Henry VIII
July 1540, 21-31

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Institute of Historical Research

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James Gairdner and R. H. Brodie (editors)

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1896

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'Henry VIII: July 1540, 21-31', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 15: 1540 (1896), pp. 445-481. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=76177 Date accessed: 02 August 2014.


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July 1540, 21–31

[21 July.] 898. Anne of Cleves to the Duke of Cleves.
R. O.
St. P. i. 645.
Perceives by his letter of the 13th to the king of England, her “most dear and most kind brother,” that he takes the matter lately determined between them somewhat to heart. Informs him that she consented to the examination and determination, “wherein I had more respect (as beseemed me) to truth than to any worldly affection that might move me to the contrary, and did the rather condescend thereunto for that my body remaineth in the integrity which I brought into this realm.” The King has adopted her as his sister, and uses her with more liberality than she or her brother could well wish. Is well satisfied. The King's friendship for him will not be impaired for this matter unless the fault should be in himself. Thinks it necessary to write this, and that she purposes to live here, lest for want of true knowledge he should take the matter otherwise than he ought. Subscribed: Anna Duchess born of Cleves, Gulik, Geldre, and Berge, your loving sister.
Three copies, pp. 3 each.
R. O. 2. Modern copy of the preceding.
Pp. 2.
Hatfield MS.
i. 29.
(Hist. MSS.
Calendar, i.
13.)
3. Another copy with the date, Richmond, 21 July.
Pp. 4. Endd.: The minute in English of the letter sent by the lady Anne to her brother, 21 July 1540.
Ib. 4. The same letter in German.
Pp. 2.
Otho C.
x., 238.
B. M.
Burnet, iv.
440.
5. Draft of a letter to the same effect, omitting the first sentence and with additional final sentence as follows:—“Only I require this of you that ye so use yourself as, for your untowardness in this matter, I fare not the worse (fn. 1) ; whereunto I trust you will have regard.”
In Gardiner's hand, pp. 3. Mutilated.
899. Anne of Cleves.
R. O.
St. P., viii.
406n.
Statement of the provision made by Henry VIII. for Anne of Cleves:—
1. She will be considered as the King's sister, and have precedence over all ladies in England, after the Queen and the King's children. 2. She shall have an annual income of 8,000 nobles; and 500l. st. have been given to her officers. 3. Two manors, Richmond and Blechingley, having splendid houses and parks of 6 leagues and 2 leagues. 4. She shall have hangings, plate, and furniture, and (5), money for her household till her income is sufficient. 6. “Pretiosissimas [vestes].” 7. Jewels and pearls. 8. A good number of officers, the heads being nobles.
Lat., pp. 2. Endd. by Wriothesley: The copy of the remembrance given to Olisleger's nephew.
R. O. 2. Another copy.
Lat., pp. 2.
21 July. 900. Apparel.
R. O. Apparel given by the King on 21 July Anno xxxij.
The recipients were “an Irish Lord,” Mr. Seyntleger, my lord of Surrey, my lord William, Lords Parre, Clinton, and Hastings. Chas. and Geo. Howerde, Messrs. Bryan, Longe, Knyvet, Cromwell, Wryothesley, Sadler, Culpeper, Seymour, Paston, Mewtas, Hobbey, and Barkeley.
The articles given are gowns and jackets of various materials and colours.
Pp. 2. Endd.: Book of the Robes for stuff delivered at Hampton Court, in (?) Master Cyssyll t[yme?].
21 July. 901. Marillac to Francis I.
R. O.
Kaulek, 201.
(The whole
text.)
[London], 21 July:—The talk of which he wrote, about an objection proposed to the marriage with Anne of Cleves, has led to the matter being determined by sentence of all the bishops confirmed and authorised by Parliament. The marriage has been declared null, and consequently has been followed by separation; this King having first sworn in presence of his Privy Council not to have had any knowledge with the said lady by which the marriage could be alleged to have been consummated on any other ground than that of the mere consent, which, he says, was of no effect because she had previously promised the son of the duke of Lorraine, and consequently this King was not bound by the marriage treaty, having made it in ignorance of this. Upon which the said lady, being required to consent that the bishops should be the judges, freely granted it; although her brother's ambassador says that he had often warned her to grant nothing to the prejudice of her own rights or her brother's estate, but could get no answer except that she would obey the King her lord, pointing out the great kindness he had used towards her and her firm intention to endure all he thought fit and to remain always in this country and not return to her own. The King, being informed of this good will, has provided her with an honourable estate, to maintain which he leaves her for life the places of Richmond, Autel (doubtless a misreading of Antel, i.e., Ampthill) and More, of 12,000 crs. rent. He has nevertheless made the curates and their vicars announce to their parishes (fn. 2) that she is no longer to be called queen, but Lady Anne of Cleves; to the great regret of this people, who loved and esteemed her much as the sweetest, most gracious and kindest queen they ever had or would desire. It is commonly said that this King will marry a lady of great beauty, daughter of Norfolk's deceased brother. If permitted to write what he hears, he would say this marriage has already taken place and is consummated; but as this is kept secret he dare not yet certify it as true.
