Letters and Papers
August 1539, 1-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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James Gairdner and R. H. Brodie (editors)

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1895

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1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15

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'Letters and Papers: August 1539, 1-15', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 14 Part 2: August-December 1539 (1895), pp. 1-15. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75882 Date accessed: 20 October 2014.


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August 1539

1 Aug.1. BISHOPRIC OF SALISBURY.
See GRANTS in AUGUST, No. 1.
1 Aug.2. BISHOPRIC OF WORCESTER.
See GRANTS in AUGUST, Nos. 2, 6, 13.
1 Aug.
R. O.
3. HUGH WHALLEY to CROMWELL.
According to Cromwell's letter dated Petworthe, 31 July, he has sent by the bringer of the same "one book called The booge of Courte, signed with the King's hand, and ten other rolls concerning the order of the King's House." From your place beside the Friar Augustines, 1 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
1 Aug.
R. O.
4. SUFFOLK to CROMWELL.
Thanks him for his goodness to him in his suit for lord Clyfford, who, he trusts, will use himself to Dr. Petter according to Cromwell's advice, "or ells I wold be sorye that ever I maryed with hym." (fn. 1) Thanks Cromwell for his good news. Perceives the King will have time to make his own bargain. All is well here. They begin "to seware the word of God somewhat better than they did." Hears many of the gentlemen speak very well. Trusts the act of Sewers shall go forward very well, and would do better if Cromwell would write to the Chancellor of the Augmentations to see such parts done as belong to the lands now in his office. From my castle at Tattershalle, 1 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
1 Aug.
R. O.
5. ISABEL GYLBERD to LADY LISLE.
Asks for the residue of the money in her ladyship's hands. Has had none for two years, since which time her daughter's marriage has cost her 300 mks., including the marriage money, the dinner, her apparel, and going up and down to London. There remains 100 mks. to pay and the day is expired. "He" (fn. 2) threatens to sue her unless half is paid before Michaelmas and all before Christmas. Can do nothing unless her creditors help her. Is sued to outlawry for a small debt. It is now 13 years since this matter first began. Lady Lisle's bailiff, Ric. Harrys, will pay nothing without special orders. Tresorow in Cornwall, 1 Aug. Signed: Isable Gylberd.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
1 Aug.
Royal MS.
18 B. VI.,
62 b.
B. M.
6. JAMES V. to GHINUCCI.
Hears that Card. Carpi has gone to Ancona on a legation, and that Ghinucci will attend to Scotch business in his absence; also that the Cardinal of Trani has reserved the fruits of the rectory of Glasgow for one Duncan, veterator technis, but James' councillor, Henry Synclar, holds the rectory and wishes the usufruct to be joined to the property, for which he desires Ghinucci's help. Falkland, kal. Aug. 1539.
Lat., p. 1. Copy.
1 Aug.
Royal MS.
18 B. VI., 63.
B. M.
7. JAMES V. to the CARD. OF CARPI.
On the same subject as the preceding. Salmond, a Scotchman, is instructed to explain the matter to him. Falkland, kal. Aug. 1539.
Lat., p. 1. Copy.
1 Aug.
Royal MS.
18 B. VI.,
63 b.
R. M.
8. JAMES V. to the CARD. OF TRANI.
Wrote before to ask him to transfer his right to the rectory of Glasgow to Henry Synclar. He has been deceived as to the law of Scotland and as to the character of Duncan, who is a worthless old man. Repeats his request. Falkland, kal. Aug. 1539.
Lat., p. 1. Copy.
1 Aug.
R. O.
9. ANTHOINE BRUSSET to LORD LISLE.
Commendations to his wife and Mademoiselle Marie, his daughter. I cannot thank you sufficiently for the good will expressed in your answer touching a "negre blanc," who threatened to kill me and pretended to be in the pay of the King of England. I wrote to ask you "sy vous le vollyes avoer en faysant ses mauvesses actes dun tel galant estrangyer nomme Jan Martin." Your reply is most agreeable, that you will not countenance his evil devices against me. When at Oye Sluice, he passed one of my servants that I was sending to Calais, and, fearing that I would inform you of his devices, he withdrew into the parish of St. Folquin, in the Emperor's country, where I sent some of my men to apprehend him, and have got him imprisoned in the castle. He shall not go out till his process is made for life or death. Gravelines Castle, St. Peter's day, 1 Aug. '39. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.
Aug.
R. O.
10. ADAM WARYNG to LORD LISLE.
Asks him to pay to the bearer, Wm. Strete, the 20 angels which Lisle promised to pay him, before he left Calais, at the arrival of the next woolfleet, "by the same token that I spake with your lordship therefor at the end of Our Lady Street, as ye were then going to Guynes, and took me by the finger, willing me that the messenger should come unto you for the premises by the same token, and your lordship would then without default deliver the same."
Has appointed the money to be paid to the poor mariners of our London fleet now laden. London, 2 Aug. 1539.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
2 Aug.
R. O.
11. DISLOYAL SPEECHES.
Depositions taken, 2 Aug., 31 Hen. VIII., of John Wessell, a tinker, of Seynt Osies, in Essex, concerning a conversation at the Bell at Tower Hill, about 29 June last, between one Roger Dycons, a mariner, and Ryan, the master of the house, in the course of which, Ryan said that it was prophesied that the Prince should be as great a murderer as his father, "and that he must be a murderer by kind for he murdered his mother in his birth."
Deposition of Dicons to the same effect; giving an account of a previous conversation about the Irish Wars, in which John Ryan, who knew the country, said it would never be quiet till two captains with 10,000 men each, were posted in O'Bryan's and O'Donell's country with orders to burn and slay as much as they might. Signed: per me Roger Dyckyns.
Pp. 3. Endd.: Th'accusation of John Ryant, &c.
