Index
E

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Sophie Crawford Lomas and Allen B. Hinds (editors)

Year published

1931

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592-600

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'Index: E', Calendar of State Papers Foreign, Elizabeth, Volume 21, Part 4: January-June 1588 (1931), pp. 592-600. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=76135 Date accessed: 23 November 2014.


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E

Easterlings, benefits to Flanders from trade with, 192.

Eaton, James, asks for safe conduct to England, information supplied by, 245.

“Ecclesiastes,” offered to queen by Coels, 73.

Ecclo. See Eecloo.

Edinburgh, Lilburg, Scotland, letter dated at, 349.

Edward IV, King of England, many descendants of extant, 543.

Edward VI, King of England, burgomaster of Antwerp christened by, 191.

Edwards, John, 82.

Eecloo, Ecclo [Prov. E. Flanders, Belgium], Parma's forces lie about, 238.

Egmond, Egmont, Jacob van, heer van Kenenburg, deputy of Holland, document signed by, 253.

Egmont, Philip count of:
-, commands Walloons in Parma's army, 213, 276, 293, 537; command of horse, 214, 293, 537.
-, present at first colloquy, 282, 285.
-, Champagny unable to obtain exchange of La Noue for, 499.

Elizabeth, Queen of England, Bess:
-, letters from, 20–1, 49, 83–4, 86–9, 90, 118, 123, 124, 153, 156, 166, 189, 204–6, 221–3, 225–6, 230–2, 236, 254–5, 274, 277–8, 299, 311, 316, 321, 328, 335, 340, 342, 363, 373–6, 386, 388, 406–7, 410, 413–4, 416, 420, 431–2, 438–9, 448–9, 485, 512–3, 528.
-, -, referred to, 59, 89, 140, 159–60, 178, 265, 302, 306, 314, 316, 322, 351, 355, 378, 383, 387, 389, 395, 397, 403, 421, 425, 432, 446–8, 469, 481.
-, letters to, 1, 8, 11, 22, 59, 73, 92, 96, 115, 117, 132, 140, 154–5, 160, 169, 178, 180, 192, 233, 239, 246, 253, 280, 307, 328, 349, 351, 358, 367, 368, 381, 383, 423, 446, 468, 516, 529.
-, -, referred to, 92, 99, 104, 121, 145–6, 196, 202, 229, 259, 305, 328, 330, 352, 375, 377, 420, 447, 510.
-, Scots troops rail against, 1; enemy means to be even with, 15; foster mother of reformed churches, 33.
-, indebtedness to army, 3; Willoughby warns of state of army, 8.
-, representations of States to, by Ortel, 3–4; demand for reimbursement, 7, 16.
-, States profess devotion to, 9; Hohenlohe professes devotion to, 11; Mörs would depart, but for, 13.
-, Ste. Aldegonde's comment on intention to treat, 17; de Loo appeals to liberality of, 24.
-, Drury hopes will pardon, 19; Mörs hopes for recognition from, 28.
-, encourages loyalty of Utrecht, 20; thanks Sonoy and promises support, 20; attack on Medemblik likely to offend, 84, 91.
-, intimates intention to support Camphire against States, 21; done by own direction, id.; Camphire well affected to, 53, 62, 100.
-, Parma content if prefers Burbourg for conference, 25; Parma suspects sincerity about peace, 49.
-, Junius hopes will not resent Rogers' marriage, 33; Coels offers Ecclesiastes to, 73.
-, not to be discouraged by disaster to reiters and support Navarre, 33; Croft witness of constancy for peace, 93.
-, Spanish warlike preparations caused to hold back from peace negotiations, 43; informs Dutch of ships taken for peace, 49, 50.
-, objection to receiving rebels, 46; Barney's slanderous speeches against, 78–9.
-, memorial of Walsingham for, 48.
-, remonstrates about treatment of Sonoy and threatens to withdraw help, 50, 83–6; Sonoy asks for decision, 64.
-, desires Russel to remain at Flushing, 50, 53; appeal to send man of quality to stay mischief in Netherlands, 63.
-, Dutch deputies desire audience of, 55; audience arranged, 72.
-, Estates of Friesland complain of misrepresentations to, 59, 60; assure of loyalty, 61.
-, urged to secure Camphire, 62, 66, 68, 83–4, 95; Camphire determined to defend oath to, 67; will follow her lead, 68; thanks captains, 88.
-, Maurice suitable governor if will show respect to, 67.
-, Hohenlohe said Provinces did not need help of, for peace, 72; asks Hohenlohe to use influence with States for Sonoy, 87.
-, remonstrance with States about Sonoy, Grunevelt, Utrecht, Leyden, 74–5; threatens to withdraw help, 75.
-, will welcome visit from Hohenlohe, 87; Hohenlohe professes loyalty to, 116.
