Letters and Papers
May 1539, 11-15

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

James Gairdner and R. H. Brodie (editors)

Year published

1894

Pages

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Letters and Papers: May 1539, 11-15', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 14 Part 1: January-July 1539 (1894), pp. 442-449. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75864 Date accessed: 16 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

May 1539

11 May.
Galba B. x.
100.
B. M.
948. NEWS FROM ANTWERP.
From Antwerp, 11 May 1539.
The 56 ships of war are being daily prepared, but they are intended only to go to Hostarland. The earl Federyg Palantyne has returned from Spain to Allmeyn. Men are being prepared in Frysia, who will finally go to Hosterlaunt, to try and conquer Denmark. With you we will have peace and not war. A new embassy has come hither from the duke of Cleves and Gelders. The marquis Hauns Alberche of Brandynburg is come here from Spain, and is lodged with the Fowkers. The Empress has been delivered prematurely of a boy, which died. Wishes to have the King's letter for licence to export munitions, as soon as possible.
P. 1. In the same hand as Nos. 786,810, &c.
12 May.
R. O.
949. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Cannot obtain my lord Privy Seal's answer, nor know the King's pleasure whether you shall come to Dover or further. It is necessary for you to have something to show for yourself; and to know unto whom the keys and governance of the town shall be left in your absence. Worthe is here, "which sueth for Mr. Marshal's coming over," and it is not likely that you both will leave at the same time. Mr. Polstede affirms you will be at Dover the 13th inst., although you have no further licence. They infer this from the style of your letter, which might have been otherwise penned, for they construe everything for their own advantage. If you have come over, you must by no means leave Dover until you hear the King's pleasure, which I will send by Sir Oliver in post. If your licence be no further than Dover the Chief Justice Baldwin and Mr. Polstede will make all the haste possible; otherwise they will wait till you arrive. Advises him what he is to do on the emergency. Thinks the matter is so far compassed that my Lady shall not stand charged with any part of the payment of the 400l. Under any circumstances you shall not deal with them till your counsel has examined the books; else, for all their fair words, you and my Lady might chance "to be set besides the cushion." Hopes ho will not be over hasty. It will be Wednesday before he can be at Dover. Can get neither horse nor harness. They have promised a commission for the Freres, but I think you will have it to small advantage. London, 12 May.
Begs he will show this letter to my Lady.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.
12 May.
R. O.
950. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Wrote by Tyson how he has done nothing these five or six days but wait upon Mr. Polstede and my lord (Cromwell) for conclusion of Paynswick, Morton Valance, and the loan of 400l. Sends the final answer, viz., that your Lordship's coming over is deferred, though I know not why. That all the labor about this matter should be suddenly dashed makes me muse; but if you were to come no further than Dover, I am not sorry. They are so variable in all their proceedings I know not what to trust. They will not hear of your costs in coming over, nor motion to be made of your interest, and say the 1,000l. must be referred to my Lord's gentleness, regarding not his honour nor their own conscience. When this matter is ended I trust you will have licence to see the King. Till this day I could never see their books. States the arrangement for the 400l. Polstede says you have written to my lord Privy Seal that you will be at Dover on the 13th inst. I trust it is not so, and that you will not set such an example of licence as to leave your charge. If you have determined so, send a post that I may advertize my lord Privy Seal, or return at once, for I think it was never motioned to the King until this day. Polstede says you have sold 40s. or more in Gloucester belonging to these lordships. Let me know what to answer. I have named Mr. Treasurer, Mr. Mayor, and Mr. Skryven commissioners for the Friars, but I see you will not obtain it till Mr. Polstede come and you are at a point in these matters. Nothing can at present be done touching the implements and lands belonging to the same, however lady Garnysshe and Mr. Porter may have acted, until it be known on what terms you are to have it, which I fear will only be for life. The King must have the stuff. As for the 200l. mass for the earl of Wiltshire you need not be hasty, as order will be taken for the same this Parliament. Will procure warrants against his coming, in Postlyng, Folstone, and Wastynghanger. Thos. Broke did not speak to me of the 5 marks. I have bespoken a saddle and harness, but not of Mr. Acton. Hears nothing of Clare. Will obtain 2 Spanish skins. It is not opportune to ask my lord Russell for 200l., or my lord Privy Seal for a quiet living. Hears nothing of Mr. Wyndsor. Jas. Hawksworth could not come to the lord Admiral, as he has hurt his arm, but Chaterton will ride to him. The lord Admiral will move the King concerning Guisnes according to your writing. Will see that Edw. Russell do his duty in the repairs of Bonham's house, and order the tenants to maintain their hedges. Will do the best for his profit concerning the brewing vessels, &c. London, 12 May.
