Letters and Papers
April 1539, 16-20

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Institute of Historical Research

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James Gairdner and R. H. Brodie (editors)

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1894

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'Letters and Papers: April 1539, 16-20', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 14 Part 1: January-July 1539 (1894), pp. 374-386. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75859 Date accessed: 29 July 2014.


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April 1539

16 April.
Titus B.I.
261.
B.M.
S.P.I., 608.
781. CROMWELL to HENRY VIII.
Has received news from the man of Antwerp, in broken English, dated 11 April, that the Princes in Germany are still awaiting an answer from the Emperor; that he had letters from Toledo of the 24th March stating that the exchange of 150,000 cr. made by the Fowkars and Welsers, to be paid at Augsburg within two months, is to muster footmen to embark at Genoa with the Emperor's ships for Barbary; but, as the Empress is very sick and is to be brought to bed within two or three months, the Emperor will not leave Spain till she is well. He thinks the English need not fear the Emperor's fleet, which is all destined for Barbary. He thinks the Admiral of the Low Countries is now at sea with all the fleet for Spain, but that he will return to the Low Countries by land. The Emperor has enough to think of elsewhere than about England, and has refused to allow the Pope's "mandements" to be published, in Spain or elsewhere, that Englishmen should be destroyed, body and goods wherever found. The news in Antwerp from the Emperor's court are that, about the end of May, the Emperor will take his way to the French king and his army go against Barbary. The duchess of Milan is no more sick and in Antwerp they hope the King will marry her.
Quotes a letter received from Rome by the man of Antwerp on the 24th March (fn. 1) containing suggestions (ambiguously worded) that the union of the Emperor and Francis is very hollow and ending with the news that there was little talk about the Turk or preparation against him, and that Bembo was published Cardinal on the 24th March.
Has written the King's advice to Chr. Mount and Thos. Paynell to be declared to the Duke (fn. 2) and Landgrave. London, 16 April. Signed.
Add. Endd.
16 April.
Harl. MS. 282,
f. 197.
B.M.
Nott's Wyatt,
350.
782. CROMWELL to WYATT. (fn. 3)
Wyatt is to return immediately to declare the matter which he cannot write. He is also to enquire whether the Emperor will this year leave Spain or war against the Turk or Barbarossa, and how things stand between France and him. London, 16 April.
Mainly in cipher, p. 1. Add. Endd.: by Nicholas, 16 April, to Toledo.
Ib. f. 198.2. Contemporary decipher of most of the above.
P. 1.
16 April.
R. O.
783. T. SOULEMONT to WRIOTHESLEY.
Scribbled a short letter to him in haste by Dr. Petre. Knowing this bearer was about to depart, asked my lord if he had any message. He desired that Wriothesley would be merry and make himself strong against the Parliament that he might be here the first day thereof. He believes it will not last long. No news since writing but what he knows. Reminds him again to speak to Mr. Myles for Forwood. If you could have the prior and monks of Quarr, examine them if they kept any register of their leases and what has become of it, for it is not among the other evidences at Mr. Chancellor's house by the Augustine Friars. "Your discretion knoweth what should be enquired and your goodwill, I do know who maketh me the bolder to importunate you specially the presence of them both John Strobriges, which be here." I protract the time as much as I may till you come. Commendations to Mrs. Wriothesley. London, Wednesday, 16 April 1539.
If you speak with the prior, ask him when young Strobrige was with him last, and what he did there.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
16 April.
R. O.
784. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
I have received your sundry letters. I hear no more of your coming to Dover, but a chance word of Mr. Polsted. I think if you come my lord Privy Seal shall bear your expenses, seeing it shall be for his commodity alone. I shall make but slender suit to him in that behalf, as your Lordship is not greatly minded thereto. When Mr. Polsted comes home, I shall feel more what their pretence is: their proceedings hitherto appear to be all for their own advantage. For the Friars I have but one answer, and that is that your Lordship shall have it. I doubt the matter is delayed, meaning to stop two gaps with one bush. Mr. Polsted promised now at his return to rid that matter and get the commission out, and as to despair, better were it that there never had been either friar or cloister. At my lord Admiral's return, I will go through with him, but fear he will make a stay at the lack of the patent. Howbeit, if it be enrolled, we shall do well enough. For Soberton they put many doubts, because it hangs in the right of Mr. Bonham's wife, and she within age, and has as yet no child. I have offered it for 100 mks., and will take 60l. Whoever gets it will want your Lordship bound for the warranty thereof. This day my lord Privy Seal being asked for answer to the letter Luck (sic) bronght from you and the Council, said the matter required no haste. The letter you wrote to the King was delivered to Mr. Hare, who is highly displeased, saying he will try his doings to be true: "it is a solemn gentleman." I send you by Sparke a satin night cap, and Larke procures answer "of my lord Chancellor's letter, which came yesternight to town.", Please write to Mr. Windsor for your money, as he is wont to make no haste. Mr. Aylmer will be here within eight days. I have received your obligation of the abbot of Westminster. No news, but great preparation of armour and warlike munitions. London, 16 April.
