Letters and Papers
October 1539, 21-25

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Institute of Historical Research

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James Gairdner and R. H. Brodie (editors)

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1895

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'Letters and Papers: October 1539, 21-25', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 14 Part 2: August-December 1539 (1895), pp. 128-137. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=75894 Date accessed: 21 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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October 1539

21 Oct.
R. O.
St. P. III. 153.
363. JAMES EARL OF ORMOND to WRIOTHESLEY.
Has this day received the King's letters promising aid. This danger might have been prevented if the Deputy would have been ruled by those the King and my lord Privy Seal appointed to him; but he adhered to the council of mere Geraldines. To cloak his fault he now sends James Bathe with letters of credence. This James is impeached of treason, and yet in most trust with the Deputy. The Deputy hates all those of the Council who were preferred by the lord Privy Seal, and is out of credit with all here, especially the Irishmen, who wonder that the King retains him as Deputy. Has not written thus largely to the lord Privy Seal. Writes not in malice but for discharge of his duty. Begs him to stay credence of any accusations against the writer, until he may come to his answer. Commendations to Mr. Richard Crumwell, Mr. Soulemont, and all my lord Privy Seal's servants. Callan, 21 Oct.
Has written other matters to Mr. Walter Cowley, who will show them at length. Signed.
Add.
21 Oct.
R. O.
Kaulek, 137.
(Abstract.)
364. MONTMORENCY to MARILLAC.
As in Francis' letter of 20 Oct. (No. 361). Compiegne, 21 Oct.
The King's malady has been pierced, a quantity of matter has come away, and he is now entirely cured. Has received the letters of the 14th.
French. Modern transcript, pp. 2.
21 Oct.
R. O.
365. JOHN FELYMORE, Priest, to LADY LISLE.
Thanks for the token sent by Mr. Bekensall and other benefits. John Scryven also sends thanks, and sweareth he will lack no pies at breakfast, while that will serve him. Paris, 21 Oct. Signed: by your poor scholar, John Felymore, priest.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: at Calais.
R. O.366. JOHN FYLYMORE, Priest, to LADY LISLE.
Mr. John Bekensall has taken great pains to procure a meet place for us to continue in, but I fear I shall not be able to continue for lack of greater friendship. Having no more help than I know of, I cannot continue, though I would fast bread and water half the week. Everything is so unreasonably dear in Paris. If your Ladyship knows any that are of your disposition, I heartily desire you to procure me some friendship of them. Mr. Bekensall has answered your letter.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: at Calais.
21 Oct.
Ribier I., 477.
367. GRIGNAN, French ambassador in Rome, to FRANCIS I.
The Pope returned to this city on Sunday last. The Pope asked what he expected as to the conclusion of peace and restitution of Milan. Replied he had good hope of it; for the state of Christendom, with regard to Turks and Lutherans, was such that their Majesties must unite to prevent its ruin, and therefore the Emperor would not fail in the said conclusion and restitution. The Pope asked for an opinion about the count Palatine's journey into England, of which he was very suspicious. Answered that he probably went upon private affairs (and not sent by the Emperor) to ask aid in money for the recovery of Denmark which belonged to his wife. The Pope said he suspected some alliance of the Emperor with the King. Replied he could not think so; because, as the Pope knew, Francis had sent by the élu of Avranches, the promises that neither should make any alliance with England without the other's consent. If the Emperor made any alliance with the king of England, it could only be to bring him back to the obedience of the Holy See.
* * * * *
Rome, 21 Oct. 1539.
French.
