Letters and Papers
September 1539, 11-15

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Institute of Historical Research

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James Gairdner and R. H. Brodie (editors)

Year published

1895

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44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53

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'Letters and Papers: September 1539, 11-15', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 14 Part 2: August-December 1539 (1895), pp. 44-53. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75886 Date accessed: 21 August 2014.


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September 1539

11 Sept.
R. O.
148. THOMAS LEYGH to LADY LISLE.
Received two days ago her letter of 1 Sept. Is sorry she is displeased with him, but does not think he has deserved it.
Could not speak with her before his departure according to his promise, having been detained by the lord Chamberlain at Guisnes until very late. As to the skin of luserne which she received and sent back to Mr. Fowler, saying that one skin will do but little good; knows that, and only sent it that she might know the price before he bought any more. She judges it to be dear, and he is of the same opinion. It cost him 36 Karolles gyldons. Bought it from one Flegge at Antwerp, whose daughter Phillip Craye has married. She can find out the truth if she wishes to make further inquiry. Thanks her for saying that he shall be no loser by it, but trusts to put it away without loss. Denies that he mistrusted her repaying him, if he had bought all lusernes for which she wrote, or that he knew how much of her money was in Mr. Fowler's hands. Has laid out for her as much money as they would have cost, when he had not as good cause to do it as he has now, and knew not her payment as well as he knows it now. It is true, as she says, that he has never lost anything by her. Has never gained a penny either by what he has provided for her, and never intended to do so. She thinks his sudden departure from Calais was by means of some of my lord's back friends, but he considers the person to whom she alludes to be friendly both to her and lord Lisle. Has never known the contrary, but he has always shown himself to be her friend. Was not ruled by him, as he knows his duty without his counsel.
As to the reckoning between them, which she wishes to have, saying that she does not love to be beholden to any but her trusty friends, perceives that she does not consider him to be one. Told Peter Bate, the day he left Calais, to find out her pleasure about the skin, but he did not go to her for eight days. Hears that she and lord Lisle will be in England shortly, and defers sending the reckoning till then. London, 11 Sept. 1539.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: At Calais.
[11 Sept.]
R. O.
149. SIR THOMAS HENNEGE to CROMWELL.
By reason of a cold which the King took yesterday after dinner his Grace, late in the evening, felt himself "grugging" with a cold. His physicians gave him a pill, and, towards morning, there came a burning heat; so they gave him a glister, and he has ever since been very well and in no danger, "for the physicians cannot perceive anything more that should remain in his said Highness." Your servant's tarrying here for the unicorn's horn was for this reason; for his Grace intended to send it you this morning betimes, but now I durst not move him for it. As soon as I can have his Grace at leisure, I will send your bills. Hampthill, this Thursday. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: 12 Sept. (fn. 1)
11 Sept.
R. O.
150. W. EARL OF SOUTHAMPTON to CROMWELL.
This bearer, sent by William Gonson, arrived here after your departure. He can show more than any other has done, for none in England know the East seas better. He knows all the havens in Phriseland, Breame, and Hamburghe. "Phriseland, he saith, joineth to Holand, and Geldersland runneth further into the mainland betwixt Phriseland and the land of Cleves." Ampthill, 11 September. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Lord Admiral.
11 Sept.
R. O.
151. GERVASE [MARKHAM], Prior of Dunstable, to CROMWELL.
I received, 11 Sept., your letter in favour of Will. Belfeld, for a new lease of the farm of Harlyngdon, because he is an "ancient farmer" of the same. He has other farms of our house, as the manor of Stodeham, wherein he dwells, with the parsonage, for many years, "whereby he hath a honest man's living"; and we renewed that lease to him for 14 years without fine, expecting him to be content without Harlyngdon, which we let to a poor kinsman of mine. Otherwise we might have had a large fine of other men, for we were never wont to let a parsonage but for seven years without a fine.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
12 Sept.
Titus, B. I.,
396.
