Henry VIII
January 1538, 21-25

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Institute of Historical Research

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James Gairdner (editor)

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1892

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40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50

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'Henry VIII: January 1538, 21-25', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 13 Part 1: January-July 1538 (1892), pp. 40-50. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75750 Date accessed: 27 November 2014.


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January 1538, 21-25

21 Jan.
Kaulek, 16.
116. Castillon to Francis I.
[London], 21 Jan.:—The king of England is sending M. de Bryan to Francis about certain proposals the bp. of Winchester has written of, and which seem to him very strange, as Francis will see more at length in another despatch of the same day.
French abstract.
*** A modern transcript is in R. O.
21 Jan.
Kaulek, 16.
117. Castillon to Francis I.
[London], 21 Jan.:—Sir, this morning the King your brother sent M. de Briant to inform me that yesterday he received letters from M. de Wincestre containing very strange proposals, which were very badly taken; and as he could not believe you would make such he sends Briant to you to learn the truth. After dinner I went to see my lord Privy Seal, who said that M. de Wincestre wrote on the 10th inst., that on asking you that the King his master might be comprised as your principal friend in this peace which is being arranged, you replied that you would do for him as for a common friend, with other talk which the lord Privy Seal did not declare; and this seemed strange to the King and his Council considering the hope everyone had of seeing you greater friends than ever. They are certainly much pained at it. The lord Privy Seal throws all the blame on the irritability and clumsiness of the said Winchester, and I confirmed him in so saying. After hearing him at length, I conclude that all will end well; for they do not wish such enemies as you. They only seek to put their country in order, which they have begun to do with the abbeys and other benefices, as peaceably as they can; and whatever countenance they may put on they do not wish for trouble. Moreover, in my judgment, it would be dangerous to them. And although you have seen, by my letter of the 10th inst., the cold answer of this King to my request for an aid, I gather from my lord Privy Seal's conversation that, if Briant does not find things so bitter (en l'aigreur) as Winchester has written, and this King hears that you continue your accustomed goodwill and amity to him, if you frankly and friendly ask a reasonable aid of him you will not be refused. Thus you will see that the people you have to deal with here "ne se veullent pas tousjours avoir par trop douces parolles."
Briant is just going to horseback. This King will decide when he hears the report Briant brings back. I find so little stability in the English with their subtleties and their proneness to suspicion that I cannot tell how far you may depend on it. Certainly, as I have written before, they incline more to your side than the Emperor's; but, if it were possible for them, they would rather live with both without doing pleasure or displeasure to either.
French abstract.
*** A modern transcript is in R. O.
21 Jan.
Kaulek, 17.
118. Castillon to the Grand Master.
[London], 21 Jan.:—M. de Briant will not fail to speak of Madame de Longueville. Unless it is intended to keep him in suspense, M. d'Albrot (fn. 1) should be made to speak a little sharply pointing out that the king of England is wrong to attempt to get the wife of the king of Scots, who would hazard his kingdom rather than suffer such a wrong. This will be enough to make Henry change his tone without giving him occasion of ill will against Francis. To draw a good large aid from the king of England there is no better way than to keep him in suspense about it, and one could get quit of the matter at any time by these threats.
Asks for his half year's salary which commenced in the middle of December.
French abstract.
*** A modern transcript in R. O.
21 Jan.
R.O.
119. John Gladwyn to Cromwell.
Your bedeman, John Gladwyn, has been at liberty (fn. 2) since Lammas by the help of your lordship or of old friends. Has gone above 400 miles in the bpric. of Durham, Westmoreland, Yorkshire, Richmondshire, Lancashire, and Notts "to hear and see the fashion of vicious people, schismatics, ipocrites, boger, treatours, rebellys, and your extreme mortall innemyes." Sends a little book written which he obtained in the North. "Good my Lord, make much of the noble earl of Westmoreland, whose heart was sore broken when his power forsook him" 21 Jan.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Cromwell, Privy Seal.
21 Jan.
R.O.