Sir Oliver takes this letter.
Hol., pp. 3. Add. Endd.: "Anno r. R. H. 8. 31.—John Husse's lettres."
12 May.
R. O.
951. JOHN HUSEE to LADY LISLE.
Since the receipt of my Lord's letters and yours I have not been at rest four hours day or night. This business once finished, I trust never to deal with them again, "for they are alone." Your Ladyship shall now be bound to no part repayment of the money, whatever chance; but I think they mean to minish the rent, saying that my Lord has sold part of the land in Gloucester to one Lane. When the matter goes through you shall be as sure of the rent reserved as lawyers can make you. This matter of my Lord's coming over is stayed for the present, to what purpose I know not; but I hope now when he comes it will not be only to Dover, but that he will see the King and be his own spokesman. They care not a rush for any slander that might arise against my Lord from his coming over, provided they have their purpose, nor if he lost all he had. I doubt if they have either conscience or soul, or believe in Heaven or Hell.
I never intended to meddle with Mr. Acton, even if your Ladyship had not written. I have written to my lady Suffolk according to your pleasure, and am promised an answer shortly. As soon as I hear from her I will accomplish her commands. I have spoken for the liveries. "He" calls for the rest of his money, 14l. 18s. 9d., and has been so long unpaid that I doubt how he will agree for the next liveries. Tong and Jasper, Mr. Basset's tailor, also press for money. For my own part I have most need of it of any man, but will forbear till I see better store. I will send the quilts as soon as money comes. God send Mrs. Basset joy of her goodly babe. I would it had had his father's mark. "By God's grace at the next shot she shall hit the mark." There is no time to motion about the 200l. if my Lord do not come over. The gentlewoman is ready, but I hear of no meet company for her. I will speak with Mrs. Anne for your kirtle. If you mean to go thorough with the earl of Bridgwater you may, but he will surely have no less rent than it now goeth for. Mr. Rolles writes you his full mind by Tyson, but is against seeking a proviso or Act of Parliament. London, 12 May.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.
12 May.
R. O.
952. E. LADY SAVAGE to CROMWELL.
I thank you for your favour shewn to me "your daily beadwoman." My cousin, Urian Brereton, of late did move your Lordship, in the suit between me and Sir John Dudley, to send to Mr. Gostewyche for the counterpane of the indenture between my late bedfellow William Brereton, Esquire, deceased, and Sir John Dudley, and to send the same to Mr. Hare for his opinion. I desire you to send for it and see that I might have an end in my suits. Fyncheley, 12 May. Signed.
P. 1 Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd. wrongly: Edward Savage.
12 May.
R. O.
St. P. III.,
128.
953. JOHN ALEN to CROMWELL.
Leaves common occurrants to the relation of the bearer, Edward Beck, who is a man of experience. O'Donell and O'Neyll and other Geraldines clearly intend to put young Gerald in his father's possessions by force. It were profitable to the King to have that boy out of the way, for then (with good governors and defended from foreign power) the land would be in better stay than it has been this 100 years. The open bruit that the Lord Deputy shall be removed has done no good. The writer would be glad of his removal, but it should be done at convenient time and some of the Council should know of it beforehand, and meanwhile he should be kept from despair by gentle letters, for he "greatly stomacheth" that neither he nor his servants have any preferment. He and his sister of Kildare could do much to get this naughty boy, his nephew. (fn. 1) Mr. Cusacke and Thos. Fynglas have arrived and reported a commission for the suppression of abbeys, so Mr Cowley had better make haste with the commission. Asks for the farm of St. Thomas Court, as he has no house in Dublin. Dublin, 12 May 31 Hen. VIII.