B. M.
Ellis, 2nd S.,
II. 86
152. W. EARL OF SOUTHAMPTON to CROMWELL.
The bearer, my fellow Mills, came hither to speak with you, and in your absence I have declared his business to the King. It is that the barbican of the tower at Calshorispoynt will be ready by Michaelmas; and to cover this the King will take the lead from Beauley, for which Mr. Wriothesley must make a warrant, which his Grace shall sign. The other point is the cost of the works there and at the Cowe, in the Isle, which, by Bartine's declaration, will ask 1,000 marks more than the money he now has. For this the King willed me to write to you to deliver a prest. Thinks it were best to deliver the whole sum at once. The King has been "somewhat a crased through cold and kept within yesterday"; but today has been abroad and killed half a score of stags with the ladies. Ampthill, 12 Sept.
Add.: Lord Privy Seal.
[12 Sept.]
R. O.
153. SIR THOMAS HENNEGE to CROMWELL.
I received your letter this morning, although your servant came over night; "for by th'advice of the physicians the King's Majesty went betimes to bed, whose Highness slept until two of the clock in the morning, and then his Grace rose to go to the stool which, by working of the pills and glister that his Highness had taken before, had a very fair siege, as the said physicians have made report; not doubting but the worst is past by their perseverance, to no danger of any further grief to remain in him, and the hinder part of the night until 10 of the clock this morning his Grace had very good rest, and his Grace findeth himself well, saving his Highness saith he hath a little soreness in his body. And I would have had his said Majesty to have read your letter, but would that I should make to him relation thereof, whereat his Grace smiled, saying that your Lordship had much more fear than required." I will send your bills as soon as his Grace has signed them. The long tarrying of your servant here was by my command. Hampthill, Friday, between 10 and 11 a.m.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd. Sealed.
12 Sept.
R. O.
154. LORD CHANCELLOR AUDELEY to CROMWELL.
Thanks him for his pains in the discharge of his pension. Hears that he is with Mr. Ric. Cromwell and intends to return by Mr. Parys' house, and so to Stondon, (fn. 2) to Mr. Sadeler. Asks him to spend a night at Walden, as he will pass within a mile. Will think some unkindness if he does not come to him. Pelham, 12 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Ao xxxi.
12 Sept.
R. O.
155. SIR THOMAS SPERTT to CROMWELL.
Received, 11 Sept. at 9 p.m., Cromwell's letter, dated Hampthill, 11 Sept.; and accordingly will send Richard Cowche to London to wait on his Lordship. The King's ships are not under Wight; but tomorrow, 13 Sept., "which is on Saturday next following," Spertt intends to go from Portsmouth to Wight, and, on Monday following, towards the Downs. Men of Poule, who came from New Haven 14 days past, reported to the writer and Edmond More, clerk of the King's ships, that the French king's galleys, in number six, "and a ship nine score with two brigantines and certain foists" are ready to sail, as the voice goes, towards Allexsandrie. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: 12 Sept.
12 Sept.
R. O.
Rymer, XIV.,
665
156. NUNEATON PRIORY.
Surrender (by Agnes Olton, prioress, and the convent) of the house and all its possessions in cos. Warw., Ntht., and Linc., and elsewhere in England, Wales, and the marches thereof. 12 Sept. 1539, 31 Hen. VIII.
No signatures, but 27 crosses. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II., 35.]
Seal injured.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 3, No. 36] as acknowledged, same day, before John London, clk., King's commissioner.
R. O.2. Certificate of Dr. John London to Sir Ric. Riche, that he has taken the surrender of the house and assigned the pensions, hereunder, which he begs may be ratified. Nuneton, 15 Sept. 31 Hen. VIII.
Nunnery of Nuneton:—Agnes Oulton, prioress, 40l.; Agnes Wilsey, Isabel Purfreye, Joan Whalleye, Eliz. Milwarde, Mary Worseley, and Joan Wetnall, 3l. each; Isabel Rapington and Joyse Fitzherbethe, 53s. 4d. each; Anne Everatte, Lucy Hasilrigge, Joan Bate, Joan Haseley, Marg. Dyxwell, and Rose Ceton, 46s. 8d.; Joan Copstone, Mary Barington, Elyne Townesende, Dorothy Riddell, and Joyse Clarcke, 40s.; Eliz. Berdemore, Isabel Bannester, Joan More, and Agnes Kingstone, 26s. 8d.; Joan Palmer, 33s. 4d. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Chancellor of Augmentations.