-, writes to Counts to stay proceedings against Sonoy, 89; Holland in worse case by giving offence to, 106.
-, decides to send money to Camphire, 89; and will continue if States will not, id.
-, repudiates intention of taking Camphire for own use, 89, 90; may easily secure Camphire and N. Holland, 95.
-, takes exception to States' behaviour about Russel's troop, 90.
-, Killigrew suggests alternatives for, 92; Naarden alienated from, 108.
-, message from to young Croft, 92–3, 97, 121–2; Croft laments Buckhurst's disfavour with, 97.
-, doubts of sincerity about peace, 93; Croft's advice to about negotiations, 117.
-, Dutch behave as if greater enemy than Parma, 94; Parma aggrieved at not answering letters, 104; should write to him, id.
-, Croft warns of danger of rising, 97; Croft complains of Drake to, 117.
-, can reconcile dissensions in Netherlands by sending over man of credit, 112; dependants in Netherlands must know at once what aid may expect from, 113.
-, Council of State ask Leicester's help with for extinguishing dissensions, 115.
-, representations of Council of State to, about Sonoy, 115, 154; mortal war waged against most faithful servants of, 141.
-, thanks Utrecht for constancy, 118; expresses gratitude to Schenck and promises proof of it, 123.
-, answer to deputies of States, 118; explains and justifies peace negotiations, 118–9; urges the compounding of internal differences, 120; representations for Sonoy and others with threat to withdraw help, 120, 124.
-, Dale wishes to set forth proclamation about stay of Germans' army, 124; honoured Parma enough by quality of commissioners, 132.
-, thought meet for Leicester to resign government because of ill-treatment by States, 124; friends of persecuted as enemies, 177.
-, questions affecting touching peace treaty, 125; Champagney describes negotiations with, 138.
-, Derby apologises for not writing to, 131.
-, Dutch towns standing very constantly for, 131; Walcheren well affected to, 141.
-, Maurice urges on, need of common agreement with Russel, 140; professes devotion to, 141.
-, Parma wrote to, about peace, 145–6; reply of, Parma said would write no more to, 146; desired Parma to be minister for peace, 147.
-, sends peace commissioners to Ostend, 146; reasons why should not proceed with negotiations, 149–50; Spaniards suspect sincerity of dealings, 536.
-, differences with Philip originated with him, 150; Parma's expectations of, 153.
-, treaty with Don Sebastian, 150.
-, device to save 20,000l. yearly in wars in Low Countries, 151; wishes clothing for soldiers to be delivered as imprest, 168.
-, alienation of will nourish ill disposition of States, 151; honour touched by General being subject to States General, 152.
-, demands that Hollanders shall desist from persecuting Utrecht, 153–4; Maurice an open enemy of, 158.
-, should write to stop attack on Medemblik, 158; demands that States shall desist from violent proceedings against friends, 166.
-, directs Killigrew to ask States if will take part in peace treaty, 159.
-, Camphire captains thank and ask for Russel as governor, 160, 180.
-, threat to withdraw assistance, 167; wishes all affected to her to be persuaded to union, 168.
-, wishes charges against Sonoy referred to herself, 168; Maurice defends action against Sonoy to, 169; displeasure at siege of Medemblik, 170; Hollanders deny concern in, 177; desires all violence against Sonoy to be forborne, 206.
-, Camphire and Arnemuyden constantly affected to, 170; Blavoet wishes to live and die in service of, 190.
-, Spencer tells Parma of accomplishments, 171; Parma asks Robert Cecil about, 184; Parma swears will keep faith with, 195, 253.
-, Dutch fear withdrawal and desire Leicester's return, 180; people made to believe that seeks to possess frontier towns, 182.
-, answer to complaints of Zeeland against Russel, 186–7.
-, desires Dutch to be persuaded to union and concord, 188; appoints Willoughby and Killigrew to accommodate their differences, 189.
-, Parma deluded by, meaning shown by countenancing of Drake, 192; honourable meaning should be made known to Parma, 196.
-, ancient alliance with Burgundy, 193; Parma uncovers at naming of, 239.
-, choice of place of conference left to, 194; insists on right to Parma's promise, 223–5.