2 Aug.
R. O.
12. JOHN WYLLIAMSON to CROMWELL.
Encloses an account of money paid and to be paid for the repairs of Leeds Castle against the coming of lady Ughtredd, and for the carriage of household stuff from Lewes and London. Asks him to send money.
As Cromwell sent orders to Mr. Jennyns concerning the alteration of the household, has caused Mr. Amyce to take an inventory of everything in the house, which my lady and Mr. Jennyns shall subscribe.
My lady, my cousin Henry, and my cousin Richard's son are in good health. My cousin Gregory's son has been sore sick, but is now well. Leeds, 2 Aug.
Would have attended on Cromwell but he is not able to ride. Asks whether he shall remain here or at London, or shall come to Cromwell with his books. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal, Endd.
4 Aug.
R. O.
13. SIR BRIAN TUKE to CROMWELL.
Has received, amongst other letters from Cromwell, an order to pay Thomas Fowler 1,000l. for the fortifications of Calais. Other letters and warrants received about the same time, amounted to little lack of 1,000l Has 400l. to pay for July wages in the Court, and other sums: at the end of the month the earl of Angwish must have 500l.; then August wages, 400l.; Michaelmas wages, 2,400l.; also ordinary warrants, ambassadors' diets, &c. Shall receive nothing till Allhallows tide, and little then, for the Cofferer must first have 1,900l. odd. Writes lest Cromwell should send warrants to him that he cannot pay, and men should think his lordship knew not "what were of the clock" with the treasurer of the King's chamber. Has received little from the Exchequer this twelvemonth, of Fifteenth money or otherwise, "and that which I had afore was by your Lordship for the most part appointed where it should be paid," and likewise the Hamper money, which was wont to be a good shot anchor. Has paid for war matters no small sum. Assignment of the Household is changed from desperate payments to the best he had out of the duchy of Lancaster, earldom of Warwick, and duchy of Cornwall; and yet the assignments the Cofferer left came not to him but to the Exchequer. Purchased lands now go the Court of Augmentations, forfeit lands mostly to Mr. Gostwyk, who affirms he may receive it by his patent contrary to the Act of Parliament. Has not now the vacations of monasteries and bprics. The subsidies of clergy and temporalty be all gone, which amounted to 20,000l. by year. With much ado made for the King's privy coffers, at Easter last, 5,000 mks. The King's great debts are gone and but small payments coming in. Want of furniture, not his own default, has occasioned him loss of the King's favour after above 24 years' service. It may yet be rather redubbed through Cromwell's favourable word to his Majesty, which he begs. Has despatched Mr. Fowler, and all except Mr. Gresham, for Mr. Vaughan, who shall be paid this day. At my poor house, 4 August, 1539.
Hol., pp. 3. Add.: Lord Crumwell lord Privy Seal. Endd.
4 Aug.
R. O.
14. THOS. BROKE, of Calais, to CROMWELL.
Intends to ask for the King's pardon granted to all offenders before the 26 Feb. last, and also for four several commissions to be sent to Calais for the trial of his honesty, he being appointed to prove certain exceptions against Peyton and Pole, 4 Nov. These men are his capital enemies and have maliciously accused him of certain heresies and slandered him for a seditious person. Begs Cromwell's favour in this suit. Has always owed to him his faith and service, as one who has set forth the wealth of this realm and the glory of God. 4 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
4 Aug.
R. O.
15. LORD CHANCELLOR AUDELEY to Mr. DUKE.
Requests him with speed to make out the patents for the pensions of the late abbot and convent of St. Osithes, and deliver them to bearer without charge. Leghes, 4 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: To his friend Mr. Duke.
5 Aug.
Ribier, I. 467.
16. FRANCIS I.
Instructions to the elect of Avranches sent to the Emperor.
To explain that Francis' negociations with the Turk for a general truce have been unsuccessful, but that the Venetians have made a private truce with the Turk. The Pope's nuncio has lately told Francis that the Pope was informed that he still entertained the friendship of the Lutherans and the king of England, and so rendered them harder to return to the obedience of the Church; also that Cantelme had obtained the truce for the Venetians to the prejudice of the general truce. Denial of this. If the Emperor speak of the affair of England, Avranches shall say that Francis will nowise contravene or prejudice what was last settled between them, whatever may offer. Also to invite the Emperor to take his journey through France. Chantilly, 5 Aug. 1639 (sic).
ii. "Relation dudit Eleu d'Avranches à son retour d'Espagne en Septembre, 1539."
Containing the Emperor's reply to the above message, saying that if his affairs admit of it he will be glad to pass through France, but he cannot yet fix a time till he knows what the Turk will do, &c.
French.
7 Aug.
R. O.
17. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
I have received your letters of the 4th. The lewd fellow (fn. 3) who has used you so badly, if he frequents this city, shall be had and treated as you write. When your letters come that you now write of I shall accomplish them. The bishop of Rochester is dead, and his successor not yet named. London, 7 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
7 Aug.
R. O.
18. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Has made search for Porter, who was here within these two days. Since he came he was with Tong, seeking employment, but Tong rejected him. If I once know his haunt I will bring him to his answer, for he has spoken largely since his arrival. Wrote today by Nich. Towrs, of Calais, who said John Raven showed him the young horse at Bristol. I wonder Blysse has not written about it. Towrs has a letter for Lisle from John Raven. Desires to know whether the draper shall have Acton's obligation, for he is dissatisfied at remaining so long unpaid. London, 7 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
7 Aug.
Lamb., 603,
f. 109a.
19. GYLLERNOWE O'MAGHIR.
Indenture, 7 Aug. 31 Hen. VIII., between the King and Gyllernowe O'Maghir, captain of his nation, who agrees to pay 12d. yearly for every ploughland within his dominion of Ynykyryne, and lend certain assistance in the King's wars.
Copy. Latin, p. 1. See Carew Calendar, No. 136.
7 Aug.
Poli Epp., II.,
179.