R. O.3. Late monastery of Nonneton, Warw.:—Assigned to Sir Robt. Glen, priest in the said monastery, for his pension, 6l. Signed: John London: George Gyffard: Robt. Burgoyn.
P. 1. Enclosed in § 2.
R. O.4. A blank page bearing the words, Nuneton, Warw.:—Joan Haseley, 46s. 8d., cum concess., 23s. 4d. Teste, 26 Nov. 31 Hen. VIII.
12 Sept.
R. O.
St. P. VIII.
201
157. HARVEL to CROMWELL.
Wrote last on the 6th. Letters from Corfu of the 26th state that Barbarossa passed Corfu pacifically, one part saluting the other, and the rector of Corfu sending a present to Barbarossa, which he accepted. Thi[s c]ity is therefore in great hope of peace with the Turk, and are expecting letters from their ambassador in Constantinople in three or four days. It is said that the Turk has put in chief au[thority] his brother-in-law, who is Barbarossa's mortal enemy in consequence of his having brought him into hate and displeasure with the Turk not without peril of his life. In Constantinople sixty thousand persons had died of pestilence "by all Ju[ne]." The Venetians will not disarm their galleys till the Turk's army has passed Peloponeso, now named Morea. Mention was made of certain motions which the French should make in Italy, but nothing is heard thereof now. War is unlikely in Italy on account of the great penury. Venice, 12 Sept. 1539.
Hol., slightly mutilated. Add. Endd.
13 Sept.
R. O.
158. LORD LISLE to LADY LISLE.
Lauded be God, I have had a fair and speedy passage, and was nothing sick, "whereof I am not a little proud that I am now become so strong a seaman. The Duke (fn. 3) and I came aland together, yet was I landed before him, where he was received with 60 great shot of artillery." Sir Chr. Morrys, Mr. Wyngfield, the mayor, bailey, and others, attended his coming on the shore. The King had sent a horse litter and two muletts covered with crimson velvet, wherein he was conveyed to his lodging. Today we leave for Canterbury. The Duke desires his commendations to you and the gentlemen of his train. You will receive by this bearer the bedding and other stuff the Duke had. Sends commendations to my Lord Chamberlain, Mr. Wallopp, Mr. Ryngeley, and Mr. Porter. Dover, 13 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.
13 Sept.
R. O.
159. JOHN WETWOD, President of Warwick College, ROBT. WHITINTON, JOHN FYSSHAR, and DAVID VAGHAN, to CROMWELL.
Have received his letters dated Grafton, 7 Sept., saying that he is informed that the lordship of Bagynton, for which he wrote in Wm. Nele's favour, is of small value. The college cannot spare this lordship, for they have no timber nor rods elsewhere for repairs of their tenements and churches. There are also coppices and other wood saleable at 16 or 17 years' growth worth 3l. or 4l. a year, besides the rent of assize, "weyves and streyves," waters, and a stone quarry for the maintenance of churches and other ground works. Unless it be for such profits, there is no reason why he should be so desirous to take the lordship in farm. They now give him a fee of 40s. a year out of the lordship, doing nothing for it. It would be dishonesty and shame to grant anything so hurtful to the college. Would willingly grant any other farm, as they have heretofore. Desire credence for the bearer. Warwick, 13 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: A. xxxi. The dean of Warwick.
13 Sept.
R. O.
160. SIR EDWARD RYNGELEY to LORD LISLE.
Sends on a letter (fn. 4) directed to Lord Lisle, which he has opened, and which he thinks should be shown to the King or the lord Privy Seal. Asks whether the writer (fn. 5) is to be retained or not. Will pay the bringer's charges.
Last night searched the watch on the walls himself, "and in the east house was constable Wm. Lieche, and in the west house Thos. Saunders, where neither of them both were, nor not one in 8d. a day." They say you have given them licence, setting one of 6d. a day in the retinue for them. Asks Lisle to write who have this licence, and to remember the fuel for the town, of which the necessity is right great. Calais, 13 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
13 Sept161. JAMES V.
MS. household book of James V., in possession of the earl of Aberdeen, ranging from 14 Sept. 1538 to 13 Sept. 1539. See Extracts in Archæologia, Vol. XXII.