-, échevins of Ghent told peace does not rest with, 195.
-, people of all sorts well affected to, 198; Willoughby suggests should write to encourage Rotterdam, 200; need to take control in country, 200–2.
-, insists on some good order being taken with Sonoy, 203; wishes Sonoy to be informed of Leicester's resignation and to yield conformity on some points, 204; Sonoy relies on assistance, 205; will undertake his good behaviour, 206.
-, thanks friendly garrisons for offices but will not encourage to depend on her, 204; desire for unity among provinces, 217.
-, States proceed in violent indirect course against, 205; persuasions do not avail to stay attack on Sonoy, 207.
-, not alarmed by threat of invasion, able to defend herself, 207, 241; Parma's reply about, 241–2.
-, Drury's debt to, 210; refers Lady Cobham's suit to Burghley, 216.
-, de Loo fears consequences if neglects peace offer, 211–2; Philip cannot yet consider as enemy, 224.
-, Russel speaks of hard case of all who rely on, 221; lack of regard for Flushing and Low Countries makes men careless, 222; provinces deceived of expectation of help, 228.
-, Zeeland deprecates attack on Medemblik from respect for, 222; Sonoy's defence to against charges of States and Maurice, 224; States and Maurice more calm since publication of her pleasure about her friends, 228.
-, Camphire wants to embrace cause of Walcheren, 227; need to assure Camphire and Arnemuiden of care and regard, 230–1.
-, unreasonable to expect provinces to agree to her making peace for them, 228; jealousy that means to get possession of towns and deliver to enemy, 232.
-, commissioners pleased at care for them, 229; enemies dislike her treating sword in hand, 234.
-, appreciates goodwill of people but deprecates expression, 232; not pleased at revolt of towns to her, 233.
-, thinks Walsingham to blame for not informing States of Leicester's resignation, 232; friends of in Netherlands discouraged by Leicester's resignation, 246.
-, wishes to conciliate States, 233; Zeeland thanks for intervention and asks for ships, 246.
-, need to look to herself but God will preserve her, 235; desires no further interest in Netherlands than maintenance of treaty, 247; only desires their unity, 254.
-, reply to Loosen and Casenbroot sent to provinces for resolution, 253.
-, only holds Ostend for defence, Croft explains action in Netherlands to Richardot, 262; two points in treaty which concern, 263; great content from discretion of commissioners, 310.
-, persisted with peace negotiations contrary to warning about Spanish preparations, 262; changes mind and insists on treaty being near Ostend, 273–4.
-, asked to take Camphire etc. into her protection, 268–9; not disposed to increase charges by taking garrisons of Camphire etc. into her pay, 273, 276; neglect of Walcheren deplored, 290.
-, charges commissioners not to let pass any word touching her honour and greatness, 274; blames them for neglect of, 296.
-, resents speeches suggesting that she begs a peace, 278; injustice of charge of being principal author of troubles in Netherlands, 279; not first to make overtures, 310.
-, men of Friesland suffer for devotion to, 279; Dutch become very obsequious to, 326.
-, armed for defence and offence against Spanish preparations, 285; insists on cessation, 295.
-, thanks Derby for his zeal, 296, 330; censures Croft's behaviour, 299; commends careful dealing of Derby and Cobham reminds them they deal with subtle Spaniards and Italians, 313.
-, considers herself ill handled over commission, 311–2; suggested Parma should send some one to, 322, 329.
-, wishes Stanley and English rebels removed from Bruges, 312.
-, Maurice informs of sending over of Colonna, 328; refers Willoughby to Walsingham about him, 337.
-, never intended to draw Arnemuiden and Camphire out of States' hands, 332; threatens to abandon Berghen and Ostend if States will not supply, 336.
-, Walsingham persuades to give a full pay to Flushing garrison, 332.
-, commends Willoughby for successes in dealings with Dutch, 335–6, censures him for appointing Drury at Berghen, 336–7, 388, 422; will not pass it in silence again, 388; Drury begs to keep place, 423.
-, Croft's article to safeguard person and state of, 339; dissatisfied with Parma's manner of dealing, 341; only endures it to show desire of kingly peace, 342.