My lord of Hartford has offered me his assistance in your Lordship's affairs at any time. I send by bearer the two "skochyns," one of the King's arms and the other of your Lordship's. For the former I paid 2s., the other Mr. Garter allows. The bearer tarried three days only for these. If they be now saved they will do next year, and you "shall not need to be in a karl's danger."
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
16 April.
R. O.
785. SIR PHILIP DRAYCOT to CROMWELL.
As I and others are commanded to be ready to serve the King, and my lord Steward who brought me up is dead, I desire, if you will allow me, to serve under your Lordship. Peynsley, 16 April.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
ii. On the back is the following list of names in Cromwell's hand :—
The abbots of Westminster, St. Alban's, Malmesbury, and Reading, "the [abbot omitted?] of Shrewsbury," the abbots of Evesham, Gloucester, Winchcombe, Ciscetur, Tewkesbury, Bury, Peterborough, Selby, St. Mary's [York], Waltham, Thorney, Crowland, Glastonbury, Burton.
16 April.
Galba, B. x.
95.
B.M.
786. NEWS FROM ANTWERP.
From Antwerp, 16 April 1[539] (fn. 4) :—I have letters from Awspwrg of the 8th inst. from my fellow [there], that the Turk is very strong in Po[lon, and] Almayne is all full of m[en of war. The] Emperor hath sent in Awspwrg [150,000 ducats] for to be delivered to the bp. of Lond[en], to take up men of war, and to buy powder and morrispickes. The Italian troops are also ready. They say the Emperor will come hither through France; that the Almayns at Frankfort are not agreed, and that their journey is remitted till Midsummer, to be kept at Colonya. Though the Empress is sore sick, the Emperor will be there in his own person. He hath sent a gentleman (fn. 5) to the Pope, the Venetians, and Andrew Doria, to excuse his inability to come into those parts, and has ordered 54 or 56 ships should be kept here, and the Great Master and Admiral remain till he comes.
They allow "nothing for the war" to go out, and it is said that some merchandise for war belonging to the Gressams is in danger of confiscation.
A corrected draft, p. 1. Mutilated.
Ib.f.97 **b.2. Fair copy of the preceding, in the same hand.
P. 1. Mutilated.
16 April.
Add. MS.,
28,591,
f. 106.
B.M.
787. AGUILAR to CHARLES V.
The Nuncio in France writes that card. Pole stopped at Girona, fearing the snares the king of England lays for him, especially an English exile who has been promised pardon if he kill the said Cardinal, and sent on the Abbot (fn. 6) who accompanies him to the French king with the Emperor's answer. This Abbot had arrived with the French king, but was not yet despatched as they were expecting the early arrival of the Scotch cardinal, to whom all this English business is to be communicated.
Francis has given strong assurances that nothing can disturb his peace with the Emperor, but the Pope seems unable to put away all suspicion. Report of peace between Venice and the Turk made through Lorenzo Gritti. The Pope leaves on the 22nd or 23rd for Our Lady of Loreto and Camarino. Madame (i.e., the duchess of Florence) indisposed. Rome, 16 April 1539.
Spanish. Modern copy from Simancas, pp. 4.
See Spanish Calendar, VI., I., No. 55.
16 April.
Add. MS.,
28,591,
f. 100.
B.M.
788. AGUILAR to CHARLES V.
Substance of his letters of the 13th and 16th April 1539. (See abstracts under these dates) with some marginal notes.
Spanish. Modern copy from Simancas, pp. 12.
