Henry VIII
February 1540, 21-29

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

James Gairdner and R. H. Brodie (editors)

Year published

1896

Pages

82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, 110, 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Henry VIII: February 1540, 21-29', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15: 1540 (1896), pp. 82-118. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=76162 Date accessed: 23 August 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

February 1540, 21–29

21 Feb. 233. Henry VIII. to the Duke of Norfolk.
R. O.
S. P. viii.,
261.
Has received his letter of the 17th inst. Thanks him for the discreet handling of the charge committed to him, and desires him to forbear further opening thereof till he has spoken to Francis and urged him in Henry's name to declare how he stands with the Emperor about Milan, for the King would not advise him to recede from covenants if he can honorably obtain his desires, but if he is still “hobbyed” with a vain hope, thinks he should seize his advantage now. The Emperor's whole estimation depends on Francis; he can get nothing out of the Low Countries or Spain, and if Francis would ally himself with Henry, he would be compelled to offer him that which he now seeks, and perhaps the superiority of Flanders as well. He is now imparked in Flanders between France, England, the duke of Cleves, and the Princes of Almain, and must yield without any making of war. This, Norfolk is to urge Francis to consider well; but if he be so far entered that he cannot listen to such advice, to keep it secret, even from such of his Council as would divulge it.
If he finds Francis to be unpledged, he shall urge him to join in a league with England, the dukes of Cleves and Saxony, the counts Palatine, dukes of Bavaria, the marquis of Brandenburg, the landgrave of Hesse, the marquis Joachim, and others; by which he may “redubbe all things past” and recover his own. If Francis say that by this means his affairs would be stayed and put in balance, Norfolk shall say that a delay of three months will not hinder him, whereas by his own counsel “he hath already kept it in balance three years without fruit.” Meanwhile Henry would remit to him half the arrears of the pensions and salt money. To encourage him Norfolk may give him an inkling of the first and second degrees of the overtures in his instructions; and if he will frankly follow Henry's advice, must demand of him a resolute answer.
Is also to take an opportunity to declare to the Dauphin how much Henry desires to gratify him, and ask what pleasures of England he most fancies. Westminster, 21 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.
Corrected draft, pp. 18. Endd.: Instructions to my lord of Norfolk.
21 Feb. 234. Henry VIII. to Montmorency.
MSS. 2980,
f. 27.
Bibl. Nat.
Paris.
Thanks him for his continual efforts to preserve the amity as reported by the duke of Norfolk, shewing that he remains such a friend as he used to be. Desires credence for Norfolk. Westminster, 21 Feb., 1539.
French. From a modern copy, p. 1. Add.: Constable and Grand Master of France.
21 Feb. 235. Marillac to Montmorency.
R. O.
Kaulek, 163.
(Extract.)
Takes the opportunity of one of this King's couriers to report that two days ago the English received notice of the King's gracious reception of the duke of Norfolk, and are very well satisfied. Two days ago, arrived an express messenger from count William (fn. 1) to offer the count's service to this King. He gives out that the said count could not have been worse treated than he was in France. Those here have, however, said nothing of it to Marillac; for he had an answer for them.
The Emperor's ambassador says his master had some words to Hoyet (Wyatt), the English ambassador, upon the same question of the Englishman (fn. 2) released at the Emperor's request “de quoy sortit la tragédie dont cy avant a esté si amplement escript,” forasmuch as Hoyet happened to say it was “ingratitude,” which word the Emperor would nowise endure; as no doubt the Constable is amply informed elsewhere. Need not write more, having written on the 12th (sic) and 16th of this month. London, 21 Feb., 1539.
French. Modern transcript, pp. 2.
21 Feb. 236. Duke of Suffolk and Sir Wm. Skipwith.
Cart. Harl.
47, A. 51.
B. M.
Indenture of sale by Sir Wm. Skypwith to the duke of Suffolk of the remainder of his lease from the Court of Augmentations, dated Westm., 8 June 30 Hen. VIII., of the house and site, &c., of Markeby priory. 21 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.
Parchment. Skipwith's seal attached.
21 Feb. 237. Lord Lisle and Sir Thos. Palmer to Cromwell.
R. O. I received your letter by John Smythe, dated London 13 Feb., concerning 500,000 of billets for this town, for which I and the Council thank you, but more is necessary. I will inform you by my next what store of malt we have and what need of more, as also of wheat. I enclose news received from Flanders this day. (fn. 3) Whether true or not “we” beseech you to take them in good part. Calais, 21 Feb. Signed.
P.
1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal.
238. Willen de Vrient to the Deputy and Porter of Calais.
R. O. My lord Deputy and Master Porter, I recommend me to your good graces. Reports the news which his fellow has heard in the Emperor's court. The Emperor has commanded all the artillery to be tested, and has also summoned hither people from Germany. He has ordered men to be stationed in Flanders, and passage to be given them in secret. It is said they will all pass through Flanders, but it is not known whither. The men of war are very sorry for the death of Capt. Joris Schinc. The French king also gathers men. The Gueldrois have sealed [an agreement] with the Emperor, but we know not what Cleves and the other countries will do. Fears that some treachery is intended. Hopes the king of England will gain the victory over any evil intended against him. Last Thursday letters arrived from the Court to the captain of Grevelinghen.
Dutch, p. 1. Add.: “Deisen brief sal men gheven an Mester Poerter te Calles.”
21 Feb. 239. Norfolk and Bonner to Henry VIII.
R. O.
S. P. viii.,
265.
Since his last by Fransisko, the — inst., has (fn. 4) had no occasion to write, the French king being 7 or 8 leagues hence and his journeys uncertain. Describes an interview with the Chancellor, who arrived here yesterday, at which Bonner was present. He said he was Henry's true servant: that his master could never forget Henry's kindness when he was captive; and spoke of his master's title to Piedmont, Nice, Bresse, and other places in Savoy, saying Francis would not make war for Milan if the Emperor would let him recover these pieces, and they would compensate the Duke out of the duchies of Bourbon, Aulverne, and Berry, &c. He said suddenly he doubted not Francis would have Henry as a principal contrahent in any new treaty with the Emperor, but seemed fain to recall the word and say “comprised as one of his most special friends.”
In reference to the two articles of which Norfolk had spoken to Francis, he spoke coldly as a man more given to pacify displeasures than to augment them: 1. As to the article of division of the Emperor's dominions he had not heard thereof; 2. As to that of ingratitude he thought neither you nor Francis would acknowledge any superior; but great princes sometimes spoke rashly and a good ambassador should make the best of their words. Norfolk said the King's ambassador could not but inform his master of them, and aggravated the words as much as possible; but he was not inclined to make much of them. Asked if the French were not to have Milan what the Emperor would do with it, and when the Chancellor replied that the Pope might bargain for it, or Don Loys of Portugal, “Well, quod I with a merry countenance, the having it by any other than yourselves shall be unpleasant to you.”
Thinks the less the King makes the French ambassador privy to what he does here the better, for he is wholly for the Constable who maintains all papistical fashions. Does not mean to open anything concerning the renunciation of the pension unless he find Francis of another sort against the Emperor than he expects. He is expected here to-morrow, but not surely. Will speak with him the day after he does come. Abbeville, 21 Feb. Signed.
In Norfolk's hand. Add. Endd.
21 Feb. 240. Norfolk to Cromwell.
R. O.
St. P. viii.,
268.
Mr. Wallop has just come hither in post, for whom I sent that he might be present when I next spoke with the King. Does not believe that Francis will be brought to enmity with the Emperor, the Constable is so much his friend and every man weary of war. The night that Norfolk spoke with Francis at Dorlaunse a post was despatched to the Emperor, and yesterday a gentleman of the Emperor's came to Hesdin and spoke with Francis nearly two hours. Believes it was about his own conversation with Francis on Monday. Henry must beware of saying anything against the Constable to the French ambassador. The Queen of Navarre, though she hates him, advises using pleasant words to the Constable. If their words may be trusted, the French mean well to England. What end shall be taken between these two princes will soon be seen. The Chancellor this day acknowledged my lord of London had always acted like a wise, honest man. I am not afraid of war with France, but fear they will keep better peace with the Emperor than I would they did. Abbeville, 21 Feb.
Hol. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
22 Feb. 241. Sir John Spelman, Justice, to Cromwell.
R. O. As Mr. Baker, the King's attorney, could not be at Hertford assizes, he delivered me your letters to him concerning a robbery by Philip Goodwyn, Clement and Henox from Chambre and Broke, the drovers of Wales. They were arraigned for robbery of Chambre's money and, “the examination of Philip openly read,” he was found guilty and put to execution; but the jury acquitted Clement and Henox in default of evidence, which the drovers afterwards confessed they refrained from giving because friends of Philip had promised them their money again. When they perceived Philip was attainted, and they should not have their money, they came to me crying for justice. As neither Clement nor Henox was indicted for the robbery of Broke, but only of Chambre, I charged the sheriff to keep Henox; but Clement was so soon delivered after his acquittal that he could not be newly apprehended. Hertford, 22 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Sealed. Endd.
22 Feb. 242. Wotton to Henry VIII.
R. O.
S. P. viii.
269.
Having taken leave of the King on Sunday, 25 Jan., and received his letters and instructions, and the plate for Chancellor Ghogreve, next day, left London on the 27th and arrived at Cleves on Monday, 9 Feb. Saluted the Duchess, in the Duke's absence, and gave her the Queen's letter. She showed great joy, and said her son the Duke had gone to Juliers and thence to Paderborn to meet her son-in-law, the Elector of Saxony, on the 4th Feb. Wished to follow them as he had letters also to the Elector and the Landgrave. The Duchess said she feared they had already left Paderborn, and that the Landgrave had not been there. Three of the Council stood by and Wotton was advised to go to Olisleger, at Wesel; who told him that he would lose his labor following the Duke, for he would be in his country of Ravensburgh before Wotton could get to him. Nevertheless, next morning, Ash Wednesday, rode to Rekelinghowsen and next day to Hamme, two great journeys in foul ways with great storms of rain and hail. Met at Hamme the Chancellor Ghogreve's servants, who said their master lay that night at the drossart of Hamme's house, half a mile out of the town and would be at Hamme by eight next morning. Next day, Friday, delivered the King's letters to him, saying he had a present for him, which he had left at Cleves. He rejoiced much, and said whatever the present was it was more than he had deserved. He said the Princes were departed from Paderborn. Their last meeting was on Shrove Tuesday, the 10th. On Ash Wednesday the Elector took his journey towards Cassel to the landgrave of Hesse, and the duke of Cleves to Bylevelt to take possession of his county of Ravenspurgh, and would also take possession of the county of Marche on his return to Duisseldorpe. Neither the Landgrave, nor any other prince of reputation, was at Paderborn, but the Elector's younger brother and Duke Ernest of Brunswick.
Although he could only have got to Paderborn four days too late, Wotton made such speed, for all the carriage of plate, that the Duke's ambassadors, who left Greenwich on Monday 19 Jan., only arrived at Cleves on Friday 6 Feb., while he arrived on Monday following, the 9th. Was the first to return to the Duke of all the company that conducted the Queen to England. Having no charge to follow the Elector further, took his journey towards the Duke of Cleves, who had meant to be at Lippe on the 14th, but the ways were so foul that he only arrived next day in the afternoon. Could have no access to him till supper time, when he delivered the King's and Queen's letters. He was glad to hear of their welfare and gave Wotton a cordial welcome. Next morning, declared his instructions to him. He caused answer to be made by Provost Vlatten that his ambassador, who had just left for England had his instructions; that the King could have sent no one to him more acceptable than Wotton, and that the Duke was much bound to Henry for being so ready to promote his interests. He had not yet seen the articles conceived in England and delivered to the steward Hoghesteyn and the chancellor Olisleger, but if the latter came that day or to-morrow to meet him at Soste, Wotton might have further answer.
That same day he rode to Soste, and Wotton followed and remained there next day, but Olisleger, in spite of his promise to Wotton, did not come, perhaps detained by the storms. The Duke then said he must go to Hamme and take possession of Marche, and advised Wotton to ride before to Duisseldorpe and wait for him, where he should be in six or seven days. On Wednesday the 18th, accordingly, the Duke left for Hamme, and Wotton for Duisseldorpe. Dined and supped with the Duke all the time he was at Lippe and Soste, but he said nothing of the matters for which they had met at Paderborn, nor of the news brought by a fellow of his chancery from his ambassador in France. Asked him the last day he was at Soste if he had any news for the King, and he said none at that time; but in the evening commanded Provost Vlatten to tell him to inform the King he would have written to him but that some of his messengers had been imprisoned by the Emperor in Brabant against the law of nations; also that nothing was done at his meeting with the Elector at Paderborn prejudicial to the King, only things for the common weal of all Germany, and though nothing was concluded he had no doubt of the Elector's friendship in case of need. Wotton asked if the imprisoned messengers had letters for England, and he said no, and the letters contained nothing but friendliness to the Emperor and a desire for the settlement of controversies about Gueldres, in which he desired the towns of Brabant to intercede. Duisseldorpe, 22 Feb. 1539.
Hol. Add. Endd.
22 Feb. 243. Wotton to Cromwell.
R. O. A more concise report of his journey and its result. As his instructions partly concerned the Elector of Saxony and the Landgrave, to whom he had a letter from certain merchantmen of London spoiled by the duke of Mecklenburg, wishes to know what to do. Describes his reception by the duchess of Cleves and afterwards by the Duke.
Arrived at Cleves on Monday, 9 Feb. The Duke's ambassadors and gentlemen Clevois came thither the Friday before, and on Saturday came duke Philip of Bavaria, who came out of England. He was still there on Wotton's arrival, but left that Monday evening. Wotton did not see him, but he commended to the Duchess his reception in England. He landed at Herderwyke in Gelderland.
At Rekelinghowsen, where he lodged on Ash Wednesday, Wotton was told by his host that duke Henry of Brunswick had lodged there on Monday night before, coming from the Emperor, but, to avoid recognition, let his servants sit above him, who all said they had come out of England, having brought the Queen thither. In conversation with Ghogreve, said he doubted not the Elector and the Duke had made some strait league, but the latter denied it, saying they had only treated of the pacification of Germany to prevent the Emperor's interference. Ghogreve also affirmed that the Card, of Mentz had been with the Landgrave at Cassel. Asked the Chancellor, and afterwards the Duke himself, if it was true that the Elector of Brandenburg had received the Gospel. Both said it was true without doubt, but they had no knowledge of his entering the Protestant league. The Chancellor said Geo. Skink, governor of Friesland, was dead. (fn. 5) There was then with the Chancellor Carolus Harstus, who is to be ambassador for the Duke in England. On remarking that he was expected there long ago, the Chancellor said so it was intended, but the Duke, hearing that his ambassadors were coming out of England, stayed him, to see if they brought any new overture. He said also that the Duke had already sent to the King, signed and sealed by him, the articles delivered by Wotton before his departure. Is doubtful, in that case, whether to ask the Duke to agree to the articles last devised.
On telling Ghogreve how well the King liked the Queen's Grace, he rejoiced greatly that the affection was mutual, for lady Keteler had written that, on leaving the Queen, she was desired to report to the Duchess, her mother, and the Duke, her brother, that she thanked them most heartily for having preferred her to such a marriage that she could wish no better. The Chancellor also said that King Ferdinand was already coming down to his brother, (fn. 6) and Wotton had heard since that he has been at Heidelberg with the Palsgrave. The Chancellor was very glad of Cromwell's letter, but had no leisure to answer it.
The people here muster in harness. The Duke has 500 lanzknechts about the Mase in Juliers. Men doubt what the Emperor will do. Whatever the rulers be, the young gentlemen and the common people are not afraid of him. Duisseldorpe, 22 Feb. 1539.
Hol., pp. 5. Add. Endd.
22 Feb. 244. [James V. to Paul III.]
Royal MS.
18 B. vi., 82.
B. M.
Theiner, 612.
Hears that a certain Scottish theologian who is in exile has there attempted to obtain the monastery of Drysbourg, which has been vacant some months. Almost all the monasteries of this country have been founded by the King's ancestors, who have had a concession from the Holy See to nominate to them within a space of eight months. This privilege was renewed to James by Clement VII., with addition of four months, so that he might have a whole year within which to nominate. Drisbourg lies upon the Borders, exposed to incursions of the English, and requires not only a man who can rule the cloister, but one who, outside, can act as a brave, liberal, and circumspect paterfamilias. Nominates Thomas Erskyn. Card. Ghinucci will say more of these and other matters. Edinburgh, 22 Feb. 1539.
Lat. Copy, p. 1.
22 Feb. 245. James V. to Ghinucci.
Royal MS.
18 B. vi., 82b.
B. M.
To the same effect, referring to the intruder as a certain blind Scottish theologian. Edinburgh, 22 Feb. 1539.
Lat. Copy, pp. 2.
22 Feb. 246. James V. to Rodulph Card. of Carpi.
Royal MS.
18 B. vi., 83b.
B. M.
To the same effect, requesting him, if he has returned to Rome, to assist in obtaining the abbey of Drysbourg for Thos. Erskyn. Edinburgh, 22 Feb. 1539.
Lat. Copy, p. 1.
[22 Feb.] 247. James V. to Philip Card. of Boulogne. (fn. 7)
Royal MS.
18 B. vi., 83.
B. M.
Thanks him for undertaking the defence of Scotch affairs, although they have no previous acquaintance. Supposes it to be a tribute to the memory of his (the Cardinal's) brother John duke of Albany. Desires him to procure the monastery of Drysbourg in commendam for Thos. Erskyn. Edinburgh.
Lat. Copy, p. 1.
[After
22 Feb.]
248. Sadler to Henry VIII.
MS. Adv. Lib.
Edinb.
Sadler
State Papers,
i., 17.
Arrived here on Tuesday, [17] (fn. 8) Feb., and next morning the king of Scots sent Rothesay herald to learn the King's health and say that Sadler, coming from his good uncle, should not be used as a stranger, but have gentle audience whenever he would. Thanked him, and said he would repair to Court that afternoon. The herald said he would go first and bring back word, for he doubted whether the King should be at leisure. Within an hour he returned, saying the King thought he should repose after his long journey, and would send for him next forenoon. The herald then left, bidding him call for everything as boldly as if he were in England.