The prince of Salerno, who came hither only to see the country, having been feasted both in this Court and in some of the most beautiful places this King has, Windsor and Hampton Court, left, after eight days, with the seigneur d'Avila, of the Emperor's chamber. It is since heard that the brother of the Duke of Ferrara, who was in Flanders with the Emperor, will be here immediately upon the same business. Parliament finishes to-morrow. What it has concluded is not yet known in detail, but will soon be printed and published; and, even as regards religion, all agrees with what was determined last year; which only differs from that held by the Church, as regards obedience to the Holy See and Orders of religious persons. One novelty is spoken of as concluded although not yet published: it is that all strangers dwelling in this realm shall depart before Michaelmas next, except only those engaged in commerce, who shall not keep house unless they be married or have letters of naturalization. At this many poor people are much taken aback (esbahys), especially Flemings, of whom there are here a great number.
French. Modern transcript, pp. 4.
21 July. 902. Marillac to Montmorency.
R. O.
Kaulek, 203.
(Almost the
whole text.)
[London], 21 July:—Refers to the letter to the King touching the repudiation of this Queen and her patience in affliction. Must not omit that the cause of this sudden settlement of so important an affair is said to be that this King has already consummated marriage with this last lady, relative of the duke of Norfolk, and it is feared she is already enceinte. Cannot affirm this otherwise; for these are things which are kept secret.
Montmorency will also learn the return of the prince of Salerno with the sieur d'Avila, who has sown here some things it would have been more honourable to suppress than to publish to this King (who told Marillac of them) and several of this Court. The substance is that D'Avila commonly said, laughing and moeking, that he could not sufficiently wonder that Francis had so easily granted the Emperor a passage through France, considering the difficulty, expense, and danger of going by sea, or by Italy or Germany. Also that seeing there was no promise to surrender Milan, so unlikely is it that they should agree on this article that there was only a truce for ten years, which the Emperor on his part would observe, but as to the restoration of Milan, he had as much mind to surrender it as a superior in title would have to make himself inferior in power—rather he would annex it to the Empire when he had put order in Brabant and elsewhere, as he expected shortly to do; concluding that Francis was not in this matter where he thought himself, but rather further off. This is the substance of what this King and others say they heard from the said Spaniard. Thinks right to report it, although he has answered those who spoke of it according to Montmorency's instructions and made light of D'Avila's words as spoken rather in passion than in knowledge of his master's intention. Those here, however, open their eyes and think they have gained a great advantage; though they continue to speak of Francis as before, and beg Marillac not to be suspicious because so many lords go and come to this country, for if it was for any other occasion than to see the country they (the English) would let Marillac know.
The King has written for the third time to this King in Rochepot's favour, for whose affair Marillac has done his best, but finds the English grow obstinate and irritated. Presented the letters to this King, who answered that, against the opinion of his Council and learned men, he had, for Francis's sake, condescended to refer the decision to deputies of either side, and he was surprised that Francis wrote of it so often. Replied that people were surprised still more in France that he made a difficulty in so clear a matter, which concerned neither him nor his subjects; for the ship in question was confessedly taken in the high seas of Zealand, out of his liberties, and was wrongfully driven into an English port by some of his subjects with their cannon, although the mariners were on their way to Scotland, as Norfolk had witnessed in open Council, and which was a point the doctors of London were unable to answer; and, although Winchester, to show his learning, offered to maintain his master's right by various “desguisemens” and irrelevant facts, I required him “de me souldre cest object,” which neither he nor any of them could do; and many who were esteemed learned, in presence of their master, hung their heads, confessing they were wrong. So that it has been determined that the affair is to be again reviewed by the Council, but there is little willingness to change their purpose, as it would seem treason to give an opinion contrary to their master's jurisdiction. At the end of this conference Suffolk complained greatly that he could not have issue of his affair in France, which has lasted 18 years, although he had all the sentences and decrees necessary. Norfolk likewise alleged the reply lately made to him on the same subject by which it was remitted to the marshals, one of whom is at Turin (?) (fn. 3) and the other ill. Winchester, continuing, explained the diligence he had made in it in vain, and the delays of justice in France,—that affairs decided in one court were revoked in another and after dragging on ten years at Rouen were revoked to the Marble Table,—that he had lent 100 crs. or 120 crs. to a suitor (poursuivant) at the Grand Council and yet had no issue; adding, like the others, particulars proving that the English were never reimbursed for depredations they suffered. The King, to conclude, said that when justice was done to his subjects he would feel bound to do it to the French; but certainly there were daily complaints, and he was astonished that over there they did not proceed otherwise.