20. CARD. POLE to CARD. CONTARINI.
Wrote last on the 17th and 18th ult.; and before that, on the 14th, wrote his whole mind. Hopes it was well taken and awaits Contarini's advice in reply; for he is much perplexed. By this time His Holiness will have declared what Pole is to do; for Card. Farnese must have reached Rome 15 days ago; and he told Pole, in passing from Spain, that as soon as he reached Rome orders would be sent. His last letter from Rome was Contarini's of the 2nd ult., though he hears from Avignon that three or four couriers have passed for Spain. This suspense hinders his enjoyment of the sweet society of Sadolet. Were he in Rome he would do something for Sadolet, the last of so many beautiful plants made by his Holiness, who would not fail to serve his Holiness in Germany, or Italy or elsewhere. Are in a wonderful solitude and hear no news but what comes from Rome. M. Alvise sends commendations. Salutes the Padre Maestro, M. Galeazzo and M. Danesio. Carpentras, 7 Aug. 1539.
Italian.
8 Aug.
R. O.
21. The COMMISSARY of CALAIS.
Information given by Robert Cockeson, servant to Thos. Boyes, man at arms, 8 August, 31 Henry VIII., that about 6 p.m. that day, one Bartyllmew a tailor, dwelling by Prince the shoemaker, told him that Harry, the Commissary's servant, has said, to Bartyllmew, that his master should be commissary still, and that he had sent him into the parishes to declare it. Also that one Sir William should be put in as his deputy till he came, and that the curate (fn. 4) should be parish priest still. Further, Bartyllmew said that Addams was a good man and had set forth the Sacrament of the Altar as high as any man could, but it was taken otherwise, and that the curate, Sir William, was as good a man as could be, or he would never trust priests. Further, that there were many witnesses sent over against him, but if others had been allowed to go over there should have been another tale told. Two of Bartyllmew's prentices were present when he said these things.
P. 1.
8 Aug.
R. O.
22. ANNE BASSET to LADY LISLE.
I have received your letter by which it appears that you think I am at the Court. I cannot sue for the pardon of John Harryse, as you desire, for Mrs. Mewtas and I are now at Guildford going to London, and shall not see the King again till he come to Grafton and to Ampthill. Nor am I sure even then; for Mrs. Mewtas is in doubt about going. Has no horse except the nag that the King gave her, and a saddle. Will have the horse as soon as it is sent for, but it is a great way off. I am sorry I did not receive your letter when I was at Court; but it I can get any one to speak to the King for his pardon, will be sure to do so. Has received of Spekkot a royal from my lord and two single ducats from yourself. My lord Admiral has given me a buck, ready baked, for you, and says it shall be sent by one of his servants who lives in London. I have recommended you to lady Hampton (Southampton), lady Brown, and Mrs. Mewtas. Written the 8 Aug.
Pp. 2. Not in her own hand. Add.
8 Aug.
R. O.
23. COUNTY OF WEXFORD.
Inquisition taken before Hamund Stafford, sheriff of Wexford, at Maglass, 8 Aug., 31 Hen. VIII. (jury named), certifying that Wexford is a county palatine and its liberties (described) have existed from time immemorial.
Latin, p. 1. Parchment.
Attached are:—
ii. Writ for the above, issued by Wm. Seyntlowe, seneschal of Wexford. Wexford, 1 July, 31 Hen. VIII.
iii. Sheriff's precept to Edmund Nangle and Stephen Rowe, the summoners, to assemble the jury. 15 July, 31 Hen. VIII.
8 Aug.
R. O.
24. GUILLAUME LE GRAS to LADY LISLE.
Apologises for his negligence in writing, by reason of his absence from Paris and other hindrances. Trusted to Mons. Bescansal to recommend him to her. Has received the schedule of Jehan Batiste de Casigny, with the proxies which she has sent back. Thanks her for the trouble her people have taken in the matter.
Sends six crespes. Desires to be recommended to the Deputy, and asks news of Mr. James, their son. Has heard nothing of him since he left. Paris, 8 Aug. 1539.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. Add.
9 Aug.
R. O.
25. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Cannot set eye upon Porter, but Tong tells me, one or other of his men will meet with him tomorrow, if he is still about this city, "for on the holidays tailors walketh abroad." He has a brother in Watling Street. Mr. Speckott tells me Ralph Hare is at Court, and has put up a bill to the King, which was delivered unto Mr. Hare. If it had touched you, Mr. Hare, I think, would have sent you a copy. Ralph Hare has so used himself that he is loth to return to Calais, and will do what he can to prevent it; "howbeit, if he refuse to fulfil his penance, he is like to have a worse turn; for by the law he doth, in his so doing, condemn himself to the fire." London, 9 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
9 Aug.
R. O.
26. JOHN INCENT and THOMAS LEGH to CROMWELL.
Have been at Amsbery, according to their commission, and moved the prioress to resign; which she has done. Have declared the monastery void; and, with all speed, send Cromwell word, so that he may prefer his friend and not be "prevented," for they will urge it to "compremysse unto your hands." Amsbery, St. Laurence Even, at night. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal.
10 Aug.
R. O.
27. FLORENCE BONNEWE, late Prioress of Amesbury, to CROMWELL.
I have received the King's letters and yours, and have accordingly resigned my office in the monastery before the commissioners thereto appointed, trusting the promises made me will be performed. I beg your intercession with the King that I may be put in surety of my living. Ambresbury, 10 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Cromwell, lord Privy Seal. Endd.
10 Aug.28. COUNTESS OF SALISBURY'S LANDS.
See GRANTS in AUGUST, No. 18.