Next day, Thursday, at 9 a.m., Sir Walter Ogilvy, Captain Borthwick, “who is lieutenant of the French king's guard,” David Lindsay, chief herald, and Rothesay came to his lodging and brought him to Court, into the chapel where the King was at mass, the chapel being full of noblemen, gentlemen, bishops, monks, priests, and other. The King knelt under a cloth of estate “without any travel,” and about him knelt the Cardinal and divers bishops and noblemen. When mass was done, he gently embraced Sadler, who presented the King's letters. These be read, saying the King, his uncle, referred all to Sadler, who should have audience when he would. Said he would willingly attend his leisure, and congratulated him upon his execution of justice upon the Borders. He replied that there was nothing he would not do to preserve the amity with his uncle. To which Sadler said the King was a prince of honour and great experience, who had entered covenants with sundry great princes and never yet gave occasion to break any. Added that, knowing his delight in English geldings, the King sent him six for a token, and bade him ask more when he would. He expressed his thanks, and promised his uncle any pleasure his realm could afford. Said that he would present the geldings when they arrived, and that he had other matters of importance to declare, which required a more secret audience. The King said he would send for him next forenoon, and so made him a countenance, and went to his chamber to dine. Captain Borthwick then said that if he tarried he should see the Queen come to mass. Said he was charged to make his master's commendations to both Queens here, but had forgotten to ask licence of the King to visit them. Captain Borthwick went to tell the King so, and returned saying that the Queen was somewhat crazed and came not abroad, and that the King thought Sadler should, next day, or when he would, visit both the Queens. Returned to his lodging, accompanied by Ogilvy, Borthwick, Lindsay and Rothesay, who dined with him.
Next day, Friday, between 9 and 10 a.m., they brought him again to Court, to the chapel where the Queen, the King's wife, was hearing a sermon in French, the King not there. The sermon done, Borthwick said the King wished Sadler to speak with the Queen, and Lindsay went and spoke with her, and returned with the same message; so Sadler repaired to her, and intimated his master's commendations, for which she thanked him, promising to set forth the amity between the King, her husband, and him, and praying Sadler to make her commendations in return.
Rothesay then came for him and took him to the King's privy chamber, where the King took him apart into a window, showing him pleasant countenance. Sadler repeated what he said the day before, touching justice on the Borders, and the horses, which were to be that night at Leith, and of which Sadler asked him to respite the seeing until they had rested two or three days. He said he was most beholden to the King, his uncle; and Sadler replied, “that using himself to your Majesty like a loving and kind nephew, he needed not to want anything wherein your Grace might stand him in stead.” Went on to say he had matters of importance to declare, but was commanded, first, to require a promise that they should be kept secret; which the King readily gave. Said the first thing he had to declare the King his uncle required to be kept secret, unless James determined to proceed to the punishment of the persons detected; for he would be loth to seem author of such a thing unless James took it to heart, as he did whatever touched James's honour. He seemed very desirous to hear it, and said “I pray you what is it? For I assure you whatsoever he be that doth offend us or our laws he shall well know that we stand not in awe to see him punished.” Said a servant of the Cardinal here was lately driven ashore in the North of England. “Yea,” quoth he, “that was Brunstoun, he is now newly come home.” Said that was so: the King, his master, had respited declaring the matter until the return of the man, in order that James might be sure of the parties; that Brunstoun left certain private letters and copies behind. “No,” quoth he, “the letters were taken from him by the King mine uncle's officers.” Replied that they had been found and sent to the King; but did not dispute the matter, for at Bamborough, John Horseley, the captain, had told him he took a packet of letters from certain Scottish men, of whom Brunstoun was one. Proceeded that among the letters was one signed by the Cardinal, which showed he was labouring to bring into his own hands both the spiritual and temporal jurisdiction (so that the power given by God to James, as to a King, should in few years be little or nothing), and was devising how to be the judge of James's traitors to the intent he might deliver them. “Which traitors, I pray you?” quoth he. “Marry, Sir,” quoth I, “as I conceive by the Cardinal's said letters, your Grace committed to ward one Hutcheson and one Harvy, for their treasons and offences committed against your Grace, and to these your Cardinal seemeth to be a great friend, and, as it shall evidently appear to your Grace by his letter, deviseth to make himself their judge to the intent he would deliver them, and all for that he would seem to be a good workman for his chief captain, the bishop of Rome, for whose service he is only meet, which meaneth nothing else than to usurp princes' powers and to diminish the same.” Added that this matter showed the craftiness of those prelates, and the opening of it the love and trust of the King, who knew how those prelates laboured to make kings their ministers, or else, with impudent boldness, vindicated the deposing of them. Marked his countenance as he listened attentively to this, “and somewhile looked very steadily on me, and with grave countenance, somewhile he bit the lip and bowed his head.” He answered, “By my truth, there are two laws, the spiritual law and the temporal. The cure of the one pertaineth to the Pope's Holiness and the spirituality, the other to kings, princes, and the temporality; and, for my part, I trust I shall do my duty to God in the discharge of such things as pertain to the temporal power within my office and rule within this realm; but, as for the spiritual law, in good faith we take no regard thereof, but commit that to the Pope's Holiness and other ordinary ministers of the Kirk within our realm.” Reminded him that God called him to be a king, and would require a just reckoning if he permitted his ministers of the spiritual laws to let his people perish for ignorance of God's word and lack of due preaching of it. He answered that he trusted God would give him grace to do his duty, and that he would punish any in Scotland, either spiritual or temporal, that failed to do his duty; but Scotland was never in better obedience to any King, for he was both loved and dreaded; and, as for the Cardinal, if he had offended he should be punished, but James did not know but that he wrote to his agent at Rome for the procuring of a legation, which would benefit Scotland, and for which he himself had written to the Pope. Offered to read the letter, which would show the Cardinal's crafty pretence, but he said (very softly, for the Cardinal was in the chamber) “No, keep the letter still, we will take another time for it.”
Thought best then to enter the second part of his instructions, and said the King, hearing it bruited that James gathered into his hands numbers of sheep and other mean things, in order to increase his revenue, had commanded Sadler to tell him that, although profitable, that kind of profit could not stand with a king's honor, nor extend far in maintaining his estate, and might make the people mutiny, for fear that the nobles, at their King's example, would take their living from them. He wished his nephew would rather use good and politic means to increase his revenue by taking into his own hands some of the religious houses that could be best spared, which occupied a great part of his realm for the maintenance of their “volupty and idle life,” and altering the rest into colleges, cathedrals, and almshouses, as he had done; which would tend more to the glory of God, and yet enable him to live like a King without meddling with sheep and such mean things. James replied that he had no sheep; his farmers might have sheep going upon his lands, but he himself knew not what he had; he had enough to live upon, and his good father, the king of France, would not see him lack, but he desired nothing but love and friendship, and would keep his word with all princes. He thanked the King, his uncle, for his advice, but thought it against reason to put down the abbeys and religious houses that had so long maintained God's service and would give him anything he needed. Sadler answered that they were a kind of unprofitable people that lived idly upon the labour of the poor; although founded upon popery and man's constitutions, they did not keep their first professions of chastity, wilful poverty and obedience; unless monks were more holy in Scotland than in England, nowhere did more carnality reign than in cloisters, which was cloaked as long as their visitation was committed to the clergy, but when the King began to look to his cure in spiritual matters, their abominations were discovered, and they weeded out, and the more notable houses put to better uses. As for poverty and obedience, they might better be called “wilfully rich,” and although they obeyed their captain the bishop of Rome they were not without bulls under lead whereby they claimed to be exempt from James's obedience. Further conversation, in which James said that because some were bad the rest should not be destroyed; he would see the evil redressed, and trusted Henry would not ask him to act against his conscience, and he would never displease his uncle, whatever tales or leasings might be reported.
To that, Sadler said he would tell him a tale or leasing that was bruited in France and Flanders of late, when the rumour was of the wars. “Wars, quoth he, what wars?” “Marry Sir, quoth I, I am sure ye know what a rumor and saying there was lately that the Emperor, the French king, and the bishop of Rome would invade England.” He replied that they were not over hasty, and he was sure they would be better advised. Told him he was reported to have said he would do against the King, his uncle, as the Emperor or the French king did. He protested, upon his hope of Heaven, that he never said or even thought so. Said the King never believed it, but rather believed the bruit made on the Borders that he had said that neither for Emperor nor French king would he break with the King his uncle. He said that, whether he said so or not, that was true, and also he dare swear that the French king never intended to break with the King. Sadler then made a long speech (given), frequently interrupted by James with protestations of goodwill, to the effect that the King, who had been a king more than thirty years, knew that it was best for a prince to live within his own limits (James knew what happened to his father by making himself another man's instrument to annoy an ally in his absence), that the present friendship with England was like to increase and benefit him, whereas the Emperor or French king could only give fair words, that James was the King's nephew and, if God took away the Prince, and his Highness left no other child, of the Queen that now is or any other lawful wife he may have, the King is put in trust by the whole realm to name a successor, and may name any of his two daughters, or his nephew, or any other that, for his qualities, should seem expedient; and although, with God's grace, he might have better store of issue than he yet had, still, he was well stricken in years. Seeing his good disposition, it behoved James to win the affections of the English, which, by reason of the ancient enmity, would be hard to obtain without open and continued declaration of amity. James replied that he heartily thanked his uncle, and promised that for no man alive would he break treaty with him. Said his uncle, to show his entire love, had thought meet to open these things to him in person, as not to be communicated to his Council till some good effect might ensue. He swore that he would never be found a babbler of such things as his uncle wished to be kept secret. Said that a meeting, such as was once almost at a point between them, would conduce much to the good effect of these things. He said, “Such a meeting as my lord William treated of?”; and added that lord William reported untruly of him that he did not agree to the meeting, whereas he was content, but the lords of his realm would not agree. Replied that whosoever letted that meeting loved neither the King nor him, but such a meeting now might redubbe all. He said he would be glad to see the King, his uncle, but would wish the French king to be at the meeting. Answered that he did not see how such a meeting could be brought to pass, for either the King or the French king must cross the sea to it. “Marry, quoth he, I should be sure of the longest and most painful journey, which I would not pass upon for so good a purpose.” Sadler wished that this meeting might first take effect, to which there was no obstacle like the sea; for the King and the French king had met before, but he and his uncle had never seen each other. He smiled and said he would advise further hereupon.
Sadler then said he had done his master's commendations to the Queen, and asked licence to visit the Queen, his mother. James replied that he might go boldly to visit her at all times. Went then straight to her lodging. She was glad to hear of the King's health, and enquired after the “state and health” of the Queen his mistress, whereto he “answered accordingly.” She took it unkindly that she had no letter from the King, for it had been a small matter to have spent a little ink and paper upon her, and she should be better regarded here if it was seen that her brother regarded her. She said the King, her son, was never better inclined to amity, and that she was well treated and much made of by the new Queen, and “other things of light importance.”
Next day, Saturday, [21] (fn. 9) Feb., Rothesay, herald, came to say that the King would be glad to receive the horses next day, when the lords then assembled might see them; and Sadler, after consulting Chr. Erington, who brought the horses, promised to present them. That night the King sent him wine, and next morning at 9 a.m., Sir Walter Ogilvy, Sir John Campbell, David Lindsay, the chief herald, and Rothesay brought him to Court, where they found the Queen again at a sermon. That done, was brought to the King's presence, who took him to a window overlooking the Court where Chr. Erington rode the horses one after the other. He praised the Barbary horse and the Jennet most, because they were of his uncle's own brood, and said “If the Barbary horse were bigger he were worth to much good, but by my truth, quoth be, he is a bonny beast, and so be they all.” Describes how the King thanked his uncle for the horses, and all the lords praised them. The King's dinner was then announced, and he went to his dining chamber, washed and sat down, and so bade the lords take Sadler to dinner with them. The Cardinal then led him by the arm to the chamber where the lords dine, where he sat at the highest place and was very gently entertained. There sat the Cardinal, the bp. of Glasgow, who is Chancellor, the earls of Huntley, Errol, Cassills and Athole, the bp. of Aberdeen, lord Areskin, Sir Walter Ogilvy, Sir John Campbell, and two or three more.
After dinner, went to the King's privy chamber, where the King conversed with him apart in a window, saying he wished all who had come between him and his uncle had reported the truth as he knew Sadler had done, and protested that none in Scotland dare bring evil tales of his uncle, whose honour he held as his own. He said he had advised of the matter touching the Cardinal and found no fault in him, for when his letters were taken in England he had shown the doubles of them. “Sir,” quoth Sadler, “did your Grace see the double of a letter that he wrote to his clerk and agent at Rome. Yea, marry! quoth he, to one that is all his doer there. Well, sir, quoth I, if your Grace do see the very original then shall ye perceive if the double and it agree. Quoth he, Have ye the original here upon you? Yea, quoth I, that I have. Take it out privily, quoth he, as though it were some other paper, and let me see it. (The Cardinal was in the chamber and therefore, think I, he bade me take it out secretly.) I took it forth of my bosom, and he took it and read it softly every word from the beginning to the end.” At the place where the Cardinal bids his agent “solicit that nothing be done that might in anywise irritate the King's Grace and his Council against the liberties of the Holy Kirk, considering the time is perilous,” the King said: “By God, they dread me.” When he had read the whole he returned it, saying he had seen the double word for word. Asked him if it did not show the crafty pretences of the Cardinal. “Why? quoth he, wherein?” Replied, it was in devising to be the judge of James's rebels. He said he would see that the Cardinal and his fellows did their duty; but as for Hutcheson and Harvy, whom Sadler named traitors, they were but simple men and their offence light, and he himself had made the Cardinal his minister both to commit them to the castle (fn. 10) and deliver them. Said that the thing seemed so strange to the King, his uncle, that he could not but advertise it, but, if it was not taken advantage of, he prayed James to keep it secret. He excused the Cardinal in everything and seemed wondrous loth to hear of any untruth in him.
Left that matter and took out of his bosom the device for the alteration of Christ's church in Canterbury, which the King bade him take with him, and read it, to show what a godly alteration the King had made of the religious houses which nourished a sort of unprofitable and idle people. He said it was both godly and charitable. Said that the King had transposed thus the most notable abbeys in his realm, and would have James do the like, to the increase of his revenue; and one house so altered should tend more to the glory of God than all did now. He thanked God he had enough to live on, and said that, if he should “mister” (need) anything the abbeys had they would give it. Sadler began to reprehend their idle life and vices, but he interrupted, laughing and saying that Sadler should hear tell that he redressed those who were naught.
Thought best not to press the matter, and reminded him of the motion for a meeting. James said he would talk of that before he left and give such answer to all Sadler's credence as should please the King his uncle; and so gave him gentle countenance, with his cap in his hand, and bade Sir Walter Ogilvy and Sir John Campbell accompany him to his lodging. Expects to bring the next advertisement himself, for the King will make haste to despatch him, to go about his pastime “whereunto they say he is marvellously given, and specially to hawking, both to the heron and the river, and (as they say) he is a great toiler and labourer at the same.” Hears that he lies here for this despatch, because he would not have Sadler follow him further into the realm.
From a draft. Dialogues mostly given verbatim.
Calig. B. viii.,
95.
B.M.
2. “A note of Mr. Sadler's letter,” being an abstract of the preceding.
Pp. 2. Endd.
249. Sadler to [Cromwell].
MS. Adv.
Lib., Edinb.
Sadler State
Papers, i. 46.
Arrived here on Tuesday, — (blank) (fn. 11) Feb., having so appointed his journey that the King's horses might be in Edinburgh within three or four days after. Before entering Scotland, sent on Berwick, the herald, to get him a lodging; who, when the Provost would have appointed him a mean lodging, complained to a servant of the Queen, the King's sister, who told the Queen and she the King, who sent command to the Provost to lodge him in a house named. Answer was made that the bp. of Ross (fn. 12) lodged there. “I say,” quoth the King, “in the foul evil, dislodge the Bishop and see that the house be fairly furnished against the Ambassador's coming.” So the Bishop was dislodged and the house furnished with beds and hanging of coarse tapestry. Is right well entertained of the King, and seems to be welcome to him and to most of the noblemen and gentlemen who favour Christ's doctrine, “whereof be a great number, but the noblemen be young.” Although they and others of the Council and about the King are well minded, sees none of sufficient wit to take the direction of things; so that the King is forced to use the bishops and clergy, who are never “out of the King's ear,” and inculk to him how catholic a prince his father was, and feed him with fair words and lead him as they will, he being given to pleasure and pastime, giving small cure to his own affairs and committing all to them. If he had one capable counsellor to go through with the matter, the King himself is of right good inclination. I have wished in my heart that the King here had “one such servant and counsellor as the King's Majesty hath of you, and, I dare say, so would many thousands in Scotland, for some of the honest men of the Court here, and well esteemed, have wished the same before me since my coming hither.” Has here no goodwill of the bishops and priests, who are yet too strong for the other side. They raised a bruit that he and his folk did eat flesh, “as heretics and Jews”; and forthwith the Cardinal made proclamation in the churches, “That whosoever should buy an egg, or eat an egg, within those dioceses should forfeit no less than his body to the fire to be burnt as an heretic, and all his goods confiscate to the King.” The false bruit that he and his folk ate flesh, being, apparently, the cause of this proclamation, he complained to gentlemen of the Court, who told the King, who forthwith sent Rothesay herald to say that, whatever publications were made, Sadler should eat what he would. Thanked his Grace, and said he was belied, for he ate no flesh, nor was it “permitted in England in the Lent.” “Marry, quoth I, I confess that I eat eggs and white meats, because I am an evil fishman, and I think it none offence; for if it were, quoth I, I would be as loath to eat it as the holiest of your priests that thus have belied me.” “Oh, quoth he, know ye not our priests? A mischief on them all! I trust, quoth he, the world will amend here once.” Another bruit raised was that his men had been monks and were now serving men. Had given them the Greek badge on their coat sleeves Μονω ανακτι δουλεω (meaning soli Regi servio, or the like) which the bishops here interpreted “monachulus” which they said was the diminutive of “monachus”; so it appears they are no good Grecians. Now the effect of the words is known and they are well laughed at. Has written at length to the King of all his proceedings, as his Lorship shall see.
Draft.
23 Feb. 250. Count William of Furstemberg.
See Grants in February, No. 94.