Gives the substances of his (Marillac's) reply, alleging the doubtful nature of Suffolk's case, denying that decisions of one court were altered in another, pointing out the expense of law everywhere and citing cases of Frenchmen who could not get justice in England, such as a poor Breton he has maintained out of charity, and four or five who had died suitors. As to depredations, Francis had been the last who had put his hand in his purse by reimbursing an Englishman who complained last year; whereas there were three or four Frenchmen who, after consuming all they had, had been supported by the ambassadors until finally in despair they went away or lost their wits. Besides, he could point out a multitude of poor people who had been robbed and who had preferred to lose all rather than engage in a profitless suit. These things showed this King how ill informed he had been by his ministers, and he finally said there were wrongs on both sides, but he would expedite those Marillac named provided Francis would do the like. Was told the same 15 months ago and can see no more expedition. Cannot deny that in some places, in Cromwell's time, people did not behave well to others (l'on ne s'y soit bien porté aux aultres). Has written all this also to the Chancellor.
French. Two modern transcripts, pp. 8 and pp. 10.
22 July. 903. Montmorency to Wallop.
R. O.
St. P. viii.,
401n.
No conclusion has yet been taken in the affair about which Wallop writes. The ambassador of Cleves has gone to the Duke for his resolution. Supposes the Duke to be so much a friend to Henry that he will conceal nothing from him. Nothing will be done here contrary to the amity between their Majesties. Neufbourg, 22 July. Signed.
Fr., p.
1. Add. Endd.
23 July. 904. Wallop and Carne to Henry VIII.
R. O.
St. P. viii.,
400.
Since writing on the 15th, heard nothing of the ambassadors of Cleves, and therefore sent Wallop's secretary to speak to them, bidding him, if they would not enter into communication, to see Crewserus. He found that they had gone, and that the report was that the matter about which they came was concluded. Sent the secretary with a letter to the Constable, whose answer is enclosed. He also had an interview (detailed) with the queen of Navarre, who said the marriage of her daughter was not concluded, for they would not agree unless the French king would give her as heritier, which he refused, offering 100,000 cr. for her dote. She thinks the Emperor will now conclude with them for the duchess of Milan. She thought the ambassadors left without making the English ambassadors privy to their proceedings in consequence of the news they had heard from England of the separation of the Queen. She said some had told lies about her to the ambassador (Wallop) to bring her out of favour with Henry, but her affection for him will not change. When she hears of any one going who will speak with the King, “she will show him such things that your Grace will not only be well contented to hear, but also make your Grace laugh and be merry.”
The French king intends to pass next month at Vateville in Normandy, within two leagues of Coddebeck towards Hable de Grace. Lovieres, 23 July. Signed.
Pp.
5.
23 July. 905. Thomas Barnaby to Wallop.
R. O. Has received his letter from Veronne asking him to get his servant taught to play on the vials, and to say no more about the King's affairs than Wallop advises him although “that matter” is much talked of, especially by the councillors of the Great Council.
The ambassadors of Gelders and their Chancellor came to his lodging on the 21st at 10 p.m. Coming home from supper very late, met the old ambassador's servant who speaks English and was with Wallop at Abbeville. He desired Barnaby to speak with his master. Offered to do so on the morrow, when he told Barnaby that he had not seen Wallop since he left Paris, for he and the other ambassadors arrived the day after Wallop left Court and they were lodged within the Court while Wallop was five leagues away. “They moved me” of the report that the King (of England) would be separated from the Queen. The “old ambassador” said first that the French king had told him this, but afterwards that it was the King or some other great man, but he had heard nothing of it from the duke of Cleves, and he thought it was but a dream. He said the marriage between the duke of Cleves and the king of Navarre's daughter was in a manner concluded. Dined with them, and during dinner the lieutenant of the Civil Law came and spoke with them. The ambassadors left between 2 or 3 next morning, but they returned to a new lodging at St. Denyse Street. Paris, 23 July.
The captain of Depp tells him that the bp. of Rome is treating of marriage between his son's daughter (fn. 4) and Mons. De Gwys's son.
Hol., pp. 3. Add.
23 July. 906. Aguilar to Charles V.
Add. MS.
28,592, f. 145.
B. M.
Wrote 30 June and 3rd inst. Proposed marriages for Victoria Farnese, and for the prince of Orange. The Pope has letters from the Constable of France that although the negotiations for peace had ceased there would always remain a good amity; and that the duke of Cleves was not making an agreement about Gueldres; indeed, he had sent a person to the king of France to communicate to him all that concerned that matter. Also [news of] the sentence the king of England had given against Cramuel, his favourite, because he conspired to make himself king and had offered the Lutherans, without his master's knowledge, to conform to their opinions and unite with them. His Holiness thinks that if the King has any good intention of returning [to the Church], he would now have an opportunity, by means of the Emperor imputing the fault of the past to Cromwell and his deceits.