-, Croft will send copy of former treaty to, 339; Champagney desires avowal of Croft's action from, 348; censures Croft, 362, 413.
-, assurances to Camphire, 342, 476; attitude about Camphire, 348, 352, 374, 377; Camphire companies broken for refusing oath to other than, 447.
-, invitation to States to join with for peace, 344–2; wishes to employ A.B. for compounding differences with Philip, 345.
-, Croft asks pardon for acting independently, 350–1; mixed feelings about Croft's action, 372; offended at being asked to avow it, 373.
-, no reason to doubt Maurice's devotion to, 353; advises Maurice to follow father's example, 374; his reply to, 383.
-, Colonna's story of coalition against, 353; alleged plot to poison, 354; thanks Maurice about, 407.
-, should write to urge Utrecht to conform with other provinces, 360, 362.
-, Geertruidenberg wishes to be subject to, 367; grounded on hope of good payment, 395; can make own terms with, 401; policy to town, 410–1.
-, Sonoy's gratitude to, 367; thanks Maurice for settlement, 374.
-, dislikes idea of sending Buckhurst over, 373; misliked Willoughby's refusal to mediate, 413; displeased with Willoughby for absence of captains, 458.
-, unwilling to have misunderstanding with States, 373; States' affection to doubtful, 399.
-, desires assurance from Parma that no attempt to be made against realm, 375.
-, Camphire bound by oath to, 378; States of Zeeland appeal to about Camphire and Arnemuiden, 381–3; they wish to be at devotion of, 397.
-, will tell Parma plainly will not endure more delays, 387; Parma must know reasons for taking war in hand, 464.
-, rebuke for ill-handling of Veluti, deplores effect of such barbarity, 388.
-, Maurice anxious to justify himself with about Flushing, 389; Maurice protests devotion to, 391, 432.
-, Flushing a slippery pledge for money disbursed by, 395; can hardly be kept if Camphire etc. abandoned by, 399; policy with too subtle, 400; cold course about will estrange them, 424.
-, policy to towns governed by fear of heavy charges, 413.
-, censures Croft and orders to return, 413; Croft begs for consideration, 423; Dale wished to move compassion for Croft, 458; pardons him, 468.
-, States thank for efforts to check disorders, 416; hostility of States to those well affected to, 447.
-, asks States to give satisfaction to Schenck, 416, 421, 431, and Bacx, 417, 420, 431–2; wants States to give Schenck government of Geertruidenberg, 422, 447–8.
-, Maurice warns of intended landing in Scotland, 421; Spanish action forces to put her navy and forces in readiness, 426.
-, Treslong desires to enter service, 433; Buzenval to move to send money for reiters, 533.
-, Princess de Chimay should seek intercession of, with Parma, 434; Netherlands nobility send to borrow money of, 474.
-, accepts Parma's offer to defray charges of commissioners, 439; offer of cessation moved to send deputies, 454.
-, will not accept cessation offered by Spaniards, 471; considerations on best terms of peace for, 472; what to do if cannot get terms of Ghent pacification, 479–80.
-, reasons for continuing negotiation, though small reason to look for success, 485–6; wishes deputies to dilate on wrongs received from Philip, 487–8.
-, confident in loyalty of subjects and power to repel attack, 486, 528, 543; Scots king belongs wholly to, 539.
-, threatens to abandon Dutch if reject terms propounded to them, 487; Spaniards hope to render suspect with Dutch, 521.
-, Dale writes letters apart to show to, 507; demands that Parma should repudiate Allen's book, 528, 542.
-, Spanish deputies declare never meant to speak other than honourably of, 507; will give way about cessation rather than delay peace, 535.
-, de Loo urges Burghley to use influence with, for peace, 509; de Loo appeals to to make clear demand of what she wishes, 529; desires assurance for perpetual peace, 547.
-, Dutch believe that they are all undone, if quails, 532.
-, Spaniards know how well provided, 539; Spanish plans to stir rebellion against, 549; expect to exhaust her by heavy charge for defence, 550.
-, denies persecution of Catholics, except for rebellion, 543.
-, reasons for claiming money advanced to Provinces, 546.