17 April.
R. O.
789. SIR THOMAS HENNAGE to CROMWELL.
In answer to Cromwell's letter, the King desires the lords to attend on him at the Feast of St. George unless they have urgent cause to the contrary. Otland, Thursday, 17 April. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
17 April.
R. O.
790. SIR THOMAS HENNEGE to CROMWELL. (fn. 7)
The King is pleased with Cromwell's letter and instructions. Asks for the nunnery of Henynges, one of the small nunneries in Lincolnshire, for the suppression of which Robt. Tyrwhyt and he were suitors. It lies among the late lord Darcy's lands, which the King gave him. If Cromwell will order the Commissioners to put his servant in possession, will arrange with the Chancellor of the Augmentations. Has told the King what order he and the lord Admiral have taken with lord Taylbous and Henneage's niece Skipwit. His Grace thinks it well to have them married as shortly as may be. Richmond, 17 April. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
17 April.
R. O.
791. JOHN HUSEE to LADY LISLE.
I have received your sundry letters and must bear my misfortune patiently. The hogshead of wine has not come. Mr. Manchester shall see it when it comes, though I am sure it is little worth. Sperke is come and has brought the playing garments, for the carriage and trimming of which I have paid. When Sparke had saved my lord of Hertford's bird, and brought it to Billingsgate, there the cat made her testament, which my lord of Hertford took right grievously, but the poor man could do no more. I beg you not to be displeased with him. I am sure your miller is home. I hear so much of the gentlewoman's (fn. 8) good behaviour and honesty that further inquiry is needless. My lady, her mother, will apparel her with such three changes as you may desire, and as for her degree, she passeth not upon it. Your ladyship's pleasure is awaited, for if she go not to Calais, her mother will provide otherwise for her. It is a pity she should suffer for her father's acts. Mr. Wriothesley has not yet made final answer to Mr. Grene. Mr. Skutt has promised to make your taffetta gown, which is not much the worse for the wetting. I send a matins book of the best making and print. Mrs. Denny sends a pair of rich gloves embroidered with gold, which I delivered to Spark. I can get no cramp-rings as yet. Mrs. Anne is merry, and every day better and better. You will receive a letter from her with this. I have not spoken with lady Rutland, nor with Mrs. Katharine, but they are merry and will be here in two days. My lord of Hertford sends you a letter. I have detained Sparke for my Lord's scutcheons, but cannot get them yet, and must pay more for them than they are worth. London, 17 April.
The bearer now carries my Lord's scutcheons for St. George's day. I have paid for the King's arms 2s. The other Mr. Garter doth allow.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.
17 April.
R. O.
792. THOMAS LARKE to LORD LISLE.
On Tuesday last I delivered your letter to my lord Privy Seal, who inquired heartily after your health, and this Thursday, 16 April,* I delivered your letter to the lord Chancellor, who came to the city on Wednesday night. After he had read it, he said he was glad that you and the Council would so justly minister justice, and that you must hereafter minister it likewise to all that call for it. He said he knew several in Calais who owed more than Nicholas does, but their creditors have no remedy because they are of the retinue. I told him that your lordship, my lord of Hertford, and others of the Council, had heard the matter and determined that unless he could find sureties for payment of the duty which he acknowledged to be paid out of his wages, he should not sell his room till the debt were paid. His lordship said he thought no one would be his surety, and asked why he should give surety more than other men. I told him Nicholas was about to sell his room to Bell, of Winchelsea, and, if he did, Lawrence should have no remedy. The Lord Chancellor said he could neither sell it nor put it away without your license. At last he promised to write to you his mind. He wishes your lordship to proceed to the election of burgesses of the Parliament, according to the last statute, but you are not to send them over until you hear from him, for he intends to speak to the King about it. Today Mr. Hussey moved my lord Privy Seal for answer to your letter. His lordship said it required no haste. I made your recommendation to Mr. Popeley, desiring him to make like request to my lord Privy Seal, and he got the same answer. London, 16 (fn. 9) April.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Deputy of Calais. Endorsed by Lisle: Sub utraque specie.
17 April.
R. O.
793. WILLIAM [LORD] SEINT JOHN to CROMWELL.
According to Cromwell's letters of the 15th inst., has sent the value of lord Taileboys' land, intending on Sunday next to be with Cromwell and declare their proceedings in Hampshire. 17 April.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Sealed. Endd.
17[April ?]
MS. Cott.
App. L. 72.
B. M.
794. DANGEROUS CONVERSATIONS.
"The confessions [of] ... dwelling at ... [in the county] of Berk, the xvij [day of ... in the] xxxti yere of the reign of [our Sovereign lord] king Henry the viijth."