22 Oct.
R. O.
368. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Has received his letters by Mr. Steward and Lambe, and has this day spoken to my lord Privy Seal on the matter that no man knows but you and he. He said, Let my lord put no mistrust in it, I warrant him he shall be remembered. He said he had written to you touching those who were put out of wages (fn. 1) since you were last here, adding that though he desired that certain seditious persons should be sent over here, he did not mean that they should be dismissed. I replied, they deserved it. He answered, he wished you had done it in a more temperate way. Thinks it would have been desirable that a book of articles against them had been sent before, and now the sooner the better. Will find it difficult to be admitted to their confidence, but will know more when Mr. Popley comes. Hopes he has the liveries. Mr. Steward says Bond hath both ling and haberdine coming, so that you shall be provided. Will have his coat of velvet made. Will "have advice of my lord Admiral's fashion, or of such other as shall be thought best, of an ancient and sage sort; and likewise my lady's harness, which shall be after the sort of the ladies resorting the Court." Has not yet got the quittance of the master of the Mint. Can do nothing about the Friars till the commission is certified. Men are looking for the coming of the Queen, but no man knows the time certain. London, 22 Oct.
Mr. Marshal is come, with all his family, and leaves this night for Calais.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.
22 Oct.
R. O.
369. JOHN HUSEE to LADY LISLE.
I have received your letter by Mr. Steward. As to the assurance of your jointure, I will, when Mr. Harryce comes, take advice of Mr. Rolles and him. I think it is already well assured, and no less concluded than 120l. a year. Your Ladyship's trust in me is not misplaced. I think Warley's reckoning is a fair one. Mr. Cosworthe desires 8l. for the crimson velvet. I am sure I sent the crampring, either by Corbett or in the letter. Mr. Roll will write in answer to your letter. "And where your Ladyship doth write that my writing did not come to pass of my Lord's return to the King from my lord Prince, I am sure my lord will justify the same that he was so determined. How the matter changed after, God knoweth." I shall take Mrs. Anne's advice about the making of your harness. Lady Garnayshe sends by Hugh Colton's ship 60 quinces and a basket of barberries. London, 22 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
22 Oct.
R. O.
370. SIR ANTHONY WYNGFELD to CROMWELL.
Thanks him for his goodness to him in the matter between his son and mistress Feshar bard (Fitzherberd). Letherrynggame, 22 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
22 Oct.
R. O.
371. J. LORD RUSSELL to CROMWELL.
As yet they have much business in the hearing of causes. Trusts, however, that these shall be abated by a fortnight after Hallowtide, when he intends to address him towards the Court to see the King, the Prince, and Cromwell. Desires favour for the bearer, Mr. Edgecombe, whose father, (fn. 2) though his body be dead, still lives in the hearts and minds of the people. The bearer, his son, shows himself a follower of his father, and has honestly declared himself touching the lady, his mother-in-law, and his father's will. Edgecombe is now a suitor for his livery. Requires Cromwell to get the fine to the King abated, for his father's sake, and considering his charges in performing his father's will. Desires Cromwell to advance him (Edgecombe) to the King's service. Excetoure, 22 October. Signed.
Pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.: Lord Russell.
22 Oct.
R. O.
372. JOHN BEKYNSAW to CROMWELL.
Excuses himself for not returning as soon as he was expected. Was sore sick at Calais and Boulogne, and had to travel in a cart. Did not arrive at Paris till Oct. 20. Hopes to be back in three weeks. The bearer, Mr. Buclere, is he whom I commended to you, riding to your place of Murlac (Mortlake). Paris, 22 Oct., 1539.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
22 Oct.
R. O.
373. EDMUND ATKYNSSUN to SIR WM. SAYLLYSBERY.
Thanks him for his letter received from Jenes (Genoa). Cannot advertise him of his friends in these parts, for he does not know his own. Thos. Clyfford has spoken more things than be honest. There are certain who take pleasure to hear of Sir Wm.'s dishonour, but they have answer made them little to their pleasure. Would be glad to hear of his return hither. Sir Clement West was deprived of the Great Cross, 4 Sept., and condemned to the Tower. Sir Nicholas Lambert is also in the Tower. Have been sore afraid of the Turk this year. He has taken Castell Novo, and slain all the soldiers there. He came into Poullye but did no harm. So (?) Keryssandre and master Gerrerd desire to be recommended. Malta, 22 Oct.