120. Sir Thos. Denys to Cromwell.
Since last being in London, has often sorrowed that he could not declare himself before the King of the untrue complaint against him that he had concealed a robbery, (fn. 3) was a Papist and hung at other men's sleeves. Though Cromwell has signified that the King is his very good lord, fears his Grace may hereafter recollect the complaint and withdraw his favours. Would be sorry to lose now in his old days what in youth he has dearly bought with his body, serving the King in his wars by land and sea. Doubts not Cromwell remembers his excuse touching the first article of the complaint. "As to the second article, papisticque," knows that the King is supreme head under God of the Church of England, and so was it decreed by all the clergy and confirmed by Act of Parliament. "And for more proof thereof your lordship about three years past caused Sir Wm. Kyngeston and me to read in a book called Bratton, not unwritten this 400 years, as I suppose, where he doth call the King's Grace vicarius Christi, wherefore I do reckon a papist and a traitor to be one thing." Offers to fight any one who has accused him, and will take upon him to prove it. No one living shall prove that he has offended the King therein in word or deed or writing, nor privily nor openly objected, let or hindered any cause concerning his said authority. As to the third article, hangs at no man's sleeve, but at the King's only. Has a yearly fee of 4l. from a great man, as one of his learned council, and is master of the game in one of his parks, which he will leave if it be the King's pleasure. 21 Jan.
Hol., p.2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
21 Jan.
Kaulek, 16.
121. Francis I. to Castillon.
Loriol, 21 Jan.:—Has received the answer to the letter he sent to Castillon by express, which sufficiently answers Castillon's despatches of 30 and 31 Dec.
French abstract.
*** A modern transcript is in R.O.
21 Jan.
Balcarres
MSS.
(Advocates'
Lib. Edinb.)
ii. 1.
122. Anthoinette [Duchess of Guise] to the Duchess of Longueville.
Writes briefly, as she will have news in two or three days. Your father is in the country, just returned from Lorraine. His voyage de Gueldres has not been approved. "Il la fet savoir au Roy ne ses (scais) se quy s'en concleura. Il a layse Mons. son frere (fn. 4) ayant la gouste" Your aunt (fn. 5) is in good health. The marquis (fn. 6) is going to the Court. "Mons. de Pierefort estet a Nency nous trop aseuré" Your brother's fever is better; he is considered to be cured. Is anxious to know the truth. Monstier sur Saulx, 21 Jan.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. Add.: A ma fille la duchesse de Longueville.
22 Jan.
Harl. MS.
282, f. 15.
B. M.
Nott's Wyatt,
469.
123. Henry VIII. to Wyatt.
Since the despatch of the last post, by whom we signified our mind on the relation made by Sir John Dudley at his return, we have more deliberately digested the Emperor's friendly treatment of him in the discourses you and he had with his Council, for which you shall cordially thank him, desiring him to perform his promise of joining us in this league between him and France as a principal contrahent; also his promise touching their Council. But in anywise the comprehension must not be pretermitted, as it may concern all treaties between him, us, and France. As we conceive that he bears us hearty affection, we have "much suppressed all remembrance of such old things as have interrupted of late days our amity," and should be glad of an occasion to express our love. As the proposed marriage of the duchess of Milan and the duke of Cleve and Juliers is stayed, the King might honour the said duchess by marriage, considering the reports of her. This Wyatt might suggest as of himself in conversation with the Emperor Graundevile, or Cobus, and advise them "to set forth some overture of the said duchess of Milan for that purpose" Westminster, 22 Jan. 29 Hen. VIII.
Signed at the top.
Pp. 2. Add.: ambassador with the Emperor.
22 Jan.
R. O.
124. The Mayor, and his brethren, Of Northampton, (fn. 7) to Cromwell.
We beseech your Lordship to be good to our town, thanking you especially for your kindness to me, Wm, Walgier, mayor, "when last at Windsor, in obtaining a commission for taking horses for posts and other the King's necessaries at that time. Some of the horses have never been returned, and others are utterly marred and destroyed. Ask what is to be done to get recompense. Northampton, 22 Jan.
Hol., p.1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
23 Jan.
R. O.
125. Sir John Vyllers to Cromwell.
According to Cromwell's letters to William Assheby, John Dygby, and the writer, they have committed Sir Ric. Lawe, vicar of Sproxton, to gaol at Leicester. All books and writings found in his house, with the depositions Anthony Brokesby had taken of the woman that accused him, and other depositions, are sent up by the bearer, who can further instruct Cromwell. 23 Jan. Signed.