10 Aug.
R. O.
29. HERRY POLSTED to CROMWELL.
Sends two bills to be signed, one of the Forest of Ashdown, the other for Rayleghe, with a survey of the Forest and the iron mills. Master Heydon's son, the clerk of the Duchy, says that, a fortnight before my lord of Wiltshire's death, my lord Admiral willed him to make a copy of my lord of Wiltshire's grant of the Forest, as the King had given it to the earl of Surrey. My lord of Wiltshire kept six keepers in the Forest and a ranger. Supposes fewer keepers will walk that ground. Will ride tomorrow to my lord of Canterbury with Cromwell's letter for the leases of Reyleghe and Stoneham, in Sussex. The Rolls, St. Laurence Day. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: My lord Privy Seal. Endd.
10 Aug.
R. O.
30. LORD LISLE to CROMWELL.
Received Aug. 9 his letter dated Aug. 3, stating that Henry Palmer fears the partiality of some of the Council here. There is no one who bears him such ill will as to treat him unjustly. Will show him good will, as Cromwell desires. He might have had an indifferent end in the matter between himself and Mr. Porter without troubling Cromwell, but he is very quick, much given to his own opinion, and trusting in his own wit. Knows of none who pretended to do him any wrong. Will endeavour to reconcile Mr. Porter and him and move the rest of the Council to do the same. Will examine Thos. Curthop, priest of Marke. As to Cromwell's wish that if he appears to be guilty, they should proceed against him, the Council have never given judgment in such matters touching life and death. Will therefore, if they find him guilty, hand him over to the Mayor.
Has taken sureties for Swyfte's forthcoming, and sends depositions against him. It has been no little trouble, considering how long ago the examination was taken. Begs Cromwell not to believe every light, seditious person who complains of him or the Council, which encourages disobedience. Would rather resign than suffer the misorder and disturbance of the last two or three years. Calais, 10 August.
His heart is heavy that he may not come to see the King. Portar, whom Cromwell calis Mr. Portar's servant, has been detected of heresy and very evil behaviour. He was in lord Lisle's service, but he put him away for evil fashions. He said he would make the bread which he ate as good as the Sacrament. Signed.
Pp. 3. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
R. O.2. Deposition of John Porter, servant to lord Lisle, taken before him, Sir Ric. Granfeld, High Marshall, Sir Thos. Palmer, Master Porter, Sir Robt. Wingfield, and Sir John Butler, Master Commissary, 12 May 30 Hen. VIII.
The said John Porter, Hugh Davie, soldier in wages, a Welshman who knows little English, Thos. ap Howell, archer on horseback, and John Dowse, soldier in wages, depose to a conversation on Friday week, in which Porter expressed his disbelief in Our Lady and the Mass, and Ric. Swift, soldier in 8d. a day, found fault with him for it.
Pp. 3.
10 Aug.
Thenier, 612.
31. JAMES V. to PAUL III.
Repeats the request he has frequently made for the office of legate to be conferred on the card, of St. Andrew's. Falkland, 10 Aug. 1539.
Lat.
10 Aug.
Add. MS.
28,591, f. 212.
B. M.
32. AGUILAR to CHARLES V.
"Lo que escrive el marquis de Aguilar a x, xiij de Agosto 1539."
Card. Farnese arrived 21 July, and the Pope had a conference in his pre sence with the duke of Castro and the secretary Marcello.
The Pope is confident nothing will be done about the continuance of peace between the Emperor and France without his mediation; though he does not think Francis proceeds with the same sincerity as the Emperor. He had proposed the marriage of the daughter of Francis to the Emperor, to confirm it. As to the Council he is glad the Emperor is satisfied with his policy to suspend it in order to do first what is desirable for the Christian religion. What the Pope is doing about Germany, &c.
In the matter of England, Aguilar reported to his Holiness that which was written to him; and Card. Farnese and Marcello described their negociations with the Emperor's Council thereupon, concluding that affairs of Germany must first be settled. Upon this his Holiness spoke long, complaining that the delay gave that King cause to do worse, and that he considered how the Emperor urged on the one hand that Card. Pole should go to the French king, and the French king excused it, saying there was no necessity until the Emperor resolved more particularly what was to be done in case the exhortation to be made by ambassadors of the Emperor and French king were insufficient to move the king of England. And that even if the said King should agree to the mission of Card. Pole as arranged with Card. Farnese, and the ambassadors should be sent, if their going did not succeed, and afterwards commerce was not forbidden, it would be fruitless and irritate him the more; and that he now knew no remedy but to keep the thing alive, lest the king of England should think it was forgotten: and that what troubled him most was that the French king might not always be as well disposed as now.
Spanish. Modern copy from Simancas, pp. 4. Headed as above.
See Spanish Calendar VI. I., No. 80.
11 Aug.
Vitell. B. XXI.
186.
B. M.
33. NICH. WOTTON to [HENRY VIII.]
"Hit maye please your Highness to be [advertised that on the ... [day] of July I received your Grace's most ... [letters of] the 12th of the same month," and shortly afterwards addressed myself to the Duke [of Cleves, of whom], 31 July, I had audience at Duren, in the high parts of the duchy of Juliers. And, having declared as much of the instructions last sent me as was then to be uttered, after many letters to and fro, I had finally these answers:—that, on Thursday, 7 Aug., the Duke had a letter from the Elector of Saxony, dated 29 July, in which he promised shortly to send some of his counsel to the Duke purposely for the King's matter; and that immediately on their arrival the Duke's ambassadors will take their journey with them towards the King, being already commanded to be in readiness. The names of the ambassadors appointed are Dr. Henry Olisleger, chancellor of Cleves, and the Duke's "houemester" as they call him, or præfectus aulæ, Wernherus van Hosteden, called here Van Hoghesteyn, a gentleman of Juliers. Expects they will depart very shortly. Was told that they should have power to treat and conclude everything, as in the King's last instructions, especially to offer a decent sum as dowry. On his asking for a copy of the covenants between the old duke of Cleves, and the duke of Lorraine was told that they should either be sent to him or delivered to the King by the ambassadors at their coming, who would also explain why that matter took no effect. Is endeavouring to obtain secretly a copy of the covenants between the Elector of Saxony and the lady Sybille "and yf I canne not speede otherwyse I will ... of the Chawncelor Olisleger, and s ... as soone as I canne have theym ... I have also dyvers tymes before of ... sendis the receipte of your Grace's most ... by your Grace's commaundement, dissuadidde the ... to leane or to truste to th' Emperor, whatsoever agr[eement] he offer to make withe theym, whiche shulde hold [so] longe as hit pleasyd hym, and so will I do heereaf[ter] when th'occasion will serve for hit."