"My master" and Sir Nic. Upton, and the writer have been sore sick. Desires to be recommended to his master's brothers. Would write many things but de bon yntendedor poco parole.
Hol., pp. 2. Add.: At London or elsewhere.
22 Oct.
R. O.
374. EDMUND ATKYNSSUN to GEO. KEBULL.
His master was sore sick of an ague last August, but is now in good health, and he himself was confessed and received his Maker, but God hath let him scape this year. Hopes to see Kebull in England, if his master can get a better commandry. His master desires to be recommended to Kebull, to his sister, Kebull's bedfellow, to his brother Knyght, and his sister Ann.
Desires to be commended to Harry Tyrell, mistress Ann Knyght, mistress Sexton, Thos. Torssy, and Christopher. Malta, 22 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: at London or elsewhere.
23 Oct.
R. O.
375. ROB. BURGOYN to the BP. OF CHESTER.
On the view of the late monastery of Wigmore, although the site be well builded and cast into fair lodgings, it is found not to stand in the most wholesome air, lying close in the west and north, and half open on the south and east, where it adjoins on a low marsh. My horses would not eat the hay grown there, and the ground is so "replenished with stones" west and north that it will bear neither corn nor grass. Wigmore, 23 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: The bp. of Chester and lord president of the King's honorable Council.
23 Oct.
R. O.
376. KATHARINE COUNTESS OF NORTHUMBERLAND to CROMWELL.
The parson of Catton, notwithstanding Cromwell's letter, refuses to grant her a continuance of years of the parsonage and says he will go up to Cromwell about it. Desires credence for Maunsell and Hungate, Cromwell's servants. Bolton in Craven, 23 Oct. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
23 Oct.
R. O.
377. JOHN BEKYNSAW to LADY LISLE.
I have been to divers peltiers to inquire for your fur. They will not sell the best under 15 cr. a skin though you may have very good for 12 cr., Dames of this country who wear that fur in the "poynnyardes" wear the same in all the rest of the gown; howbeit many wear white taffeta armosyn in the "suyte." Paris, 23 Oct. 1539.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Calais.
23 Oct. (fn. 3) Corpus
Reform., III.
795.
378. PONTANUS to the ELECTOR OF SAXONY.
Admits that Bucer is an excellent divine, and perhaps if he, Melancthon and others had been sent into England they might have withheld the King from his godless determination; and then, as the writer advised, the Vice Chancellor (Burgratus) and Frederic (Myconius) would have been instructed not to interfere in the discussion; for they were not sent with that view, but only to intimate the coming great embassy (stattlichen Schickung), when Melancthon, Bucer, and others were to have been sent, and the answer given to the English ambassadors at Brunswick was to that effect. As it is, they have given more time to the discussion at London than Luther and others would have done, and the result is less satisfactory. At the same time, it is clear the King of England cares little for God's word or truth; otherwise he might have been content with the negociations which the bp. of Herbordt (fn. 4) with the archdeacon and Luther, Pomeranus, Jonas, Creutziger, and Melancthon, had together as divines for a quarter of a year. Thinks, moreover, that now even if the greatest embassy were sent to England it would be a noisy, empty thrashing of straw on the King's behalf, and nothing would be settled. Advises the Elector to give Bucer's writing to the divines at Wittenberg, with a request for their opinion; and their answer will show what they think of Bucer's proposed negociation.
German.
23 Oct.
Corpus
Reform., III.
796.