"The week before Passion Week last ... of Fynchemstede in a ground by his cony ... communication between the person and me the cause ... I was and all other put out of the King's works so sodenly ... grete loss that we should have by hit, merveling whethe[r we should] have was or not, the person answered, if thou lyve the[n thou shalt] see a world that thy father's father never saw such a w[orld] ... said I, if it may be bought with money I doubt not but it sh[all] ... trust. Nay, nay, said the person, it hath been bought with money [but] it will be bought no more. Well, said I, if we shall have any [war, I] would we should have it quickly, that we poor men might be ... again, for I think if any going be I shall be one. Nay, nay, said [the person], if any going be ye shall not need to care, for ye shall never s ... if ye once meet ye shall turn all one way, for they come for a ... wealth. The King, God save his Grace, is a noble king and a go[od] ... I think it not long of him, but of his Council more than of ... Kaye the person as long as some be rulers that we shall [have no other] rule than we have, but off with their heads still. Well, said I, I ha[ve heard] of a prophecy that the King should be fain to forsake his land ... come in again. Well, said the person, I have read in a prophecy ... bull should serde the mayor's daughter. And is it not so? Hath [not the King] married Semayre's daughter? Undoubted, said the person, God [hath] ordained a head of the Church, and that is the Pope, for look what h[e binds] in earth God binds in Heaven; look what he looses in earth God looses in [Heaven], for he is God's vicar in earth. I will not say but the Church was ... indeed, and so be other men too. There must come a scourge. Well ... he, there came certain of kings to him, how many I cannot tell, w[hether] it was three or four, but saith he, they kneeled down to him, so[me] kissed his feet and some his breast and one his crown and took hi[m for] their head every one of them, and he saith there was a Pope and is a Po[pe], for God hath ordained it so to be, for the Pope is the head of the Church ... the death of these two men hath spilled all together. The one wa[s my lord] Henry, (fn. 10) the other I know not. He said if anything had come [other] than well, should not my lord Henry have inherited the cro[wn ?]
P. 1. Mutilated and partly illegible. Endd.: Smethwykes.
17 April.
R. O.
795. HARRY HUTTOFT to CROMWELL.
I have received your letter showing the delivery of my simple and rude [letter] by my poor wife, declaring thereby my sorrowful state. I hope for some means of quietness by your Lordship, and am sorry this long time has passed without fulfilment of my duty. Although I have offended by folly and over much trust, I doubt not, if my request be obtained, to be redeemed from danger of my creditors and repay the King in a way that will be to his profit, no less than 500 marks a year. I have 360 butts of malmsey on which your Lordship knows 1,400l. have been disbursed; if they were at liberty I could pay them to my creditors at 16 nobles the butt, which would amount almost to 2,000l. and save 600l. Further, I perceive by your letter that the King's pleasure is to have the manor of Maryborne and recompense the owner by lands or otherwise in these parts. (fn. 11) The owner has been in Bretayn the last two years, but I will send for him with speed and doubt not he will agree. I trust to your Lordship's goodness "to have in consideration the commodities of the same as the house, the woods and the farms to be void at his entry within two years for his setting forward towards the world." 17 April.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
17 April.
R. O.
796. ANTHOINE BRUSSET to the DEPUTY OF CALAIS.
The Queen has appointed me captain of this castle (fn. 12) as well as of the town. As we have always been friends in the past, I will try to continue and increase our friendship. As I have been absent for long, my horses are destitute of oats, and I therefore beg you to allow me to buy 100 pairs of raisers of oats and "soucrion" in your Pale. Gravelinghes, 17 April 1539.
Fr., Hol., p. 1. Add.
17 April.
R. O.
797. REYNIER ODELEN (?) to LORD LISLE.
Madame de Broucbr', my mistress, thanks you for your good will and is recovered from her illness. The bearer brings three pairs of young herons, or as many as he can get, which I pray you to accept. We have as yet no "bihoreaulx ditz quacks," for their ordinary season is about St. John Baptist day. St. Omer, 17 April 1539.
Fr., Hol., p. 1. Add.
17 April.
Vatican MS.
798. CARD. POLE to CARD. FARNESE.
Yesterday, the 16th, by M. Raymundo Vidale, from Avignon, I had your letter of the 8th showing me that my letters from Toledo, 22 Feb., did not arrive until 7 April, at which I much marvel, because the courier was to leave the day after I left the Emperor's court, as the Nuncio said. I know not how such great delay has been caused, and I must have appeared to you to have been negligent in this so important cause, in which I am very anxious and harassed. You will have heard by mine of the 25th ult., and by the Abbot, (fn. 13) who left here on the 8th inst., all that has been drawn from the Emperor and French king about this business of England. I stay here awaiting advice and ready to obey. Carpentras, 17 April 1539.
Italian. From a modern copy in R. O., p. 1. Original endorsed as received, 4 May.
