barnes.
10 Supplied from modern marginal note.
11 The Editor says the date of the original draft is ambiguous, but from the sequence he judges it to be as above.
12 According to the inquisition Charles duke of Suffolk died on the 24th Aug. 37 Hen. VIII. (1545), and his son and heir Henry was then of the age of 9 years 11 months and 6 days. He must, therefore, have been born on the 18th September 1535.
13 Foxe, bp. of Hereford.
14 Foot-note by the Editor.—"Hæc alia manu adscripta sunt, sed epistola serius scripta est, quum Antonius Barnes, d. 18 Sept., cum Melanthone Jenam venerit.'
15 See Vol. VIII., 79, and also the signatures at the surrender of this abbey, in Eighth Report of Dep. Keeper of Public Records, App. 11., p. 25.
16 Perhaps Lady Rochford.
17 The Court was at Bishop's Waltham from the 18th to the 26th Sept. 1535; but whether this be the Waltham from which, or 1535 the year in which, the present letter is dated is a little doubtful.