Elizabeth of France. See Isabella.

Emden [E. Friesland, German Empire]: secret agents travel to England by, 80; order for Horsie at, 95.
-, suggested for peace conference, 262.
-, Groningen waged war with Count of, 363.

emperor. See Charles V; Ferdinand I; Maximilian II; Rudolf II.

empire. See Germany.

Enchusen, Enchuysen, Enckhuisen. See Enkhuisen.

Ende, Eynde, H. van den, captain of Camphire, 89.
-, letters of, 67, 161, 180, 268, 379.
-, Willoughby's letter to, 476.

enemy:
-, Dutch unable to withstand with allies, 6; knows wants of Ostend and Berghen, 10.
-, would be glad to win over Mörs, 13; means to be even with Bess, 15.
-, designs on Zeeland, 15, 16, 22, 28; intercepted letters of, 205.
-, Maurice suspected of treating with, 21; Heusden can get pay from, 55.
-, Walgrave has information of designs, 22; removing forces from Sluys, 28.
-, designs on Ostend, 29; designs on Flushing, 53, 252; designs on Walcheren, 61.
-, part of forces go against Bonn, abandons Zutphen fort, 63; Bonn besieged by, 492.
-, preparing shipping in Flanders, 57.
-, William of Nassau accused of having intelligence with, 60; suspicion of intelligence with, 70, 92.
-, Sannes fled to, 60; Sherley's company cut up by, at Zwolle, 66.
-, danger of Dutch making separate peace with, 61; danger of towns falling to, through mutinous troops, 62, 70, 72.
-, remarkable inactivity since Sluys, 70; forces still increasing, 71; with transport, 398.
-, Salisbury's intelligence with to deliver up Berghen, 96; supposed concentration against Berghen, 103; has mustered 36,000 men, 112.
-, alleged offers to Maurice, 108; Maurice seeking treacherous conclusion with, 109, 157.
-, Soissons admits practises with, 108; prevails more by divisions of Dutch than by own valour, 120; Dutch not to treat with, without queen's consent, 155.
-, Maurice warns queen of great preparations and danger to country, 140.
-, practising to get Lillo, 165; supposed able to command Walcheren, 173; plot to fire Flushing, 208.
-, violent proceedings against Sonoy of great advantage to, 167; factions lay open dangerous gap to, 168; frontier towns readier to accept than divided masters, 181.
-, well informed of what is meant by Dutch, 175; seeks advantages by discontents and mutinies among Dutch, 204.
-, queen urged to move to save outlying provinces from, 202; malicious reports of her intention to deliver frontier towns to, 204.
-, forces near Bon, 202, 208; list of forces and commanders in Low Countries, 213–4.
-, forces between Bruges and Antwerp, consumption of loaves, 208.
-, Conway apprehensive of attack on Ostend, 213; expected attack on Ostend, 221, 254, 442, 445, 448–50, 458, 460, 470.
-, count on discrediting English with Dutch, 221; queen suspected of intention to deliver towns to, 232, 265; suspicion of secret practice against Flushing, 270.
-, expected to besiege Berghen, 250, 265; Zeeland asks English ships for defence against, 315.
-, great forces and preparations of, 251; will force recovery of Ostend, 295.
-, danger of Geertruydenberg revolting to, 251, 276, 356, 395, 404; danger of Camphire and Arnemuyden going over to, 273.
-, beginning incursions into Veluwe, 266; loss of Geertruidenberg would open Holland to, 356.
-, Friesland in danger from, 280; expected attack on islands, 315, 382, 411.
-, Croft allowed men of Ostend to meet and confer with, 299; need to furnish Berghen and Ostend against, 336; Ostend and Berghen in danger from, 492.
-, Russel believes Colonna a spy of, 338; no sign of attempting anything, 405.
-, fear that English will deliver cautionary towns to, 345.
-, army increases daily, threatens much, claims to have great party in Scotland, 352.
-, strong in the field, threatens present attempt, 388, 390.
-, traitors planning to deliver towns to, hiding under queen's name, 391; danger of Schenck being driven to return to, 417.
-, agreement between Maurice and Willoughby promises good enterprises against, 392; Maurice preparing to encounter at sea, 414.
-, more chances of profiting by dissensions than by arms, 406, 413.
-, stronger at sea than was wont to be, 415; need to have intelligence of putting to sea, 478.
-, governorship of Geertruidenberg would give Schenck opportunities to annoy, 417; Geertruidenberg beginning to listen to, 447; fear of its falling into hands of, 478.
-, will not besiege Ostend yet, 459; defence very weak against, 463; Conway says Ostend not tenable against, 469; part of camp remains near Ostend, 484, 502; Conway's defence against, 488.
-, Friesland feels cannot long withstand, 513; will take advantage of their confusions, id.
-, Justin of Nassau informed Seymour of designs of, 515; great haste in preparations for England, 525; reports of intended invasion by grow assured, 531.