18 April.
R. O.
799. MARGARET MARCHIONESS OF DORSET to CROMWELL.
I beg you to remember my poor suit, for without your help I cannot furnish my lord Chancellor's great requests, especially for the first payment. Be not weary that I so often trouble you, for I know not where else to go for help, and I stay here only for that matter. At my lord Chancellor's house in London, 18 April. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
18 April.
R. O.
800. NORFOLK to CROMWELL.
At the choosing of the knights of the shire at Norwich on Monday last, my nephew, Sir Edmund Knevet, had assembled a great number of people, but when he saw his power would not suffice, he said he never minded to have been one himself but to support Edmund Wyndham and another he would not name. Then he fell in such fume with Richard Southewell that divers of the most worshipful of the shire, fearing a breach of the peace, went to entreat between them. This failing, they advertised me, and I sent for both parties hither. I desired them to forgive displeasures and be lovers as before. Southewell was conformable and did his best, but no persuasion of me, my son, Sir Thomas Strange, Holdiche, nor Ric. Banyarde, could bring Knevet to conformity. Knevet said he would never love him, calling him false gentleman, knave, and other opprobrious words. I bound them in 2,000l. apiece to appear before the King's Council in the Star Chamber on the 28th inst., and till then to keep the peace. When my nephew saw this, he "used such marvellous words and fashion" that I was forced either to have kept him in ward or, as I have done, to charge him on his allegiance to keep peace. If he comes to you, I beg you to bring him to better order. He is young and trusts too much to his wit, and will neither follow the advice of his father-in-law, Sir John Shelton, nor me, but is ruled by three or four "light naughty knaves of Welshmen and others," and is running into debt. If he comes to you before I do, "be quick with him and give not too much confidence to his words." There is a light rumour that Parliament shall be adjourned: let me know by bearer. Kenyngale, 18 April. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
18 April.
R. O.
801. THE CITY OF CHESTER to the COMMISSIONERS in the MARCHES of WALES.
As the King has ordered all his ports and havens to be viewed and fortified, and all his able subjects to be mustered, with their harness, have thought it right to mention that no such commission has come to this city which is unprovided of ordnance, and the ports in these parts are open. Chester, 18 April.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
18 April.
Otho E. XI.,
f. 292.
B. M.
802. SIR RIC. BULKELEY, and Others, to HENRY VIII.
Certifying that, as commanded, they have surveyed the coast fortifications of North Wales, and have set beacons and vigilant watch. Many places in the Isle of Anglesey and elsewhere, as appears by a schedule enclosed, are so open that they can only be defended by main strength. The key to the haven of Bewmares is a place called Graye Cote, at the haven mouth, where a fortress should be made. Another fortress should be made at South Crooke, in the haven mouth of Caernarvon, and another at ... rhyaneth, for the defence of Conway. Cannot give an estimate of the cost, but would like the King to send an expert. Refer to the castles of Conway, Bewmares, Caernarvon, and Hardlach, but the document is here much injured; also to the hardship imposed on the inhabitants of Anglesey by being under the command of the Council of the Marches, they being a mile from the mainland and the boat only carrying 12 or 16 men at once. Haven of Dyvye, 18 April.
Signed: Richard Bulkeley--Edwarde Gruffyth—John Puleston—John Salysbury.
Pp. 2, injured by fire. Add. Endd.: Ao 30o.
18 April.
R. O.
803. SIR RICHARD BULKELEY to CROMWELL.
I, Edward Griffith, John Pilston, and John Salesbury, esquires, have sent, by my brother, this bearer, a certificate according to the King's command, under his broad seal, directing us to survey the sea coast of North Wales, look the places most likely for landing of enemies, provide for fortifications, bulwarks, and trenches, and keep up beacons, and a watch day and night. This we have done and beg you to present the certificate to the King. Bewmares, 18 April. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Sealed. Endd.: Ao xxxo.
18 April.
R. O.
804. FRANCIS I. to MARILLAC.
Has received his letter of the 2d. Glad to hear of his good reception. Approves his answers to the King. He has made a good beginning, and Francis hopes he will continue to use the same language, endeavouring to keep the King in good humour. Nothing could be better than his answer when asked if Francis had not made to him any particular declaration about the match he lately offered him through Castillon, in order more easily to continue war against the Emperor. If he is pressed again upon the subject he shall again thank the King warmly for his great offer, but say Francis does not see how to accept it in the present state of relations between him and the Emperor. Is to write news of the state of affairs in England as frequently as possible. The affairs of Francis are as well as could be wished.