Begs him to write to Mr. Treasurer to pay his fee and diets.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Lord Cromwell, lord Privy Seal.
12 May.
R. O.
954. WM. LORD SANDYS to LORD LISLE.
I have received from your Lordship two letters from my lord Privy Seal, the one addressed to you alone, and the other to the Council. I will be with you to-morrow at Calais before noon as you desire. I beg you to send notice to my lord Grey and the rest of the Council that they may be ready also. I return, enclosed, your two letters, and one from my lord Privy seal to myself, which please communicate to Mr. Wallop. Guisnes, Monday, 12 May 31 Hen. VIII. Signed.
P. 1. Add. Endd.
Wegener,
Aarsberet-
ninger IV.
136.
Dep. Keeper's
45th Report
App. II. 19.
955. DENMARK.
Speech of [Dr. Barnes] (fn. 2) to Christian III., in which (after congratulating him, on Henry VIII.'s behalf, upon the tranquillity of his kingdom, and offering all assistance in the maintaining of a purer doctrine in the Church, and of the public peace) he desires to have a time appointed for the hearing and answering of the matters in their commission, and proceeds to say that last summer, (fn. 3) viz. A.D. 1538, an English cardinal, the King's public enemy, sent from the Roman Pontiff, came into Spain upon Papal business with the Emperor. Thereupon the English ambassador who was then in Spain, asked the Emperor, considering his friendship with the King of England in the past, to refuse audience to his King's enemy. The Emperor, who seemed more to favour the wicked aims of the Pontiff than the innocence of the King, said he could not deny audience to the legate of his most holy father the Pope, even if he knew the legate to be a traitor. The ambassador, knowing that the Pope and his cardinal were plotting against the King, insisted; whereupon the Emperor angrily replied that he had a far better right to hear the Pope's legate that the King had to hear ambassadors of the pretended King of Denmark, who not only held a wrong opinion in religion, but also was usurping the kingdom of the Emperor's brother and keeping the lawful King in chains. By these words the King perceived the Emperor's hostility to Christian, and has thought it friendly to warn him of it. Moreover the King has commanded him to represent that he is willing to join with Christian against the Papists for the preservation of the Christian religion, and of the public peace, provided he is offered just conditions in return; he therefore desires Christian to signify by ambassadors what seems to him best to be done. Signed by Robert Barns, doctor of theology, and George Sentlyger, ambassadors of the King of England.
Latin.
12 May.
Wegener,
Aarsberet-
ninger, IV.
138.
Deputy
Keeper's
45th Report,
App. II. 19.
956. CHRISTIAN III. to HENRY VIII.
Has received his letters by his ambassadors, by whom also he perceives Henry's friendship to himself, and zeal for the Christian religion. Has given them a full reply, and has also entrusted to them certain business of his own. Prays that nothing may deter him from maintaining the true Church of God against the false church which the bishop of Rome has so long forced upon the Christian globe. Ex oppido nostro Othonia (Eutin), 12 May 1539.
Latin.
Ib. 139.957. CHRISTIAN III. to HENRY VIII.
Has received his friendly intercession by Laur. Foulbery, (fn. 4) the bearer; but neither knows what damage his sailors did to Henry's subject at the time when he was fighting for his ancestral kingdoms both by sea and land, nor has he those at hand whom he might question upon the subject. Has therefore deferred the matter till affairs permit him to come to Copenhagen, where the damage was done. Ex Otonia nostra.
Latin. From a draft in the hand of Peter Suavenius.
Ib. 140.958. CHRISTIAN III. to HENRY VIII.