-, See also Farnese, Alessandro, duke of Parma; Spain; Spaniards.

Engelstedt, Ludich, paper of, on value of Groningen, 364.

England:
-, Scotch soldiers rail against, 1; officers absent in, 11; Stanley's rancour against, 77; Stanley's correspondence with, 489.
-, supplies expected from, 3; advantage of buying beef, malt and barley in, 35; clothes for troops provided in, 168.
-, last refuge of the Dutch, 29; Maurice not well affected to, 54.
-, Parma spreads report of attack on, 29; boasting in Spain and Low Countries against, 44.
-, rebels from, maintained by Philip, 46; Parma believes Stanley and Allen able to make parties in, 77.
-, Camphire well affected to, 68.
-, secret agents from, in Flanders, 77; Stanley's communications with, 79, 80.
-, La Motte and Stanley discuss map of, 79; proposed investiture of Philip with by pope, 122.
-, threatened invasion of, 79, 84, 173; needless alarms in, 97.
-, Mostaert goes for, 96.
-, heavy burdens of, danger of causing rising, 97.
-, supporters of in Netherlands abandoned by, slackness blamed, 105; has no advantage from dissensions among Dutch, 381.
-, States, Council and two Counts mean well to, 108.
-, questions of merchants' reprisals can be dealt with in, 117; Parma will not allow provisions to pass from, to Ostend, 213.
-, Champagney describes mission in, 137; benefits to Flanders from trade with, 192.
-, peace would only lead to new war with, 149; proofs of Philip's practises for invasion of, 150; must look for Philip's resentment, 201; to be attacked through Scotland, 349.
-, Parma recalls pleasures of parks and hunting in, 171.
-, Richardot hints at accident in, to prevent peace, 185, 190, 194; questioned about, 195.
-, difficulty of war with recognised, 192; Parma denies any designs on, 242.
-, Spaniards would prefer for conference rather than occupied town, 194.
-, Willoughby asks favour for men of Dort trading in, 199; Enkhuisen continual victuallers into, 228.
-, Parma holds to purpose to invade, 213; Barney's account of pretended journey of King of Spain into, 213–5; Jesuits to accompany armada to, 245.
-, St. Omer not well disposed towards, 220.
-, mutinous Dutch towns declare for to get money from, 224.
-, would be dishonoured by losing Berghen after Sluys, 250; discredited by peace proposals and Leicester's resignation, 345.
-, Allen sends prelates to prepare enterprises for, 260; men of judgment believe Parma's preparations directed against, 303.
-, ships from Holland and Zeeland may assist Philip in invasion of, 270; Parma means to secure Ostend as base for invasion of, 133; Boulogne possible base against, 350.
-, levy in Netherlands of sailors for, 317, 356; Dutch ready to send ships to, 416.
-, Maurice sends Odo Colonna to, 328; Hohenlohe and Schenck going to, 346.
-, Colonna's report of designs against, 353–4; English exiles brag openly of returning to, 371; to put themselves in readiness for, 489.
-, Parma likely to attack from Dunkirk, 358; assurance required from Parma that no attack intended on, 375.
-, Richardot and Champagny complain of war preparations in, 366, 371; hostility chief impediment to enjoyment of peace by Spain, 464.
-, Eson promises to discover many actions in, 387; Allen prints libel for circulation in, 489.
-, Parma's designs certainly against, 391; difficulty about cessation increases suspicion of, 414; commissioners raise question, 426; on inclusion in cessation, 427, 485.
-, cessation proposed would allow invasion of from Low Countries, 453–4, 461, 468; holding of towns will stay invasion, 455; forces in Flanders directed against, 534.
-, Russel asks for reinforcements from, 459; Conway asks same, 489.
-, by securing first, reduction of Low Countries easy, 473; Parma means to embark from Dunkirk for, 478.
-, Arenbergh's remark about securing footing in, 474; troops from Antwerp reported to be for, 476; Spaniards likely to be mild if cannot achieve purpose in, 494.
-, plan to invest Parma with crown of, 478; Philip has authority from pope to conquer, 479.
-, all good means must be used for defence, 479; English forces could be better employed in, 502.
-, queen confident of loyalty of and power to repel attack, 486, 528, 543; Norris wishes to be back to serve in, 531.
-, Armada reported sailing against, 488, 494, 530–1; sand bags for use in, 489; arrangements for rebellion in, 549.
-, hard for Parma to make navy to annoy, 493; Spanish army and fleet to unite against, 504; Parma's landing force for, 516.
-, Philip has not meddled with internal affairs of, 506; bull of pope to stir against queen, 528.
-, Spaniards boast that great changes will shortly be seen in, 516; wind good for, 524; enemy's great haste in preparations for, 525; show of invasion of puts queen to great charges, 550.
-, return of commissioners to, 529; designs discovered against, 541; render progress of negotiations futile, 542–3.
-, Barney can disclose Parma's correspondents in, 538; clergy contribute for restoration of obedience to Rome, 549.
-, will never suffer stranger to rule, 543; grounds of Spain's quarrel with, 549.
-, Netherland Estates will never do anything to prejudice of, 545; peace terms for confirmation of intercourse with Netherlands, 547.
-, King of. See Edward IV; Edward VI; Henry VII; Henry VIII.
-, merchants of. See Merchant Adventurers; merchants, English.
-, Queen of. See Elizabeth; Mary.
-, ships. See ships, English.