Upon the death lately of the Councillor Sanguyn, Francis has given his office to the president De Thou and the office of De Thou (who is clerk) to Marillac. Abbey of Vauluysant, 18 April, 1539.
French. From two modern copies, pp. 3 and 2.
18 April.
Kaulek, 94.
805. MONTMORENCY to MARILLAC.
Has received his letters of the 2nd. His salary shall be increased, so that he shall lose nothing. Announces his nomination as a councillor at Paris. The relations with the Emperor are as good as possible; so he may communicate "doulcement et modestement" with the Emperor's ambassador. Pemilly, 18 April.
French abstract.
(fn. 14) *** A modern transcript is in R. O.
19 April.
Tit. B. I. 265.
B. M.
S. P. I. 610.
806. CROMWELL to HENRY VIII.
Would have set forward today to wait on the King tomorrow, but for "some grudge of an ague." Has received news from Flanders, most of which Henry knows already. Have not heard before of the advice of the bp. of Lundensis at Frankfort, but thinks their enterprise will come to nothing. Vaughan's letters to the King explain matters fully.
On receipt of the letters of the Council, the Marquise has been examined. She pretends ignorance who reported the tale, but admits that much like words have been told her. Will persist till the bottom of her stomach is disclosed, and all conspiracies unravelled. Leynham's examination shows him to be but a mad prophet. Here arrived yesterday one Hieronymo, an Italian of Senes, a man of much outward simplicity, and apparently as weak learning, who fled from the Papists in Italy, and went to Wittenberg for a short season, and has letters of commendation from Luther, Melancthon, Creutziger, Oziander and others, to my lord of Canterbury and Mr. Thyxstyll. Has sent him to the Abp. to judge of his learning and to help him. Sends letters from Norfolk showing how much he is grieved with the assignment Cromwell made to Anth. Rouse of one of Sir Edw. Ichingham's daughters. Is sorry he takes it to heart, but refers the matter to the King. London, 19 April. Signed.
Add. Endd.
19 April.
Calig E. II.
(173).
B. M.
807. MARILLAC to CROMWELL.
Cromwell deputed Master Thos. Solomon and Dr. Balays (Bellasis) to examine a Florentine merchant, (fn. 15) prisoner in the Tower, at the suit of the Toulouse merchants. But Solomon, who understands both languages, has been too busy, and Dr. Balays, who only understands English, has begun the examination, at which he allows other Florentines to be present, especially Cromwell's servant Portunary, who warn him that he will be condemned if he answer in the way he does offhand. Desire that Solomon be present that these interpreters may not make the answers as they think fit. Ratclef, 19 April, 1539. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Mutilated. Add.: Monseigneur le Previsel (?).
19 April.
R. O.
808. RIC. SOUTHWELL to CROMWELL.
"On Monday last past the county day was holden at Norwich, where, after the writ of election of knights of the shi[...]e openly read, my brother Edmond Wyndeham and I were chosen." Sir [...]mond Knyvet, whose good will in advancing mine enterprise I desired, perceiving, in the castle yard, his enterprise unlike to prevail, suddenly left, and "hath determined one other, which taking effect is like to turn one or both of us to some displeasure." His friends Sir John Shelton, Sir William Paston, Mr. Thorisby, and others, then moved a stay "which taking no place, did signify it to the duke of Norfolk's grace," who charged us to come before him this Thursday last, and has bound us both in 2,000l. to keep the peace and appear before the Council. Please consider that my enterprise was commenced at the King's command, and on Thursday next I will wait on you. Norwich, where I with the other commissioners for the survey of musters were this 19 April assembled for the determination of the same. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
19 April.
R. O.
809. ANTHOINETTE DE SAVEUSES to LADY LISLE.
I write from a desire to hear news of you. I hear you have met with some trouble, but I trust it is not so. Your misfortunes are mine. I hope God will preserve you from every evil, either to body or soul. You know that the tribulations of this world are the gate through which we enter bliss.
I have confidence that if you needed patience, you would do your duty, but since I knew it I have been much troubled by not hearing from you. On Easter Eve I sent you two and a half dozen bonnets, by a man of Calais. If I knew you had received them, I should be more at ease. I beg you to send me news by the bearer, who speaks English, if you have no leisure to write. Dunkirk, 19 April.
Fr. Hol., p. 1. Add.
19 April.
Galba B. x.
98.
B. M.
810. NEWS from ANTWERP.
From Antwerp, 19 April, 15[39].