(fn. 5) Finds the Council willing enough to publish that lady Anne is not bound by any covenants made by the old duke of Cleves and the duke of Lorraine, but is free to marry as she pleases. She has been brought up with the lady Duchess her mother (as the lady Sybille also was till she was married and the lady Amelye has been and is) "and in manner never from her elbow, the lady Duchess being a wise lady and one that very straitly looketh to her children." All report her to be of very lowly and gentle conditions, "by the which she hath so much won her mother's favor that she is very loth to suffer her to depart from her. She occupieth her time most with the needle, wherewithali she ... she canne reede and wryte her ... Frenche, Latyn, or other langaige she [hath no] ne, nor yet she canne not synge nor pleye [upon] enye instrument, for they take it heere in Germanye for a rebuke and an occasion of lightenesse that great ladyes shuld be lernyd or have enye knowledge of musike." Her wit is good and she will no doubt learn English soon when she puts her mind to it. "I could never hear that she is inclined to the good cheer of this country and marvel it were if she should, seeing that her brother, in whom yet it were somewhat more tolerable, doth so well abstain from it. Your Grace's servant Hanze Albein hathe taken th'effigies of my ladye Anne and the ladye Amelye and hath expressyd theyr imaiges verye lyvelye."
Thanks the King for giving him the archdeaconry of Gloucester, as he is informed by my lord Privy Seal. Duren, 11 Aug. 1539.
Hol., pp. 5.
12 Aug.
Kaulek,
121.
34. MARILLAC to FRANCIS I.
12 Aug:—Having seen what Francis wrote him from Chantilly, 31 July, went to the King, who was on his progress about 60 miles from London in the direction of Antone (Southampton), to present Francis' letter and hear the important matters he had to communicate. He freely told me that a Milanese nobleman, of credit and authority in the Emperor's court, named the Marquis of Merignan, offers to deliver into his hands Parma and Placentia (towns of such importance to Francis, says the King of England, that there is no need to specify it otherwise here), by means of some of his relations who have the chief government there, provided he (Henry) will put in sufficient garrison to protect the Marquis and his assistants from the Emperor and to defend the towns. This offer he is unwilling to accept, lest Francis or the Emperor should take some sinister opinion of him as attempting to get the state of Milan which is in question between them. Similarly he would not refuse it but kept it in suspense until he should know whether it would suit Francis. In that case, he begs to be informed at once, in order that he may either carry it out in his own name (for he does not yet know whether the personage would be pleased that others should know it), or endeavour to induce the said Milanese gentleman to put Francis in his (Henry's) place. If the thing does not suit Francis, this King desires that it may be kept secret so as not to harm the said gentleman, who chooses next winter as the best time to execute his design.
As these proposals seemed of such importance that I would not like to be believed alone without evidence, I begged for it in writing, and he, not to commit the secret to others, benignly agreed to write you a letter in his own hand giving credence to what I now write which I first read to him word for word and of which I left him a copy.
French.
* A modern transcript is in R.O.
12 Aug.
Kaulek,
122.
35. MARILLAC to MONTMORENCY.
12 Aug.:—Has gone to the King, 60 miles from London, not far from Portsmouth and Southampton. Visited the new fortifications and certainly found all conformable to his previous despatches. Of the 90 ships that were at Portsmouth only 7 or 8 are left, which ordinarily are there, and a fine "galiace" well equipped. The remainder of the ships which belonged to the King and his chief ministers have moved into this river Thames to disarm, and those which belonged to merchants have already sailed away on their own business. The fortifications at the said places are almost finished and of very great extent, sufficient to make good defence of that coast. True they are not very durable, being made of stakes filled with earth as it made in a hurry. As to those at Dover the persons who are continually passing them can best describe them. Recently a ship has been sent charged with artillery and munitions for Berwick, a strong place overlooking Scotland as Calais does France. This King continues his progress, gradually approaching London where he will be at Michaelmas to attend Parliament, which commences 1 Nov. and lasts till Christmas.
French abstract.
* A modern transcript is in R.O., erroneously dated at the head, 12 Oct. 1539.
12 Aug.
Cleop. E. IV.
201.
B. M.
Wright's
Suppression
of the
Monasteries,
239.
Strype's Ecc.
Mem., I. i., 407.
36. THOS. LORD AUDELEY to [CROMWELL].
Sends copy of the value of the goods of St. Osie's and the particulars delivered to him by Myldmay, the auditor, one of the commissioners, with estimate of lead and bells. Was not at the dissolution, nor has any pennyworth of the goods, but thinks the commissioners served the King well. They were Sir John Seyntcler, Sir Will. Pirton, Myldmay, and Jobson, "which be two of the Court of the Augmentation," and a Master of Chancery. Sent for the abbot previously and induced him and his convent to surrender without a murmur. Begs Cromwell to further his suit, which the King has granted only during pleasure, and his bill is for life. "They be offices and fees that must be given," and Audeley will serve the King honestly. Has nothing at present but the Chancellorship, which is high but chargeable. Understands Cromwell is at a point for him to have the archdeaconry of Leicestershire, and to give my lord of Hereford 80l. Begs him, therefore, to help to the resignation thereof, and [get] the King's letter to the bp. of Lincoln for the election. The person that should have it is Will. More, bp. suffragan of Colchester. If obtained, Audeley's servant will discharge the 80l. at London to my lord of Hereford's use. Has written to Pope about it. Will give Cromwell 20l. for his pains. My lord of St. John's has sent to him for commissions "to gather the ffrary. I have warrant to make them, ye know, by the gret boke that the Gret Master opteyned at the Kynges hand; neverthelesse, I staye in yt till I may know the Kynges plesure therein." He says the King has the tenth of the rates thereof. Eston, at the Earl of Essex's house, 12 Aug.