Duke Cosmo. The Pope has signed the dispensation of the comendadors of Calatrava and Alcantara. Italian news. The Emperor's letters of 25 June. Rome, 23 July 1540.
Spanish. Modern copy from Simancas, pp. 10.
24 July. 907. Parliament.
Journals of
the House of
Lords, i. 128.
Account of daily business and attendance of peers in the Parliament 12 April 31 Hen. VIII. to 24 July 32 Hen. VIII., with list of Acts passed. Dissolved.
Lat.
[24 July.] 908. Henry VIII. to Clerk and Wotton.
R. O.
St. P. viii.
403.
Before answering their letters from Cleves of 13 July, wherein they declare at length their conference with the Duke and his Council, will explain what has been done here since the departure of you, the bp. of Bath.
According to the determination agreed upon by the Council, “which we signified unto you by our letters of the — (blank), on Tuesday, 6th inst, the nobles and commons made suit to the King to commit the examination of his marriage to the clergy. Sent incontinently the lord Chancellor, the duke of Suffolk, the lord Privy Seal, the bp. of Winchester, the Treasurer of the Household, the Controller and the Chancellor of the Augmentations to the lady Anne, who at length was contented with the proposal. The clergy debated all Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, and their sentence was declared to Parliament on Saturday, and also signified to the lady Anne by the duke of Suffolk, lord Privy Seal, Wriothesley, and Riche. She agreed thereto, “confessing the integrity of her body,” and refusing mother and brother and all who would move her to the contrary, committed herself wholly to the King to remain as his servant and subject as she then wrote. Signified to her that she would be honourably entertained as the King's sister, and sent her a token, for which she sent a letter of thanks confirming her former letters and subscribed, “sister and servant.” [In which letters she mentioned her former agreement to abide the determination of the clergy with special mention of “the state of her body remaining entire for any act of carnal knowledge.” These letters with a token were brought to the King on the Sunday night, and upon the Monday were published in both houses of Parliament]. (fn. 5) Parliament has confirmed the act of the clergy. After the Act was passed in both houses, Suffolk, Privy Seal, and Wriothesley devised with her for the establishment of her household, and [on Friday the — (blank) inst.] she dismissed those who waited on her as a queen. She is still at Richmond, in good cheer. Other particulars and the King's liberality are shown by the credence committed to his servant — (blank) whom he now sends with letters to the duke of Cleves. (fn. 6)
Signified to Lady Anne the Duke's answer made to you and, by letters, to us, that he would be content with justice; and she thereupon writes to tell her brother that she is satisfied, and this bearer, Olisleger's nephew, has credence on the matter. Sends copies of her letter and the King's to her brother, and the credence.
Considering the conformity (unexpected when Clerk left) of the Lady Anne and seeing by their letters that Clerk deferred not to open to the Duke the King's benevolence to him in case he were conformable: directs him to evade the offers he made, as the money which should be given to him by way of gratuity should rather be bestowed on the Lady, and the cost of her traduction to Calais is recompensed by her present endowment. His amity is, however, to be retained. His referring his final answer to consultation with his kinsmen and states, gives a very good reason for departing from the offers to him. Looks daily for their letters showing how the Duke takes the sentence and meanwhile as far as may be, gives directions (set out at great length) what to say to the Duke. They are to repair to him with Olisleger's nephew, who shall first declare his credence; and after that they shall deliver Lady Anne's letter and declare the causes of separation as in the King's letter to the Duke and the letter which the bps. of Durham and Winchester now write to them. If he is mild, gentle, and desirous of quietness and silence in the matter, with a demonstration that he would gladly have something for his own profit, they must not put him in despair thereof, but refer to the King, and enter into capitulations for mutual aid. If he shows himself intractable and high couraged, Clerk shall say he was not sent to render an account of the King's just proceedings, but friendly to communicate them, and desire licence to depart, while Wotton shall remain.
Corrected draft, pp. 20.
R. O. 2. Modern copy of the preceding as altered to the form printed in the State Papers.
Pp. 12.
909. The Divorce from Anne of Cleves.
R. O.
St. P., i. 635.
Statement of the King's case; that he asked for and was promised a discharge of the precontract with the eldest son of Lorrayn before the lady's traduction into England; that he renewed the demand, as Oslyger knows, on her arrival at Greenwich, and a new promise was given of which notarial instruments were made “which ye have seen;” and for want of this discharge he abstained from consummating the marriage. Olesleger and the Offtmayster offered to lie in hostage meanwhile. No discharge was sent, but only an instrument which did “intrike it more.” As there had been so much sticking and so many promises, it was evident that “they” had no better discharge; and as the condition for the clearing of the espousals had a day prefixed, (fn. 7) which was past, the clergy adjudged that the failure of this condition relieved the King from his promise made at the solemnization.