P. 1, Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: "Sir Jo. Vyllers, knight"
23 Jan.
R. O.
126. William Fawnte to Cromwell.
Lately informed him of extortions practised by sheriffs and justices of the peace, among others Sir Walter Smyth. (fn. 8) Declared this to Sir Wm. Fildyng, who has given him a book of bills of complaints to show to Cromwell. It is said Sir Walter is come up to London. He let his sheriff-wick of Warwickshire for 20 mks. above all his charges, reserving the half of all sums exacted from the people, amounting to 10l. and above. It is no little shame to him; who is accounted worth 1,000l. Wm. Underwode, Ric. Sheperd, Wm. Edward, and Wm. Cowper, who committed an abominable burglary on a poor widow, are fled the country by his suffrance, which is felony. Kenelworth, 23 Jan.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
23 Jan.
R. O.
127. Katharine [Countess of] Northumberland to Cromwell.
Sends by Wm. Proctour, the bearer, 20l. as his half-year's fee. Semar, 23 Jan. Signed.
P. 1. Add: Lord Privy Seal.
23 Jan.
R. O.
128. Sir Thos. Whartton to Cromwell.
On behalf of the abbot of Hollm, the bearer. His proceedings have been right honest, and he is a good borderer. Is steward of the house by the King's command. Hollm, 23 Jan.
All the Marches within the bounds of his charge are in good order.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
23 Jan.
R. O.
129. Shipping at Calais.
Account of the cargoes of three vessels discharged at Calais, viz., 1. the Erasemus of Harwich, John Olyver master, laden in Anvera (Antwerp) by John Petwell, goods discharged and sold at Calais 14 Aug. 1537; 2. the John a Baptyst of Calais, John Goodlawe, master, laden in Anvera, goods landed and sold, 6 Nov. 1537; 3. the Crystover of Rye, John Whyt master, laden in Baro, with goods from Anvera which were landed and sold at Calais 23 Je[niver?] 1537.
P. 1.
23 Jan.
R. O.
St. P. ii. 545.
130. Mayor and Aldermen of Dublin to Cromwell.
To the same effect as lord Leonard Grey's letter of the 19th. (See No. 109.) Dublin, 23 Jan.
Hol. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Sealed.
23 Jan.
R. O.
131. Gardiner to Cromwell.
Sends Wyatt's letters open, as they were enclosed in this packet. Thought Franciscus would have returned from Spain before this. Sends Rede "who can skyl of runnyng" My posters are in England,—Olyver Massey, Arthur Poley, Saintclere, Herry Fraunces and Story, and then Barnabe, who can do well. Asks Cromwell to further his suit to the King for horses and money, for he needs both. It were superfluous to write of the matters contained in his letters to the King. "This troubleth me that any man should think we had need of their promises. Me thinketh it were possible they should depend of us. And then the King's highness as he is Emperor in deed in his realm, so he should in deed imperare through and over all and himself no further to care what other men do, but all they to care what he doth. In that methink were quietness; and I am weary of travail and specially in writing such displeasant matter. I must ever write as truth requireth"
The bearer has asked that he may be sent into Spain at his next dispatch. Pierelate, 23 Jan.
Hol., pp. 2. Sealed. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
23 Jan.
Kaulek, 17.