379. LUTHER, and Others, to the ELECTOR OF SAXONY.
Have read Bucer's writing which appears to be written with vehemence. no doubt with good intent, on the information of the fugitives at Hamburg, We see no way, however, to assist them; for, though we seek to avoid danger or labour, enough has been done to warn the King. That Henry VIII. is acting against his conscience is clear; for he knows our doctrine and observances are at least not against God's word. Yet in his articles and edict he says some of them are against God's law, though he has read many writings addressed to him on the subject and has himself ordered to be translated into English a little book of Sarcerius which he used as his prayer book (welches er für sein Betbuch (fn. 5) gebraucht) in which these negociations are briefly comprehended (darinnen diese Händel kurz gefasset). We understand also that he has spoken much of this learning and condemned France for persecuting it, for he knew it was right. Moreover he has many pious preachers like the deprived bp. Latimer and Cromer, whom he heard and tolerated for a time. Yet now he denounces these doctrines worse than the Pope, and threatens with death those who do not accept these articles. A terrible persecution has begun, for many lie in prison expecting punishment. Yet he used this very teaching which he now persecutes for a time for his own advantage. Seeing that the Papal power must fall, he urges great Kings to set up religions for their own convenience. That will lead to fearful blindness. Fears that Henry cares nothing for the honour of God. He told the Vicechancellor (Burchard) that he meant to govern his kingdom himself; which showed that he cared little for this learning but meant to make a religion for himself. Think therefore it will be useless to give Henry another warning.
Hear also that the King is a sophist and covers everything with glosses. The bp. of Winchester, who is so powerful now, leads about with him two bad women in men's clothing, yet declares that marriage is against God's law and says he will maintain against the whole world the untruth of justification by faith. He has got two burnt before this year, only about transubstantiation, and the proverb is true that like master like man.
Melancthon has already written a remonstrance to Henry VIII. himself and also to Cromer (fn. 6) and to Cranmer; but he has been informed that the King has taken his remonstrance ill; and even if he were in England he would have no audience or opportunity of discussion, as the former embassy had. Comments on the King's arguments about good works and the marriage of priests. Wittenberg, 23 Oct. 1539.
Signed by Luther, Justus Jonas, Bugenhagen, and Melancthon.
German.
24 Oct.
R. O.
380. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Has written frequently, and lately by Conway. Officers are appointed to go over and prepare for the Queen's coming to Calais. Mr. Harrys is come, who shall examine the books between my lord Privy Seal and you and my lady. My lord Chamberlain was sent for yesterday in post. It is thought he shall with speed return to Calais. Spoke with lord Ferres for your gelding. He is very well pleased with his hawk. The men that were dismissed (fn. 7) are very diligent here. London, 24 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
24 Oct.
R. O.
381. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Advertised him, yesterday, by Conway, of his communication with my lord Privy Seal, who has promised to make haste. The discharged people* who are here report that they are suing for their livings, which have been taken from them without cause assigned. The articles against them must be sent with speed. The master of the Ordnance looks for his wine and herrings and promises me the 20 bows. I have found here a proper light blade, but the hilts are not gilt. If you may have new hilts made there I will send it. Sends him a dial. London, 24 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
24 Oct.
R. O.
382. JOHN HUSEE to LADY LISLE.
Mr. Harris is come, and Mr. Rolles has appointed with him a time to oversee the books between my lord, your ladyship and my lord Privy Seal. I doubt not they will do the best they can for your assurance. I have bespoken your ladyship's harness. The bearer, Mr. Steward, tells me Bonde has both ling and haberdeyn, so he thinks to be as well provided there as here. I should like to hear if the liveries have come safe. London, 24 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
24 Oct.
R. O.
383. W. EARL OF ARUNDELL to CROMWELL.
I have received your letter by Mr. Thwayttes to be good to him in his suit. I have always been good to him for his master's sake and if he do his duty to me I am content at your instance that he shall enjoy his farm. Downley, 24 Oct. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
24 Oct.
R. O.
384. BP. ROLAND LEE to CROMWELL.
My alliesman, John Bradshawe, had your favour in his suit for the farm of the late monastery of Wigmore. Of late a stay was made, as the ground there was thought needful for some of the King's horses; whereupon I desired Mr. Burgoyne, auditor of the suppressed lands, then there with Mr. Scudamore for the survey, to certify me how he liked the ground, and he sent me the letter enclosed (fn. 8) showing it is far unmeet for such purposes. I beg you favour my alliesman for lease of the same. One John Thomas ap Rice, of Kedewen, belonging to lord Ferrers, has committed felony and manslaughter and is fled. If any suit to the King for his pardon come to your hands, I beg your lordship to stop it, for the hanging of such one, being a gentleman, in his county, for such an offence will save 20 men's lives and do more good than the hanging of a hundred petty wretches. Shrowisbury, 24 Oct.