The lawfulness of the marriage might have been always called in question, whenever the son of Lorraine might make his claim by the laws of the Bishop of Rome, who, as the King's mortal enemy “would soon have given ear hereunto.” If any allege that in the solemnization the King consented, it is to be answered that a conditional consent is no consent unless the condition is fulfilled. Moreover, a matrimony non consummate is made void by a second matrimony consummate as the bishops of Rome, when it suited them, have judged. The Church of England has also considered other great causes not to be published.
The Lady was content that the Church should judge her cause, and now that it has decided, is well content to use her liberty.
Pp. 4. Many passages underlined and a few corrections in Clerk's hand.
24 July. 910. Cromwell to [the Council].
R. O.
St. P., i. 642.
Has read the French king's letter to the King, touching Mons. de Rochepot, hinting that injustice has been done by Cromwell's means, and that he has a great part of the prize. Never showed favour otherwise than appertained to justice, which was that Easterlings in league with the French king and robbed by his subjects might have justice here as the goods were in English ports. The French proctor agreed that the case should be tried here by the Admiralty, and departed, and a French advocate was sent hither, who was satisfied with the order taken and also departed. The ambassador now here then made suit to have the matter determined in France. A consultation was held at Guildford, and it was agreed if the French king would send a commissary to a place indifferent, Henry would do the same. My lords of Norfolk, Privy Seal, Durham, and Winchester, were present. My lord of London was ambassador, and fully instructed of the whole matter. Denies that he had or was promised any part of the prize. The Tower, 24 July.
Hol., pp. 2. Endd.: The French king's letter touching Mons. de la Rochepot with the earl of Essex's answer.
24 July. 911. Card. Farnese to the Bp. of Modena. (fn. 8)
Laemmer, 292. * * * The Pope is grieved to hear his opinion of the probable issue of the Diet; for any concession to the Lutherans of things esteemed to be de jure positivo would put in doubt resolutions taken by Councils, and, unless made with the participation of other nations, would be a scandal to Christendom. Moreover, it would be a bad example to give in Germany, in presence of their Majesties (the Emperor and king of the Romans), now when the king of England has taken a turn in the right direction, by punishing Cramuel for the countenance given to the Lutherans, and has in his Parliament determined some Lutheran articles (now in question) conformably with the Catholic faith. * * * * Rome, 24 July 1540.
Italian.
25 July. 912. Lord Justice and Council of Ireland to Henry VIII.
R. O.
St. P., iii.
223.
At the departing of lord Leonard Gray, late Deputy, the land was left in great hazard. Hurts done by the Tooles, Cavenaghes, OCchonor, the Kellys, OMolaughlyn, OMelmoy, Magoughegan, and ODoyn. OBrene, ONeyle, ODonell, and their adherents appointed a general meeting at Fenaa beside Fower, intending to overrun the Pale. Great preparations to prevent that meeting, which the Irishmen perceiving, refrained from coming to the meeting. Concluded, however, to do some exploit, and entered and burned OChonnor's country. ONeyle writes fair letters, but is “a mere fraudulent Irishman, a pure Geraldine.” A new hosting upon OCchonor, with 14 days' victuals, appointed for 9 Aug. Lately Brereton had a letter from ONeyle showing how he “beareth” OCchonor. Neither ONeyle nor his predecessors ever meddled with Leinster affairs before. He should have fair words till the pride of these other traitors be abated. Dublin, 25 July 32 Henry VIII. Signed: Wyllyam Brereton—John Alen—George Dublin.—Edwarde Miden.—J. Rawson, pr. of Kyllmaynam — Willm. Brabazon—Robert Cowley—Thomas Lutrell, justice—James Bathe, baron—Patryke Whyte, baron.
Add. Endd.
25 July. 913. Sir Ant. St. Leger, Deputy of Ireland.
Irish Pat.
Roll, 32–33
Hen. VIII.,
m. 1.
Certificate that the lord Deputy, 25 July 32 (fn. 9) Hen. VIII., in Holy Trinity cathedral, Dublin, took his oath of office (recited in English) before John Alen, Chancellor, and the Council of Ireland.
Lat.
26 July. 914. Wallop and Carne to Norfolk.
R. O. On the 23rd sent from Loviers a packet of letters to the deputy of Calais to be forwarded to the King. Wrote that the ambassadors of Cleves had taken their leave of the French king, without any perfect conclusion, but has since received the enclosed letter from Thos. Barnaby (fn. 10) at Paris about them. This morning a young man asked Wallop's steward if he could speak with him, saying that it was he who had been in prison for so long in Paris, and he wanted help to return to England, and that he was lodged at “one Mons. de Charlez Viderz house, being an advocate.” “This is he that calleth himself Blanche Rose, (fn. 11) of whom Mr. Bryan can tell you enough.” Asks what he shall do concerning him. Rouen, 26 July. Signed.