132. Francis I. to Castillon.
[St. Vallier], 23 Jan.:—When he was about to answer the letter of the 10th, the bp. of Winchester came to him in a village (villette) where he had dined, and held the same language as the king of England held to Castillon. Replied that he had informed his good brother of his reasons for deferring to agree to the Council and asked his intention upon this point; that the king of England had not seemed to take it in good part, and said he was aggrieved that Francis seemed to dissemble (avoir par ambages), and, when he could not agree with the Emperor, to pretend it was on his (Henry's) account that he refused the Council. He (Francis) was much hurt that Henry should take his proceedings otherwise than they were meant, and but for his affection to Henry would take it still worse. His deputies and the Emperor's had lately parted after concluding a prolongation of truce to be further prolonged hereafter; and he and the Emperor would send ambassadors to reside with each other, and the negociation of the peace was remitted to Rome. Now when the Emperor had agreed to that, with the intention of passing in person into Italy, were the Pope and he likely to be at accord or not? And was there no deception in saying nothing would be done to prejudice the King his (Winchester's) master? He spoke of this because he would feel annoyed if people (the Emperor's party) promised them one thing and then did the contrary; still he was glad his good brother left him at liberty to agree to the Council. On his side, of course, he did not fear this Council, for he had never attempted to withdraw himself from the obedience of the Roman Church; and if they came to treat of it, when the Pope, the Emperor, and himself, the kings of Hungary, Portugal, and Scotland, and all the Italian potentates, who are on safe ground, wished (a thing which he could not then refuse without putting them all against him) that the Council should not be delayed for the king of England, would that Council not be reputed universal? He heard from his ambassador that Henry said the peace was not ready, though both parties were so weary that they would willingly have it; but he thought the Emperor powerful enough to commence a new war when he liked, and he on his part was strong enough to do the same. Lastly (and he had written as much into England at the time), he had determined to send to his good brother a personage with ample power to treat for a stricter amity—a resolution which Winchester then approved of—and the said personage was ready to start, but he (Francis) had now thought better not to send him.
"How," said Winchester, as if discontented, "will you not then send the said personage?" Replied he would not, as he did not see that his going could be of any service, as their original treaties were large enough and their friendship so great and sincere that nothing new could be added. Winchester answered he was sure that if the said personage were sent his master would willingly treat. Reminded him that it was not his (Francis') fault that they did not treat last year; but the English would never assist him with a single crown and had left him to bear all the burden of the war, and so what could be expected of a new treaty? Winchester did not appear satisfied with that reply.
As to the duchess of Longueville, if Henry speaks again of it, Castillon shall say her marriage is quite concluded with the king of Scots, and to break it now would neither be honourable nor reasonable, and the king of France would not lose such a friend as the king of Scots, whom he looks upon as his own son.
French abstract.
*** A modern transcript is in R. O.
23 Jan.
Kaulek, 19.
133. The Grand Master to Castillon.
Saint Vallier, 23 Jan.:—The King is very pleased to find himself free touching the Council. The final peace will be treated at Rome, so Castillon may judge whether the Pope and Emperor do not trust each other. Affairs go as well as possible in Piedmont. The Emperor and Francis are going to exchange ambassadors.
French abstract.
*** A modern transcript is in R. O.
24 Jan.
R. O.
134. Council in the Marches of Wales.
Warrant to Sir Brian Tuke, treasurer of the Chamber, for the payment of Rowland bp. of Coventry and Lichfield, president, and the Council in the Marches of Wales, as follows:—Diets, 13l. 6s. 8d. a week: yearly fees:—Sir John Porte, 40 mks.; Sir Ant. Fytzherbert. 10l.; Sir Edw. Crofte, 10l.; Sir Ryce Mauncel, 10l.; John Russell, secretary, 13l. 6s. 8d.; Roger Wigston, 5l.; John Vernon, 13l. 6s. 8d.; Thos. Holte, King's attorney, 13l. 6s. 8d.; Ric. Hassall, King's solicitor, 5l.; their foreign expenses, 100 mks. yearly. Wages and diets of Wm. Carter, armourer at Ludlowe, 6d. a day. To be paid from Michaelmas last. Total, 875l. 15s. 10d. Westm., 24 Jan. 29 Hen. VIII.
Pp. 2. Endd.
24 Jan.
R. O.
135. Elynor Countess of Rutland to Lady Lisle.
Has received her letter, her stuff which lady Lisle had at Calais, and 2 tuns of wine and 2 barrels of herring. Thanks her for them. Could get none good in these parts. Asks her to send the price that she may pay her for them. Intends to put her to the trouble of sending more. Mrs. Katharine is in good health. She is of gentle demeanour and uses herself well in everything. Enfield, 24 Jan.
She and her husband desire to be recommended to lord Lisle and to lady Clynton.
Lord Rutland spoke to lady Lisle's servant, Corbet, about having the next vacant room in Calais for a servant of his. Asks her to speak to her husband about it. Signed.