"My fellow of Awspourg" writes that munition of war is very dear there, as the Emperor causes so much to be bought. When I know what the King wants, I will send you a "patron" of everything. He writes also that the lords have left Frankfort, "and that they have seatted out their affairs 18 months. I cannot believe it." I have letters from the Portuguese ambassador in Paris "very new," that there is much talk that the Emperor will pass through France, that the amity between him and the King daily increases, and that the Dolfyn is going to the Emperor in Spain. In Geltherland there are 7,000 or 8,000 men, but it is not known who they are. It is said they will be chased away by force, as they eat up all the poor people. They say that the prince of Haraunges is going in post to the Emperor.
P. 1. In the same hand as No. 786.
Galba B. x.
98.*b.
B. M.
2. Another copy of the preceding, in the same hand.
P. 1. Mutilated.
19 April.
Add. MS.
28,591, f. 108.
B. M.
811. CHARLES V.
Instructions for Don Diego Hurtado de Mendoça sent, as resident ambassador, to Venice.
He is to learn the state of affairs from Don Lope de Soria, whom he replaces, and to keep Aguilar, the Emperor and King of the Romans well informed of the course of events. Gives directions. Toledo, 19 April, 1531 (sic).
Spanish. Endd.: 1539, and that Don Diego left Toledo, 28th May 1539. Modern copy from Simancas, pp. 11.
See Spanish Calendar, VI. I., No. 56.
20 April.
R. O.
812. SIR THOS. AUDELEY CHANCELLOR to LORD LISLE.
Desires him to examine into the case of Ric. Bullour, who was banished from the town of Calais, and deprived of his wages, 5l. 8s. 3d., by the under-marshal, for making a supplication of the negligent ordering of the market at Calais, this last Lent. Christchurch, London, 20 April. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
20 April.
R. O.
813. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Wrote three days past by Sparke. Since then my lord Privy Seal sent me word, by Mr. Polsted, that this term he intends to go through with your lordship for the 400l., he promised, and also for your commission for the Freres. What is meant by this delay I cannot imagine, but I take it to be more for their assurance than your profit. I shall not fail now on St. George's Day to conclude with my lord Admiral if he be reasonable. What he will say to your patent being missing I cannot tell; but I will learn whether he is minded to make an end of it or no. Touching Soberton, I have tried divers, but none will deal unless you will be bounden to the "warrantise," and to make any other shift for money until you know whereon my lord Privy Seal will rest is unnecessary. You send me word by Mr. Highfield's man, that you marvel that you hear not from me. You know I cannot always find messengers, but when occasion requires, I shall send expressly. Mr. Acton has promised now to make sure your annuity. If he trifle, I shall put his obligation in execution. I spoke with Gesslyng for your wood. If you send a hoy or two to Bulverhide in Sussex, eight miles beyond Winchelsea, they shall be laden with as much billet and tallwood as you shall write for, and as good chepe as any man shall sell. If you send the size from Calais the billets shall be made accordingly. You must let me know when you intend to send for it in order that Gesslyng may write to his man to have it ready. I have your lordship's evidences from Helywell here in my lodging. Where shall they be bestowed? Here shall be shortly a great muster of the citizens, above 20,000. Their day is not yet appointed. Mr. Hare will "try his matter well done" against your lordship. He takes your writing very grievously. I hope you shall break his malice. Cannot yet hear from Mr. Windsor, although I wrote to him according to your pleasure, sent me by Lark, who intends to depart in a day or two, with such answer as my lord Chancellor shall send. London, 20 April.
P.S.—Since writing I have heard that you are displeased with me for not writing oftener. I kept Sperke waiting two days for your "skochyns," for Mr. Garter had no haste to send them. Hereafter, rather than incur your displeasure, I will send special messengers, although sometimes the writing may not be worth the cost of the bearer. If I could always find conveyance you should have no cause to complain.
Hol., pp. 2.
20 April.
Add. MS.
11,041, f. 68.
B. M.
814. THOMAS WHYTNEY, Priest, (fn. 16) to JOHN SCUDAMORE.
Wm. Davynport detains 4l. of my pension, now due, to the use of one Ralph Holyngshed, for a debt of my predecessor's, which was still owing at the time of the dissolution of our late monastery. Thinks the King, as his successor, undertakes the debts of the house. It used to be paid to one, widow Washyngton, and should have been put in the King's book at the time of the surrender; but the commissioners tarried but one day, and Dr. Leghe commanded him to report the debts to Mr. Chancellor. Begs him to write to Davynport to pay the whole pension, or, if Mr. Chancellor have commanded the contrary, move Mr. Chancellor in his favour. Has already himself moved Mr. Chancellor herein, who said he did not remember writing to Scudamore to make this stay. 20 April.