Pp.
2. Add. Endd.
26 July. 915. Ormond to Henry VIII.
R. O.
St. P., iii.,
225.
On the 20th inst. landed at Waterford. That day his brother entered the Kavenaghes' country, and he followed next day with the men of Kilkenny and thereabouts. Continued five or six days burning and destroying until he had the hostages of most part of Odrone, except Donyll McCahir, a wild young man, adherent of Tirlaugh OToole. This Tirlaugh aided the Kavenaghes, but seeing they could not prevail sent to Ormond to conclude a peace such as Norfolk and other deputies have concluded with him, saying he durst never trust lord Leonard, the late Deputy. Must now leave the Kavenaghes, as he hears OBrene (who, being “crased” all the while Ormond was with the King, could not assist OConnor before) is coming to the borders of Casshell next Thursday, and he must have his retinue ready to resist any invasion. Donough OBrene, the late OBrene's son, comes over Shannon at the same time, and has sent word he will be on the King's side. Mr. Brereton, the justice, has done great services, especially in a late journey upon OConor. James of Desmond comes to the borders of Casshell. I shall show him, as your Majesty willed me, that upon his submission you will be his good lord. Encloses a letter from him. Garreghkill in ODrone, 26 July. Signed.
Add.
26 July. 916. Manuell Cyrne to John III. of Portugal.
R. O. Writes the news, as Fernão Dalurez advised him to do. The ambassador writes of the licence which the king of Scotland says he has given to the family of Robert Breton (Barton) to arm [ships] against the Portuguese. Hears of no ship out as yet. So old a quarrel ought to be finished.
Negociation of the king of the Romans with the Lutherans.
There is strange news from England—that the King has left the sister of the duke of Cleves whom he married in January last, and of whom Cyrne sent an account when she passed by here. The cause is not yet certain; some say that there was a previous contract with the duke of Lorraine, some that the King would marry an English lady, niece of the duke of Norfolk, daughter of his brother, and that she is already with child. Thinks there must be some other secret reason. Master Cramuell is now in the castle of London, condemned to death. Some say he was a traitor, some a heretic, and some both. The captain of Calais and the viceroy of Ireland are also arrested.
News of the Emperor's proceedings in Flanders. 26 July 1540, from Antwerp.
Portuguese. Modern transcript, pp. 7.
27 July. 917. Cromwell's Goods.
R. O. Stuff of the late earl of Essex delivered to Hampton Court, 27 July 32 Hen. VIII., by the hands of John Gate, groom of the Robes. Notes in margin of the persons to whom the items are delivered, i.e., Davy Vyncent, Mr. Cyssyll, Brystowe, Mr. Baynton, Mr. Henege; Cotton, Mr. Henege's man; John Gate, and my lord of Sussex; the “robes of the Garter of crimson and purple velvet” remain at Hampton Court by the King's command.
P. 1.
27 July. 918. Deputy and Council of Calais to Henry VIII.
R. O.
St. P. viii.,
411.
The French king having fortified Arde and furnished it with men of war, and the Frenchmen having three years past made a passage from Arde to Calais by Cowebridge (instead of the old way by Newnham Bridge) by which they could convey in one night their greatest ordnance into any part of the Marches, and overrun a great part of them, wrote before that trenches should be cut athwart it, but have had no answer. The case is urgent.
The bulwark and other works at Beauchamp's tower will be finished in five or six weeks after Michaelmas. It will be such a piece of work both for beauty and surety as hath not been seen in this town before. Send the Surveyor, who wants 2,000l. for it. Calais, 27 July 32 Hen. VIII. Signed: H. Mawtravers—Wyllyam Grey—Thomas Palmer—Edwarde Wotton—Ryc. Graynfeld—Edward Ryngeley—Will'm Sympson.
P. 2. Add. Endd.
27 July. 919. Lord Maltravers to Henry VIII.
R. O. Since the Council's letters were written, has heard that by pretext of the bridge and passage mentioned therein, much cattle and “bease” is conveyed out of the Pale. Yesterday Sir Edward Ringeley asked Wm. Starkie, late yeoman of the chamber to lord Lisley, “what he knew by the said lord Lisley.” He replied that the worst point that ever he knew was that while certain Frenchmen were lodging with him at the Staple Hall, after supper he opened the chest wherein the keys lie and showed them to the French men, saying, “These be the keys of all the gates of this town.” Doubted what might be his meaning therein, and therefore informs the King.