23 Feb. 251. Henry VIII. to Count William of Furstembergh.
R. O. Thanks him for his good will expressed in the letters brought by bearer. Has no need of men at present, being in friendship with all Christian princes, but will not decline his offer and has ordered him a pension such as he has had from Francis I., viz., 3,000 cr. of the sun payable in London, and trusts he will not fail to aid him in case of need against all princes except the Protestants of Germany. Westminster, 23 Feb. 1539, 31 Hen. VIII. Signed.
Fr., p.
1. Add. Endd.: “The King's letters first written to C G., but changed afterwards, and thereupon have the instructions been conceived.”
R. O. 2. Modern copy of the preceding.
Pp. 2.
23 Feb. 252. Cromwell to Lord Sturton.
R. O. Is informed that one John Compton, of Yewill, has, in “compercenere” with Sturton, a mill there and takes half the profits. Desires him, as he lives far from the mill, to lease his share in it to Compton for 40 years at the accustomed rent. Westminster, 23 Feb. Signed.
P.
1. Add. Endd.
ii. [Cromwell] to —
I am informed that Sir Ric. Smithe, (fn. 13) parson of Langom (Llangan), co. Pembroke, is imprisoned by [Thos. Webbe] (fn. 14) the bailiff there, for treasonable words. I desire your lordship to examine the matter and, if found guilty, to put him in prison at the King's pleasure; if not proved so, set him at liberty on his giving sufficient sureties to appear when summoned by the King or Council.
Corrected draft on the back of the preceding, p. 1.
23 Feb. 253. Norfolk to Henry VIII.
R. O.
S. P. viii., 275.
On the arrival of Francisco with Henry's letters of 21st, went this morning to the King, conducted by Loys Mons. de Nevers. Knowing my lord of London would not be acceptable to the King, caused him to take his leave in the outer chamber. Francis received Norfolk and Wallop in his bedchamber. Will report on his return, which shall be as soon as possible, for Francis will not let him tarry, though there lacked none offers on his part. Francis says he will nowise break with the Emperor if he keep promises, and finding him firm in this, Norfolk said nothing of renunciation of any part of the pension. Trusts, however, Francis will be still the King's friend. Hopes the King will not be displeased with his return, which Francis pressed upon him. Has had this day a good time with the Queen of Navarre and Madame d'Estampes and trusts good will come of it. Abbeville, 23 Feb. Signed: T. Norfolk: John Wallop.
Hol. Add. Endd.
24 Feb. 254. Thos. Prior of Christchurch Canterbury to Cromwell.
R. O.
Ellis, 3 Ser. iii.,
277.
Beseeches him to continue good lord to him, especially now in the change of the religion of this cathedral church from prior and convent to dean and canons. Is informed that the commissioners and visitors for the said change will be here in little time, and that the archbp. of Canterbury will be one, who is not as good lord to the prior as he would wish. Supposes “without your especial lordship” that he will put him to as much hindrance as he can. Hears that his brother, the warden of the manors, Dr. Thorneden, is called dean of Christchurch in the Archbp.'s house. Hoped, and still hopes, by Cromwell's favour to have had the office. Has been prior twenty-two years and it would be much displeasure to him in his age to be put from his living or from his chamber and lodging. Hears also that the Archbp. will take away the keys of his chamber. If so, doubts whether he shall have the same keys or chamber again. Can have no comfort or help but in Cromwell. Cromwell's letter that he should have the chamber with all commodities of the same as he had before, was a great comfort to him. Trusts with Cromwell's favour to have it for the term of his life, which cannot be long, for he is above 62 years of age. Asks to know his pleasure by letter. Tuesday, 24 Feb. Signed.
Pp.
2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
24 Feb. 255. Robert Benett to Cromwell.
R. O. Dr. Lupton (fn. 15) lies dead-sick in his bed unlikely to live three days. I hear all his goods be “sperkled” abroad and gone. And as I am loth, guiltless, “to be had in disdain of his friends, as the clamorous noise now spreadeth,” this is the bill of Mr. Chambers's own hand sent to Dr. Lupton, which I procured in evidence of the truth. 24 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Privy Seal. Endd.
24 Feb. 256. Yarmouth.
R. O. Declaration of all such obligations as have been taken within the port of Yarmouth and creeks thereto belonging for grain and victuals to the King's use from 29 Nov. 30 Hen. VIII., on which day the King's restraint was delivered to the customers and controllers of the said port, to Michaelmas following.
The list contains 49 bonds for Yarmouth, 15 for Blakeney, and 3 for Dunwich, with the names of the persons and the amounts, and of the ports at which they are to be delivered.
“Also I have remaining in mine hands 24 obligations made from the 24th day of November Ao 31° unto the 24th of February then next following, because the day of bringing the certificate be not as yet expired.”
Pp. 10.
24 Feb. 257. Francis I. to Marillac.
R. O.
Kaulek, 164.
(Almost the
whole text.)
Norfolk has assured him of the good amity of the king of England. Among other things, he said, immediately after his arrival, that Hoyet had informed his master that, speaking lately with the Emperor of the English prisoner (fn. 16) released at Paris, he had used a word which could not be said sincerely in English or French otherwise than “ingrat,” which word the Emperor had taken very ill. The king of England had therefore despatched Norfolk to Francis as his most trusted friend to beg for his advice what to reply to the Emperor. Answered that the thing required reflection. Norfolk has since delivered a memorandum of the words used by Hoyet and the Emperor's answer. Sends copy of this with another memorandum delivered by the Imperial ambassador here upon the same subject, not materially different. Thinks, as he told Norfolk, that Henry need make no other reply to the Emperor (inasmuch as there is nothing in it touching his honour or otherwise), but to remind him that we all know the rank which kings ought to hold, and that the Emperor is king like us, and Emperor to boot. Norfolk had much other discourse with him on the part of his master to which he has made ample answer to be shown to his said master, to whom also Marillac shall show the contents of this. Has given Norfolk this packet for Marillac in order that both may speak the same language. For the affairs remaining to be settled with the Emperor, the cardinal of Lorraine and the Constable, will go in a few days to the Emperor. Abbeville, 24 Feb.
French.
R. O.
Kaulek, 165.
(The text.)
2. Article delivered by the Emperor of the reply he made to Master Hoyet.
Upon the “propos d'ingratitude” with which Hoyet reproached the Emperor touching the release of Brancetor:—That such words were of themselves improper for Hoyet to use to his Majesty, who had never been “ingrate” to the king of England or any other; that the reproach of ingratitude from a superior was suffered by an inferior who could not contradict; and when it was said between equals, each did what he considered necessary for his honour, and if it was said by the less to the greater, he either repelled it or laughed at it.
French. Modern transcript, p. 1.
R. O.
Kaulek, 165.
(The text.)
3. Copy of a memoir delivered by the duke of Norfolk.
When Hoyet complained of the ingratitude the Emperor showed in soliciting the release of the traitor and rebel Brancetor, the Emperor replied “I have had him delivered and wish you and your master to know that I am not ‘ingrat.’ If he has done me one good turn I have done him one as good or better, and besides I could not be ‘ingrat’ towards him. The lesser can be ‘ingrat’ towards the greater, but this term can scarcely be suffered between equals.”
French. Modern transcript, p. 1.
24 Feb. 258. Montmorency to Marillac.
R. O.
Kaulek 166.
(Extracts.)
Norfolk is now returning thither, and will report how graciously he has been received. Among other things he asked the King's advice touching the Emperor's words to Wyatt about the release of Brancetour. Before replying the King sent to his ambassadors with the Emperor to know what the words really were; and their account, enclosed, differs much from Norfolk's. The King said he thought his good brother should not trouble about it, as his honour was not touched. The amity between the two kings is as good as ever it was.
As to what Marillac writes about Count William, the man has been too well treated by the King and Constable, and has become so blind and demented, that he knows not where he is nor to what saint to devote himself. No certain news that the king of the Romans has arrived; but, by report, he may be in Brussels in a day or two. The Cardinal (fn. 17) and Montmorency will scarcely stop to be sent for to go there to finish the things commenced. Marillac shall communicate to Norfolk the article delivered by the Emperor touching his reply to Wyatt. Abbeville, 24 Feb.
Deliver the Duke a copy of the article if he wishes it.
French. Two modern transcripts, pp. 2, and pp. 3.
24 Feb. 259. John Butler to Bullinger.
Orig. letters
(Parker Soc.),
627.
Received, 12 Jan., letters from our English brethren, Ric. Hilles and Peterson, to this effect. The state of that kingdom is much more sound since the marriage of the Queen, who is a pious woman, by whom, it is hoped, the Gospel will be diffused. There is now no persecution, except of the victuallers, of which sect a certain impostor named Wattis (fn. 18) is now holding forth (O shame!) in the stocks in Canterbury bridewell, after having been accustomed to mouth it elsewhere in opposition to the Gospel. Meanwhile the Word is powerfully preached by one Barnes and his fellow ministers. Books of every kind may be safely exposed to sale; which I have thought it right to let Froschover know. The monasteries, wonderful to relate, are all destroyed, or will be before Shrovetide. Of the more wealthy, the two abbots of Glastonbury and Reading have been condemned for treason and quartered, and each of them is now rotting on a gibbet near his abbey gate— a worthy recompense for their imposture!
These good men [Hilles and Peterson] salute you. Peterson has pledged himself to me by letter to be with you ere long, to carry away the bows for which he bargained with Schentzius and others at Glaris last year. Have compassion on this exiled and destitute Scotsman, the bearer of a letter to you. [Basle], Feb. 24.
24 Feb. 260. [James V. to Paul III.]
Royal MS.
18 B. vi., 86 b.
B. M.
Hears from Ghinucci that the Pope desires him to withdraw his request for a legateship for the Card. of St. Andrews, lest other princes should make a like demand. Urges the necessity of the kingdom, and repeats his request. Holyrood, 24 Feb. 1539.
Copy. Lat., p. 1.
25 Feb. 261. Henry Palmer.
R. O. Original patent of his appointment as bailiff of Guisnes. See Grants in February, No. 107.
Parchment.
25 Feb. 262. Nicolas Robertsson to Cromwell.
R. O. Writes on behalf of the bearer, Thos. Goodyng, his kinsman, whose brother Richard refuses to abide by the arbitrement of Ric. Cromwell and one Mr. Tomewe, in a matter at variance between them. Boston, 25 Feb.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
25 Feb. 263. James V. to Charles V.
Royal MS.
18 B. vi., 85 b.
B. M.
Repeats the request he has already several times made for restitution of the ship and goods belonging to Kentigern Tennand, James Micgel, and Alex. Lamb, taken by John Martinez of Amalibia, Martin de Oyhoa, of Arona, and Dominic de Aloarado, of Devaa, to the value of 6,000 gold pieces. Desires credence for Angus herald, and Tennand. Edinburgh, 25 Feb. 1539.
Lat. Copy, pp. 2.
25 Feb. 264. [Wyatt] to Henry VIII.
Harl MS.
282, f. 119
B. M.
Nott's Wyatt,
392.
Yesterday, about 4 o'clock, the king of Romans arrived here, whither his sister (fn. 19) had come two days before, from Ghent, to meet him. Three hours later, the Emperor arrived from Ghent in post. Three or four score are imprisoned at Ghent, and it is thought that justice shall be done now the Emperor is absent. Mr. Parker, Mr. Blunt, and Mr. Gresham, Henry's servants, are here “about the provision.” Mr. Palmer left two or three days past. Awaits further instructions by Mr. Mason, and despatches this bearer chiefly because of the enclosed letter. Sends it so blotted with his hand, where the cipher was, so that Henry may see the very letter. It is of some importance, both for its “fresh date” and its news of Almain matters. The writer (fn. 20) penetrates far into matters of state. Could, if desired, obtain continual letters from him. Where he writes of the assembly to be, 1 March, at Wittenberg, Wyatt could, if necessary, write to him to go thither. As men now a days set forward their matters with false rumors, no doubt Henry's marriage (as he writes) is falsely reported there, and also his other deeds disguised to alienate the Germans. If Henry wish anything published there in his justification, Wyatt could get this man to translate and publish it. Will write to him to report what things are “sowed there in the people's ears,” in order that indirect provision may be made against them. As to the Italians and Spaniards, mentioned in the letter, doubtless the bruit deceived him, as it did the ambassador of Cleves in France, upon whose relation Wyatt wrote of it. Cannot learn that there is any truth in it. Desires to be remembered “for my short abode here.” Brussels, 25 Feb.
Copy, pp. 2. Begins: Please it your Majesty. Endd. in Wyatt's hand: From Brussels, 25 Feb., by Whetthell:—letters to my lord Privy Seal, Mr. Browne, Mr. Poynings, Mr. Dene (?), Mr. Vaughan.
25 Feb. 265. News from Antwerp.
R. O. Antwerp, 25 Feb.:—The Emperor is yet at Guanto, where he has imprisoned 40 of those who have most offended, who are likely to be punished according to their faults. His host there is daily increasing by numbers of lanzknechts from Almain, and they do much hurt to the country. He had 22 pieces of great ordnance brought from Malyns to Guanto, and it is said he will visit personally the chief towns and deprive them of their strengths. The King of Romans has come to Brussels, and a lord of Hungary named Gerom Lascha, who brings news of a six months' truce between the Turk, the Emperor, the Venetians, and the rest of Christendom; of which it is to be hoped a good peace will follow. The said Jerome is “a lord of adventure” who has heretofore served the Waywode and the Turk, and at other times the King of Romans.
P. 1.
26 Feb. 266. Thomas Vachell.
R. O. Copy of the grant to Thos. Vachell, 26 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. (see Grants in Feb. No. 115). Opposite the clause constituting him bailiff of the town of Reading, &c, is written in the margin in another hand, “upon these words riseth all the doubt.”
Lat., pp. 3.
26 Feb. 267. Anne of Cleves.
R. O. Copy of notarial certificate of the production, on Thursday, 26 Feb. 1540, before Werneherus ab Hosteden and Hen. Olisleger, councillors of Wm. duke of Cleves, of the precontract (detailed) of Anne of Cleves with the son of Anthony, duke of Lorraine, which appears to have been made on the 15 Feb. 1535.
Lat. pp. 2. Mutilated. The margin of the first page illegible from damp.
26 Feb. 268. Lord Lisle and the Council of Calais to Cromwell.
R. O. Since the last view he (fn. 21) sent of the grain in Calais, has, in pursuance of Cromwell's letter, got the corn within the East and West Pales to be brought in without bruit, and finds there is 1,000 qrs. of wheat over the first view. More is coming in daily; and both the soldiers' garner and the mayor's garner are sufficiently furnished. Not one grain shall depart out of the King's pales till further instructions. Has caused the brewers also to report what store they have of wheat and malt; it is 200 qrs. wheat and 560 qrs. malt, which will serve them but a small season. If they are to provide for half a year they have no money to pay it, and what they have is on credit. They want a commission to take up malt in England. Sends a view he has caused to be taken of the cattle in Marke and Oye. Wishes the commission granted by Cromwell for 5,000 of “billott” to be enlarged; the brewers spend as much themselves, as Cromwell will see by a bill enclosed, and the expense of fuel for a year or half a year is uncertain. Calais, 26 Feb. Signed: Arthur Lyssle k.: Ryc. Graynffeld: Edward Ryngeley: Robert Fouler: Thomas Palmer.
Pp. 2. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
ii. Report by Will. Page and Rob. Clare, made by order of the lord Deputy and the Council, 20, 21, and 22 Jan. 31 Hen. VIII., of the number of sheep, fat and lean, and also fat beefs and cows in the East Pale, with the names of the owners; viz., in Marke, Oye, Olderkerke, Newkerke, Hofkerke, and Gempe. Totals, 5,535 fat sheep, 8,476 lean sheep, 12 fat beefs or cows. Of these totals the numbers which belonged to Englishmen and strangers respectively are also given.
Pp. 4.
iii. Memorandum, showing that in the whole year 30 Hen. VIII. “and as much as sithens Michaelmas to this day,” 24 Feb., there have come to Calais, as appears by the custom books, 4,658,000 (xlvjc. ml. and lviij. ml.) of billott, and 2,202 load of logs.
P. 1.
26 Feb. 269. Nicolas Partridge to Bullinger.
Orig. Letters
(ParkerSoc.),
614.
Wishes he could give an equally satisfactory account of the English Church to that given by Bullinger of his. Not but that we are on a sufficiently sound footing. There does not exist here a single monk, at least in name. Punishment has been inflicted lately on three principal abbots (fn. 22) who had secreted property and conspired to restore popery. Good pastors freely preach the truth, nor has any notice been taken of them on account of the articles mentioned by Bullinger. The King, who is exceedingly merciful, would promote the truth and has desired certain bishops to consult about selecting 12 monasteries where boys might be brought up in learning. Parliament is summoned for the 8th April.
I am residing with Ant. Aucher, mayor of Dover, as tutor to his children, who wishes me to salute you in his name. Did not receive your letter of 20 Aug. till 26 Feb. You will receive by Rayner a gold angel for you to pay the boy Christian. I expect the annotations of Bibliander on the Proverbs and on Job, and would like to have your commentary on St. John's Gospel.
Salutations to Bullinger's wife, mother, sons and daughters, and to Rodolph Gualter, who, he wonders, has not written to him. Thanks for books sent by Froschover, which he expects, this fair, by Rayner who will give Froschover a pair of Oxford gloves for Bullinger. Feb. 26.
Salutations to Pellican and Leo, Bibliander, Megander, Ammian, Master Binder, &c.
27 Feb. 270. Sir John Wallop to Lord Lisle.
R. O. I have nothing to write but the hope that we shall live in peace this year, yet I would advise your lordship to make all things ready for war and not allow Poole and Donyngton craftily to convey away corn as they did before. I trust if my lord of Norfolk tarried with you one day, he would comfort you and advise you to sequester all crafty folks, I mean those who, like Poole, disobey the King's injunctions, not forgetting the flesh eaters. I beg you to communicate this letter to Mr. Comptroller, Mr. Treasurer, Mr. Porter, and Mr. Ruckwood; and to give my commendations to the Marshal and Under-marshal, without making them acquainted with this letter. I beg also to be commended to my lady and to Mrs. Basset, Mrs. Philip and Mary. Abbeville, 27 Feb. Signed.
P.
1. Add.: Deputy of Calais.
[27 (fn. 23) ] Feb. 271. [Christopher Mont] to Wryot[hesley].
Vit. B. xxi.,
166.