Replies to Henry's letters about the English ship which was taken by pirates. Winter was coming on when he received notice that the English ship was taken, but in spite of the unpropitious season he dispatched his ships to the port in which the pirates were dividing their booty. There his sailors burnt everything they found, except the English ship, which they brought away ransacked of everything. The voyage from Copenhagen to Mecklenburg (ad Megapolitam regionem) is not long, but tempest and contrary wind delayed the expedition two months, during which time there was spent more than the whole value of the ship. Still, at Henry's request, he has not only been content to forego the expenses incurred, but also has restored the ship. Ex Otonia nostra.
Latin. From a draft in the hand of Peter Suavenius.
12 May.
Poli Epp., II.
153.
959. CARD. POLE to CARD. CONTARINI.
Yesterday received his letters of the 21st and 28th ult. Thanks him profusely for having given up his intention (of leaving Rome this summer) on account of the cause which Pole is treating. As to the new and old obstacles to the cause, refers to letters of "Ludovico tuo," (fn. 5) from whom and from Priolus, he gets much consolation. Describes the mutual consolation they have lately derived from conferring the Psalms of David. Sees the handiwork of God in the fact that whereas in "this cause" it was once replied in Spain that it would be impossible to do what the Pope demanded, the reasons of this impossibility are in great measure taken away.
The letter you wrote to Card. Sadolet of your judgement of his Epistola ad Gebennenses, (fn. 6) was sent me this morning, he being in the town, and I can only say that you seem to do the office of a learned and true friend. When I speak with him I will take occasion to introduce the Epistola ad Sturmium of which you write in the letters to me (nelle mie lettere); (fn. 7) "e di uno e dell'altro farò argomento di un' altra letters per un' altra volta. V. S. Riverendissima perdona questa mia negligente barbarie, adesso esseudo molto distratto nell' animo in vari pensieri scrivendo a diversi." Carpentras, 12 May 1539.
Italian interspersed with Latin.
13 May.
R. O.
960. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Wrote yesterday both by Tyson and Sir Oliver. Spoke this afternoon with lord Russell, who will not help in the matter of the 200l., and leaves it to my lord Privy Seal. Bery, the bearer, has received your money of Mr. Windsor. Bonham has taken a fine of 10l., of Lang Spers, of Shoryer. All those that last suffered for treason, their wives and children, Sir Adrian Fortescue, young Phillippes, and the great traitor "Poolle, Car." with divers others are attainted of treason according to their deserts. London, 13 May.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
13 May.
R. O.
961. JOHN HUSEE to LADY LISLE.
The bearer, Bery, has my lord's money of Mr. Wynsor. To-day, Blagge the grocer has been to me about money due more than 12 months since. The draper, Tong and Jasper, has also been with me several times for theirs. If the draper and grocer be not now paid they will never trust more. My lady Suffolk promises me an answer as soon as may be. Mrs. Katharine has not made me full answer, and bitherto I can find no company meet for the gentlewoman. (fn. 8) Nycholas's wife has promised to go with her.
While writing, a letter came from your ladyship, with one for Mr. Harris, to which I will obtain an answer. You may send Lyttcott's money when it comes to you, for I will not touch what Bury (Bery) has, without authority. Mr. Basett's spaniel shall be sent with the first. I desire to be commended to him and my mistress, his bedfellow, "to whom I pray God to send many moe boys, but not of the last's kind." London, 13 May.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
13 May.
R. O.
962. SIR THOMAS PULTENAY to CROMWELL.
I have received your gentle letters requiring my manor of Shenley, (fn. 9) my oldest inheritance, and the best land, which I am loth to depart from. If the request be for your own use, to the intent that you will favour me and my children in suits lawful, forasmuch as you promise me other lands more commodious, my son and heir and other friends shall commune with your lordship at the end of this term; for I can neither ride nor go myself. Mysterton, 13 May.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
13 May.
R. O.
963. WILLIAM ABBOT OF YORK to CROMWELL.
Sends two brethren according to his promise concerning the dimission of the cell at Lincoln. They are commanded to appear before the Chancellor of the Augmentations "for trial of all our cells," with the evidence. When they are despatched before him, they shall conclude about the said cell. York, 13 May. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
14 May.
R. O.
964. CHARGE against SIR EDWARD WILLOUGHBY.
Deposition of Will. Garard, scrivener, to the effect that Lewis Fortescue, of the Middle Temple, on the vigil of Ascension 31 Hen. VIII. came to his house in Fleet Street, and declared in presence of Mr. Awbrey, the King's servant, my lord Russel's command that he should write what he had before deposed to the King's commissioners concerning several obligations of arbitrament between Sir Edward Willoughby and the said Awbrey. May make some variance in his evidence by reason of long time since his last deposition.