14 Sept162. SURVEYORS OF CROWN LANDS.
See Grants in SEPTEMBER, No. 14.
14 Sept.
R. O.
163. SIR THOMAS HENNEGE to CROMWELL.
The King is "in as good temper and prosperous health" as ever he was. This day, at mass time, I procured his Grace to sign your three bills, i.e., Sir Clement West's letter, a warrant for 200l. for repairs of Woodstock, and Mr. Knightley's bill for the discontinuance of his serjeantship at the law; which bills I send by bearer. Hampthill, Sunday, 14 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
[14 Sept.]
R. O.
164. LORD LISLE to LADY LISLE.
The Palsgrave and I are merry here in Canterbury. Send me the furs of my tawny velvet gown and the sables; for, from what I have heard they may be needed. The Palsgrave desires his commendations. He left behind him the little flagon with the walnut water. Send it with the furs. I trust by my next to have good news. Canterbury, Sunday, at 9 o'clock. Signed.
P. 1. Add.
14 Sept.
R. O.
165. DANGEROUS WORDS.
Deposition of Edmond More, clerk of the King's ships, before Thos. Handcokk, mayor of Portsmouth, Sir Thos. Spert, Henry Huttoft, and others, 14 Sept. 31 Hen. VIII.
He can prove that about three years ago, at the Groyn, in Galicia, Edward Foster, gunner, said to Nich. White, mariner, that "if the King's blood and his were both in a dish or a saucer, what difference were between them, or how should a man know the one from the other? Also the same Edward said that if the Great Turk would give one penny a day more than the King would, he would serve him against the King."
P. 1. Endd.
14 Sept.
R. O.
166. JOHN BENNOLD to LORD LISLE.
On Friday night, Master Hector's priest arrived here with letters for lord Lisle, which Bennold gave to Mr. Comptroller, who sends them on. Encloses a declaration of the said priest. My lady has given him money to go home again. Thinks Hector should be entertained, as he may do singular good service, which he cannot do without his old pension of 10 cr. a month, for him and his priest. Now that lord Lisle is with the King, he may work in this matter with him and the lord Privy Seal. Has told him to come again. Calais, 14 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
14 Sept.
Balcarres MS.,
IV. 97.
Adv. Lib.
Edin
167. AIGNOT (?) to the QUEEN [OF SCOTLAND].
I have been at Chasteaudun, and put in your chambre des comptes, for security, by order of the Duchess, your mother, various documents relating to your lands in Burgundy; at which your belle mere is displeased, who arrived 15 days ago at Blandy, by order of the King, for she was wasting everything in those lands of Burgundy. She is doing still worse at Blandy, selling woods, &c. The duchess of Nemours and her children arrived there eight days ago from Savoy, and yesterday she left to go to the King at Villers Costeretz. The marquis of Rothelin withdrew a month ago to Beaugency, still very ill. Wrote sometime ago how he had been always at Paris with her counsel for the process of Laual and her other business. The card. of St. Andrews has helped much in that process, for the Duke, her father, was then in his government of Burgundy. Will not fail to be, while he lives, in any place where he can do service to her and the Duke (fn. 6) her son, as he has done these 40 years past. The bearer, Jacob, can inform her of the great prosperity of her father, mother, and son. "De votre maison de Mellun," 14 Sept. Signed: "vostre tres humble et tres obeissant subget et secretaire, Aignot" (?).
Fr., pp. 2. Add.
15 Sept.
R. O.
Kaulek, 126.
(Extracts.)
168. MARILLAC to FRANCIS I.
London, 15 Sept.:—Having seen, by the letters of 25 Aug., your determination not to listen to the practices about Milan, I went to this King and declared your reply as dexterously as possible; pointing out the amity between you and the Emperor and the repose of the powers which by it would be changed to marvellous disturbance, especially that, the Turk being already in arms at the door of Christendom, it might be said that the Turk had come at your instigation, and that you had only awaited his coming to execute your designs, to the disturbance and danger of all Christendom. He seemed to take this in good part, and said that, for the like office of friend and brother, he would not wish you to do a thing which was contrary to duty and reputation; but, not knowing your relations with the Emperor, he had shown you what was offered to him, so as not to fail in any office of a true friend. He said this with every sign of goodwill.