Pp. 2, mutilated. Add.
24 Jan.
R. O.
136. Margaret Marchioness of Dorset to Cromwell.
I thank you for taking into your service my son Thomas and a servant of mine, Ootes Nicolas. As to the former I shall be glad that he learn in his youth to live on the means assigned him by his father's will, but if that do not suffice I will from time to time depart to him of my own as you think meet. As he is young and needs an honest sad man to be with him I have appointed Clement Chayrde, an old servant of my husband's, to wait on him. Sir Richard Clement's Moote in Kent, 24 Jan. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
24 Jan.
R. O.
137. Francis Harbart to the Duke of Norfolk.
We have no war with any Irishmen but O'Conner and his brother, Kayr O'Conner, with whom we are now at a 15 days' truce. This Kayr has acted very falsely, and since he joined O'Conner the latter's offers for peace have been much less. The Deputy's last hosting punished O'Conner sorely. If my lord of Ormonde and lord Butler were as active in the King's service as the Deputy the O'Conners would soon be banished; for if they attacked the back of his country with O'Kayrolle, who is Ormond's man, and McGilpatric, who is his son-in-law, O'Conner durst not stay. Alas! it is pity that good country is not inhabited with Englishmen. We here lack nothing so much as English inhabitants. Last year when your Grace was in the North I made suit to the King, but, in your absence, could get nothing, and am beggared. Since I first spake with you at Longle, I am poorer by 400l., although my service has saved the King 10,000l. I have nothing but a farm called Portlester, which I have taken from the Commissioners here. Begs favour for bearer, the King's old servant Barnardyng, gunner, who has done good service. Dublin, 24 Jan.
Hol., pp. 3. Add. Endd.
24 Jan.
R. O.
138. John Davy to Lord Lisle.
Received a letter from the controller of Fecame, "which is the high admiral of France and lieutenant" there, complaining that a ship of his has been arrested, by Wm. Marse, in Calais, in reprisal of a ship of his taken to Fecame, 12 years ago, by John le Fewer, "the which at that same time the said Le Fefer had part on the said ship which is now arrested in Calais," who sold his share to the controller. This the controller denies. If he is not satisfied he will repay himself by taking the first ship that comes from Calais. He is a great friend to the English. Has found him just and generous.
The ship taken by Le Fever was taken in time of war, and was judged lawful prize by the Admiral's court in Rone.
Hol., pp. 2. Add. Sealed. Headed: 1537, in Rone, 24 Jan.
24 Jan.
R. O.
139. Harvel to Cromwell.
The league between the Emperor, the Venetians, and the bp. of Rome against the Turk was lately confirmed at Rome. They intend to attack him this year with 200 galleys, 100 ships, and .50,000 foot. The costs are thus divided, the Emperor half, the Venetians "0/3" (one-third), and bp. of Rome "0/6" (one-sixth). The Emperor, who comes to Italy this spring, will be captain of all. The Turk has sent to offer the Venetians peace, with all good conditions, but the governors are constant to their alliance with the Emperor. The city sustains incredible damage by these wars, but they will not bow to the enemy who, without just cause, has provoked them to war, and now repents, being in great fear of this new league. Most of his subjects are Christians, who will on occasion make "general sublevations" Both the Emperor and Venice make great preparations. There have lately come to Trent 40,000 pikes, many hackebusshes, and 15 carts of powder with other ammunition. Ferdinando is also preparing to invade the Turks in person, "insupportable of the rebuke he had by his host, which so vilely fled this winter past to his great shame and damage" Barbarossa has done great damage to the Venetians in the Archipelago, having taken above 40,000 of their subjects, of whom he has put great part to the galleys. Peace between the Emperor and French king is hoped for here. The bp. of Rome has been long coming toward Bononye with voice of keeping the General Council at Vincentia, but all are fables. In Va (Venetia), 24 Jan. 1537.
Since writing hears that the Emperor and French king have made truce for 12 months.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
24 Jan.
Harl. MS.
6,989, f. 80.