Thank God, the country is in good quietness where I have been.
Hol., pp. 3.
12 Aug.
R. O.
37. A CORRODY FROM BARLINGS.
Receipt dated 12 Aug. 31 Hen. VIII., by Ric. Naylour, of Snarforth, from Thos. Hall, receiver of the attainted lands in Lincolnshire, of 4l. for a corrody from the monastery of Barlynges, to the use of Margaret Scotson and Elizabeth her daughter, in accordance with a decree of the General Surveyors, dated 12 July last. Signed and sealed.
P. 1. Endd.: Anno XXX.
12 Aug.
R.O.
38. WILLIAM HATTON, of Holdenby.
Receipt by Lewys Sutton, bookbinder of London, of 5 mks, from Wm. Hatton, of Haldenby, for lands in Northamptonshire sold to him. 12 Aug. 31 Hen. VIII.
Sealed, p. 1. Endd.
12 Aug.
R.O.
39. LORD LEONARD GREY to WM. POPLEY.
I have received your letters and those of my old servant Stephen ap Henry in favour of Walter Pepart, who has married your kinswoman. Explains that the two leases he holds of the abbot and convent of St. Mary Abbey would little benefit Pepart, and one of them is of such parcels as one Fynglas shall have by the Lord Privy Seal's letter to the Commissioners. Credence for the said Walt. Pepart, the bearer, and commendations to "my Lord your master." Drogheda, 12 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: dwelling with my lord Privy Seal.
12 Aug.
R.O.
40. LORD SANDYS to LORD LISLE.
I thank you for your venison this morning. On Sunday last, proclamation was made at Arde, by sound of trumpet, that the French king would license any of his subjects or others to put beasts to "justment" into Cousuade, the King our master's ground, paying the French king money for pasturage. Please call Boweyt Hake, of Merke, before you, or instruct the bailly of Merke to inquire the truth, and write to De Biez to know what answer he will make, so that you may certify the King as you think good by the advice of Sir John Wallop. Commend me to my Lady. Guisnes, 12 Aug. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
13 Aug.
R.O.
Foxe, v. App.
No. XVI.
41. DR. CROME'S PREACHING.
Deposition, 13 Aug. 31 Hen. VIII., of Wm. Coplande, rector of Allhallows Breadstreet, and vicar of St. Sepulchre's, on being convented before the Lord Mayor of London and Mr. Waryn, alderman and a gentleman of the King, and Mr. Chomley, recorder, touching a sermon made by Dr. Crome, 16 July, in the said church of Allhallows upon the Gospel of the Requiem Mass, beginning In illo tempore dixit Martha ad Jesum. He represented priests' vestments as indifferent matters, said nothing was of Christ's institution but the mass, and in it only the consecration. He said Martha appealed only to Jesus and not to the Apostles, and did not invoke saints as helpers. Signed.
Hol. p. 1. Endd.
R.O.2. Deposition of Thos. Herd, priest of Aldermary church.
Was present at the feast of Reliquiarum last past, A.D. 1529 (sic), at the sermon of Dr. Crome, "where the curatt of that chyrche wold not suffer us to kepe that serves but served the Dominik (?), and because of that I was behynd off my serves, and in tyme of the sermon I sayde my serves of that day and gave lytyll ere on to hym on tyll the tyme that he spake of the bysschopes (fn. 6) that had loste there promosyns." His words were "Friends, would to God that ye would leave your slanderous tongues. Ye say that these bishops be false knaves and whoresons." He said they were as good livers as any and their honesty lay not in their promotions, else the lord mayor, sheriffs, &c., would lose their honesty on going out of office. He said also, there were lie mongers in the city of London, and that they uttered [lies] at vintners' and barbers' shops and at bishops' tables. Signed.
Hol., p. 1. Endd.
R.O.3. Deposition of Thos. Artes, priest, as to the words spoken by Dr. Crowum in the pulpit in his parish church of Aldermary on Relic Sunday last, which deponent reported in Jesus Communs and to the parson of St. Michael in Queenhithe. He said that there is a craft of liemongers that slandered the good men that lost their promotions and called them whoresons, and showed that their honesty lay not in their promotions by example of the lord mayor, &c.; also that a man's honesty was not in his wealth, else when he was at church his honesty would be at home; nor did it lie in his purse, for a thief might rob him; nor in his garment, for then the tailor might merit; also that the liemongers' warehouses were barbers' shops, taverns, and bishops' boards, Signed.
Hol., p. 1. Headed: 1539. Endd.
13 Aug.
R.O.
42. JOHN HARRYDANCE.
Statement by Wm. Longford, parson at Whitechapel without Aldgate, in reply to questions put to him by the Lord Mayor and his Council, 12 August, 31 Henry VIII.
