Henry VIII
November 1535, 6-10

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1886

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'Henry VIII: November 1535, 6-10', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 9: August-December 1535 (1886), pp. 262-271. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75677 Date accessed: 25 July 2014.


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November 1535, 6-10

6 Nov.
Vienna Archives.
776. Chapuys to Charles V.
The marchioness of Exeter has sent to inform me that the King has lately said to some of his most confidential councillors that he would no longer remain in the trouble, fear, and suspense he had so long endured on account of the Queen and Princess, and that they should see, at the coming Parliament, to get him released therefrom, swearing most obstinately that he would wait no longer. The Marchioness declares this is as true as the Gospel, and begs me to inform your Majesty and pray you to have pity upon the ladies, and for the honour of God and the bond of kin to find a, remedy. Since my letters of the 1st inst., the merchandize of the Germans has been released except that belonging to the men of Dantzic, who are suspected to have been the cause of the capture of the English ships and are regarded as secret enemies of the Lubeckers and friends of the king of Sweden and duke of Prussia. London, 6 Nov. 1535.
Fr. From a modern copy. P. 1.
6 Nov.
Vienna Archives.
777. Chapuys to Anthony Perrenin, Secretary of State to the Emperor.
Since writing on the 1st, something else has happened, as he will see in the letters to the Emperor. Cannot write more on account of the courier's haste. "Cette diablesse de concubine" will never be satisfied till she is freed from these poor ladies, for which she works by all possible means. Desires to be recommended to the Secretary Martyrano. London, 6 Nov. 1535.
Fr. From a modern copy. P. 1.
6 Nov.
R. O. St. P. v. 34.
778. Northumberland to Cromwell.
Offers him 1,000 marks for the captainship of Berwick, which is likely soon to fall vacant, as Sir Thos. Clifford is now speechless. Reminds him of the kindness he showed the Earl when they parted in his garden at Camberye. Topclyff, 6 Nov.
Hol. Add: Mr. Secretary.
6 Nov.
R. O.
779. H. Duke of Richmond to Cromwell.
I have granted to my servant Anth. Driland the keepership of the park of Coliweston in reversion. But as the King desires that the Queen should have it, Driland is in doubt whether he shall enjoy the same. As he has heretofore received no other recompense, I request your favour in his behalf. Windsor, 6 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Sealed. Endd.
6 Nov.
R. O.
780. Roland Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield to Henry VIII.
By the aid of Sir Thos. Englefyld I have brought the parts about Shrewsbury to a reasonable stay touching robbery, intending to remain in your town of Ludlow, of which we have partly repaired the castle, during the winter. I beseech you that Sir Thomas may have your thanks when he attends you. I am right desirous of his return. Since he left the Marches 12 days since, the business has been great, and he will be loth to return except at your command. For reformation here we have devised a new book of instructions, which, with the old, I have sent to Mr. Secretary. Ludlow, 6 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
6 Nov.
R. O.
781. John Abbot of Bury to Cromwell.
Begs a licence, notwithstanding the injunctions left by the late visitors, to go abroad with a chaplain or two on the business of the monastery. Bury, 6 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add: Secretary. Endd.
6 Nov.
R. O.
782. Nich. Abbot of Rewley to Cromwell.
My brethren, considering the services of my natural brother Will. Austen done to their monastery, have granted him the surveyorship and receivership of their lands, with a fee of 4l. stg. I beg your favor herein. Rewley, 6 Nov.
Hol., p. 1. Add: Secretary. Endd.
7 Nov.
R. O.
783. Thomas Prior of Christchurch, Canterbury, to Cromwell.
I have received your letter dated Windsor, 2 Nov., desiring to have the advowson of the parsonage of Newington in Surrey. We are not the patrons. There is a benefice of the same name in Oxfordshire belonging to the abp. of Canterbury. Were it ours, and worth 100l. a year, you should have it. Canterbury, 7 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary.
R. O.784. Christchurch, Canterbury.
Petition of the prior and convent to Mr. Secretary for the modification of some of the injunctions lately sent to them by Dr. Layton.