The embassy of Cleves has not yet arrived, and there seems some coolness on this side, because of the coming of duke Frederic, brother of the Count Palatine, who was lately at Paris, who lately certified here that he was at Calais intending to cross hither; as this King has told me, who sent some of his chief ministers, knights of his Order, to meet him, and wrote to the mayor and burgesses of London to receive him honorably, who are making great preparations to do so. There are divers conjectures about the cause of his coming, the most likely being that it is to resume the marriage negociations formerly commenced between this King and the duchess of Milan.
French. Modern transcript, pp. 3.
15 Sept.
Kaulek, 127.
(Nearly the
whole text.)
169. MARILLAC to MONTMORENCY.
Refers to the King's letters for his answer to this King about the practises in Italy; who said he knew of others of like effect, but now, knowing the disposition of affairs, he would keep them for another time. He also mentioned the coming of duke Frederic, who came secretly (fn. 7) with four horses and two carriages only. Some of the nearest servants of this King dare to say he brings a secret commission from the Emperor to make a conspiracy here and get money if he can; others that he will demand aid against the king of Denmark, which kingdom he claims in right of his wife; but the common opinion is that he comes to resume the long protracted discussion of the marriage of the duchess of Milan. The King himself said he did not know the motive of his coming, unless it were for old acquaintance' sake, adding that if the said Duke spoke of what was formerly in question he knew what to answer; and that he was not to be put to sleep by fine promises, of which there is such a market that everyone may be rich and poor—rich in hope and poor in effect—and would to God the King his brother knew it as well as he. Saw whom he meant, knowing the wound that hurts him most. Made no reply, and let him discourse thus at his pleasure, as also of the taking of Castlenove, which he knew two days before "your" letters; for there is not a single bruit anywhere which he does not hear among the first, be it false or true, even to little private matters which princes care but little to hear. He speaks as if he knew not only the Kings and lords but their servants, forces, places, designs, and occasions, both far and near, and as if he had men all over the world who did nothing but write to him.
He said also he expected ambassadors from the duke of Saxony, Lubeck, Denmark, and Cleves, his good friends, and that if Francis absolutely would not recommence the war, which he would not advise unless he saw great advantage in it, but only make some new alliances and confirm the old, that alone would be sufficient to make the Emperor deliver what he had so often promised; and especially now when the Turk presses him so close, the Venetians feel aggrieved by him and have no hope of peace with the Turk but through Francis, and all Italy complains, and the Emperor himself is ill provided with money. Replied only that the heart of kings was in the hand of God.
As this King has finished his progress and retired to Hoinzort (Windsor), 20 miles from London, to prepare to receive duke Frederic, the writer has come to London to send this despatch, and see what welcome they will make duke Frederic. After his arrival will go as near the Court as possible, and try to find out what their business is. 15 Sept., at London.
Sent by Veley, who left express.
French.
* A somewhat inaccurate modern transcript is in R. O.
15 Sept.
R. O.
170. WILLIAM [LORD] SEINT JOHN to CROMWELL.
The bearer, Thomas Serle, delivered the ground in variance between him and Mr. Hill, late serjeant of the King's cellar, to Hill, according to your award. He was to have Mr. Hill's help for the marriage of one Couper's wife's daughter to his son; but Mr. Hill did nothing, so that Serle is without recompense unless your Lordship show him favour. I think good that you direct Mr. Wareham and me to treat between the parties and exhort Couper to favour the marriage. 15 Sept.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
15 Sept.
R. O.
171. RIC. POLLARD, THOS. MOYLE, and RIC. LAYTON to CROMWELL.
Omitted, in their former letter, to say that the specialties come to their hands appertaining to this house amount to 2,000l. and above. Glastonbury, 15 Sept. (fn. 8) Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal.