English:
-, increasing differences with Hollanders, 113; States strive to make odious to the people, 131; enemy counts on discrediting with Dutch, 222.
-, losses inflicted by on Low Countries, 228; lost some honour through default of States, 445.
-, Solms would rather serve against than Spaniards, 402, 412; States will not appoint any who well affected to, 437.
-, bailiff of Flushing ill affected to, 438; out of taste with States because of Stanley's treason, 497.
-, gentlemen prisoners, threat to send to Burgundy, 500.
-, names of, in Stanley's regiment, 524.

-, exiles, fugitive:
-, none more mischievous than, 191, 245; must be removed from Bruges if conference held there, 293, 312, 323, 370; Richardot says impossible, 324; queen resents denial, 340.
-, brag about returning to England, 371, 542; promised restoration to, 375; to put themselves in readiness for, 489.
-, Allen's libel to be circulated among, 461; come to Bruges, 489.
-, Philip's ill will shown by support of, 486; Parma deceived by reports of, 543.

Enkhuisen, Anchisen, Enchusen, Encheyseyn, Enchuysen, Enckhuisen [Prov. N. Holland, Netherlands]:
-, steps to stay man for Muscovy at, 28; order taken for Horsie at, 95.
-, troops of against Sonoy, 113; ships made ready at, against Medemblik, 142, 166.
-, warrant of arrest granted to Polliver against, 228.
-, continual victuallers into England, 228.
-, burgomasters of, 107.
-, bailiffs and echevins of, confession taken before, 112.
-, pensioner of. See Maelson, Francis.
-, ship of, come from Spain to Calais, 509.

Entens, Berthold, Bartel Entes, Colonel, Groningen besieged by, 364.

envoys. See under ambassadors.

Erfurt [Saxony, German Empire], 33.

Errington, Captain Nicholas:
-, letters from, 400, 485.
-, company at Rammekens, 3, 343, 440, 469, 490.
-, money due to, 219; efforts for repairs, 398.
-, asks that Merchant Adventurers may be repaid advance, 485.

Eson, promises to discover many actions in England, 387.

Estates. See Low Countries, States General of.

Este, Alfonso II of, duke of Ferrara, moves for league against Spain, 123.

-, Don Caesar d', mission to Duke of Florence, 123.

Eustes, Ulster, one of Stanley's captains, 524.

Evertssen, Dierick Jan, of Amsterdam, treason of discovered, 383; Maurice wishes to be rid of, 384; interrogation of, 396.

Everye, Juan:
-, letter of, 530.
-, reports sailing of Armada, 530.

exchequer, lord chief baron of. See Manwood, Sir Roger.

Eynde. See Ende.



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