1. That the prior may be allowed for his health, at certain times, to walk outside the walls and lodge at some of the houses built for recreation out of the monastery, and also such number of the convent as Mr. Secretary will assign. 2. To rescind the article commanding them to keep three or four more of the convent at study at Oxford besides the five whom they have been accustomed to maintain there. Their charges are so great that they cannot find any more. 3. That the brethren after their profession "may render their stories without book" as hitherto. 4. That their matins and stories in the night time may still be sung or said without candlelight, except by the reader of collects and the legend, lest it induce them to sleep. 5. Remonstrating against the prohibition of the fairs granted to the priory by king Richard II. and of temporal men keeping shops within the gates of the monastery. 6. That six of the convent who have taken the order of deacon or subdeacon desire to leave the monastery. 7. That the sextons, keepers of the shrine, and other church officers may continue to lie in the church and not in the dorter. 8. That they may still have, as hitherto, two gates to the monastery, one for general resort and processions, the other for carriage of fuel, &c. 9. To desire explanations of Mr. Visitor and Mr. Bartlet touching the article about dining together.
Pp 4. Endd.
7 Nov.
Cleop. E. iv. 122. B. M. Wright's Suppression of the Monasteries, 86.
785. Ric. Wharton to Cromwell.
The prior and convent of Ingham in Norfolk, not far from St. Benet's Abbey, have sold their abbey and lands to one Wm. Wodhowse there, without the knowledge of their founder, Sir Francis Calthrope, and contrary to their promise to Edward Calthrope, nephew and heir to Sir Francis, who has married a near kinswoman of the writer, to give him the first offer of it. Woodhowse is now in London to sue out the recovery. Begs Cromwell to stay it. Edward Calthrop will give Cromwell 100l. for his favor. Begs to know his pleasure by bearer. Bungeye, 7 Nov. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
7 Nov.
R. O.
786. Will. Oxenbregge to Cromwell.
This Sunday, 7 Nov., Will. Lawles, knowing that I was the Queen's grace's servant, showed me that he and other men of the parish of Rolvynden, Kent, heard the vicar preach openly that day fortnight, saying, "Ye shall not follow the saying of evil princes, nor evil rulers, but rather put on your harness and fight against them." Winchilsea, 7 Nov. Signed
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
7 Nov.
R. O.
787. [Lord Lisle to Cromwell.]
I have received your letter dated 4th inst. Though its contents are no little grief to my heart I will accomplish your commandment, though it touch mine oath and ordinance. I would not have done so for any within the realm of England, except at the King's commandment. This man never served the King, and for his duty done here I am sure he kept not his watch three nights since I came to Calais. For my scrupulosity of conscience, I would ye knew it as well as I do. I would be loth to lose the honor that God and the King hath called me unto, to be perjured. I never did anything to Tourney for malice, and he would not deny it if we were both before you. I trust the King will be good lord to me, and next him my trust is in you to maintain me in execution of justice, to keep the retinue in obedience, causing them to do their duty with circumspection, with the advice of the Council, and as much charity as in me lieth. "Where it pleased you to write to me of matiers more to be banished, and that men have winked at it, I know not what you mean in it." As to the long delay of him, your own letters will save me, for you commanded me to be good to Clifford, and that it was the King's pleasure he should have Tourneis room, which encouraged me in doing what I have done. Clifford is the King's sworn servant, and it becomes me not to take him to my service. I pray you to be good master to him, for I have no room void yet. "Written with the hand of him that had never a heavier heart at your commandment." 7 Nov.
Draft, p. 1. Begins: Sir.
7 Nov.
Add. MS. 8715, f. 137b.
B. M.
788. Bishop of Faenza to M. Ambrogio.
* * * The Scotch ambassadors are going to Paris to wait for news from their King, and for the time for taking away the bride, if the marriage is concluded. Dijon, 7 Nov.
Ital., pp. 3. Copy headed: Al Sig. Mons. Ambrogio, &c.