P.S. in his own hand: "Let not my lord Ferris know this to he speak to your lordship thereof, if he be so minded." Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Crumwell lord Privy Seal. Endd.
24 Oct.
Royal MS.
18 B. VI. 67b.
B. M.
385. JAMES V. to GHINUCCI.
Writes in favour of Andrew Scheround, who obtained the vicarage of Ekfurde in the court of Rome, and against whom a false and malicious suit has been commenced. Falkland, 24 Oct. 1539.
Lat. Copy, p. 1.
24 Oct.
Add. MS.
28,591, f. 249.
B. M.
386. CHARLES V.
Instruction for Don Luys de çuñiga, sent to Italy, 24 Oct. 1539, to announce the Emperor's determination to pass to Flanders through France.
The Emperor has been of opinion that, for the affairs of Christendom, it would be needful for him to go to Italy and take direction with the Pope and signory of Venice for resistance against the Turk, and see to the remedy of the affairs of Germany; and then to proceed to Flanders to pacify some commotions which have arisen there. But now, seeing the lateness of the season and the length and difficulty of the journey from Italy to Flanders, proposes to go through France and visit Francis on his way. Intends to start about the 8th or 10th Nov. çuñiga is to inform Prince Doria, the marquis del Gasto, etc. Madrid, 24 Oct. 1539.
Spanish. Endd. as above. Modern copy from Simancas, pp. 9.
See Spanish Calendar VI. I., No. 88.
Add. MS.
28,591, f. 240.
B.M.
2. Secret instruction which was given to Don Luys de Çuñiga, who went to Italy from Madrid, 24 Oct. 1539.
Besides his general instruction declaring the determination of the Emperor's departure and going into Flanders through France, it appears well to declare in this the causes which have led to it, to be shown to Prince Doria and other of the Emperor's servants in Italy. Declares causes—pointing out the danger from the Turk and the necessities arising from the state of Germany. Of the other instruction a copy is sent to M. de Praet and the ambassador in France: Çuñiga is to take Doria's opinion upon it. If Doria has not arrived at genoa he must leave a copy with the ambassador Figuerroa and go on to Milan and Rome. Madrid, 26 (sic) Oct. 1539.
Spanish. Modern copy from Simancas, pp. 18. Headed in Spanish as above.
See Spanish Calendar VI. I., No. 89.
25 Oct.
Vit. B. XXI.,
f. 211.
B. M.
387. HENRY VIII. to JOHN FREDERIC DUKE OF SAXONY and WILLIAM DUKE OF CLEVES.
Credence for Nich. Wotton, his ambassador. Westm., x[xv Octobris] anno regni nostri xxxjo.
Lat., pp. 5. Injured by fire. With marginal note made before the fire: Saxony, 31 Hen. 8, 25 Oct. The endorsement at f. 210 "Matters of Germany," probably belongs to this document, and not to the paper at f. 209.
25 Oct.
R. O.
Kaulek, 137.
(Almost the
whole text.)