B. M.
“Domine Wryot[hesley] … advenissem audivi eo ad … quem apud my lord Debite … a prandio prodiens me per manum … quonam proficiscerer, et addidit secure … re posse, cui respondi iter mihi esse Argent[oratum ad Comitem] Guilielmum; qui (fn. 24) respondit, Mihi injunctum fuit [in mandatis] regiis ut in Gallia inquisitionem facerem super seru[icia quæ] ille comes regi Galliæ impendit, et ideo cuperem [me fuisse] in Anglia cum Serenissimo Rege ante tuam exped[itionem]. Et rogavit, Numquid Serenissimus Rex vult illi da[re annu]am pensionem? Cui respondi Serenissimum Regem esse conte[ntum] illi ex munificentia pro sua persona dare annuam pensio[nem]. Statim ille adjecit, Triumne milium coronatorum? Respondi …. At ille, Recte, et ex regia dignitate factum, nam ut in Galli[a] omnes strenui et bellicosi viri illum summa laude prosequuntur, ita nemo de illo male loquitur præter unum Const[abu]larium et ei addictos; illum vero Vogelsperger honestissimi quique (ut Ducis verbo utar), villanum nominant, et ignavum. In summa plurima apud me commemoravit pro laude comitis Guilielmi, eumque dignum esse adfirmavit quem tantus rex assumeret in suum famulitium. Deinde memini[t] quam bonæ voluntatis et synceri amoris Rex Galliæ persis[t]eret erga Serenissimum Angliæ regem. Tandem rogavit, ut se sedulo et amanter commendare vellem Comiti Guilielmo. Ego, inter hæc omnia, nihil Duci dixi de literis patentibus ad Comitem, nec ullam omnino mentionem vel de[pre]cationem feci ejus insimulationis, qua Dux me immerito no[ta]vit nuper, quia verebar vehemens ejus ingenium, dum g … aucupari vellem, quorsum evaderet. Ita bona grat[ia ab]eo dimissus sum. Ego nihildum scio quod scribere [possim]. Scriptum C[a]l[e]ti, 2[7] Februarii.” * * *
In Mont's hand, p. 1. Mutilated.
27 Feb. 272. Hanns Paur, Merchant of Nuremberg, residing at Antwerp to Cromwell.
R. O. Your servant has sent me, from Francfort, letters to be forwarded as quickly as possible to your Lordship. As no safe messenger was at hand, we hired the bearer for 10 crowns, to carry them to my brother Christopher Paur and James David, in London. Offers his services whenever Cromwell shall have any business with Nuremberg. Antwerp, 27 Feb. 1539.
Latin. Hol., p. 1. Add.
27 Feb. 273. Hans Paur, of Nuremberg, to Cromwell.
R. O. After the other letters were sent, new letters have been, late this night, received from Franckford, from your servant. Having engaged a new messenger (veredarius), has sent the same to his brother Christopher Paur and James David, in London, whom he commends. Offers his services in any part of Germany. Agreed with the former messenger for 10 crowns. 1½ shall be given to this. Antwerp, late this night, 27 February 1539.
Latin. Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
27 Feb. 274. James V. to Ghinucci.
Royal MS.
18 B. vi.,
87 b.
B. M.
On behalf of John Steinsoun, to whom Ninian, late prior of the Premonstratensian house of Quhithirn, dioc. Candidæ Casæ, assigned a pension of 80l. Scotch. The present prior, Malcolm, wishes to set apart a piece of land for the payment of this pension, and consents to the resignation of the vicarage of Mochram in favour of Steinsoun. Edinburgh, 27 Feb. 1539.
Lat. Copy, p. 1.
28 Feb. 275. [Lady Lisle] to [Anne Rouaud,] Madame du Bours.
R. O. You cannot tell how much I rejoiced to receive your good news by the bearer. I am very sorry to hear of Madame de Riou's illness. In accordance with your letter I send you a greyhound, the best I can get at present, hoping to send others some day to you and to your son. I will send to England for poodles (barbets), for I can get none in this town, except one, which I send to your son. He is very good at retrieving the head or bolt of a crossbow, both in water and on land, and will fetch a tennis ball or a glove put on the end of a stick, and other tricks. Commend me to your son, Mons. d'Agincourt, and his wife, your daughter. Calais, 28 Feb.
French. Draft, p. 1. Add.
28 Feb. 276. Aguilar to Charles V.
Add. MS.
28, 592,
f. 40.
B. M.
Wrote, on the 8th and 13th, negociations with the Pope as to defence against the Turk for this year. Germany. The affairs of Madame (the duchess of Florence) and Ottavio. Italian news. Rome, 28 Feb. 1540.
P.S.—Has received the Emperor's letter of the 13th for Ottavio to go immediately, and for Aguilar and Lope Hurtado to satisfy the Pope as far as possible.
Spanish. Modern copy from Simancas, pp. 16.
[29] Feb. 277. George Rolle to Lady Lisle.
The letter noticed in Vol. XIII., Part I., No. 368, about John Bassett's title to Esthagyngton, in reversion after the widow of Sir Wm. Coffyn, dec., belongs to this year.
29 Feb. 278. Lord Lisle.
R. O. Licence to Peter Bekwith, one of the King's retinue at Calais, to go to England for forty days. Calais, last day of Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. Signed and sealed.
29 Feb. 279. James V. to Henry VIII.
Royal MS.
18 B. vi., 87b.
B. M.
Received his writings, dated Greenwich, 27 Jan. last, and credence by his familiar servant, Ralph Sadler, gentleman of his Privy Chamber. Made answer to him in every point, as doubtless he will rehearse. Thanks him heartily for his present. Palace in Edinburgh, last day of February, 27 James V.
Copy, p. 1.
280. John ap Rice to Cromwell.
R. O. Cromwell's goodness of late, upon his suit made to him, puts him in confidence that where his word may do him good he will gladly bestow it. Asks him to remind the King of examinations, writing of professions, instruments touching his Grace's marriage, minutes of leagues, riding on his Grace's affairs and such other services as Ap Rice has done, and that, in consideration thereof, he may buy his farm of Herford, at the rate of the yearly rent expressed in his lease, paying 400l. in hand and the rest in four years; or else that the King would grant him the same state and term of years that he had from the late house of Gloucester, considering that the fine of 400 mks. paid to the late abbot came to the King's hands. If necessary, will pay a convenient fine, for he has dwelt there a long time and spent 100 marks in building. Would rather spend all to his shirt, than be put beside it. Since the said house will be erected or otherwise transposed shortly, the time is now only to do good herein.
Hol., p. 1. Add.: Lord Privy Seal. Endd.
R. O. 2. Considerations to be alleged to the King's highness on the behalf of John ap Rice.
That he wrote, for the King, professions for all the bps., abbots, priors and other ecclesiastical governors and persons, and keeps them, without fee or reward. That he wrote divers instruments concerning the King's marriage with queen Jane, the baptism of the Prince, Lady Mary's renunciation of appeal, and divers books of leagues between the King and outward princes. That he wrote the examinations of the late rebels that came to the Tower and of most of the prisoners that came thither these 4 or 5 years. He rode in post to Hull at the time of the late commotion, for the examination, and to see the execution of Halom and his accomplices, and made divers other journeys on the King's affairs. He made a breve docket to the King out of all his late visitation, “compendiously touching the name, th' order, the state, the number and the ‘detectes’ of every religious house within this realm.” Never molested the King with any suit till now. Is compelled to do so, by reason of the decay of his office, which chiefly consisted in elections of abbots and priors, now abolished.
In Ap Rice's hand, p. 1.
281. Thos. Pery to Ralph Vane.
Vesp. C. vii.,
102.
B. M.
Ellis 2d. S. ii.,
139.
“Hereafter followeth all manner of thing as concerning mine accusation and what proceeded thereof in the castle of Tryana as hereafter followeth in anno 1539.”
On 9 Oct. last, which was in the said year, was brushing clothes in his warehouse in Ayemonte when a priest, and two or three men with him, came in. The priest saw a brazen bell weighing some two kyntalls which Thos. Edwards, merchant of London, brought, in the ship the writer came in, to sell, and said “What a good Christian is your King of England to put down the monasteries and to take away the bells!” Answered “If you think that he be not a good Christian, go you thither and show his Grace so and he will make you answer.” He said “Do you say that he is a good Christian?” Answered that he was and was so taken in his realm. The priest said he was no good Christian, but a heretic, for he put down monasteries and sold the bells and was pope within his realm. Answered he had nothing to do with that, but he knew the King was a good Christian, and so he would declare before a notary.
Describes how next day he went to Leype about the lading of his ship and was there arrested on the 11th., by command of the vicar, and put in chains. On 21 Oct. the “algwazyll mayeor of the Inkyzissyone of Sywell” (Seville) examined him and made sequestration of all his goods (detailed); and would have carried him to Seville with bolts on his legs, but his friend, the duke of Beja, entered surety for him to present himself at the castle of Tryana. Came thither, 27 Oct., and there was kept till 8 Feb. without being suffered to speak to anyone. Describes at length numerous examinations he underwent during that period, both with and without torture, as to whether he thought the King a good Christian or had said the putting down of monasteries was well done. Finally, on 8 Feb., he, with John Robyns, Harry Hollande, Robt. Morgante, and Wm. Alcot, did public penance, described, and he received sentence, to be imprisoned in the prison of Perpetwe for six months, attending mass every Sunday in his habit of yellow canvas with red crosses, and forfeit all his goods. Was then taken back to the castle of Tryana, and thence, on Shrove Sunday, to the prison of Perpetwe, where he remains without a blanket or garment to his back.
Hol., pp. 7. Add.: “To his right worshipful Rayffe Vane, gentleman belonging to my lord Privy Seal, dwelling in Hadley beside Twnebryche in Kent, this be delivered.—The Mary Fortwne of Leye.”
Ib. f. 91b.
B. M.
2. Another copy addressed to Richard Fylde, merchant, in London.
Hol., pp. 8.
Harl. MS.
295, f. 146.
B. M.
3. Later copy of § 1 with the address copied as above.
Pp. 7.
282. Grants in February 1540.
Feb./Grants. 1. John baron Russell. Licence to alienate the manor of Caryfytz Payn and the moiety of the advowson of the parish church of Charleton Makerell, in Charleton Mackerell, Soms., and all lands, &c., in said place held of the King in chief; to Sir John Horsey. Westm., 3 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 16.
2. Licences to alienate:—
Stephen Barrett, and Th. Fryez. One messuage and certain acres of land, &c., in Elyng, Hants., to John Mille of Southampton. Westm., 4 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 6, m. 22.
Rob. Benslyn. 21½ acres of land in Southbyrlyngham, Norf., to Nich. Howlett. Westm., 4 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 17.
Rob. Benslyn. 10½ acres of land in Byrlyngham, Lyngwode and Beyghton, Norf., to Wm. Reynoldys, of Lyngwoode, and Rog. Reynoldys his son. Westm., 4 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 17.
Rob. Benslyn. A messuage called Wynters and 16½ acres of land in South Byrlyngham and Lyngwoode, Norf., to Wm. Smyth and Geo. Smyth his son. Westm., 4 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 17.
Rob. Benslyn. 5 acres of land in Byrlyngham and Lyngwoode, Norf., to Kath. Reynoldys, widow, and John Reynoldys, her son. Westm., 4 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 18.
Rob. Benslyn. 6 acres of land in Southbyrlyngham, Norf., to John Lemman. 4 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 18.
3. Commission of gaol delivery.
Salisbury Gaol: at the city. Sir Ric. Lyster, Sir Th. Willoughby, Ric. Lobbe, mayor, Sir Edw. Baynton, Sir Mich. Lyster, John Bonham, Th. Yorke, Barth. Husey, Chas. Bulkeley, John Abarough, Rob. Suth, Wm. Webbe, Th. Chafyn, and Hen. Goldeston. 4 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 5, m. 13d.
4. Commissions of Peace.
Midland Circuit:—Sir Walt. Luke, Sir Humph. Brown, the mayors of Lincoln, Coventry, Leicester and Nottingham; Sir Wm. Parre, Sir Wm. Feldyng, Sir Hen. Sacheverell, Sir Brian Stapleton, Sir John Byron, Sir Rob. Tyrwhytt, Sir John Thymolby, Sir Robt. Husey, Edm. Knyghtley, Rog. Wygston, John Haryngton, Edm. Molyneux, Anth. Nevell, Edw. Warner, John Beamount, Th. Harvey and Rob. Chauntrell. Westm., 4 Feb.
5. Western Circuit:—John lord Russell, Sir Ric. Lyster, Sir Th. Wylloughby, Sir Th. Denys, Sir Giles Strangwayes, Sir Ph. Champernon, Sir Nich. Wadham, Edw. Wylloughby, Sir John Horsey, Sir John Chamound, Sir John Fulford, Sir John Arundell, jun., Sir Th. Trenchard, Sir Hugh Paulett, Sir Hugh Trevavyon, John Rowe, serjeant-at-law, John Paulett, Wm. Porteman, Barth. Fortescue, John Stowell, Th. Sey[n]tabyn, John Bonham, Rob. Vyvyan, Ric. Pollard, Chas. Bulkeley, Barth. Husey, Ric. Andrewys, Ric. Phylleppes, John Harrys, Nich. Wylloughby, Wm. Thorp, Humph. Prydeaux, Wm. Thornell, John Norton, John Wy[n]tershull, and Th. Horner. Westm., 4 Feb.
6. Norfolk Circuit:—Andrew lord Wyndesore, John lord Mordaunt, Sir Edw. Mountagu, Sir John Baldwyn, the mayor of Norwich, Sir Rog. Townesend, Sir Wm. Paston, Sir John Heydon, Sir Geo. Somers, Sir Humph. Wyngfeld, Sir Rob. Payton, Sir Giles Alyngton, Sir Wm. Drury, Sir John Tyndall, Sir Th. Barnardeston, Sir John Seynt John, Sir Mich. Fyssher, Sir Laur. Taylard, Sir Th. Elyott, Sir Th. Longevyle, Ric. Crumwell, John Gostwyke, Ric. Suthewell, Edm. Wyndham, Th. Checheley, Rob. Holdyche, Rob. Ap Ryce, Th. Hall, Simon Fitz, Paul Darell, Th. Bacon, Th. Castell, Th. Downold, Rob. Drury, Ralph Lane, jun., Th. Rudstone, Nich. Luke, Geo. Gyfford, Nich. Hardyng and Clement Higham. Westm., 4 Feb.
7. Oxford Circuit:—Walt. lord Ferrers, Hen. lord Stafford, Sir Wm. Sulyerd, Sir John Porte, Sir Edm. Mervyn, serjeant-at-law, Sir Wm. Kyngston, Sir John Daunce, Sir Wm. Essex, Sir Wm. Barentyne, Sir Walt. Stoner, Sir Edw. Crofte, Sir Humph. Forster, Sir Edw. Wadham, Sir Chr. Baynham, Sir Jas. Baskervyle, Sir John Talbott, Sir John Gyfford, Sir Wm. Bassett, Sir Anth. Hungerford, Sir Simon Harecourte, Sir John Welshe, Sir Geo. Gresley, Sir Ph. Draycote, Sir Edw. Aston, Sir Geo. Gryffyth, Sir John Brygges, Sir Edm. Tame, Sir John Russell, jun., Sir John Brereton, Sir Rob. Nedeham, Sir John Clerke, Sir John Broun, Rog. Wygston, Wm. Whorwood, John Pakyngton, John Russell, Wm. Fermour, John Scudamore, John Welshe, Th. Vernon, Th. Bromeley, John Corbett of Lee, Walt. Wrottesley, Th. Holte, Dav. Broke, Th. Lane, Th. Monyngton, Rob. Wye, Rouland Moreton, Th. Newporte, Geo. Wylloughby, Wm. Cokesey, Hen. Brygges, Th. Wayneman, Ric. Warmecombe, Th. Havard, Nich. Chyppenham, Wm. Gateacre, Ric. Walweyn, Th. Vachell and John Lutton. Westm., 4 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 5, m. 28d.
8. City of Salisbury:—Thomas lord Audeley of Walden, C., Thomas lord Crumwell, P.S., Sir Ric. Lyster, Sir Th. Willoughby, Sir Edw. Baynton, Ric. Lobbe, the mayor, Sir Th. Arundell, Sir Mich. Lyster, John Bonham, Th. York, Barth, Husey, Chas. Bulkeley, Th. Ap Rice, John Abarowe, Rob. South, Wm. Webbe, Th. Chaffyn, Hen. Goldston. 4 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 5, m. 6d.
9. Somerset:—Thomas lord Audeley of Walden, C., Thomas duke of Norfolk, Treasurer, Charles duke of Suffolk, Lord President of the Council, Thomas lord Crumwell, P.S., Henry marquis of Dorset, Edward earl of Hertford, William earl of Southampton, Great Admiral of Eng., Henry earl of Bryggewater, J. bishop of Bath and Wells, John lord Russell, Henry lord Mautravers, John lord Audeley, William lord Stourton, Walter lord Hungerford of Heytesbury, Sir Wm. Paulett lord Seynt John, Sir Ric. Lyster, Sir Th. Willoughby, Sir Nich. Wadham, Sir Edw. Gorge, Sir Anth. Hungerford, Sir John Seyntlowe, Sir Th. Arundell, Sir Hen. Capell, Sir John Newton, Sir Wm. Carraunt, John Stowell, Th. Clerk, Edw. Rogers, Wm. Portman, Th. Stradlyng, Ric. Phyllyppes, Nich. Fitz James, Rog. Blewett, Dav. Broke, Alex. Popham, Anth. Gylbert, Alfred Fitz. Jamys, Rog. Basyng, Geo. Gylbert, Hugh Malett, Wm. Vowell, John Porter, Th. Horner. 4 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 5, m. 6d.