15 Sept.
R. O.
172. NICHOLAS THORNE to CROMWELL.
"These days" I advertised your Lordship of the safe arrival of The Saviour from Andeluzia. I purpose sending her again to Luxborne and shall depart with the first wind. If there is any service I can do your Lordship in those parts I desire you to write. I pray you "recover the warrant for the tonnage of your said ship, that now at Michaelmas, at the payments in the Exchequer, the customers of this town may be allowed." Bristowe, 15 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
15 Sept.
R. O.
173. NUNS OF GRIMSBY.
Pensions appointed to the nuns of Grymesbye, dissolved 15 Sept. 31 Hen. VIII., viz.: —
Marg. Ryddesdale, prioress, 4l.; Eliz. Harrison, sub-prioress, Joan Roosse, Isabel Kyngesdon, Beatrix Frankysshe, Joan Lowndesdale, and Marg. Bettnesse, 33s. 4d. and 30s. each. Signed: per me John Freman: John Hennege: per me Joh'em Wyseman.
P. 1.
15 Sept.
R. O.
Rymer, XIV.,
660
174. ULVESCROFTE PRIORY.
Surrender of the house and all its possessions in cos. Leic., Ntht., and Warw., and elsewhere in England, Wales, and the marches thereof. 15 Sept. 1539, 31 Hen. VIII. Signed by Edw. Dalby, prior, and 7 others. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II., 46.]
Seat broken at edges.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 2, No. 17] as acknowledged, same day, before John London, clk., King's commissioner.
R. O.2. Certificate of Dr. London, to Sir Ric. Riche, that he has taken the surrender of the house hereafter ensuing and assigned the pensions stated. In consideration that each must come up to London at his own charge to sue out the assurance of the same, begs him to ratify them. Ulvescroffte, 15 Sept. 3[1] Hen. VIII.
Priory of Ulvescroffte:—Edw. Dalbye, prior, 20l. (in consideration that he "redeemed the house of the King" and left it free of debt); Thos. Massye, Thos. Mason, Wm. Belton, Ric. Eglett, Wm. Elande, and Wm. Smythe, from 6l. to 5l. 6s. 8d. each; Hen. Smythe, novice, 40s. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Chancellor of Augmentations.
15 Sept.
R. O.
Rymer, XIV.,
661
175. MARYKE PRIORY, Yorkshire.
Surrender (by Christabel Cowper, prioress, and the convent) of the priory and all its possessions in England and the marches thereof. 15 Sept. 31 Hen. VIII. No signatures. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report. App. II., 30.]
Seal defaced.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 2, No. 3] as acknowledged, same day, before John Uvedale and Leonard Bekwyth, King's commissioners.
R. O.2. Pensions assigned to the late prioress and nuns of Marry k, Yorks., 15 Sept. 31 Hen. VIII., viz.: —
Christabell Cowper, prioress, 100s.; Marg. Levechild, Joan Norres, Marjory Conyars, Eliz. Dalton, Eleanor Maxwell, Joan Barnyngham, Joan Marton, Grace Rotherforde, Eliz. Cloce, Eliz. Robynson, Anne Ledeman, Eliz. Syngleton, from 66s. 8d. to 20s. each. Signed: Jo. Vuedale. Leonardum Bekwith. Countersigned by Sir Ric. Riche.
Parchment, p. 1.
15 Sept.
R. O.
176. SIR FRAS. BRYAN to CROMWELL.
Since you left the Court, the King has been a little sick of a cold, "halffe ferryng a grugge off an ague," but is now well. Last night he had as fair a mask and was as merry as he has been this good while. He departs on Thursday to Dunstable to bed and on Friday to the More, where he will be Saturday and Sunday all day, and so to Windsor. Ampthill, 15 Sept.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
15 Sept.
R. O.
177. JOHN BISHOP OF EXETER to CROMWELL.
This 15 Sept., I have received, at Tavestoke, your letters concerning the next avoidance of the archdeaconry of Exeter. If it fall void in my life-time I should like to bestow it on a clerk who would be much to my comfort. If you knew how many promotions have fallen to my gift these four years past and how few of them I have had liberty to bestow on my chaplains, who are learned and virtuous preachers, you would wish me to remember them. I trust you will defer your desire, when the archdeaconry falls void, till I can state further considerations. Signed.