Was present at the sealing of the said obligations, and there were no words razed or interlined. Shortly before his said last deposition, Sir Edward as much as confessed to him that the word "or" in the endorsement of one of the obligations was changed into an "and." Said it was a shame for him, a knight and man of worship, to work so untruly. Sir Edward piteously begged deponent to save his honesty and to lay the slander upon his (deponent's) apprentice, a boy, saying it was easier for such a boy to have such slander than for a man óf worship as he was taken for; and Sir Edward offered deponent 3s. 4d. Refused. Sir Edward asked what he would say if called before the King's council. Replied he would tell the truth. Then Sir Edward "shrinking downwards as though he would kneel to this deponent weeping and holding up his hands" desired deponent not to disclose his confession, and he should have 20 marks. Defied him and his corrupt rewards. Signed: William Garard.
Large paper, p. 1.
15 May.
R. O.
965. SIR BRIAN TUKE to LORD LISLE.
I thank my lady for her baken partridges, baken carps, &c. As Mr. Writhesley has now been home for some time I have been expecting to hear from you or him some forwardness set forth between you at his being at Calais touching your debts to the King. But as he has said nothing I have thought it well to remind you, for on my faith I dare not let it sleep as I should like to do and have done this ten years. I advised you to write to Sir Chr. Morice who is one of the sureties in Francis de Bardi's debt, but I fear my letter was not delivered. I assure you there is nothing I have so long respited. There must be an end of it once, and the longer the more to your discomfort and my blame. London, 15 May 1539.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
15 May.
R. O.
966. JOHN HUSEE to LADY LISLE.
I have been with Mrs. Katharine, who is fully determined to go Northward with my lady Rutland. I accordingly enclose a letter which I have drawn to my lady Rutland, which please to return if you are satisfied, or amend it at your pleasure. It had better be sent before Whitsuntide. I also return my lady Rutland's letter which you sent me. Mr. Harryce has promised me a letter of his mind to your ladyship in two days. The quilts shall be sent with the first. I hope the gentlewoman (fn. 10) will be going in two days to Calais. Mr. Skutt's quails must not be forgotten. Lord Taylboyz is married. Remember the draper and others lacking money. London, 15 May.
Your ladyship's suit to Mr. Wryothesley for Mrs. Crene's husband will take no place.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.: William Mewtes, partner with Kimberdall.
[15 May.]
R. O.
967. [JOHN WORTH] (fn. 11) to LORD LISLE.
This present Holy Thursday eve the King took his barge at Whitehall and rowed up to Lambeth. He had his drums and fifes playing, and rowed up and down the Thames for an hour after evensong. On Holy Thursday he went in procession about the Court at Westminster in the Whitehall. My lord Cobham bore the sword before him with a multitude of other nobles. "The high altar in the chapel was garnished with all the apostles upon the altar, and mass by note and the organs playing, with as much honour to God as might be devised." I was told by those of the King's chapel and by Kellegrew that upon Good Friday last the King crept to the cross from the chapel door upwards devoutly and served the priest to mass that same day, "his own person kneeling on his Grace's knees." There were the goodliest musters ever seen in London on Thursday last. It is said the King will remove on Monday to Greenwich. My lord Privy Seal lies at St. James in the Fields. The bishop of Exeter came to London on Saturday with fourscore horse in a livery, lighted at my lord Privy Seal's gate at St. James's, and spoke with him. At his departure he gave 20 nobles in reward to the officers of the house. The recorder of London's servant Ball showed me that last week there was one hanged for eating flesh on a Friday against the King's command. There is also an Act passed that all gavelkind land in Kent shall hereafter go to the elder brother only. It is said there is another Act passed that if any priest or married man be taken with any man's wife he shall suffer death. God save the King. His Grace receives holy bread and holy water every Sunday, and daily uses all other laudable ceremonies. In all London no man dare speak against them on pain of death. Geo. Rolles sends commendations to your Lordship and my Lady. London, Holy Thursday.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