Being asked how long he had been there, said a year and a half. Asked if he were "always permanent" there, said he had been the more part at Oxford University, but since the beginning of Lent had continued on his benefice. The Lord Mayor then asked if he knew any of his parishioners to transgress any civil order, injunction, or statute. Said he knew none, except that he was told John Harrydance, being above in his chamber window towards the street preached to his audience in the street. Was not present to hear him. He observed such intempestive hours that he knew not when he preached, either early in the morning or very late at night. Being asked how he knew that he preached, said it was by hearsay, as on Monday, 21 July, meeting Wm. Wren in the street, who enquired of him if he had been at the sermon preached overnight between 10 and 11 and on to 12 o'clock by Wm. Harrydance. The writer enquired if he was there and he said he had been in bed, but a man lodged in his house resorted thither. Wren could not inform him what was preached or what audience was there. On the 22nd July, Robert Leyson and Edmond Smith met him and complained that Harrydance disturbed the whole parish lately at night. On this, intended to consult the bp. of London, but he was so sick that the writer could not speak with him. On the 24th July, Mr. Leyzton, clerk of the Closet, was in the city and sent to enquire of these premises. Showed him the whole thing as above, requesting him, if he could, to find some remedy. Further, the Lord Mayor, having asked him to search who were present at the window "at that inopportune fable," has heard that Lawrence Clerk, barber, the wife of Esgor, and, as William Draper informs him, Robert Beryngton, constable, were there with others. John Wilkinson says that Harrydance was busy talking in his garden on Sunday morning last. John Tranffyld says that certain of the city repaired to his house at that time, but for what cause he is uncertain. "Also about weeks past (sic) John Morris, William Draper, and William Hucchynson, and other of the parish, were present, he being preaching in his garden these words: No marvel if the world doth persecute holy men and setters forth of light, for Christ said, They shall come after me which shall persecute the tellers of truth. Also John Morris asked in a time, I marvel, Harrydance, that thou settest so little and that thou fearest not to break the commandment of the Council. To whom he shaped an answer saying, It is as fit for me to be burnt as for thee to bake a loaf. So, my Lord, I have accomplished your commandment and my masters all; here writing such things as these men here named hath reported." Signed.
Hol., pp. 2.
R.O.2. Depositions taken, 12 Aug. 31 Henry VIII., before Sir Robert (sic, for "William") Forman, lord mayor of London, Sir Ralph Waren, alderman, and Sir Roger Cholmeley, recorder.
Lawrence Clerc, barber surgeon, dwelling in Whitechapel, says that about a month past he heard John Harydaunce preaching out of his window to the street between 9 and 12 at night. There were not present, that he could see, more than six or eight listeners. About the time the King was at Guildford last, Robert Silvester, one of his servants of the scullery, with the said Lawrence and six others, bowling in a garden next to that of Harydaunce, saw and heard him preach to their company, when Silvester said if he would not leave his preaching he would cast his bowl at his head.
ii. Examination of Harrydaunce, taken 13 August.
1. To the first article, he says that since Midsummer last he has declared the word of God in his garden about 20 times before divers of his neighbours, that is, about six persons at one time. About 20 July last he set open a certain casement of his window towards the highway in Whitechapel about 9 p.m., and continued half an hour and more speaking the word of God, but how many were present he does not remember. 2. He has spoken the word of God upon the back side of his garden, since that time, to several persons. 3. He utterly denies the same.
Pp. 2. Endd.: Touching J. Harydunce, bricklayer.
13 Aug.
R.O.
43. W. EARL OF SOUTHAMPTON to CROMWELL.
The man of Alan King's who was sent with letters from the French King's ambassador to the governor of Bretaigne, for receipt of the King's poledavies, is returned without them, and my ship which was there, by the King's command, to have taken them in has lost so much time. His Majesty delivered the money for them to Alan King three years ago, and now has purchased the French King's letters for them and yet goes without them. The meaning, as I take it, by letters, to Alan and the Ambassador, from the party that keeps them, is that, unless he have restitution of some things taken at sea, the King is not like to have his own. Please peruse the said letters and examine whether the default lies in Alan or the Frenchman. I think the King should send a man specially thither. Molsay, 13 August. Signed: W. Southampton.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
13 Aug.
R.O.
44. JOHN BEKYNSAW to LADY LISLE.
My lord of Hartford (Hereford) sent me a letter from you by which I perceived you have received my previous letters and your goldsmith's ware. Gave your respects to Le Gras, who desired me to see "this" surely conveyed and say that he marvels greatly "that Mr. James Basset wytsavyth not to write once since his departing hence," for all the kindness showed him. Will always be ready to do her service. Paris, 13 Aug. 1539.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: At Calais. Sealed.
13 Aug.
R.O.
45. JOHN BEKYNSAW to LADY LISLE.
This day, I send you a letter by Guyliam, a Frenchman, my lord William's servant, and a box of "crepyns" from Sir Guiliam Le Gras, with his letters. I trust you have received them ere this. My lord of Hertford sent me your letters, which Thaddy brought on the 8th, by which I see you have received all my letters with your goldsmith's ware. Paris, 13 Aug. 1539.
Hol., p. 1, Add.: At Calais.
14 Aug.
Calig. E. II.,
189.
B. M.
46. HUBERTUS THOMAS to [BONNER].
"S.P. Cognitum erga utrumque principem (fn. 7) et ... tuum, domine et vir eximie, littere tue hesterne notiorem reddid[ere], qui tam humaniter ad me scribas (sic) non est opus erga eos excusatione, quod ipsos non inviseris; agnoscunt voluntatem et commendationes tuas, a me sibi diligenter factas, grato acceperunt animo, et sese vicissim tibi commendant. Ultra ea que ego de nuncio Hispanico tibi dixi nihil accepi, nec de Italo quicquam. De donis utrique datis hec sunt." To each a gold goblet of 1,500 cr. value, with 1,500 cr. in it. He (i.e. Francis) paid all our expenses in France, 3,000 cr. The Queen gave the Princess dresses and a bed, worth 2,000 cr. An amulet of 4,000 cr. value. He gave me a chain worth, I think, nearly 500 cr. The King offers all good will.
These are the things you so often desired me to write, and I am sorry I had no leisure to see you before [your] departure. "Sed spero futurum ut inceptam amicitiam aliquando non habentem mixtos metus continuemus. De Principe omnia tibi pollicere, de me autem nihil non sum facundus (?) donec inchoatum jamdudum opus absolvero; quod domino Crumuello, summo viro, et, si libet, Regi (me sue Majestati humillime commendans) certificare poteris. Non pretermittem ex Inferiori Germania quicquid illic erit novarum rerum scribere, ubi abs te vicissitudinem et quas scis literas expectabimus." Ex Villa Cotterrey, 14 Aug. 1539.