8 Nov.
R. O.
789. Freer John Artur to — Prows.
Was appointed Warden of the Grey Friars of Canterbury by the King, against the heart of the provincial. Kept the observance somewhat strict, because they rebelled against the King and held so stiffly with the bishop of Rome, for which he daily reproved them. Intended to punish one Henry Bocheer, a naughty knave, who would not preach after the archbishop of Canterbury sent down a commission to all preachers to preach the truth, and extol the King as Supreme Head, under God, of the Church in England. His excuse was that he would not displease his friends, before whom he had previously preached. Another reason for punishing him was that he called a Dutch friar, whom Artur appointed to blot the bishop of Rome's name out of the books, a heretic, and spit in his face. This caused the Dutch friar, who was an Observant, to steal over the sea with another friar. He caused a friar to go to London, whom Artur had ordered to stay and rule the house in his absence. He stole certain things, and gave them to folks in the town. He intended to ravish an honest wife of the town. All these faults he refused to confess, though Friar Artur threatened if he did not to put him in prison or send him to the ordinary, and he postponed his confession from day to day by pretending sickness. Finally, he accused the writer of speaking against the King, and has been set free, while Freer Artur was put in prison, and an Observant, who was his mortal enemy, made his keeper. No one was allowed to come to him or bring him food. Escaped to France, and tarries there till Mr. Secretary takes pity on him. Offended the provincial by refusing to attend a Convocation at Oxford last Candlemas twelve month, because he had no other authority but by the bishop of Rome. Has imprisoned certain Observants, and brought others before Dr. George for rebelling against the King's commandments. Desires the favor of "your master" that he may come home safe. Would not have fled, but they intended to famish him, and vaunted that they had set Mr. Secretary against him, so that he should not come to his answer for a twelvemonth, but rot ir prison. Believed this, because the King's attorney and baron Hale favor the Observants. Asks him, if he can do anything, to inform one Prowd, a Grey Friar, who will send him word at Dieppe or Rouen. Prowd can tell your master the truth of all this. He is to be found at the Grey Friars at Newgate. Henry Bocher, who accused him, preached at Rye about two years ago, and had to escape privily, for the men of Rye would have put him by the heels for his outrageous speaking against the truth and the King's statutes. He is a naughty knave and a crafty, and doth much harm privily. Dieppe, 8 Nov.
ii. The Same to Dr. Browne, Provincial of the Austin Friars.
As soon as the minister heard that Artur was put in prison he deposed him, and instituted one that cannot construe his paternoster, because he was his mortal enemy. He slandered him in the town and cherished his enemies, the Observants, giving them leave to go into the town, after the King's officers had ordered them to keep to their convent. While in prison the minister handled him as if he had been a paynim, and extorted from him an account which will cost him 4l. He accuses him of robbing the convent, to disgrace him with the people. Asks Browne to answer for him in him in his absence. Has written more fully to Prows, Mr. Secretary's servant. Dieppe, 8 Nov.
Copies, pp. 3. Probably in Friar Arthur's hand. Endd.: Concernyng Frere Arthure.
R. O.2. Notes of texts and extracts from the Fathers and others in favor of the Papal jurisdiction.
Lat., pp. 8. Apparently in the same hand as the preceding.
8 Nov.
R. O.
790. William Dovell Abbot of Clyffe to Cromwell.
Dr. Tregonwell has visited our house by authority of the King, as Supreme Head, and has commanded me and all my convent to keep within the precincts of our monastery. Unless I am able to visit the lands belonging to the house as formerly, will not be able to maintain hospitality or pay the King's tenth. Desires licence for the purpose, and also leave of the bishop of Bath to preach at certain places within the diocese. Clyffe Abbey, 8 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
8 Nov.
R. O.
791. Treasonable Words.
Examination of John Nesfelde, bailiff of Lounsburgh, 8 Nov. 27 Hen. VIII. at Skypton Castle before Henry, earl of Northumberland.
About the Invention of Holy Cross last, Sir Will. Thwates, parson of Lounsburgh, with Nesfeld, Will. Saunderson, John Chapleyn, and others, were making merry in Chapleyn's house, when he told them he had been at Malton and heard news from London that by a grant made in Parliament every temporal man with 20l. in goods or lands should pay the King 20s.; on which the parson openly said, "I am very glad to hear these news; for now shall ye temporal men be pylled and polled as well as the spiritual men be. And said further that all realms christened had forsaken us, but only the Lutheryens. And now shall this money thus granted serve them to the intent that they shall take our part in bringing about our (the King's) (fn. 1) false purpose. And said the realm of England was enterdite, with other violent words, as well then as at other times; (fn. 2) and the interdiction lay at Calais and at other ports without the realm; and if it were conveyed in, we should have no more Christian burial than dogs: howbeit the King will not obey it."