388. MARILLAC to FRANCIS I.
[London], 25 Oct.:— Has done his best, as directed in Francis' letter of the 12th, from Compiegne, to learn the conditions of this King's marriage with the sister of the duke of Cleves, but they are kept very secret. It can only be affirmed that this King esteems it, according to what he himself says openly, a good alliance, and that he has long desired this league with the German princes, especially with the duke of Saxony, who has married one of the sisters of the duke of Cleves, and consequently with all his confederates; among whom he expects to be able to help his friends and neighbours (ses amis voisins) with as many Germans as they like to aid them, and prevent almost any serving against those whom he intends to aid. The second advantage he expects from it is prompt succour from Germany if he should be attacked, by creating a diversion on that side. The third advantage is in religion; as he hopes by the intercession of Cleves to soften many innovations in Germany, which are too harsh, and to find some middle way to compose difficulties. A fourth motive has been his desire of issue (as he has only one male child), which he could not better have than with the said lady, who is of convenient age, healthy temperament, elegant stature, and endowed with other graces, as the said King affirms. These causes, after his failure to find a match in France and Spain, have induced him to make an alliance with Cleves, which he esteems, next to an alliance with Francis or the Emperor, the most suitable for himself, especially at a time when it is easy to see he values the friendship of the Germans on account of the novelties in religion, which they would show themselves prompt to defend as they have occasioned their introduction. The time of the consummation of the marriage seems doubtful, as the Admiral's voyage is stopped, and the lady will be brought by her own people to Calais, and thence conducted as honourably as possible to this Court. But news has come lately from Flanders of some dissatisfaction there at the match not being completed with the duchess of Milan; and this, with the little goodwill between the Flemings and Cleves, may make them resume their first purpose of sending for her by sea. However, she is expected soon (though some say Christmas will be soon enough), and preparations are made in all the towns through which she is to pass for a magnificent entry; which will be doubly great in this town, for their joy of having a Queen of an alliance which they think to their advantage.
French. Modern transcript, pp. 4.
25 Oct.
R. O.
Kaulek, 138.
(Almost the
whole text.)
389. MARILLAC to MONTMORENCY.
[London], 25 Oct.:— In his last letter, dated the 14th inst., mentioned some particulars about the coming of the new Queen. She will not, however, arrive so soon, if the news just received from Flanders is true, viz., that the ambassadors who came for this marriage separated at Calais and went home disguised as private men, and that afterwards a rumour of great discontentment arose in Flanders, saying that this King had promised to marry the duchess of Milan, and they would compel him to keep his word, at least he should [never] enjoy this sister of the duke of Cleves. This seems hardly credible, but has troubled those here, who are easily moved and would play "au plus seur"; so that every day they have been in council at extraordinary hours to provide against this danger; so some say, and it is difficult to learn anything else about it. They are painting and arming some ships, apparently to bring the lady by sea, although, to deceive those who would hinder it, they still give out that she is coming by land. The fact is they are troubled either by that or by the rumour that the duke of Cleves has attempted something against the Emperor.
Spoke to the Emperor's ambassador of the continued friendship of the Emperor and France, and read him the first lines of the Constable's letter from Compiègne. He seemed glad, confessing he had had his doubts, but now believed it, and saw that the Emperor could not do less than shortly surrender Milan, confessing also the troubles and novelties, which have arisen in Flanders (which seemed to Marillac another reason why Francis should expect justice to be done to him, either willingly or otherwise). Besides, the writer cannot believe that the Turk, whatever intercession Francis may make, will lay down his arms and give the Emperor time to recover. Knows, from his experience when there, that whatever fine promises the Turk may make, he keeps none but what make for him. Will, as instructed, continue to hold the most gracious general words with the English, foreseeing that the Emperor will be the more inclined to keep the amity of Francis when he sees that the later maintains his alliances.
The English ambassador in France in his last letters expressed much satisfaction with the treatment he received, although formerly he complained, to one of the writer's servants, that he was kept waiting for audiences and was only half listened to. He is of such quality that he prefers a good look (visage) to more substantial benefits; and when he thinks he has had a reception other than he expected he looks on all as lost, and writes to his people here, who take it as a sign of amity that their ambassadors are caressed and think that one does not love them if their ambassadors are not reated with ceremonies, of which they are here as full as any nation Marillac has seen.
Parliament, which was to commence the 1st of next month, is prorogued till after the coming of the said lady. It will then be seen what will be treated anew, and what will be done with the abbot of Glastonbury, who has recently been put in the Tower, because, in taking the abbey treasures, valued at 200,000 crs., they found a written book of the arguments in behalf of queen Katharine, the Emperor's aunt, against the marriage of queen Anne, who was afterwards behaeaded.