Credence for bearer.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: receiver in co. Staff., and, in his absence, to Wm. Scudamore his son.
20 April.
R. O.
St. P. I. 612.
815. SIR PIERS EGGECOMB to CROMWELL.
Hears from a servant of his, that the people in Devonshire and Cornwall mistrust the King's command that parsons or vicars are to keep a book of those wedded, buried, and christened. They fear it means increased taxation. 20 April.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
20 April.
R. O.
816. JOHN SALYSBURY to CROMWELL.
Has a commission from the King, with Sir Ric. Bulkeley, Edw. Gruffithe, and John Puleston, to repulse the King's enemies, if they arrive in any part of North Wales. Asks whether he is to come up to Parliament, which begins on 28 April. Denbigh, 20 April. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao xxx. Sir John Salysbury.
20 April.
R. O.
817. SIR WILLIAM EURE to CROMWELL.
As the King has appointed him captain of Berwick, considering the decay among the burgesses, writes at their desire to complain that they have been interrupted by the merchants of Newcastle in the privileges granted by former kings of the shipping of wools, hides, and woolskins, between this town and the water of Cockett. They now intend to labour by their proxies in Parliament for confirmation of the said grant, and request your favour. The burgesses, with their servants, number 200 men to serve the King at need and have no commodity but this, whereas the merchants of Newcastle have great advantages in lead, iron, coal, grindstone, tallow, and other things of which this town is destitute. The borders are quiet. The Scots have lately had musters like ours. I trust you remember the multitude of people in this town and the great number of workmen lately come, with our small store of victual. Berwick, 20 April. Signed.
P. 1. Sealed. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
20 April.
Vatican
MS.
818. COCHLÆEUS to CARD. CONTARINI.
Ex Misna, 20 A prilis 1539:—There has been sent to me from Liege, a book of the most learned Albertus Pighius, written last year against the King—yea! tyrant—of England, for the printing of which at Leipzig, license was lately asked of our pious prince. (fn. 17) I therefore sent it to Leipzig to the printer; but under a Lutheran prince that will nowise be allowed. The author had sent it to a printer at Cologne, who was willing to print it secretly in some village; but the Senate hearing of it, forbade on pain of death the printing there of anything against the King of England. If you have any news of England, will you kindly let me share it? First I desire to know with what success Card. Pole conducts the affair for his country, whom I beg you to salute in my name. I heard that that tyrant was by the Pope declared a heretic and deposed, and that the French king was chosen, and appointed executor against him. However, I have nothing certain, but hope that through Card. Pole his noble country will be freed from the impious tyranny of that man.
Latin. From a modern extract in R. O., pp. 2.

Footnotes

1 Sic; but evidently meaning that the letter was dated the 24th March.
2 Of Saxony.
3 This letter has been already calendared as of the year 1538 (Vol. XIII. Pt. I. No. 780) but is proved by Cromwell's letter to the King, 23 April, to be of this year.
4 Supplied from modern marginal note made before the mutilation.
5 Andalot.
6 Of San Saluto.
7 This abstract was wrongly placed in the year 1538. See Vol. XIII. Pt. I. No. 795.
8 A daughter of lord Hussey, who was attainted in 1537. See Husee's letter of 28 April.
9 The writer apparently meant 17 April, which was a Thursday in 1539. The 16th was not a Thursday even in 1540. But this letter was certainly written in 1539.
10 Henry Pole lord Montague; the other being the marquis of Exeter.
11 By statute 32 Hen. VIII. [c. 63] (which is not printed) it is stated that the King had enclosed certain meadow lands, belonging to the prebend of Rugmere in St. Paul's, within his new park of Marybourne; in compensation for which the advowson of Throwley, in Kent, was annexed to the preband with the parsonage and lands thereto belonging; these being part of the lands of the suppressed abbey of Syon. The owner referred to is probably John Palmer, who was compensated by the above statute for the loss of his interest in a lease of the lands referred to.
12 Apparently on the death of Tovar, who was captain of the castle, Brusset being then captain of the town. See p. 369, note.
13 Of San Saluto.
14 A very brief and imperfect abstract is given of this letter in Kaulek, p. 93.
15 See No. 660.
16 Late abbot of Dieulacres, as appears by a subsequent letter of his in the same MS. Volume, f. 70.
17 Duke George of Saxony, leader of the Papal party in Germany, died about this time (17 April 1539, according to Anderson) and was succeeded by his brother Henry, who had joined the Protestants.