Since coming hither has found all matters in good order and no need of administration of justice, except the discharge on Saturday last of John Hinberie, soldier here, for perjury. Relates the case, showing that Hinberie was imprisoned half a year past by the Council but released by Lisle.
Two merchant men banished by the Emperor out of Gawnt and one out of Russeler have been here these fifteen weeks, being commanded by the earl of Southsex and Sir John Gage not to depart till the King's pleasure be known. Calais, 27 July 32 Hen. VIII. Signed.
Pp.
2. Add. Endd.
28 July. 920. John Lord Russell.
Great Admiral, see Grants in July, No. 117.
28 July. 921. Convocation of Canterbury.
Wilkins, iii.
850.
The provincial synod assembled 14 April. The first two sessions were occupied upon the matter of a “prolocutor,” Ric. Gwent being elected and presented. In the next two was debated the spontaneous offer to the King of 4s. in the pound besides the annual tenths. After this the matter of the nullity of the marriage between Henry VIII. and Anne of Cleves was proposed and the archbishops, bishops, deans, archdeacons, and proctors of the clergy of either province were convoked by the King to discuss it. The principal names, as appears by the register of this convocation, were the archbishops of Canterbury and York; the bps. of London, Durham, Winchester, Lincoln, Carlisle, St. Davids, Llandaff, Hereford, Worcester, St. Asaph, Rochester, Bangor, and the elect of Westminster; Ric. Gwent, archd. of London, John Incent, dean of St. Paul's, Peter Vannes, dean of Sarum, John Taylor, dean of Lincoln, H. Williams, dean of Lichfield, Simon Haynes, dean of Exeter, Ric. Layton, dean of York, Edm. Cranmer archd. of Canterbury, Ric. Rawson, archd. of Essex, Ric. Coren, archd. of Colchester and Oxford, Thos. Baugh, archd. of Surrey, Maurice Griffith, archd. of Rochester, John Worthyall, archd. of Chichester, Polydor Virgilius, archd. of Wells, Ric. Street, archd. of Derby, David Poole, archd. of Salop, Thos. Winter, archd. of Cornwall, John Heneage, archd. of Taunton, Griffith Leison, archd. of Carmarthen, Thos. Westby, archd. of York, Thos. Magnus, archd. of the East Riding, John Langrich, archd. of Cleveland, Robt. Davel, archd. of Northumberland, Wm. Holgil, archd. of Carlisle, &c.
The process finished, it is doubtful whether anything else was done. The King's writ of dissolution as given in Cranmer's register is as follows:—
Writ (recited), addressed to the abp. of Canterbury, to dissolve at St. Paul's, this very day, the convocation assembled there by the King's writ on the 13th April. Westm., 28 July 32 Hen. VIII.
Latin.
28 July. 922. Thomas Magnus.
R. O. Grant for life to Thomas Magnus, in lieu of his pension as master of St. Leonard's, York, of the reversion and rent of Bennyngbroughe grange, &c, the house of St. Leonards' and rectory of Newton, Yorks. 28 July 32 Hen. VIII.
Later copy.
28 July. 923. The Diet of Hagenau.
R. O. “Constitutio Romani Regis, in presentia Electorum Principum, Statuum et Protestantium lecta et publicata Haganoe vicesimo octavo die Julii, Anno Domini MD xlo.”
Account of the proceedings of the Diet at Hagenau, with the demands of both parties, from its indiction at Spires, 6 June, until its prorogation to 28 Oct., at Worms.
Partly in Mont's hand. Lat., pp. 19, with flyleaf intitled as above.
28 July. 924. Diet at Hagenau to Charles V.
R. O.
St. P. viii.
359.
Ask him to summon “Comitia Maxima” and preside in person. Hagenau “feria quarta post Jacobi anno 40°.” Subscribed as from the princes and delegates who appeared at Hagenoe “ad quintum, nonas, Junii” (corrected from “Julii.”)
ii. “Summa eorum que in Conventu Haganoe acta sunt.”
1. By the king of the Romans, electors, and Princes who assembled at Hagenoe it was treated with the Protestants that they should restore the goods of those who had been before in peaceful possession, or allow them to be put in sequestration till the religious differences were settled either by a general council or a national synod. Or that they should answer at the ordinary tribunal of the Chamber to those who sued for church goods taken away. 2. That the pacification of Nuremberg should benefit only those who gave in their names at the time of the diet at Augsburg, not those who have accepted the confession subsequently. 3. That hereafter they should admit no one into their league. 4. That they should keep the peace in the Empire under the penalties allotted to peace-breakers.
To the 1st the Protestants replied that as the goods were turned to godly uses according to the Scriptures and to old canons, it would be wrong to apply them again to impiety, and sequestration would impede the ministry of the Word; that they had already refused the jurisdiction of the Chamber as partial, &c. To the 2nd, that the decree of Nuremberg was granted to all who agreed with them in religion as shown by the Emperor's rescript given at Savilion. To the 3rd, that they cannot honestly repel those who would embrace true religion. To the 4th, that they are always ready to keep peace, and will give securities if necessary.