15 May.
R. O.
968. SIR JOHN NEWTON to CROMWELL.
On receiving the King's letters to prepare a certain number of soldiers for service at sea, called together his tenants. One whom he selected refused the prest money, saying he would go to sea at no man's request, but on land would not refuse the King's demand. Sent him to prison, as he began to "condicion with the King's Grace" among the tenants, causing some of them to murmur, but the sheriff (fn. 12) has delivered him again. Barescourte, 15 May.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
[15 May.]
R. O.
969. SIR GEORGE LAWSON to CROMWELL.
My lord of Norfolk has written to me to send up the bearer, the master mason of the King's works, with a plat of the measure of this town of Berwick. Begs that he be shortly despatched again. Wishes letters addressed to the commissioners of the surrendered monasteries in his favour, for the preferment of the Austin Friars in York and the White Friars in Newcastle adjoining his two poor houses. Berwick, Holy Thursday. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
15 May.
Lamb. MS.
602, f. 68.
970. WALTER [WELLESLEY], BISHOP OF KILDARE, to the DUKE OF NORFOLK.
The King intends to suppress certain religious houses here. Asks the Duke, by whose influence he obtained his promotion, to protect his monastery of Connall. Asks credence for the bearer who is well known to Norfolk. Connall, 15 May. Signed: "Walterus Episcopus Darensis ac perpetnus commendatarius de Connall."
Lat., p. 1. Add. and Endd. See Carew Calendar, No. 133.
Cleop. E. v.
50.
B. M.
Burnet, IV.,
298.
C.'s Letters,
466.
971. [CONVOCATION (fn. 13) to HENRY VIII.]
Requests his Highness carefully to weigh eight different arguments, apparently directed against the making of new ordinances to prohibit the marriage of priests or to prevent variety of opinions. Suggests among other questions whether Scripture teaches purgatory or the invocation of saints; whether there be any unwritten verities necessary to be believed; whether it be against scripture to kiss the image of Christ; "and generally whether images may be used any otherwise than your Grace setteth forth in your injunctions"? Urges that if these arguments do not induce the King to stay he would allow the article of priests' marriages to be disputed in both Universities—all the arguments against it to be delivered to the defenders twelve days before the disputation.
Pp. 3. Endd.: Certain questions exhibited to the clergy.

Footnotes

1 Young Gerald Fitzgerald.
2 The speaker uses the first person plural in the beginning, but afterwards the first person singular, speaking for himself and his colleague.
3 Sic, "proxima preterita estate, hoc est anno Domini 1538." The real time was undoubtedly the February, 1538–9.
4 See Vol. XIII., Pt. I., No. 927.
5 Ludovico Beccatelli.
6 See No. 562.
7 The editor of Pole's letters, apparently from not understanding the old usage by which "my letters" stood for "letters addressed to me" seems to have confused the punctuation here.
8 Lady Hussey's daughter.
9 Shenley in Hertfordshire. Sir Thomas died seised of the manor, 13 August, 1540. See Inquis. p. m. 32 Hen. VIII. No. 87. Thus it appears that the exchange offered by Cromwell did not take effect.
10 Lady Hussey's daughter.
11 The signature is crossed out in different ink, so as to be almost illegible; but the handwriting identifies the writer.
12 Apparently Sir Henry Long, sheriff of Somersetshire.
13 This paper has been ascribed to Cranmer, but does not seem to be in the hand of any of his secretaries. From the conclusion, "And your said humble subjects shall pray." &c., and from the endorsement, it would seem to be the draft of an address to the King which it was hoped that Convocation would adopt.