10. Mich. Stanhop, and Anne, his wife. Grant, in tail male of Michael, of the manor of Shelforde, Notts., belonging to the late monastery of Shelford, Notts.; the woods called the “Prior's Parke” and “Esthawe” in Gedlyng; the rectories of the parish churches of Shelforde, Saxendale, Gedlyng, Burton Joys, and North Muskham, Notts., Rowceby and Westburghe, Linc., and Elwaston and Okebroke, Derb., formerly appropriated to the said monastery; the following annuities which used to be paid to the said monastery, i.e. 33s. 4d. by the vicar of Deryngton, Linc., 33s. 4d. by the rector of Leysyngham, Linc., 6s. 8d. by the rector of Ryskyngton, 5s. by the rector of Dygby, Linc., 10s. by the rector of Stupton, Linc., 5s. by the rector of Repynghale, Linc., 10s. 8d. by the rector of St. Peter's in Lincoln; and all possessions of the monastery in Shelforde, Saxendale, Newton, Brigforde, Gunthorpe, Lowdeham, Cuthorp, Horyngham, Bulcott, Gedlyng, Carleton, Stoke, Lamcott, Flyntham, Long Collyngham, Cawnton, the town of Nottingham, Newarke, Burton Joys and North Muskham, Notts. and co. of the town of Nottingham, Elwaston, Alwaston, Brayeston, Kyrkehalome, and Okebroke, Derb.; the city of Lincoln; and in Ambaston, Fulbek, Rowceby, Westburgh, Deryngton, Leysyngham, Ryskyngton, Digby, Stupton, and Repynghale, Linc., and elsewhere in said cos.; in as full manner as — (blank), the late prior, held the same.
Except the site of the said late monastery and other possessions of the same monastery in Shelford formerly granted by patent to the said Michael and Anne, with the rents reserved thereon.
To hold by a yearly rent of 119l. free of all other charges, except the following annual fees and rents, &c.: 53s. 4d. for the office of bailiff; 6s. 8d. to John Greves for the custody of the woods of Gedlyng; 20s. payable to Edmund Asshefeld for life; 13s. 4d. payable to the dean and chapter of York; 6s. 8d. payable to the chamberlain of York; 16s. payable to the collegiate church of Southwell, Notts.; 6l. 13s. 4d. payable to the vicar of the parish church of Westburgh; 6l. 13s. 4d. payable to the cathedral church of Lincoln; 66s. 8d. payable to Elizeus Garland, chantry priest of Corpus Christi, in the church of Newarke, Notts., and his successors; 16s. 4d. payable to John Bullocke, deacon in Gedlyng church, and his successors; 26s. 8d. payable to a chaplain at Bulcott; 13s. 6d. issuing from the rectory of Shelford; 10s. 8d. issuing from the rectory of Saxendale; 3s. 9d. issuing from the rectory of Gedlyng; 12s. 8d. issuing from the rectory of Burton Joys; 8s. 11d. issuing from the rectory of North Muskham; 5s. 5d. issuing from the rectory of Westburgh, for procurations and synodals; 7s. payable to Mich. Stanhop and his heirs; 20s. payable to Francis earl of Shrewsbury and his heirs; 2½d. payable to Thomas earl of Rutland and his heirs; 12s. 4d. payable to the prior of St. John's of Jerusalem in England; 6s. 1d. payable to the prior of St. John's de Aquilo; 20d. payable to Geo. Stapleton and his heirs; 4d. payable to Brian Stapleton and his heirs; 14s. 1d. payable to Sir John Willoughby and his heirs; 12d. payable to Thomas Barre and his heirs; 40s. payable to the master of the hospital of Temple Bruerue, a brother of St. John's of Jerusalem in England. Del. Westm., 5 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 6, m. 16.
11. Ric. Duke and Elizabeth, his wife. Grant, in fee, for 1,727l. 14s. 2d., of the lordships and manors of Otterton and Budlegh alias Estbudlegh, Devon, which belonged to the late monastery of St. Saviour and SS. Mary and Bridget, Syon, Midd.; the advowsons of the vicarages and churches of Otterton and Harpford alias Harford and Fen Otery, Devon; and the churches and rectories of Otterton and Harpeford or Harford; with all lands, glebes, &c., in Otterton, Normeston, Houghton, Pasford, Patteston alias Pytteston, Harpeford alias Harford and Fen Otery, Devon, belonging to the said late monastery; and certain messuages, cottages, mills, &c., in Stouton and in the parishes of Harpeford alias Harford, Fen Otery, Otterton, Bykton, and Budleigh alias Estbudleigh, Devon, belonging to the said late monastery; also the water and course of the water of Oter, &c., Devon, with the fishery thereof; and free warren, view of frankpledge, and wreck of the sea in Otterton and Budleigh; and all messuages, lands, &c., in Otterton, Budleigh, Estbudleigh, Pasford, Houghton, Patteston alias Pytteston, Normeston, Pynne, Stouton, Bykton, Harpeford alias Harford, Fen Otery, Saltern, Tudwill, Polehayes, Knoll and Daldyche, Devon, and elsewhere in said co., belonging to the said manors, rectories, and churches; in as full manner as Agnes Jorden, the late abbess, held the same in right of the said monastery; to hold by the yearly rent of 9l. 12s. Del. Westm., 5 Feb., 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 4, m. 9.
12. Rob. Stanshawe, a groom of the King's chamber. Grant in fee for 30l., of the house and site of the late Friars Minors, commonly called “lez Grey Freres,” Reding, Berks; and the churchyard thereof, and all houses, &c., within the site, circuit, and precinct, and the walls and ditches of the said house:—To hold by the yearly rent of 6s. 8d. Greenwich, 31 Jan. 31 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 5 Feb.—P.S. Pat. p. 1, m. 36.
13. Edw. Gayle, of Feversham, Kent, “sherman.” Pardon for having killed Ralph Corveser, of Sethyngborne, Kent, in self defence. It appears by record that the said Edward and Ralph happened to meet at Sethyngborne and quarrelled about the purchase of a pair of spurs; whereupon some neighbours interfered to appease them, a certain Th. Marten holding the said Ralph in his arms, and Jasper Barbour doing the like to the said Edward; but nevertheless the said Ralph suddenly recoiled from the said Thomas and beat the said Edward on the head with a rod; upon which the said Edward, in self-preservation, gave the said Ralph, with a sword, a mortal wound upon the left arm, whereof he died the next day. Westm., 5 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 2, m. 16.
14. Sir Th. Arundell. Grant, in fee, for 400l., of the manor of Chesilbourne, Dorset, belonging to the late monastery of Shafton or Shaftesbury, Dorset; and the advowson of the parish church of Chesilbourne, Dorset; in as full manner as Eliz, Zouche, the late abbess, held the same; to hold by a yearly rent of 3l. 15s. 10d., with liberties. Del. Westm., 6 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 6, m. 22.
15. Sir Percival Harte. Grant, for 400l., of the manors of Hamerhall alias Great Belstede, Litle Belstede, and Braundeston alias Brampston, and the rectory of Wasshebroke, Suff., and the advowson of the vicarage and parish church of Wasshebroke, and of its annexed chapel of Velechurche, which belonged to the late monastery of Darteford, Kent; together with the annual pension of 6s. 8d. which the rector of Alpheton, Suff., used to pay to the said monastery; and all possessions of the monastery in Hamerhall, Great Belstede, Wasshebroke, Copdok, Litle Belstede, Braundeston alias Brampston, Magna Waldyngfeld, Parva Waldyngfelde, Illey Combusta, Harkenstede, Lavenham and Alpheton, Suff.; in as full manner as Joan Vane, the late prioress, held the same in right of the said late monastery:
To hold the said manor of Hamerhall alias Greate Belstede and the said rectory and advowsons in fee simple, by the yearly rent of 66s. 8d.; and the said manors of Litle Belstede and Braundeston alias Brampston, the pension, &c., in tail male, by the yearly rent of 36s. 2d., with liberties. Del. Westm., 6 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 4, m. 9.
16. Eliz. Hill, widow of Ric. Hill, late serjeant of the King's cellar. Grant, in fee, of the reversion and yearly rent of 4l. 13s. 4d. reserved upon a 21 years' lease, 28 Nov. 31 Hen. VIII., to Th. Radley of Inge at Stone, Essex, husbandman, of the manor called Stanley in Inge at Stone, Essex, late of the monastery of Berkynge, Essex. To hold by a rent, 10s. Westm., 4 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 6 Feb.—P.S. Slightly mutilated. Pat. p. 2, m. 21.
17. Geo. Carewe, clk. Presentation to the portion of Tytcombe in the church of Tyverton, Exeter dioc., void by the death of John Smyth, clk. Del. Westm., 6 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 3, m. 9.
18. Ric. White, alias Cannell, alias Chanon, of Estgrenwich, Kent. Pardon for having, 20 Sept. 29 Hen. VIII., assaulted and robbed Ric. Chambre and Nich. Broke, at Nunlane in the parish of Mepersale, Herts. Del. Westm., 6 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 6, m. 17.
19. Commissions of the Peace.
Lincolnshire, Holland:—Thomas lord Audeley, of Walden, Chancellor, Thomas duke of Norfolk, Treasurer, Charles duke of Suffolk,lord President of the Council, Thomas lord Crumwell, Privy Seal, William Earl of Southampton, Great Admiral of England, Thomas earl of Rutland, J. bishop of Lincoln, Edward lord Clynton, Sir Walt. Luke, Sir Humph. Broun, King's serjeant-at-law, Sir Wm. Husey, Sir Th. Hennege, Sir Th. Tempest, jun., Sir John Copledyke, Francis Broun, John Hennege, Anth. Eyrby, Nich. Roberdson, Th. Holland, Rob. Walpole, John Reede, Ric. Wolmer, Th. Halght, Ric. Ogle, jun., Anth. Roberdson, Ric. Reede, Blaise Holland, Ric. Goodyng, John Fryskenney, Th. Broun, Wm. Roberdes, John Tamworth. 6 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 5, m. 5d.
20. Essex:—Thomas lord Audeley of Walden, Chancellor, Thomas duke of Norfolk, Treasurer, Charles duke of Suffolk, lord President of the Council, Thomas lord Crumwell, Privy Seal, William earl of Southampton, Great Admiral of England, John Earl of Oxford, Great Chamberlain of England, Henry earl of Essex, Thomas earl of Rutland, Robert earl of Sussex, Henry lord Fitzwater, Henry lord Morley, William bishop of Colchester, Sir John Spelman, John Baker, Attorney-General, Sir Brian Tuke, Sir Richard Ryche, Sir Giles Capell, Sir John Raynesforth, Sir Wm. Pyrton, Sir Th. Darcy, Sir Humph. Wyngfeld, Sir John Seyntclere, Sir John Tyrell, Sir Humph. Broun, King's serjeant-at-law, Sir Rog. Cholmeley, serjeant-at-law, Eustace Sulyerd, John Poyntz of Hukkyngton, Edw. Tyrell, John Gatys, John Broun, John Jenour, John Lucas, Wm. Moryce, John Hasylwood, sen., Rob. Mordaunt, Ric. Hygham, John Pylbarough, Wm. Harrys, Barth. Prowse, John Edmondys, Th. Tey, Guy Crayford, John Blake. 6 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 5, m. 5d.
21. York, West Riding:—Thomas lord Audeley of Walden, C., Thomas duke of Norfolk, Trear., Charles duke of Suffolk, lord President of the Council, Thomas lord Crumwell, Privy Seal, C. bishop of Durham, William earl of Southampton, Great Admiral of England, Ralph earl of Westmoreland, Thomas earl of Rutland, Henry earl of Cumberland, R. bishop of Llandaff, William lord Dacre of Gyllesland, John lord Scrope of Bolton, John lord Latymer, Sir Ric. Lyster, Sir Chr. Jenney, John Hynde, King's serjeant-at-law, Th: Magnus, clk., Sir Marmaduke Constable, sen., Sir Wm. Evres, Sir Th. Tempest, Sir Wm. Gascoygn, sen., Sir Th. Wentworth, Sir Ralph Ellerker, jun., Sir Wm. Middelton, Sir Geo. Darcy Sir Rob. Nevyll, Sir Wm. Malyvery, Sir Geo. Lawson, Sir Wm. Copley, Sir Hen. Everyngham, Sir Chr. Danby, Sir Hen. Sayvell, Sir Marmaduke Tunstall, Sir John Dawney, Sir Th. Tempest of Braswell, Sir Wm. Maloury, Sir John Wentworth, Sir John Nevell, Th. Fayrefax, serjeant-at-law, John Uvedall, John Norton, Wm. Babthorp, Ric. Redman, Rob. Bowes, Rob. Chaloner, Ric. Bellasys, John Anne, Gervase Clyfton, John Polleyn, Th. Wentworth of Wentworth, Wm. Hungate, sen., Fras. Frobiser, Rog. Malett of Normanton, Th. Gryce, John Lambert, Th. Grene, John Pekk, Chas, Jakson, Anth. Awmond, John Gascoign, Th. Ryther, Ralph Poleyn of Scotton, John Wakefeld, Hugh Wyrall, Wm. Tankard, Th. Waterton. 6 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 5, m. 5d.
22. Commission of Gaol Delivery.
Barton gaol within the liberty of Thomas bishop of Ely: at Elye. John Hynde, King's serjeant-at-law, John Gooderyke, Th. Hutton, Geoff. Colvyle, Th. Rudston, John Burgoyn, Alex. Balaham, and Ric. Reede. Westm., 6 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 5, m. 13d.
23. Lincolnshire.—Commission to Sir John Villars, John Constable, and Humph. Stafford, to inquire whether Wm. Blewett be an idiot. Westm., 7 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 3, m. 25d.
24. John Beeke. Lease of the chief tenement of Shiningfelde, called Elyns, two other tenements there called Tomsons and Hacches, the land called Morys, a garden called Seyses, &c., lately belonging to the monastery of Reding, Berks., and now in the King's hands by the attainder of Hugh, the late abbot, of high treason; with reservations; term, 21 years; rent, 8l. On surrender of a lease of the premises to him (in reversion after Ric. Alsey), by the late abbot of Reding, and for a fine of 66s. 8d. Del. Westm., 8 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 21.
25. Th. Eldrige. Lease of the lands called Wynshurste, Retham, and Smythesmede, Berks., parcel of the demesne lands of Cholsey, and the tithe of the same lands; parcels of the lands belonging to the late monastery of Reding, in the King's hands by the attainder of Hugh, the late abbot; with reservations; term, 21 years; rent, 9l. 6s. 8d. On surrender of a lease of the premises, by the said Hugh, the late abbot, for which the said Thomas paid the abbot a fine of 20l. Del. Westm., 8 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 21.
26. John Oldnale. Lease of the site of the manor of Rowington, Warw., and certain granaries, lands, &c. (specified), together with the rectory of Rowyngton and tithes, parcels of the lands of the late monastery of Redyng, Berks., now in the King's hands, by reason of the attainder of Hugh, the late abbot; with reservations of woods and advowsons of churches; term, 21 years; rents, 8l. for the manor, and 4l. for the rectory. On surrender of a similar lease by the late monastery, and payment of a fine of 20 mks. Del. Westm., 8 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 20.
27. Commission of gaol delivery:
Winchester city gaol:— At the city. Wm. Haycroft, mayor, Sir Ric. Lyster, Sir Th. Wylloughby, John Norton, Wm. Thorpe, John Wyntershull, Rob. Bager, Walt. Chaundler, and Th. Bedeham. Westm., 8 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 5, m. 12d.
28. John ap Rice of Paynscastell in the lordship of Elvell, marches of Wales. Pardon for having 8 Sept. 29 Hen. VIII., stolen three sheep, value 7s., the goods of John ap Howell Vaughan, of Clifforde in co. Hereford. Del. Westm., 9 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Countersigned by the president and council of the Welsh marches, i.e., Bp. Roland Lee, Sulyard, Porte, Pakington, Croft, and Russell.
29. John Bady of Worthen, Salop, yeoman. Pardon for having received and abetted Jevan Gryffry, late of the lordship of Kedewen, marches of Wales, yeoman, knowing the said Jevan to have stolen, 15 Aug. 28 Hen. VIII., a bay horse and gray mare belonging to some person unknown at Westbury, Salop. Del. Westm., 9 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Signed by the Welsh Council. Pat. p. 2, m. 15.
30. Ph. Nycholl of Leomynster, Heref. Pardon for having 21 Aug. 29 Hen. VIII., broken into the house of Th. Dewall, at Dewall, Heref., and stolen therefrom 13s. 4d. in coin. Del. Westm., 9 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Signed by the Welsh Council. Enrolled on Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 4, m. 13.
31. Th. Barcar, of Uslett, Yorks., W.R., being a boy under the age of nine years. Pardon for having accidentally killed one Anne Wylkynson, under the age of three years, while shooting with arrows at a mark from Whytgyft church, Yorks. Westm., 9 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 16.
32. Denis Bouthe. Annuity of 4s. issuing from the lands in Fetherston and Preston Jaklyn, Yorks., late of Th. Baxter, deceased, during the minority of Rob. Baxter, s. and h. of the said Thomas: with the wardship and marriage of the said heir. Del. Westm., 9 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 28.
33. Commissions of the peace:
Devon: Thomas lord Audeley of Walden, C., Thomas duke of Norfolk, T., Charles duke of Suffolk, L. P. of the Co., Thomas lord Crumwell, P. S., Henry marquis of Dorset, William earl of Southampton, Gt.Ad. of Eng, J. bishop of Exeter, Sir John lord Russell, John lord Zouche, Sir Ric. Lyster, Sir Th. Wylloughby, Sir Th. Denys, Sir John Fulford, Sir John Chamound, Sir Th. Stukeley, Sir Ph. Champernon, Sir Geo. Carewe, John Arundell, John Rowe, serjeant-at-law, Ric. Pollard, Barth. Fortescu, Ric. Eggecombe, Ric. Hals, Wimond Carewe, Hugh Stukeley, Ric. Yeard, Rob. Chydley, John Pollard, Humph. Prydeaux, John Harrys, John Amadas, Rob. Brytt, John Whyddon, Lewis Fortescu, Alex. Wood, Anth. Bery, John Brydgeway, John Pasmer, Wm. Rowp. Westm., 9 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 5, m. 7d.
34. Cheshire:—Thomas lord Audeley of Walden, C., Thomas duke of Norfolk, T., Charles duke of Suffolk, L.P. of the Co., Thomas lord Crumwell, P.S., R. bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, Sir Walt. Devereux lord Ferrers, Sir Wm. Sulyerd, Sir John Porte, Sir Edw. Croft, Sir Pet. Dutton, Sir Rice Maunsell, Sir Wm. Bruerton of Bruerton, Sir Wm. Standley, Sir Wm. Venables, Sir Hen. Delves, Sir Edw. Fytton, Sir John Donne, Sir Ranulph Maynwayryng, Sir John Helford, Rog. Wygston, John Pakyngton, John Vernon, Th. Holcroft, John Russell, John Holcroft, Th. Holt, Hugh Starky, John Massy, Edm. Savege, Urian Bruerton, Wm. Moreton, Ric. Hassall, John Byrkenhed. Westm., 9 Feb. Pat 31 Hen. VIII. p. 5, m. 7d.