P. 1. Add.
15 Sept.
R. O.
178. WM. LORD SANDYS to LORD LISLE.
My lady your bedfellow, with all your children, Mr. Wallop, Mr. Comptroller, and the rest of the Council here are merry. No news but that little Palmer, the vice-bailly of Guisnes, sent, on Friday last, a coat and 2s. in money unto Pickeringe, his servant, whom your lordship and I commanded to be kept in prison at Guisnes for his offence against the King. Pickeringe, being thus comforted by his master, broke prison the same night and escaped. This shows what a fellow the vice-bailly is. Commend me to my lord Privy Seal and other friends. Guisnes, 15 Sept. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
15 Sept.
Royal MS.,
18 B. VI. 65b.
B. M
179. JAMES V. to CARD. GHINUCCI.
Desires him to obtain licence for Alex. Wod, brother of David Wod, chief of the King's accounts, to resign the prebend or rectory of Lecthnot, Brechin dioc., in favour of his nephew, Andrew, son of David, reserving the usufruct and right of re-entry if he survive his nephew. A proxy is sent from David earl of Craufurd, baron of Glenesk, the lay patron. Hears that the Pope now rarely or never grants such requests, but he desires Ghinucci to try and obtain it. Stirling, 15 Sept. 1539.
Lat. Copy, p. 1.
15 Sept.
Royal MS.,
18 B. VI. 66.
B. M
180. JAMES V. to CARD. GHINUCCI.
Similar request in favour of George Ogilby, the King's servant, whose uncle, George Ogstoun, desires to resign the perpetual vicarage of Forg, of which Wm. Creichthoun, lord of Frendrecht, is patron. Stirling, 15 Sept. 1539.
Lat., p. 1. Copy.
15 Sept.
Add. MS.
28,591, f. 218.
B. M
181. CHARLES V. to AGUILAR.
Has received, on the 24th inst. (sic), his letters of the 13th about Card. Farnese's report to His Holiness. Cæsar Cantelmo's negociations at Constantinople. The Council. Germany. The Emperor's passage to Italy. In the matter of England the Emperor still thinks that Cardinal Pole should go to the French court, that it may be seen that the ambassadors who shall go, go by mutual consent.
Spanish. Headed: Al marques de Aguilar, de Aranjuez a xv. de Septiembre de M.D. xxxix. ao. Modern copy from Simancas, pp. 3.
See Spanish Calendar VI. I., No. 82.
15 Sept.
Add. MS.,
[...],591, f. 216.
B. M
182. CHARLES V. to AGUILAR.
Juan Riccio de Monte Pulchano just arrived. Loss of Castelnovo confirmed. The said Juan brought the bull of concession of the "medios fructos." As to the Faith and Germany and England, he and the Nuncio delivered, in writing, the opinion of the Pope and Sacred College that the Emperor's passage into Italy is necessary. They spoke also of Camarino, etc. The Emperor's reply as regards Germany.
Spanish. Headed like the preceding letter. Modern copy from Simancas, pp. 4.
See Spanish Calendar VI. I., No. 83.

Footnotes

1 This must be the date the letter was received.
2 Standon, Herts.
3 Frederic Count Palatine, duke of Bavaria.
4 See No. 166.
5 Master Hector. See No. 166.
6 Of Longueville.
7 The R.O. transcript here reads "came secretly to Calaie."
8 There must certainly be an error in the date of this letter. Layton writes the very next day from Reading, where apparently Pollard was with him, and the text of his letter is in the same handwriting as that of this letter; so that Layton, a clerk, and most probably Pollard also, were all together at the writing of both letters. But the distance between Reading and Glastonbury could not well have been travelled in a single day, and there is no indication besides in either letter that the writers were upon the move. Moreover, on the 22nd, Pollard, Moyle, and Layton write that they only reached Glastonbury on the preceding Friday, which was the 19th; and as this letter refers to a former letter, presumably from Glastonbury also, it could hardly have been written before the 20th, and most likely was after the 22nd. As the true date, however, can only be a matter of surmise the letter is placed under that given by the writers. Possibly the error may not be in the day but in the place, the secretary who penned the letter writing "Glastonbury" for "Reading."