B. M.
140. Andrew Osiander to Cranmer.
The cause of his infrequent writing has been not only lack of matter, but also certain suspicions which have troubled him. The publication of his pamphlet de Incestis Nuptiis has been forbidden by the Senate by a more severe edict than the writings of any heretic. The alleged cause was that it was unlawful to publish counsel which he had given them. Replied to them so that they were ashamed and afraid; for he saw that the real reason was that the book helped the cause of the king of England, and might therefore displease the Emperor. Feared they might intercept his letters to Cranmer, and therefore abstained from writing until now, when he thinks there is no danger.
The Turks won a great victory last autumn in Hungary. "Cacianus dux" had led the army into a place where provisions could not be procured, and they were attacked by two Turkish armies joined together. (fn. 9) He then fled, so that the whole army was killed or taken. 70 guns and 25,000 men were lost. He desired a safeconduct to come to King Ferdinand and purge himself, and is now in custody.
Many lies have been told to conceal the disaster from the people. Besides the comet, there have been seen two swords in the heavens, like the arms of the elector of Saxony, at Coburg, a town on the borders of Franconia, three days' journey hence. What they signify is disputed. Some say there is a plan to drive out Ferdinand and put the Elector in his place. Others suspect new war against the bps., for the Elector is suing the bishop of Mainz for certain jurisdictions which his predecessor usurped. Unless the bp. obeys the award, war will doubtless be made on him, and if the other bps. help him, they will all perish. The landgrave of Hesse will, as some think, send help to the duke of Gueldres, to harass the bp. of Liege, who has offended him by calling him a fool.
Thinks what he wrote, "de Annulo Papistico," seemed a joke to Cranmer; yet it portended something, as itself shows, for "my cardinals" sent me their advice, which I published against the wishes of my other rival, Paul III., as it was sent from Bologna on that condition. Thinks Luther is printing notes on it. If he does, will give him 144,000 years of indulgence. Germany is quiet. The Zuinglian Swiss repent and return to us. Peace between the Emperor and French king is desired but not hoped for.
The other's book (fn. 10) has moved many men here. They wonder that the Emperor does not reply. Will write again in the spring, when what has been planned at home in the winter begins to open. Nuremberg, 24 Jan.
Lat. Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Archiepiscopo Cantuariensi.
Otho, C.x., 162.
B. M.
2. Contemporary translation of the preceding. Printed by Pocock, in Records, ii. 483.
Pp. 4, mutilated. Endd.
R.O.3. "De prohibitis et incestis nupciis declaratio, Andrea Osiandro concionatore Noricensi authore, anno 1537."
Lat., pp. 21. Endd.: "De prohibitis," &c.; and in another hand: "Mr. Cope's book touching the Council. One copy of instructions for Mr. Henes. Mr. Boner."
25 Jan.
Cleop., E. v.,
101.
B. M.
C.'s Letters,
359.
141. Cranmer to [Cromwell].
As concerning the book lately devised by him and other bishops, which Cromwell sent to Cranmer, corrected by the King, returns it by the bearer, the pursuivant, with some annotations, which he trusts that the King will pardon. Would have nothing therein that Momus could reprehend; but refers all to the King's judgment. In the lower margin, next the binding, the King will find numbers referring to the words commented upon. Approves of all "those his Grace's castigations" upon which he makes no comment, and some which he has annotated he really mislikes not.
As to the punishment of those who set forth seditious bruits of the King in these parts, one was ordered at Canterbury on Wednesday last according to the King's commandment; another shall suffer the same tomorrow at Sandwich, and the other shall be served accordingly. In reply to Cromwell's questions (1) whether marriage contracted and solemnised in lawful age per verba de præsenti and without carnal copulation, be matrimony before God? (2) Whether such matrimony be consummate or no? and (3) What the woman may thereupon demand by civil law against her husband?—1. Cranmer, and the doctors with him, agree that it is perfect matrimony before God, but not utterly consummated, as the term is among school divines and lawyers. 2. Has no one here who knows about civil law except Dr. Barbar, who in this matter requires books and other learned men to consult with; but all causes of dower are judged by common law, and there are plenty of learned men to advise the King in the civil law at London. Forde, 25 Jan. Signed.
Pp. 2. Begins "My very singular good lord."
Royal M.S.