35. Gloucestershire: — Thomas lord Audeley of Walden, C., Thomas duke of Norfolk, T., Charles duke of Suffolk, L.P. of the Co., Thomas lord Crumwell, P.S., Wm. earl of Southampton, Gt. Ad. of Eng., R. bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, Walter lord Ferrers, Sir Wm. Sulyard, Sir John Porte, Edm. Mervyn, King's serjeant-at-law, Sir Wm. Kyngston, Sir Edw. Croft, Sir Edw. Wadham, Sir John Brydges, Sir Chr. Bayneham, Sir Anth. Hungerford, Sir Walt. Denys, Sir Edm. Tame, Rog. Wygston, John Pakyngton, John Vernon, John Russell, Anth. Kyngston, John Barlowe, clk., Ric. Lygyn, Th. Whytyngton, Rouland Morton, Nich. Wykes, John Arnold, Arth. Porter, John Gyse, John Huntley, Geo. Bayneham, Ric. Reede, Rob. Whytney, John Poynes, Leonard Poole, Dav. Broke, Rob. Wye, Th. Holt, Ric. Hassall, Wm. Stumpe, Th. Matson, Ric. Coton, Jas. Clyfford, Th. Lane, Ric. Brayne, Anth. Straunge, Th. Haward. Westm., 9 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 5, m. 7d.
36. Wm. Gonson. Grant, in fee, of the reversions and rents reserved upon the following Crown leases, viz.:—
(1.) 24 Nov. 31 Hen. VIII., to Th. Myldemaye, of the house and site of the college of Acon, in the city of London; term, 21 years; rent, 3l. 6s. 8d.
(2.) 20 May 31 Hen. VIII., to Wm Stokes of the lands, &c., called “le Spittellande,” a field called “le Brodefeld,” adjoining the said lands, a house called “le Graunge Howsse” with garden adjoining, and two other houses called “a Oxehowsse,” and “a garner” in the parish of St. Mary, Maldon, Essex, in as full manner as the said William then held the same: which premises belonged to the late monastery of Bileigh; term 21 years; rent, 6l. 12d.
Also grant as above, of a messuage or brew-house called “le Red Lyon,” and all gardens, &c., thereto adjoining in the parish of St. Botolph in Estsmythfelde near London, Midd., which belonged to the late monastery of St. Mary of Graces next the Tower of London, Midd.; the site of a chapel in the hamlet of Mulsam next Chelmisford, Essex, belonging to the late monastery of St. Osith; and all lands, &c., in the said hamlet, belonging to the said late monastery; and a moiety of the tithes in the lordship of Mulsham, likewise belonging to the said late monastery: also, the whole manor of Magna Warley, Essex, belonging to the late monastery of Barking, with the advowson of the parish church of Magna Warley; and all messuages, &c., in Magna Warley, Shenfelde, and Stifforde, or elsewhere, Essex, belonging to the said manor; in as full manner as Dorothy Barley, the late abbess of Barkyng held the same: to hold the premises at certain stated yearly rents; with liberties. Del. Westm., 10 Feb. [31] Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 44.
37. Th. Storrett of Yarom, York, N. R., butcher. Pardon for having killed Wm. Lowell in self-defence. Westm., 10 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 16.
38. Wm. Pomfrett, of Maydenhith, Berks., shoemaker. Pardon for having killed in self defence, Roger Cosyn, who attacked him while passing from Maydenhith to Bray. Westm., 10 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 1, m. 16.
39. Sir Th. Denys, of Holcombe Burnell, Devon. Grant, in fee, for 1,127l. 3s. 4d., of the manor and manors of Litlam alias Littelham and Exmouthe, Devon, belonging to the late monastery of Shirbourne, Dorset; in as full manner as the last abbot held the same; also, the messuage formerly in the tenure of Kath. Lytton, in the parish of St. Peter-the-Less, in the ward of Beynardes Castell in London; which messuage lately belonged to the late monastery of Croxden, Staff., and is worth 26s. 8d. a year.
Also the hundred of Budlegh alias Estbudlegh, Devon, which came to the King's hands by the attainder of Henry Courteney, late marquis of Exeter.
To hold by the following yearly rents, viz.: — for the manors of Litlam and Exmouthe, etc., 6l. 3s. 10d., and for the messuage in London, 2s. 8d.:—the hundred of Estbudlegh to be held by the twentieth part of a knight's fee without any rent. Del. Westm., 11 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 22.
40. Sir Th. Darcy, of Danburye, Essex. Grant, in fee, for 612l., of the manor of Hoton belonging to the late monastery of St. Martin, Battle, Suss.; the advowson of the parish church of Hoton; and all messuages, lands, etc., in Hoton, Brendwode, Shenfelde, Mounteneysynge, Billeryca, Ronwell, Lachenden, Magna Burstede, Parva Burstede, and Nevenden, Essex, belonging to the said late monastery; in as full manner as the last abbot of the said late monastery held the same; at a rent of 68s.; with liberties. Del. Westm., 11 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 13.
41. Paul Sydnor and Alice, his wife. Grant in fee, for 240l., of the reversion and rent of 14l. 13s. 4d. reserved upon a 31 years' lease granted to Rob. Jonour, by patent 23 Nov. 27 Hen. VIII., of the manor of Barnes in Brancheley, Kent, the advowson of the church or rectory of Brancheley, and the rectory of Barnes in Brancheley.
The premises came to the King's hands by reason of the forfeiture of Thomas Wolsey, late abp. of York.
To hold by the yearly rent of 26s. 8d. by way of tenth. Del. Westm., 11 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p 2, m. 23.
42. Sir John Williams, master of the Jewels. To be bailiff of the manor of Pottersbery, and parker or keeper of the park of Potterspery, Northt.; with fees of 20s. a year as bailiff and 2d. a day as keeper of the park. Westm., 5 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 11 Feb.— P.S. Pat. p. 6, m. 17.
43. Fulk Rutter. Lease of 38⅓ acres formerly of John ap Jevan in the vill of Kernevett in the commote of Keymergh, 6 acres, “de dimid' plac'” (?) of the same land in the town of Lleweny in the commote of Issalett, 10 acres late of Wm. Wynnaway in the town “Parcus de Lleweny,” 4 acres, 3 roods, 5 perches, late of the said William there, 10 acres late of Hen. Houghton there, 2 acres, 3 roods, 5 perches, late of Wm. Pigott there, 4 acres, late of the said William there, 2 acres late in the tenure of the said William, and 2 acres late in the tenure of Rob. Rutter, in the town of Polleflatte; all which premises are parcel of the lordship of Denbigh; with reservations; term, 21 years; rent, 26s. 8d. and 7s. 6d. of increase: On surrender by Rob. Jones and the said Fulk Rutter, of patent 28 June 14 Hen. VIII., granting a similar lease to them and one Ric. Rutter, now deceased. Del. Westm., 11 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 19.
44. John Wynchecombe. Grant in fee, for 2,619l. 13s. 4d., of the manors of Burhulbury alias Bokylbury and Thacham, and the whole borough of Thacham, Berks., with all appurtenances in Burhulbury alias Bokylbury, Thacham, Henwyke, Crokeham, Hammyllcorteland, and Newbury, Berks.; also the rectories of Burhulbury and Thacham, &c., with the advowsons of the vicarages, and all appurtenances (except the tithes, &c., in Mygeham, Greneham, Colthrop, and Crokeham, belonging to the said rectory of Thacham): — All which premises belonged to the late monastery of Redyng and came to the King by the attainder of Hugh Cooke, the last abbot. Rent, by way of tenth, 14l. 11s. 1d. Del. Westm., 12 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 1, m. 44.
45. Wm. Edmunds. Lease of a meadow in Reding lying between the great meadow there called le Estmede on the east and the common way from Reding to Cawsham on the west; parcel of the lands of the monastery of Reding, Berks., in the King hands by the attainder of Hugh the late abbot; term 21 years; rent 8l. and 20d. of increase: On surrender of a lease of the same meadow under the seal of the said late abbot. Del. Westm., 12 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 21.
46. Chas. Hey alias Bretherton, of Newton in Makerfeld, Lanc., yeoman. Pardon for having, on the 22 June 25 Hen. VIII., mortally wounded Ric. Byllyng. Del. Westm., 12 Feb.—S.B. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 1, m. 43.
47. Jas. Benett, of Colchester, Essex, fuller, servant of John Maynerd, sen. Pardon for having, 1 June 29 Hen. VIII., robbed his master of 106l. 17s. 6d. in money at Colchester. Del. Westm., 12 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Endd.: at the suit of the lord Chancellor. Pat. p. 6, m. 6.
48. Leonard Warcopp alias Carliell, one of the King's heralds at arms. Annuity of 20 marks from lands in Somerby and Sowerby Sherly, Yorks., which belonged to Hen. Hamerton, deceased, during the minority of Margaret and Alice Hamerton, ds. and coheirs of the said Henry; with the wardship and marriage of the said Margaret and Alice. Del. Westm., 12 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 6, m. 4.
49. Wm. Calverley. Annuity of 5l. issuing from lands in Bolton, Merley, and Karlinghawe, Yorks., which belonged to Walt. Calverley, dec., during the minority of Anne Calverley, d. and h. of the said Walter; with the wardship and marriage of the said Anne. Del. Westm., 12 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 6, m. 4.
50. John de John, born subject of the King of the French. Denization. 12 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 2, m. 34.
51. Reynold Scott, esquire of the Royal Body, and Ric. Keys, serjeant-at-arms, commissioners of the King's works at Sandgate, Kent. Commission to take and retain in the King's name as many free masons, carpenters, herdhewers, joiners, carvers, glasiers, bricklayers, tilers, smiths, plumbers, plasterers, sawyers, daubers, fellers of trees, diggers, and other artificers and laborers as they shall think requisite for the completion of the King's works, and as much stone, timber, and other materials as they shall require, with carriage for the same; and also to take up horses at Gravesend, Rochester, Syttyngborne, Caunterbury, or elsewhere, at the usual prices; with power to imprison those who refuse such assistance without bail or mainprise during their pleasure. Westm., 12 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 6, m. 12 (undated).
52. Commission of the Peace:
Cornwall: Thomas, lord Audeley of Walden, C., Thomas, duke of Norfolk, T., Charles, duke of Suffolk, Lo. P. of the Co., Thomas lord Crumwell, P.S., Henry marquis of Dorset, William earl of Southampton, Gt. Ad. of Eng., J. bishop of Exeter, Sir John lord Russell, Sir Ric. Lyster, Sir Th. Wylloughby, Sir John Arundell de la Hern, Sir John Chamond, Sir John Arundell, Sir Th. Arundell, Sir Hugh Trevavyon, (fn. 25) John Arundell de la Talferu, sen., John Arundell of Treryse, John Carmynowe, Ric. Eggecombe, Rob. Vyvyan, Ric. Penrose, Hen. Tracarell, Th. Seyntabyn, Wimond Carewe, Walt. Burlas, Wm. Carneshewe, Rob. Langdon, Th. Chamond, Humph. Travylyan, Pet. Coryngton, Nich. Carmynowe, Steph. Gayer, Rob. Hyll, John Tubbe, Wm. Bere. Westm., 12 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 5, m. 8d.
53. Rog. Stockly, clk., M.A. Licence to exchange one of the four incompatible benefices now lawfully held by him. Del. Westm., 13 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 15. Rym. XIV. 652.
54. Ric. Snell, a yeoman of the crown. Lease, for a fine of 60l., of the demesne lands following, belonging to the manor of Domerham, viz.:—the arable lands, &c., with granary and stable belonging to the “mancion place” of the said manor; the farm of Bollesbrugh with the “Conyger” and conies there; a water-mill in Domerham, late in the occupation of John Roode; the farm of 1,100 sheep and 80 lambs, and 70 acres of arable land at Towehide in the said manor with tithes thereof; 70 acres of arable land late in the occupation of Robt. Laurence and John Harreis; a piece of land in Domerham called Drakenorth, alias Drakenworth of 15 acres, late in the occupation of Rob. Gardyner; another piece of land in the occupation of Morgan Wykes; another called “le Orchard,” late in the occupation of Walt. Hunt; another called Forthbury, late in the occupation of John Holewey; a parcel of land there called Golderscroft, late in the occupation of John Smyth; another called Edylake, late in the occupation of John Garrett; another called Parsons Orchard in Domerham; a perch of land with 80 acres of arable land at Alyngford in the said manor, with tithes thereof; 80 acres of arable land, late in the occupation of Th. Sadler, alias Wever; and a croft called the “graunge of the lords demeanes” of Towhide, late in the occupation of Valentine Carpenter; parcel of the lands of the late monastery of Glastonbury, Soms., which came to the King's hands by the attainder of Richard, the late abbot; with reservations; term, 21 years; rent, 46l. 16s. 4d. On surrender by the said Ric. Snell of a lease of the premises by the said abbot and monastery. Del. Westm., 13 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 17.
55. John Holcroft and Th. Holcroft, esquire of the Royal Body. Grant in survivorship of the office of receiver of the possessions of the late monastery of Lenton, Notts., in cos. Notts., Derby, Lanc., Chester, Northt., or elsewhere in England, in the King's hands by the attainder of Nicholas, the late prior, with fees of 20 marks a year, and 20s. per 100l. of the issues. Westm., 12 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. Del. 13 Feb.—P.S. Pat. p. 2, m. 15.
56. Sir Richard Riche, Chancellor of the Court of Augmentation. Grant in fee, for 891l., of the manor of Maylandhall, Essex; the rectories of Maylande, Southmynster, and Althorne, Essex, with the advowsons of the vicarages of the parish churches; and six acres of wood called Byrchewoode, in the parish of Purlyghe, Essex: —which belonged to the late monastery of St. Osith's, Essex; and all other possessions of that monastery in Maylande:
Also 2 messuages, 2 cottages, and 600 acres of marsh in Burneham, Southmynster, and Althorne, Essex, by the name of the two marshes called Halywell Marshe and Twyselworthe Mershe, in the parish of Burneham; the marsh called Turnecole (elsewhere Turneclose) Mershe, in the parish of Southmynster; and the marsh called Landesende, in the parish of Althorne, &c., which belonged to the late monastery of Halywell, Midd.
Rent, 60s.; the grantee discharged of all burdens, except an annuity of 100s. to Sir Th. Audeley, the lord Chancellor. Del. Westm., 14 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 18.
57. Sir Nich. Pointz. Grant, in fee, for 835l. 10s., of the manors of Osilworthe and Bagpathe, Glouc., parcel of the possessions of the late monastery of Kyngeswood, Wilts.; the grange called Calcote in Coldenewenton, Glouc., the messuage, grange, lands, and tenements, called Bagston, in Wickwarr, Glouc., the two messuages, granges, &c., in Hill, alias Hull, Glouc., the two cottages, &c., in Acton, Glouc., the woods called Highwood and Copieswood in Kyngeswood, Wilts.; and all possessions of the said monastery in Hill, alias Hull, Osilworthe, Bagpathe, Acton, Calcote, and Bagston, Glouc., which Wm. Frenche, the late abbot, held in right of the same. Rent, 4l. 12s. 11d., free of all charges, except a life annuity of 5l. 6s. 8d., granted to the said Nicholas, and another of 40s. granted to Th. Matson, out of the said manor of Osilworthe. Del. Westm., 14 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 16.
58. Sir John Gage, of West Fyrles, Sussex, and Philippa, his wife. Grant in tail male, for 200l., of the manor of Alcyston, Suss., belonging to the late monastery of St. Martin, Battle, Suss.; with a tile house, and all appurtenances of the manor in Alcyston, Telton, Blachenton, Selmeston, Erlyngton, Helynglee, Bramber, Barwyke, Fynden, Wasshington, Kyngeston, Bowsey, Portyslade, Olde Shorham, and Newe Shorham, Suss., and elsewhere; except certain lands (specified) in the borough of Telton, in the parishes of Selmeston and Alcyston, Suss., which were lately granted to Sir Edw. Bray, in fee simple. To hold, in tail male to the said Sir John, by a rent of 10l. Del. Westm., 14 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 1, m. 43.
59. William lord Sturton. Annuity of 5l. 6s. 8d. issuing from the manor of Wysshford Magna, Wilts., late of Wm. Brent, deceased, during the minority of Ric. Brent, s. and h. of the said William; with the wardship and marriage of the said heir. Del. Westm., 14 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 1, m. 43.
60. Cheshire: Commission to John Massye, Wm. Sneyde, and Ric. Bruche, concerning the idiotcy of Th. Percyvall. Westm., 14 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 3, m. 25d.
61. Commission of the Peace:
Herts: Thomas lord Audeley of Walden, C., Thomas duke of Norfolk, T., Charles duke of Suffolk, Lo. P. of the Co., Thomas lord Crumwell, P.S., Henry earl of Essex, Thomas earl of Rutland, J. bishop of Lincoln, T. bishop of Ely, Henry lord Morley, Sir John lord Russell, Sir John Spelman, John Baker, Attorney General, Sir Richard Riche, Sir Hen. Parker, Sir Giles Capell, Sir Griffin Donne, John Goderyke, Hen. Gooderyke, Rob. Lytton, John Bolles, John Copwood, Geo. Hyde, John Brokett, Edw. Brokett, John Peryent, sen., John Conyngesby, John Cok, Th. Knyghton, John Gyll, John Newporte, Rob. Dacres, Th. Skypwyth, Th. Hemmynge, Ric. Ranshawe, Hen. Heydon, Wm. Gery, John Sewster. Westm., 14 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 5, m. 8d.
62. Nich. Snell. Lease of the tithes of corn and hay, belonging to the rectory of Domerham, Wilts., parcel of the possessions of the late monastery of Glastonbury, Soms., in the King's hands by the attainder of Richard, the late abbot; with reservations; term, 21 years; rent, 10l. and 2s. of increase; on surrender of a lease of the same from the late abbot. Del. Westm., 15 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. — S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 15.