ii. Will. Saunderson of Lounsburgh examined on St. Nicholas even, 27 Hen. VIII. before John Aske, justice of the peace in the East Riding, confirms the above, and adds that the parson said the King would be destroyed by the most vile people in the world, "and that he should be glad to take a boat for safeguard of his life and flee into the sea and so forsake his own realm; (fn. 3) and, masters, there hangs a cloud over us, what as it means I know not."
iii. John Symson confirms all the above statements, adding that the parson did not say these things once or twice, but whenever he could get any convenient audience, and because his neighbours refused his company, he blamed them unreasonably.
iv. John Chapleyn deposes to the same effect, and has heard him speak much of prophecies of fields that were to come.
v. Additional deposition by Nesfelde that Master Magnus sat at Warter Abbey, about two miles from Lounsburgh, about the feast of Peter and Paul last, and had before him all the curates of the deanery of Herthill except the parson of Lounsburgh, who refused to appear; that Magnus delivered every curate a brief to be declared every Sunday, and the parson of Lounsburgh alone refused to publish it till the Sunday before Holyrood day, when men began to murmur against him, as all the parish knows.
Pp. 2.
8 Nov.
R. O.
792. First Fruits and Tenths.
Receipt dated 8 Nov. 27 Hen. VIII. by John Gostwyke, treasurer of the King's first fruits and tenths, from Thos. Cromwell, chief secretary, of the following documents.
Obligations dated 20 May 27 Hen. VIII. of Nic. Fytton, 6l. 13s. 4d., John Willyams and Thos. Wykes, 6l. 13s. 4d., Wm. Colley and John Halfehyde, 5l., Thos. Wykes and John Willyams, 5l., Wm. Birriton and John Burghyll, 5l., the same, 5l., John Halfehyde and Wm. Colley, 3l., Edw. Walwyn and John FitzRusse, 3l., the same, 3l., John Chamberleyn and Ric. Heyward, 40s., the same, 40s. An obligation upon the new statute dated 8 June 27 Hen. VIII., wherein Edw. North is bound in 500l. for the payment of 466l. 13s. 8d.
P. 1.
9 Nov.
R. O.
793. Roland Lee, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, to Cromwell.
Thank you for your gentleness to my surveyor. When I was last at Court you were pleased to move the King for a warrant of 100l. for the repairs of Ludlow Castle, which you sent to Sir Edw. Croft, receiver of the Marches; on which I bought 8 fother of lead and bestowed it on the castle, and repaired it as it has not been repaired this 100 years. I would have continued to do so if I might have had my money, which is near 60l. I am told by Crofte and Turner, the auditor, that the whole receipts are assigned to the King's household and the lady Dowager, so that I am compelled to borrow the money, and if I have not your help I am at no little afterdeal. Please direct your letter to Crofte to pay me the 100l. My lord of Norfolk will report our diligence here. I told him what I wrote to you concerning the thieves in these parts, at which time Geffrey Harley put up his supplication, and his Grace called Mr. Englefield and me, and said if he were a thief he should be hanged, which is not unlike, if grace come not from you. Commend Mr. Englefield, and encourage him to repair here after Christmas, as Mr. Vernon must be absent. Ludlow, 9 Nov. Signed.
Paragraph added in his own hand, stating that the repairs would have cost the King 500l.
P. 1. Add.: Mr. Secretary. Endd.
[9] Nov.
R. O.
794. The Mayor and Aldermen of Chester to Cromwell.
Touching the imprisonment of Fernando de Ibarra, a Spanish merchant, by Ralph Rogerson, their late mayor, for the sale of certain cloths in the open market. He has been married and settled at Chester for 15 years. He rides about the country and buys up cloth for foreign merchants, which has been usually bought by the merchants in the city, contravening the city charters. Chester, Tuesday before the feast of St. Martin. Signed by Thomas Smyth, mayor, and eight aldermen.
Pp. 2. Add.: Secretary.
9 Nov.
R. O.
795. John Tregonwell to Cromwell.
At Barlynche in Somersetshire, belonging to the Canons Austins, the prior will resign if Sir John Barwyke, the subprior, may succeed. He is a man of discretion. And though you have given me authority to receive resignations and order the elections of abbots and priors, without your special pleasure I will attempt nothing of the same. The lands are 100l. yearly, the house is 60l. in debt and in some decay. This day I ride to Barnstaple and other parts of Devonshire. Barlynche, 9 Nov.