7. C. xvi. 199.
B. M.
142. The Bishops' Book.
"A book of annotations of certain defaults found in the Bishops' book," with the names of the critics in the margin, viz.: "Heth, etc" "Chichester," "My 1. of Cant., and "St. Jermye."
The passages commented on which are referred to by the number of the folios, do not quite tally with "The Institution of a Christian Man," printed by Berthelet, 1537.
Pp. 23. Endd. as above.
25 Jan.
R.O.
143. Thomas Lord Dacre to Cromwell.
I have received your letters of the 13 Jan., showing that, much to my comfort, your Lordship is contented to be master of my game of my parks of Dany and Herst, though the gift is not worthy of your kindness. Concerning your Lordship's patent, give credence to the bearer both in that and in other matters between my lord La Warr and the executors of my Lord my grandfather and me, so that I may recover my lands on finding sureties touching the charges in my grandfather's will, wherein I am unkindly handled, as Mr. Audeley can inform you. Horstmounceux, 25 Jan. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
25 Jan.
R. O.
144. Sir Res Manxell and George Mathew to Cromwell.
We have received the King's commission to examine the particulars of a bill exhibited unto his Highness by Richard Hore against Walter Herbert and other. The earl of Worcester wrote to us that the said Walter Herbert and Watkyn Herbert did attach Hore's ship and convey it to Chepstow by his command, by virtue of the King's letters; desiring us to certify accordingly. So we could not examine the said Walter and others, but have taken and do send depositions of witnesses. Kardif, 25 Jan. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Crumwell, of the Council. Endd.: Herbert and Hore.
25 Jan.
Galha B. X.,
329.
B. M.
145. John Hutton to Cromwell.
At t[his] instant I received yours, dated the 14th inst., from London. The news which I wrote from letters from Venice I did not affirm to be true, and for the news of Gelderland the common bruit was my author. My letters of the 20th will give more information about Friar Peito. "To the inquisition of thestat .... of him at Rome," according to your commandment, I will with all diligence do my best.
Thanks Cromwell for his favours and asks him to "adubb" any faults caused by his not having had bringing up to use such style and terms as suit the office he now holds.
The news I wrote of Barba Russa in my "formall" letter is now denied, but I thought it my duty to advertise you thereof. The conclusion of the peace is now held to be doubtful. Many of the subjects of the duke of Gelderland have done homage to the duke of Cleves, which is here evil taken. The earl of Nasso and the lord of Prat are sent to the duke of Cleves to stop this and to clear all promises made concerning the duchess of Milan. There is a marriage concluded between the son of the duke of Lorraine and the daughter of the duke of Cleves.
Preparations for furnishing the frontier begin. Commissioners have been sent to the prelates in High Dochela[nd]. Breuxe[lles], 25 Jan.
Hol. pp. 3. Mutilated. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
25 Jan.
Poli Epp. ii.
102.
146. Card. Pole to the Card. Of Liege.
Since all that was required of the Pope, touching the confirmation or declaration of his legatine power (legatio), has been obtained, it only remains to pray that God will enable him to carry out his pious desire of reforming his flock. Rome, 25 Jan. 1538. (fn. 11)
Latin.

Footnotes

1 The abbot of Arbroath.
2 See Vol. XI., 981.
3 Perhaps that of Andrew Hyllersdon. See Vol. XII., Pt. ii., Nos. 754, 803. Sir George Carew's letter, No. 856, seems like an indirect imputation of blame to Sir Thomas, and the latter was in London very soon afterwards, at the funeral of Jane Seymour. See Vol. II., Pt. ii., p. 373.
4 Ant. duke of Lorraine.
5 Renée of Bourbon, duchess of Lorraine.
6 Francis marquis of Pont-à-Mousson, son of Anthony duke of Lorraine.
7 As there seems to be no published list of the mayors of Northampton, it is impossible to date this letter with certainty, but it can only belong to one of three years, 1537, 1538, or 1540. In January 1539 Thomas Chipsey was mayor, and writes to Cromwell a dated letter.
8 Sheriff of Warwickshire in 1536–7.
9 See De Rewa, Hungar. Coron. Centuriæ, 76.
10 In § 2, "The book that hath been written for the one part."
11 An undated P S. is added in Pole's Letters, of which a copy will be found later on dated 28 Jan.