63. Sim. Hiett. Lease, for a fine of 20l., of the site of the manor of Ivyngton, with all lands, &c., thereto belonging; the pasture and pannage of Ivyngton parke, and the heath thereto annexed; a pasture called Fattyngmore; a mill called Ivyngtonsmyll; with tithes of the corn and flax of Ivyngton, Brereley and Parvyn; and all tithes of lambs; wool, geese, pigs, and pigeons of Ivyngton, Brereley, Warton, Stagbache, and Chorlestrey; with tithes of wool and lambs of a tenement in Leomynstr, called Redyngs Place and West Harnes; and certain farm stock and implements (specified and valued); all which are parcel of the lands, late of the monastery of Reding, now in the King's hands by the attainder of Hugh, the late abbot there, of high treason; with reservations; term, 21 years; rent, 46l. 13s. 4d.; on surrender of a similar lease from the late monastery. Del. Westm., 15 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 29.
64. John Worthyall, clk. Licence to hold one other cure or incompatible benefice, along with two which he now holds. Del. Westm., 15 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Endd.: at the suit of the bp. of Chichester. Pat. p. 6, m. 8.
65. Ric. Venables. To be one of the serjeants-at-arms, with fees of 12d. a day. Del. Westm., 15 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Endd.: “Venables to be serjeant of arms giving his attendance upon my lord Chancellor.” Enrolled on Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 4, m. 12.
66. Oliver Leder. Licence to alienate the tenement late in the tenure of William Bromwell, in the parish of St. Thomas Apostle in London, to Sir Rob. Dormer and Joan Browell, widow, and the heirs and assigns of the said Robert for ever. Westm 16 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 6, m. 22.
67. Gaol of John, late abbot of Peterborough, at Peterborough: Commission of gaol delivery to Sir Edw. Mountagu, Edw. Saunders, Edw. Warner, Th. Brudenell, John Lane, Edw. Gryffyn, John Turnour, and Wm. Dudley. Westm. 16 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 5. m. 13d.
68. Peterborough; liberty of John, late Abbot: — Commission of the Peace to Thomas, lord Audeley of Walden, C., Thomas duke of Norfolk, T., Charles duke of Suffolk, Lo. P. of the Co., Thomas lord Crumwell, P.S., William earl of Southampton, Gt. Ad. of Eng., John lord Russell, Sir Edw. Mountagu, Edw. Saunders, Edw. Warner, Th. Brudenell, John Lane, John Tournor, Rob. Wyngfeld, Wm. Dudley, Edw. Gryffyn. Westm., 16 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 5, m. 9d.
69. Ant. Hennyngham. Livery of lands as s. and h. of Sir John Hennyngham, deceased, with the reversion of the dower of dame Alice, widow of the said John. Del. Westm. 17 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 3, m. 34.
70. Sir Th. Denys. Licence to alienate the messuage formerly in the tenure of Kath. Lytton, widow, in the parish of St. Peter the Less in the ward of Baynerdys Castell in London; which belonged to the late monastery of Croxden, Staff., to Matt. Coltehirste, his heirs and assigns for ever. Westm., 17 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 6, m. 38.
71. Walt. Paslewe, of Ryddelesdem, Yorks. Grant in fee, for 274l., 13s. 4d., of the messuages, granges, lands, &c., now in the several tenures of John Mylner, Wm. Lange, Rob. Mylner, Leonard Thomas, Wm. Migeley, Laur. Mygley, Wm. More, John More, Edw. Fether, Edw. Elleson, Wm. Rodeley, Hen. Wilson, John Ellemworth, Rob. Ellenworth, Jas. Hardye, the widow of Ric. Elleson, John Kyghley, Rob. Firth, John Lacoke, Ultrid Glover and Rob. Fether, in Ayrdale and Harden, Yorks., belonging to the late monastery of Ryvalles, Yorks., and the yearly rent and service which the said Walter and his ancestors have rendered to the said late monastery for lands which the said Walter holds of the King in Ayrdale and Harden; and all messuages, lands, &c., in Ayrdale and Harden belonging to the said late monastery; in as full manner as the last abbot held the same. To hold at a rent of 30s. 8d. Del. Westm., 18 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 5, m. 13.
72. Hen. Marland. Lease of a tenement in Marland, Lanc., and certain acres of land, &c., in the lordship of Castelton Marland, parcel of the lands belonging to the monastery of Whalley, Lanc.; now in the King's hands by the attainder of John, the late abbot, of high treason; term 21 years; rent 21s. 8d. Del. Westm., 18 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 5, m. 31.
73. Sir John Horsey. Lease of the site of the manor of Yarlington, Soms., with a hall, chapel, kitchen, and gate-house and other houses, &c., and closes, &c., called Olde Parke, le Courte Felde, “le Courte close,” “le Brechehill,” “le Rie lande,” “Carie mede,” and “Shipton More,” Soms., parcel of the lands late of Margaret countess of Salisbury, attainted:—with reservations; term 21 years; rent 14l. 2s. 8d. Westm., 18 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 2, m. 13.
74. John Northcote a yeoman of the Guard. Grant of the office of improver of the lordship of Newporte, S. Wales, vice Wm. Morgan, dec., with fees of 3l. a year. Del. Westm., 18 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 5, m. 14.
75. Geo. Rede alias Ph. Tristram, of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Northumb. Pardon of all offences committed before 23 Oct. 31 Hen. VIII. Westm., 17 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. Del. 18 Feb.—P.S. Pat. p. 6, m. 6.
76. Sir Th. Darcye, of Danburye, Essex. Licence to alienate the manor of Hoton, Essex, belonging to the late monastery of St. Martin, Battle, Suss., the advowson of the parish church of Hoton, Essex; and all messuages, &c., in Hoton, Brendwode, Shenfeld, Mountenesyng, Billerica, Ronwell, Lachenden, Magna Burstede, Parva Bursted, and Nevenden, Essex, belonging to the said manor; and all other messuages, lands, &c., which belonged to the said late monastery; to Sir Richard Riche for life; with remainder to Rob. Riche, one of the sons of the said Richard and the heirs of his body; with remainder to the right heirs of the said Sir Richard. Westm., 19 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 1, m. 33.
77. John Norton. Annuity of 10l. issuing from the manor of Hunderbarton and lands in Mynskyppe, Yorks., which belonged to Ric. Alboroughe dec, during the minority of Ric. Alboroughe, s. and h. of the said Richard, with the wardship and marriage of the said heir. Del. Westm., 19 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 6, m. 6.
78. Natalis Roussart, merchant of Rouen. Licence to export 500 “dykars” of tanned leather a year for 4 years. Westm., 17 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. Del. 19 Feb.—P.S. Pat. p. 7, m. 12.
79. Sir Fran. Bryan. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 5, m. 14. See Grants in Feb. 1539, Vol. XIV. Part I., No. 403 (57).
80. Sir Robert lord Ogle, of Botthall, Northumb. Livery of lands as s. and h. of Robert lord Ogle, deceased. Westm., 18 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 20 Feb.—P.S. Pat. p. 3, m. 35.
81. John Stoner, a serjeant-at-arms. To be (1) bailiff of the lordships or manors of Cholsey, Blewbery and Henrede, Berks., and keeper of the chief messuage of Cholsey and (2) keeper of the wood of Onolde in the said manor of Cholsey, and of all other woods in the lordships or manors aforesaid in the King's hands by the attainder of Hugh Cooke, late abbot of Redyng, Berks., with fees of 100s. and 20s. a year respectively. Del. Westm., 20 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 5, m. 33.
82. Pet. Johnson, of Graveshend, tailor, born subject of the Emperor. Denization. Westm., 20 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 2, m. 34.
83. John Robynson, gunner. To be one of the King's gunners with fees of 8d. a day, vice Ric. Gawen, dec. Westm., 18 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. Del. 21 Feb.—P.S. Pat. p. 6, m. 8.
84. Thomas the prior and the convent of Christchurch, Canterbury. Grant in exchange for the manor of Merstham, Surrey, of the rectory of Warneham, Sussex, which belonged to the late priory of Rusper, Sussex, in as full manner as Rob. Sowthwell and Margaret, his wife, granted the same to the crown, by their charter, dated 10 Aug. 31 Hen. VIII. Also the advowson of the parish church of Est Peckham, Kent, granted to the King by the said Rob. Sowthwell. Del. Westm., 22 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 11.
85. Hen. Parker, clk., rector of Mawby, Norf. Licence to be non-resident, provided he visit his benefice, or any others he may obtain, at intervals of two or, at the most, three months. Westm. 20 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. Del. 22 Feb.—P.S. Pat. p. 6, m. 24.
86. Jasper Horsey. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 5, m. 33. See Grants in Feb. 1539 Vol. XIV. Part I., No. 403 (60).
87. Th. Dyer, one of the King's gentlemen sewers. Lease of the chief messuage or mansion of the manor of Weston, Soms., a close near the barn there, and another close called Wardeclose; the rectory of Weston with its tithes, &c., in Weston, Middelsowey, and Otherey; parcel of the lands of the monastery of Glastonbury, Soms., now in the King's hands by the attainder of Richard, the late abbot; term, 21 years; rent, 70l. Del. Westm., 22 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 5, m. 32.
88. John Wynchecombe. Lease for a fine of 20s. of (1) all tithes and portions of tithes of Migeham, Crokeham, and Colthrop in the parish of Thacham, Berks., and (2) of Greneham in the parish of Thacham; and (3) a tenement with a garden, a cottage, and a meadow adjoining in Reding, in a street called Oldestrete; which tenement and garden lie between the water of Kenet on the north, and the tenement of Isabella Nycholas on the south; and the said cottage and meadow lie between the said water on the south, and the cottage and lands called Coppidhall on the north: all which premises are parcel of the lands of the late monastery of Redyng in the King's hands by the attainder of Hugh, the late abbot; term, 21 years; rents (1) 10l.; (2) 4l. 13s. 4d., and (3) 30s. Del. Westm., 22 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. — S.B. Pat. p. 5, m. 31.
89. Hen. Polsted of London and Alice his wife. Grant in fee, for 540l., of the house and site of the late priory or cell of Bykenacre, Essex, formerly parcel of the lands of the late new hospital of St. Mary without Bysshopisgate, London; the church, steeple, and churchyard, &c. of the same; the manor of Byknacre, Essex, the advowsons of the churches of Woodham Ferres and Steple, Essex; and all other possessions of the said cell in Woodham Ferres, Danbury, Norton, Steple, Chelmesford, Mailond, Stowe, Esthanyngfelde, Hanyngfeld, Purlegh, Burneham, and Downeham, Essex; in as full manner as Wm. Major, late prior of the said late hospital, held the same; with liberties; rent, 60s. Del. Westm., 23 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.— S.B. Pat. p. 5, m. 16.
90. John Tregonwell, LL.D. Grant in fee, for 1,000l., of the house and site of the late monastery of Milton, alias Middelton, Dorset; the church, steeple, and churchyard of the same, &c., the manor of Milton, alias Middelton, the advowson of the vicarage of the parish church, the rectory, the chapels of Wollande, Lyscombe, and Wydcombe, annexed to the said rectory and church, all tithes of corn, &c., on the demesne lands of the monastery in Milton, Huyshe, and Churchecombe, Dors., and all tithes in Holworthe, Dorset; and portions of tithes in Milborne St. Andrew's, Dorset; which premises belonged to the said late monastery; with liberties; to hold by the yearly rent of 12l. 4d.
Also grant as above, of a fair on the eve, day and morrow of St. Sampson. Del. Westm., 23 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 24.
91. Edm. Hatley. Lease of three closes in Wobourne, Beds, the first called Cowclose, the second Copsey close, with a strip called Armsall tonge, and the third called Carswell close, late in the occupation of John Pountes; a horsemill with six “lez leyes” in Carswell, and a pightel in Birchemore, late in the tenure of Edw. Staunton, and the herbage of a grove in Milton Bryan, Beds, called Palmer Shrobs, [late] in the hands of the late abbot of Wobourne; all which came to the King's hands by the attainder of Rob. Hobbes, the late abbot; term, 21 years; rents, 4l. 6s. 8d. for the closes; 40s. for the mill and pightel; 6s. 8d. for the herbage; and 3s. 4d. of increase. Del. Westm., 23 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 4, m. 1.
92. Vincent Powre. Livery of lands as s. and h. of John Poure, deceased. Westm., 18 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. Del. 23 Feb.—P.S. Pat. p. 3, m. 37.
93. Th. Gymlott, alias Barbour. Grant of the free chapel of Monketon, alias Monkenton, Wilts, void by death. Westm., 23 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 2, m 18.
94. William Count à Furstenberg. Annuity of 3,000 crowns of the sun for life. Del. Westm., 23 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 6, m. 6. Rym. xiv. 653.
95. Commission of Gaol Delivery:
Gaol of Richard, late abbot of St. Alban's, Herts: at the said town. Sir Thomas Crumwell, keeper of the Privy Seal, Sir Edw. Mountagu, Sir Richard Ryche, Sir Fran. Bryan, John Conyngesby, Ralph Rowlett, Wm. Cavendyssh, Th. Knyghton, Edw. Brokett, John Sewster, John Cok, Th. Skypwyth, and Th. Hemmyng. Westm., 23 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 5. m. 13d.
96. Commission of the Peace:
St. Alban's, Herts; Liberty of Richard late Abbot: Thomas lord Audeley of Walden, C., Thomas duke of Norfolk, T., Charles duke of Suffolk, Lo. P. of the Co., Thomas lord Crumwell, P.S., William earl of Southampton, Gt. Ad. of Eng., Sir John lord Russell, Sir Edw. Mountagu, Sir Ric. Ryche, Sir Fran. Bryan, Sir Arth. Darcy, Sir Rog Cholmeley, serjeant-at-law, John Conyngesby, Ralph Rowlett, Wm. Cavendysshe, John Bolles, Th. Knyghton, Edw. Brokett, Wm. Heydon, John Sewster, John Cok, Ric. Ranshawe, Th. Skypwyth, Wm. Ibgrave, Hen. Audeley, John Maynard, Th. Hemmyng, John Kechyn, Hen. Heydon, Ric. Harvey. Westm., 23 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 5, m. 9d.
97. Brian Cave of Ingwardby alias Ingarsby, Leic. Grant, in fee, for 1,371l. 6s. 8d., of the manor of Ingwardby alias Ingarsby, Leic., parcel of the lands of the late abbey of St. Mary de Pratis, Leic., and divers lands (named) in Hongerton, Leic.; the rectory of Hongarton; and the advowsons of the said rectory, and of the vicarage and church of Hungerton, Leic.; and all personal and small tithes, and the tithes of hay of Quenby in the parish of Hungarton; and all other glebes, lands, &c, belonging to the said rectory, except tithes in Baggrave in the said parish of Hongarton: also the woods called the “Wynmyll grovett,” “Halyday grove,” “Quenbye grovett” and the “Midlefelde grovett,” in the said parish of Hongerton; in as full manner as the last abbot of the said late monastery held the same: To hold by a yearly rent of 7l. 11s. 11¼d., free of all burdens except a yearly pension of 20s., payable to the bishop of Lincoln for the indemnity of the church of Hungerton, 8l. a year to the vicar, and 10s. ¾d. yearly to the archdeacon of Leicester for the synodals and procurations of the said church. Del. Westm, 24 Feb., 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 3.
98. Th. Cave of Stanford-upon-Aven, Northt. Grant in fee, for 1,194l., of the manor, the rectory and church, and the advowson of the vicarage of Stanford aforesaid, Northt. and Leic.; which belonged to the late monastery of Selby, Yorks.; with all possessions of the monastery in Stanford upon Aven, Downe, Stormesworth and Boresworth, Northt. and Leic., and a yearly rent of 18d. from a water mill in South Kyllworth alias South Kenelyngworth, Leic., in as full manner as Robert the last abbot held the same. To hold by a yearly rent of 6l. 12s. 9d., free of all burdens except 10l. a year payable to the vicar of Stanford, 5s. a year to the bp. of Lincoln for a pension issuing from the said church; and 4s. a year payable to the archdeacon of Lincoln for the procurations of the said church. Del. Westm., 24 Feb., 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 2.
99. John Rydley, of Fryngford, Oxon, yeoman. Grant in fee for 85l. 10s., of the messuage, tenement, grange, or farm called Uxmere, 2 tenements now in the tenure of And. Ledall, in Ipesden, a yearly rent of 10s. in Ipesden, and lands called Nuttyngs, now in the tenure of Ric. Eton, in Tuffelde, Oxon; which premises belonged to the late priory of Goryng, Oxon. Annual value, 4l. 15s.; rent, 9s. 6d. as tenth. Del. Westm., 24 Feb., 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 1.
100. Th. Wryothesley. Lease of the fishery of Stowre and Aven from the stream called Stoure were and Wildwere to the sea coast; and “le leyre de le lampronup” at the bridges of the late priory of Christchurch, Hants; with all nets and other implements belonging to the same fishery: parcel of the possessions of Margaret countess of Salisbury, attainted; term, 21 years; rent, 30s., and 4d. increase. Westm., 22 Feb., 31 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 24 Feb.—P.S. Pat., p. 6, m. 5.
101. John Smyth. Custody of the lordship or manor of Bathorne in Birdbroke, Essex, with its appurtenances to the yearly value of 20 mks., which lately belonged to Hen. Makewilliam, deceased, during the minority of Hen. Makewilliam, s. and h. of the said Henry; with the wardship and marriage of the said heir. Del. Westm., 24 Feb., 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 1, m. 35.
102. Sir Hugh Paulett. To be surveyor of the possessions in cos. Soms., Dors., Wilts and Hants, or elsewhere in England, which came to the King by the attainder of Ric. Whytyng, late abbot of Glastonberye; with 20l. a year. Del. Westm., 24 Feb., 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 5. m. 33.
103. John Pollard, clk. Presentation to the parish church of Northtawton, Exeter dioc., vice Th. Sentleger, clk., resigned. Del. Westm., 24 Feb., 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 6, m. 8.
104. Th. Arderne of Castell Bromewich, Warwick, and Sim. Arderne, son of the said Thomas, and the heirs and assigns of the said Simon. Grant, for 272l. 10s., of the manor of Berewoodhall, Warw., and the rectory of Crudworth, Warw., belonging to the late monastery of St. Mary de Pratis, Leicester; and all appurtenances in Crudworth and Sutton Colfeld, Warw.: to hold by the yearly rent of 30s. 4d. Del. Westm., 25 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 5. m. 12.