The ordinary would have elected Barwyke, as the house is not of the King's foundation. Mr. Phetypace of Beselles Lyghe is the founder. I have showed the parties that the whole matter is in your hands, and that they must sue to you.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
9 Nov.
R. O.
796. Sir William Courtenay to Cromwell.
Thanks him for his manifold goodness, which he desires him to continue towards his cousin Stowell. The obligations in which he and my lord Souche were bound are expired. Desires him to continue the matter that new obligations may be made. Mr. Controller agrees to be bound that Stowell shall abide the award of Cromwell and my lord Chancellor next term. Powderham, 9 Nov. Signed: By your brother, W. Courtenay.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd.
10 Nov.
R. O.
797. Pages of the Chamber.
Warrant to the treasurer and chamberlains of the Exchequer for the usual payment of 100l., against Christmas, to the grooms and pages of the Chamber.
Endorsed: "A warrant for the grooms of the King's chamber for their hundred pounds."—"Apud Westm. 10mo Nov. a° r.r. H. VIII. 27.—per Wriothesley."
10 Nov.
R. O.
798. Priory of Holy Cross, Reigate.
Deed by John Lynden, prior of Holy Cross, Reygatt, Surrey, and the convent, acknowledging a loan made to them by Thos. Stydolff of 16l. 7s. 4d., which they will repay by remitting to him for two years a rent of 5l. 5s., due by the said Thos. Stydolff and his son John for the manor of Westhumble and lands in Mykelham, Dorkyng, and Lethered, and by authorising him to receive to his own use for two years a rent of 58s. 8d., due to them by Roger Atwell for a tenement in Hedley. Chapter house, 10 Nov. 27 Hen. VIII. Signed by the prior and dan Robert Ayers. Sealed.
R. O.2. Depositions taken — June, 38 Hen. VIII. (fn. 4) of John Lymden, clk., "concerning a covent seal exhibited by John Sydolf (sic) of the priory of Rygate" bearing date 10 Nov. 27 Hen. VIII.
1. When the deed was sealed he was prior and had three canons there. 2. He delivered it to Thos. and Jo. Stydolf 4 Nov., one whole year and 7 [corrected from 8] months before the Commissioners came to suppress the house. 3. Which they did in the feast of St. Anne [corrected from "before 27 July"], 28 Hen. VIII. 4. Does not remember in whose presence or where it was delivered, but it was with the assent of the convent. 5. The said John and Thos. received and retained the rents granted to them while the house stood. 6. He borrowed 16l. 7s. 4d. of the said Thomas and spent it about the suits of the house. 7. The said Thos. and John had none other recompence. Signed.
ii. Depositions of John Stydolff, 18 June 38 Hen. VIII.
1. Was not present when the deed was delivered to his father, but his father delivered it to him in the parish of Chertsey. 2. He and his father became bound to Barnard Jenyns for the sum lent to the prior, and afterwards paid him. 3. He had no other recompence but the deed.
Pp. 2. Endd.
10 Nov.
R. O.
799. John Whalley to Cromwell.
Wrote 10 days past that he would discharge half the workmen, and so did. And while the Master of the Masondewe was in London—Whalley thought he was only at Canterbury—has done more work with 120 men than was done before with 180, because he discharged the old and idle. The Master has now taken 20 or 30 of them back, saying he does it by Cromwell's authority. Last pay day Whalley discharged the "draggers of peobles" and some "peonars" with shovels and set them to work breaking rock and filling up the jetty, because the pebbles have come over the works and half filled the entrance of the channel within the pier head. Has set on drags again to let certain ships, which went out "this other daye" and are at Sandewiche, come in again. When he spoke to the King at Wyndsore, "Mr. Sadler standing by," and his Grace made him paymaster of his works at Dover, he was to look to the King's profit. If, however, the said Master is to take upon him Whalley's charge and suffer the King's money to be spent in vain, he were worthy to be punished. Begs Cromwell to aid him; is willing that anyone should keep the books, between himself and the King, except the said Master, who would triumph over him. The person who keeps the books between himself and the King was recommended by Mr. Gonson, who may be examined as to his character. The Master of the Maysondewe has asked for many drags; has let him have two or three till Cromwell's pleasure be known. Dover, 10 Nov.