Lat., p. 1. Slightly mutilated. Address mostly illegible ... ac ... errimo viro ... Serenissimi Anglie ... domino meo semper ... honorato." Below the address is an endorsement by Bonner, of which can be read only the words, at Crepye, the xiiijthth.
15 Aug.
R.O.
Ellis, 3 S.
III. 87.
47. THOMAS THACKER to CROMWELL.
The bp. of Herfford has given your Lordship 6 weigh of Bay salt, which I have bestowed in your cellar at Friar Augustines. Your households here all well. You shall receive herewith a letter from the lord Deputy of Ireland. Your buildings go forwards.
Of late I moved your Lordship for the farm of the suppressed priory of Braydsall park, Derbyshire, 10l. 17s. 10d. a year. Mr. Chancellor of the Augmentations put my name in his book for it, but one Robert Wodd, of Waltham Holy Cross, has got his name into the King's book for it, so Mr. Chancellor put me down for a cell or farm of Repyngton or Repton, Derbyshire, suppressed. Within these two days my brethren have certified me that the prior of Repton of late made a lease of it to Parson Leveson, which, though sealed not half a year ago, bears date 3 or 4 years past. The prior, on the approach of the surveyors, caused the supposed farmer to bring in part of his stuff, and so put me from it without your help. The cell or farm is called Calk, but in the books in the Exchequer it is entered "Aston, Chelardston, Calk et Donasthorpp—valent in re. et ferm. ibidem per annum, 5l. 10s. 4d." I suppose the surveyors will now find it of more yearly value.
I beg your Lordship to pardon my bold writing. At the Rolls, 15 August.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Crumwell lord Privy Seal.
15 Aug.
R.O.
48. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
I received your letter, by Gillam, and have been with my lord Admiral, who called his solicitor before me and bade him search the Rolls for your patent of Porchester and Bere. If it was found, the solicitor was to devise a surrender which he should send to his lordship at Guildford manor; if not found, he was to draw up a minute of a letter in which your lordship shall surrender all your interest; and then he has promised to send the money immediately which he shall defray. He will send a buck baken, which is Mrs. Anne's gift. Will settle with the draper. My lord Admiral promises to speak to the King for your licence to come over. Believes his lordship intends you shall be here at the beginning of the Parliament. Will send John Ravyn's letter to Bristol by the first opportunity. Wrote yesterday by one Dyckenson, of York, how John Porter was in the Counter, upon the Mayor's commandment at your suit. London, 15 Aug.
My lord Admiral has left his new house here, late the bp. of Bath's, for Byfleet, and so to Guildford manor, and then to Court.
Hol., p. 1. Sealed. Add.
15 Aug.
R.O.
49. SIR WILLIAM PENIZON to CROMWELL.
Sends a diamond set in a slender gold ring, meet to be set in the breast of a George, which, though not of the best, he desires Cromwell to accept. His wife also sends a slender present and both thank his Lordship for the buck given them this day. Moved Cromwell not long "agone" of the dissolution of Reading Abbey; the abbot, preparing for the same, sells sheep, corn, woods, &c., to the disadvantage of the King, and partly also of the farmer. Marlstone, 15 August. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: from Madynstone.
15 Aug.
R.O.
50. WM. SAYNTLOO to CROMWELL.
Is daily vexed in his offices, which he holds by patent as amply as any seneschal in times past, although Cromwell wrote, at his leaving England, to the lord Chancellor here, to favour him. Begs him to remember "this poor country" according to their petitions, and to write to the lord Chancellor, "which, concerning my fiant and other things, hath with extremity used me," to see his retinue paid, who go unpaid since Michaelmas last. Roscarlon, 15 Aug.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
15 Aug.
R.O.
51. JOHN DEVERUS, of Wexford, to CROMWELL.
He and his ancestors have ever served the earl of Sruisbrie (Shrewsbury) and his ancestors, farmers of Wexford. One Ant. Salynger and others, commissioners, appointed him chancellor of the county palatine of Wexford, but one John Allen, lord chancellor of Ireland, and others lately in commission, have disallowed the patent. One James Wythe, justice of the liberty of Wexford, is also recorder of Waterford and justice of Tipperary, and, for his attendance there and service with the earl of Ossory, cannot reside here and sues for a discharge of his office of justice of Wexford. Begs he may succeed Wythe in that office and have the old fee of 10l.; for of late years the fee has been reduced, as the chancellors were mere unlearned keepers of the seal. Desires certain extensions of power and a letter to the Deputy and Council to prevent any interruption in the office. Wexford, 15 Aug.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Lord Cromwell, lord Privy Seal. Endd.
15 Aug.
Vatican MS.
52. CARD. POLE to CARD. FARNESE.
Sees, by Farnese's letter of 25 July, that His Holiness wishes Pole, since nothing more can be done at present in the English cause, to return to Rome. Sends his gentleman, the abbot of San Saluto, with a petition that he may be allowed to remain in this country until next spring, both for the consolation of those poor people of England, who will be in despair if they see him turn back, and for his own repose. Begs Farnese's favourable intercession for this. Carpentras, 15 Aug. 1539.
Italian, From a modern copy in R.O., pp. 2.

Footnotes

1 He married Suffolk's daughter Eleanor.
2 Meaning her son-in-law, Prideaux. See her letter of 10 October following
3 John Porter. See Nos. 18 and 30.
4 Wm. Smith.
5 This paragraph is printed in Ellis, 1 S. II. 121.
6 Latimer and Shaxton.
7 Frederic Count Palatine and the Princess Dorothy his wife. The writer was Frederic's Secretary.