105. Sir John Porte, of Etwall, Derb. Grant in fee, for 434l. 8s. 4d., of the manor of Etwall alias Etwell, Derb., belonging to the late Carthusian priory of Bevall alias de Bella Valle, Notts; and all possessions of the priory in Etwall alias Etwell; also the advowson of the rectory and of the vicarage of the parish church of Etwall, the rectory of Etwall, the tithe barn there with yard thereto adjoining, and all the glebe lands of the said rectory, and tithes of grain in Etwall; all which belonged to the late monastery of Welbecke, Notts.
Also release to the said John of the annuity of 4 marks issuing from the said rectory which belonged to the late monastery of Tuttebury, Staff.: In as full manner as the premises were held by the last prior of Bevall, the last abbot of Welbecke, and the last prior of Tuttebury, at a rent of 48s. 4d. Del. Westm., 25 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 5, m. 17.
106. John Wyndham, of Orcharde, Soms., and Elizabeth, his wife. Grant in fee, for 267l. 8s. 4d., of the manors of Browne and Trebarowe, Soms; the advowson of the parish church of Trebarowe, Soms.; and all messuages, lands, &c., called Octro, Smalcombes and Sloworthe; and all those lands, &c., in the parishes of Cutcombe, Imbercombe, Luxborowe, and Carehamton, Soms., which belonged to the late monastery of Clyve, Soms. Annual value, 14l. 13s. 3d.; rent, 29s. 4d. Del. Westm., 25 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 5, m. 21.
107. Hen. Palmer, one of the horsemen at arms in the King's great retinue in the town of Calais. To be bailiff of the county of Guisnes, with the usual fees as enjoyed by Rog. Basyng, John Anlaby, Adam Clere, Th. Englisshe, and Wm. Pawne. On surrender of patent 11 Feb. 22 Hen. VIII. granting the same office, along with that of collector of the quit rents in the town of Calais, to the said Rog. Basyng, one of the sewers of the King's Chamber. Del. Westm., 25 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 6, m. 12.
Vacated on personal surrender by the said Henry in order that the office might be granted to one John Broke, 30 Mar. 37 Henry VIII.
108. Wm. Cavendisshe, one of the auditors of the Court of Augmentations, and Margaret, his wife. Grant in fee, for 769l. 8s. 4d., of—(1.) The lordships and manors of Northawe, Cuffeley, and Childewyke, Herts, belonging to the late monastery of St. Alban's, Herts; the rectory and church or chapel of Northawe, Herts; lately belonging to the said late monastery; and the advowson of the vicarage and parish church or chapel of Northawe, Herts; and all messuages, lands, &c., in Meriden, in the parish of Tewynge, Herts, lately belonging to the said late monastery; and all appurtenances of the premises in Northawe, Cuffeley, Meryden, and Chyldewyke, and elsewhere, Herts, in as full manner as Ric. Boreman, the late abbot, held the same.
Also (2.) The house and site of the late priory, cell, or rectory of Cardigan, S. Wales, which formerly belonged to the late monastery of Chertesey, Surrey, and afterwards to the late abbey of Holy Trinity, Bustlesham alias Bisham, Berks; the rectories and churches of Cardigan, Berwyke, and Tremeyn, S. Wales, parcel of the possessions of the said late cell; and the advowsons of the vicarages and churches of those places; and all other possessions of the said late cell.
Rents, 72s. 2d. and 13s. 4d. The grantees to be discharged of an annuity of 6l. payable to one Th. Hore, late prior of the cell of Cardigan, and from all corrodies and other charges except annuities of 52s.d. payable to one John Mery for a term of years for the custody of the woods of the manor of Northawe; 20s. to Thos. Stepnethe for life as steward of the said manors of Northawe and Cuffeley; and 10s. to the farmer of the said manor of Childewike for his gown or livery; and all charges issuing from the said late priory or cell besides the above annuity of 6l.
To hold with liberties, &c. Del. Westm., 26 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 25.
109. John Croke. Grant in fee, for 1,187l. 7s. 11d., of the house and site of the late priory of Studley, Oxon; the church, steeple, and churchyard thereof, &c.; the manor of Studley, Oxon and Bucks; the manor of Crawcombe alias Crawcombe Studley, Soms.; the manor of Longcompton, Warw.; and 6l. rent in Crawcombe Bere, Soms.; the rectory and church of Bekeley, Oxon; the rectory and church of Hilmere alias Ilmere, Bucks; the chapel of Senekeworth alias Sakeworth, Berks; the advowson of the church or rectory of Crawcombe Studley, Soms.; and the advowson of the vicarages and churches of Bekeley and Hilmere; and all other possessions of the said priory in Studley, the town of Oxford, Steple Barton, Steple Aston, Astwykes, Worton, Wighthill, Wightley, Benbroke, Bekbroke, Takeley, Weveley, Forstyll, Ellesford, Ellesfeld, Overhayford, Tetyndon, Tyvyton, Bekeley Parke, and Staunton, Oxon; Horton, Marlake, Okeley, Wornehall, Thomley, Wynchyndon, Kymbell, Hilmere, Ilmere, Estclaydon, Botelclaydon, Wighthill, and Wightley, Bucks; Belgrave, Leic.; Wescot and Fairford, Glouc.; Senekworth and Sakworth, Berks; Langport and Lamport, Northt.; Longcompton, Warw.; and in Crawcombe Studley and Crawcombe Bere, Soms.; or elsewhere in England: in as full manner as Joan Willyams, the late prioress, held the same; except a wood called the “Priores Woode,” lying between Pawncelles, in the forest of Barnewode and Oxventes, Asshamfeld, and Merlake, Bucks; and all lands, tenements, and hereditaments in Wroxton, Ardeley, Chesterton, and Wendelbury, Oxon: To hold by the yearly rent of 6l. 14s. 2d., free of all other charges, except the following, viz.:—10s. a year, payable to the bishop of Lincoln for the church of Bekeley, 3s. 4d. a year to the dean and chapter of Lincoln, 22s. a year to the late monastery of Osney for a portion of tithes, 10s. 7d. a year, payable to the archdeacon of Oxford for procurations and synodals, 8l. a year payable to the vicar of Bekeley for his pension or stipend, 20s. a year for the fee of the steward of the said manor of Crawcombe Studley, 8s. a year for the fee of the bailiff and collector of the rents of the said manor of Crawcombe Studley, and 40s. a year for the fee of the chief steward of all the possessions of the said late monastery, 13s. a year for the fee of the rent collector in the town of Oxford, 20s. a year for the fee of the auditor of the said late monastery, and 26s. 8d. a year for the fee of the general receiver of the possessions of the said late monastery in cos. Oxon, Bucks, and Warw. Del. Westm. 26 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 7.
110. John Hygforde, of Henwoode, Warw. Grant in fee, for 207l. 5s., of the house and site of the late priory of Henwode, Warw.; the church, steeple and churchyard thereof; and divers lands and closes, &c. (specified), in the parishes, lordships, fields, &c., of Sylhill, Knoll, Longdon, and Wydney, Warw., which belonged to the said late monastery. Annual value, 11l. 10s. 4d.; rent 23s. 4d. as tenth. Del. Westm., 26 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. S.B.—Pat. p. 5, m. 16.
111. John Goodwyn, of Overwynchyndon, Bucks. Grant in fee, for 219l., of the lands, &c., now in the tenure of John Latham, in Westcote, in the parish of Waddesdon, Bucks.; and the close called Blakenhull, now in the tenure of the said John Goodwin, in Westcote, which belonged to the late monastery of Bysseter alias Burcestre; the close called the “Newe close,” and the parcel of meadow on the north side of the same, in the parish of Lower Wynchyndon, Bucks, belonging to the late monastery of Notley, Bucks; with liberties. Annual value, 5l. 10s.; rent 11s. Del. Westm., 26 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 1.
112. Thomas lord Audeley of Walden, the lord Chancellor. Lease of a stable within the close, called “le Bury,” in the lordship of Ware, Herts; 10 acres of meadow called Chaldewell, and five acres of meadow in Berymede, in the said lordship; a close of pasture containing four acres, with divers houses and stables therein, in which close was the site of the manor of Bretts in Westham, Essex, late in the occupation of Th. Burnell; another close adjoining the said close, containing three acres of pasture, called Neles Feelde, late in the occupation of the said Th. Burnell; and another close there called Oxleys. All which premises are parcel of the lands late of the Countess of Salisbury, attainted; term 21 years, at divers stated rents. Del. Westm., 26 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. — S.B. Pat. p. 2, m. 28.
113. Rog. Amyce. To be general receiver of the possessions in England and Wales, in the King's hands, by the attainder of Ric. Whyting, late abbot of Glastonbury, Soms., and Hugh Cooke, late abbot of Redyng, Berks, with 40l. a year and 20s. per 100l. out of the issues. Del. Westm., 26 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 15.
114. John Peppys. To be auditor of the possessions in England and Wales in the King's hands by the attainder of Ric. Whyting, late abbot of Glastonbury, Soms., and Hugh Cooke, late abbot of Redyng, Berks, with 20l. a year.
Vacated on surrender, in order that an annuity of 86l. might be granted by patent to the said John. Del. Westm., 26 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 15.
115. Th. Vachell. To be overseer of the possessions of the late abbey of Redyng, Berks, and the late priory of Leomynster, Heref., in England and Wales, bailiff of the town of Redyng, Berks, and of all liberties within the said possessions of the said late abbey and priory, now in the King's hands by the attainder of Hugh, the late abbot of Redyng, with 20 marks a year as overseer, and 10 marks a year as bailiff, and with full power to lease the premises. Del. Westm. 26 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 9.
116. Sir Wm. Drury, of Hawestede, Suff. Grant in fee, for 819l. 19s., of the manor of Whepsted, Suff., belonging to the late monastery of Bury St. Edmunds, Suff., the advowson of the parish church of Whepsted, Suff., and all appurtenances of the manor in Whepsted, Hartyst alias Herthurst, Chevington, Hornyngesherth Magna, and Hawsted, Suff., a messuage or tenement, with lands called Overcageshall, in Whepsted, and all other possessions of the monastery in Whepsted, and the lands called Monkeslonds, in Hawsted, Suff., and Hornyngesherth Magna, near the wood of the said Sir Wm. Drury called Howe Wood, also belonging to the said late monastery; in as full manner as the last abbot held the same. To hold by a rent of 72s. 6d. free of all charges, except towards Th. Munnyng, Rog. Sturgeon and John Stuerd, for such liveries and underwoods as they ought to have, by virtue of certain indentures and leases of parcels of the premises. Del. Westm., 27 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 11.
117. Rob. Brothat. Lease, for a fine of 20 mks., of the site of the manor of Luston, called the Bury of Luston, in Leominster, Heref., with tithes of corn, flax, bees, and apples, belonging to the said manor and township of Luston and the small tithes there; a cottage next the orchard there, and a pasture called “Le Cowlesowe,” and also the farmstock there (specified) to be restored at the end of the term. All which are parcel of the lands of the late monastery of Redyng in the King's hands by the attainder of Hugh the late abbot; for the term of 21 years; at the yearly rent of 27l. 7s. 10d. On surrender of a former lease made by the said late abbot. Del. Westm., 27 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. — S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 14.
118. Th. Hatcliff. Lease, for a fine of 40s., of the site of the manor of Depford Strond, Kent, and all other possessions there, and in Camerwell and Rodderith, Kent and Surrey, held by the late Queen Consort Jane, which the said Thomas held along with Rob. Acton by a 31 years' lease from the said Queen Jane (by indenture bearing date 27 Feb. 28 Hen. VIII.) which is now surrendered; term 21 years, rent 12l. 6s. Del. Westm., 27 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 7.
119. Sir Jas. Boleyn. Livery of lands as brother and heir of Th. Boleyn, earl of Wiltshire, deceased, alias son and heir of Sir Wm. Boleyn, deceased, alias son and heir male of Sir Geoff. Boleyn, likewise deceased. Westm., 21 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. Del. 27 Feb.—P.S. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII. p. 7, m. 26.
120. John Mason, A.M., the King's scholar. Presentation to the canonry and prebend of Themysbury, Winchester dioc. Westm. 25 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 27 Feb.—P.S. Pat. p. 7, m. 25.
121. John Potter of Westminster, girdler, alias yeoman. Pardon for having 13 Jan. 28 Hen. VIII., in conjunction with Rob. Walyng, of Westminster, clockmaker, alias Rob. Clokmaker, yeoman, John Rawlyn, of Westminster, bricklayer or mason, and John Barbour, of Westminster, yeoman, broken into the house of Ralph Johnson at Stretham, Surrey, and stolen therefrom certain articles of value, chiefly silver and gilt, the property of the said Ralph; to which burglary the doers were incited by Ric. Wydrafte alias Hodgys, of Thistilworth, Midd., yeoman, whereof he stands indicted. Del. Westm., 27 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. S.B.—Pat. p. 7, m. 6.
122. Nich. Long, of London, yeoman. Pardon for having, 26 Jan. 29 Hen. VIII., at London, in the parish of All Hallows the Great in the ward of Dowegate, broken into the house of Edw. Lyghtmaker, merchant, and stolen 36 pieces of linen cloth called “gentisshe clothe” to the value of 34l. Westm., 25 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 27 Feb. P.S. — Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 7, m. 9.
123. Ric. Lee, of the town of St. Alban's, Herts. Grant, in fee, for 477l. 3s. 9d., of the manor of Sopwelbury, Herts, and all its appurtenances in the parish of St. Peter in the town of St. Alban's or elsewhere; the lands called Rannesdenland; the grove called Pynnyngsgrove; a piece of meadow opposite Soppwell myll in the said parish; and all tithes of corn and hay with two parts of the small tithes in the said manor; also the lands called Eywoode parke, meadows called Parkemede, in the said parish, late in the several tenures of Edw. Spenlowe, Th. Flexmer, and Wm. Skipwyth, water mills called “Cowley myll” and “Stankford myll” in the said parish, and 2 closes of land, pasture, or meadow, the one lying near “Craswell mede,” and the other beside the highway leading to Haliwell:—All which premises belonged to the late monastery of St. Alban's, Herts; with reservation of the great wood called Eywood enclosed with hedges and ditches in the said parish of St. Peter. To hold by the yearly rent of 53s. ¼d. free of all burdens except 6s. 8d. a year to the farmer of Sopwelbury for a gown, and 6s. 8d. a year to the farmer of Eywoode for a gown. Del. Westm., 28 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 18.
124. Ric. Snowe, of London, and Elizabeth, his wife. Grant, in fee, for 810l. 11s. 8d., of the reversions and rents reserved upon the following crown leases, viz.:—
(1.) 20 June 31 Hen. VIII., to Th. Wyndham of the house and site of the late monastery of Chycksand, Beds, and the demesne lands of the same, which were in the proper occupation of the late prior; together with 100 quarters of malt, 20 quarters of corn, 20 quarters of wheat and 20 quarters of pease yearly, which the farmer of the house called “le Dayre house” and the lands thereto belonging used to pay to the monastery as rent; term 21 years; rent, 38l. 3s. 4d.
(2.) A lease by indenture bearing date 15 Jan. 31 Hen. VIII. to Wm. Ardren and Ric. Coke, of divers closes (named) of land and pasture in the lordship of Chicksand with free warren in the premises; term 21 years; rent 4 marks.
Also, grant as above, of the house and site aforesaid, the church, steeple, and churchyard of the same, and all tithes on the lands of the said late monastery in Chicksand and in the parish of Deane, Beds, and divers woods (named) there; and all other possessions of the monastery in those places, in as full manner as the last prior of the said late monastery, or the last general master of the order of St. Gilbert of Sempringham held them.
To hold by a rent of 4l. 10s. 1d. free of all burdens, except 106s. 8d. a year to the vicar of Deane and 14s. 4d. a year for the synodals and procurations of the same church. Del. Westm., 28 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 10.
125. John Hill. Lease, for a fine of 20 mks., of the site of the manor of Stoke and the demesne lands thereof, with the tithes of corn, flax, lambs, wool, and pigs of the manor and of all the other tenants of the township of Stoke; a close of land called Poleclose with tithes of Rysebury, and a cottage in Stoke late in the occupation of Richard Goold, and a farm stock to be left and restored at the end of the term; fields, &c. (specified). All which belonged to the late monastery of Redyng and are in the King's hands by the attainder of Hugh the late abbot; term 21 years; rent 20l. 8s. 8d. This lease is granted on surrender of a former one granted by the said late abbot Hugh. Del. Westm., 28 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII. — S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 17.
126. John Busshe. Pardon for having acquired of Th. Dudley without licence a tenement or cottage in the parish of St. Katherine Colmans in the city of London, to hold to the said John and his heirs for ever. Westm., 28 Feb. Pat. 31 Hen. VIII., p. 6, m. 38.

Footnotes

1 Count William of Furstenberg.
2 Brancetour.
3 See No. 238.
4 Norfolk writes in his own name throughout, though the letter is signed by Bonner as well.
5 Extracts from the preceding paragraphs of this letter are printed in S. P. viii., pp. 274–5 note.
6 The Emperor.
7 Philippe de la Chambre, who was called Cardinal of Boulogne because his mother, Anne de la Tour, was the daughter of Bertrand de la Tour, count of Boulogne (see Gallia Christiana, X., 1570). There was no bishopric of Boulogne till 1566.
8 Blank in this MS.; but the abstract in § 2 reads “He arrived at Edinburgh the 17th of this month.”
9 Blank in MS.
10 Edinburgh castle.
11 The 17th. See page 88 note †.
12 Robert Cairncross.
13 Ric. Rawlyns (which may be an alias of Smith) is vicar of Llangan in the Valor Eccl. IV. 410.
14 Name erased.
15 Roger Lupton, provost of Eton and prebendary of Lincoln, who died, according to Le Neve, “about 25th Feb. 1539–40.”
16 Brancetour.
17 The cardinal of Lorraine.
18 See No. 31.
19 The Queen Regent Mary.
20 Probably the Dr. Udalricus mentioned in Mont's letter of the 29 March following.
21 Written in the first person singular throughout.
22 Glastonbury, Reading, and Colchester.
23 Supplied from modern marginal note.
24 That is the duke of Norfolk.
25 Sic.