Thanks for the 500 crs. which he sees, from Montmorency's letter and from what M. Bochetel writes, that he is to receive. Will be bound to spend them at "these entries and magnificences," and his predecessors have so prejudiced him that he cannot regulate his expenses at will.
French. Modern transcript, pp. 5.
25. Oct.
R. O.
390. JOHN HUSEE to LORD LISLE.
Has received his letter by Nich. Eyer. Lisle had better allow the stuff of the late Friars at Calais to be ordered by the commissioners. As for your wish that I should make suit for the whole lands, rents, &c., of the same, I trust small suit will serve, as you showed me the King had given them to you freely; and so you may write to the lord Privy Seal when the commission is certified. Has not yet received the acquittance for the coining irons. London, 25 Oct.
Mr. Serjeant Grainfyld says that my lord Chancellor is offended that you have not sent the wines you promised.
Hol.,p. 1. Add.
25 Oct.
R. O.
Rymer XIV.,
667.
391. ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S HOSPITAL OR PRIORY, LONDON.
Surrender (by Robt. abbot of Waltham in Essex, and commendatory of St. Bartholomew's, and the convent) of the monastery and all its possessions in cos. Midd., Herts, Essex, and the city of London, and else- where in England. 25 Oct. 31 Hen. VIII. No signatures. [See Deputy Keeper's Eighth Report, App. II., 29.]
Seal perfect.
Enrolled [Close Roll, p. 3, No. 48] as acknowledged, same day, before Wm. Peter, King's commissioner.
R. O.2. Names of the canons in St. Bartholomew's, Smithfield, at the dissolution 26 Oct. 31 Hen. VIII., viz.:—
Robt. Glasyer, subprior, 15l.; William Barlawe, John Smyth, senior, Hen. George, John Smyth, jun., Chr. Reynold, Peter Wade, Robt. Stokes, Robt. Kenham, Ric. Duffe, and John Sutton, 6l. 13s. 4d. each; Geo. Chapman and Matth. Dylle, 5l. each. Signed: Robert Sowthwell: Wylliam Petre: Thom's Myldemaye: Thomas Spilman.
P. 1. The amounts of pensions are written in by Southwell.
25 Oct.
R. O.
392. RIC. LEE to CROMWELL.
Has received his letter dated 18th instant. Has, therefore, set folks at work in the Exchequer, and also on the front and posts of the Lantern Gate, which, with the beasts and "faynes" (vanes) thereupon, are all worn by the air of the sea. Asks that four beasts with faynes may be sent to set thereon, as there is no time to make any here. Calais, 25 Oct. Signed.
P. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
25 Oct.
Poli Epp.,
II. 202.
393. CARD. POLE to CARD. CONTARINI.
Wrote on his arrival at Verona of his joy at being allowed to tarry here until Christmas. Now M. Bartolomeo has disturbed everything by writing, on the 17th, that M. Durante has said that his Holiness would be glad if he came to Rome. Wonders at the Pope's sudden change of opinion, and thinks he might at least have been warned by M. Durante and M. Marcello. Writes to Bartolomeo to enquire again of M. Durante and to Card. Farnese, to sue for leave for him to tarry a few weeks. Has great need of rest, and the scarcity at Rome, and provision he has made here, constrain him to stay. M. Alvise is at Venice. The Bishop kisses his hand. Verona, 25 Oct. 1539.
Italian.

Footnotes

1 Loveday and the others. See No. 326.
2 Sir Piers Edgecombe.
3 So dated by the Editor at the head, but no date appears in the text as printed. Of course it was written about the same time as the letter immediately following; but unless the Editor had some authority for the date we might suppose it a few days earlier.
4 Meaning the late bishop of Hereford (Edw. Foxe) when he was in Germany in 1535–6 with Dr. Nicholas Heath, archdeacon of Stafford.
5 In a note on Betbuch the Editor suggests "Walch. Gebetbuch."
6 The Editor suggests, probably a mistake for Cromwell.
7 See No. 326.
8 See No. 375.