Hol., pp. 3. Add.: "chyff Secretaury." Endd.
10 Nov.
R. O.
800. J. (fn. 5) Prior of Bokenham and Convent to Cromwell.
Sends him his poor fee of 26s. 8d., "beseeching that we may obtain your favorable licence for the keeping of one cure and one chapel with four masses in the week day, with two honest religious priests" for maintaining their poor house;—also that they may put some of the laymen of their house in trust for employing their pastures and receiving their rents; else they are afraid great men who could not be resisted will require them to do as they like; also that they may receive members and observe Cromwell's injunctions for maintaining God's service. Some of the younger members of their company are not godly disposed, and rather desire liberty than to be "strytyd " (straitened?) with others. "Blottyd the 10th day of November."
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Secretary.
10 Nov.
R. O.
801. George Colt to Cromwell.
I send you five pieces of arras bequeathed to you by Dr. Shorton, late dean of Stoke. I have also sent you two "dooes of my pore gardyn," and as many pheasants as my hawks could take. Cavendish, 10 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Secretary. Endd. Sealed.
10 Nov.
R. O.
802. [Lord Lisle to Cromwell].
Yesterday, Henry Palmer, man-at-arms here, came and desired of me licence to go into England on business of his own and of yours, by your commandment as he alleges. For certain misdemeanours committed when the Admiral (fn. 6) was here, I refused to let him go, and committed him to the walls, according to the ordinance of this town, as the Council here well know. I beg you not to be displeased till we can certify you more at large of his conduct. After this punishment I trust he will be more conformable. He misconducted himself to Sir Thos. Palmer, knight porter; but if the fault be not in himself, I and the Council will take such direction that we need not trouble you further. Calais, 10 Nov.
Corrected draft, p. 1.
10 Nov.
R. O.
803. Sir Ric. Whettehyll to Cromwell.
After the marriage of my eldest daughter to Mr. SaintJhon I drew hither because I understood that when my lord of Norfolk was here, Mr. Rokewod, bailly of Marke, and Thos. Fowlar were trying to get two warren of coneys put down, the one in Marke and the other in Oye, that my grandfather, my father, and I, have held by patent since Henry VI.'s days. I also desired to be in readiness to show my grants I had to the Commissioners, while they were here. I beg you to consider my great losses by the wars "with great charge of children, both sons and daughters." Calais, 10 Nov. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: as Secretary. Endd.
10 Nov.
Add. MS. 28,588, f. 46.
B. M.
804. Hannaert to Charles V.
The French king and the duke and duchess of Orleans have been ill. The marriage of the king of Scotland with the daughter of the duke of Vendome has not been concluded, in consequence of some difficulty. The Scotch ambassadors have sent to consult their master, and are waiting for his answer. Complains of the nonpayment of his salary. Dijon, 10 Nov. 1535.
Sp., pp. 2. Modern copy.
10 Nov.
Luther's Briefe, (ed. Berlin, 1825–8). iv. 648.
805. Luther to Justus Jonas.
The legate has made his appearance suddenly enough and in this city. He is now with the marquis. He is supposed to fly rather than to ride. He asked me and Pomeranus to breakfast when I declined supper at evening in the bath. I came and ate with him in the castle (in arce). But our conversation I cannot write. I acted Luther himself before the whole table, and I also acted as the deputy of Antonius Anglicus, whom he had likewise invited (as he writes to you) with very ill tempered words. (fn. 7) * * * * Vigilia Martini, 1535.
Lat.

Footnotes

1 Interlined in another hand.
2 The remainder of the sentence is added in the same hand as the interlineation before mentioned.
3 The remainder of this sentence is added in the same hand as the previous insertions.
4 Although this document is so much later than the preceding it has been preserved along with it, and its interest belongs entirely to the earlier period.
5 John Milgate.
6 Apparently the French Admiral, Brion.
7 "Fgi Lutherum ipsum tota mensa,et Antonii Anglici quem pariter invitaratt legatum egi verbis (ut ille tibi scribit) verdiriesslicissimis, de quo coram."