In Mont's hand. Lat., pp. 3. Endd.
R. O. 2. Another copy of § 1 ii.
St. P. viii.,
358.
Lat. Endd.
R. O. 3. English translation of § 2.
Pp. 2. Endd.
29 July. 925. The Divorce from Anne of Cleves.
R. O. Notarial instrument recording that, 29 July 32 Hen. VIII. (in a certain lofty and ornate chamber within the honor of Hampton Court, in presence of John lord Russell, K.G., Great Admiral, Ant. Wingfeld, vice-chamberlain and captain of the King's pensioners, and of Ant. Huse and Thos. Argall, notaries), Wm. earl of Southampton, K.G., chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Privy Seal, and Sir Thos. Wriothesley, chief secretary, and (in a garden adjoining the King's house called Parlande Park, in the parish of Langley Marres, Bucks, in presence of John Marbury and Thos. Holme and the aforesaid notaries) Charles duke of Suffolk, great master of the Household, deposed upon oath as follows:—
ii. The declaration of certain their proceedings with the lady Anne of Cleves.
After they and Sir Ric. Riche had been with the lady Anne, at Richmount, 11 July (at which time she wrote a letter to the King declaring her whole mind, subscribed “your Majesty's most humble sister and servant Anne, daughter of Cleves,” she writing the word “sister” upon comfort that the King would so accept her if she persisted in the declaration of the truth, “of which discourse there is already an instrument made apart”), the King sent the said Duke, Earl, and Sir Thomas again to her, still at Richemount, 14 July, with his token, as to his dearest sister by adoption, and his letters of the 12th, as follows (recited):—
“Right dear and right entirely beloved sister,” by the relation of the lord Master, lord Privy Seal and others of our Council lately addressed unto you we perceive the continuance of your conformity, which before was reported, and by your letters is eftsoons testified. We take your wise and honourable proceedings therein in most thankful part, as it is done in respect of God and his truth, and, continuing your conformity, you shall find us a perfect friend, content to repute you as our dearest sister. We shall, within five or six days, when our Parliament ends, determine your state after such honourable sort as you shall have good cause to be content, [we] minding to endow you with 4,000l. of yearly revenue. We have appointed you two houses, that at Richemont where you now lie, and the other at Blechinglegh, not far from London, that you may be near us and, as you desire, able to repair to our Court to see us, as we shall repair to you. When Parliament ends, we shall, in passing, see and speak with you, and you shall more largely see what a friend you and your friends have of us. Requires her to be “quiet and merry.” Westm., 12 July 32 Hen. VIII. “Thus subscribed, Your loving brother and friend, H.R.”
Declared to her how the King took her proceedings in good part and sent her, “as to his sister and none otherwise,” a token and also his own letters; and delivered the token, being 500 mks. in gold, and the letters. Having read the letters, she gave the King thanks and, of herself, declared her mind to ensue the purport of her former letters and maintain the truth, both touching “the integrity and cleanness of her body,” and all the rest. For further testimony she sent his Highness a ring for a token and wrote him a letter in her own tongue, the translation of which follows:—
The letter of 16 July recited at length (See No. 891).
On their presenting her letters and token, the King sent the Duke, Earl and Sir Thomas to Richmond, 17 July, to discharge the officers and servants who attended on her as Queen, and appoint and swear others to serve her as the King's sister. She took leave openly of such as departed, and welcomed those presented to her, declaring, of herself, how bound she was to the King, and that “she would be found no woman by inconstancy and mutability, though all the world should move her to the contrary, neither for mother, brother nor none other person living,” adding that she would send the King all letters she received from her brother, mother or other of her kin.
Declared this to the King, who sent them again, 21 July, to see her household fully established and present certain jewels and other things of great value which he gave her, and also to show her certain letters he had received from the Duke, her brother, and the bp. of Bath, his ambassador with the said Duke. She thanked the King for participating the letters to her, and as, by the Bishop's letter, it seemed that Olisleger feared she was not well treated, she wrote in her own language to her brother, as follows:—
The letter of 21 July recited (in English), without the date. See No. 898.
When this was written, learning that it should be conveyed by a nephew of Olisleger's, being the King's servant, she had him called in, and desired him to commend her to her brother, and say she was merry and well entreated. This she did with such alacrity and pleasant gesture that he may well testify “that he found her not miscontented.” Then, after she had dined, she sent the King “the ring delivered unto her at their pretensed marriage, desiring that it might be broken in pieces as a thing which she knew of no force or value.”
On the 24th July, having received a letter from the Duke her brother, written in his own hand upon knowledge of this matter, she sent it to the King, who perused and returned it.
The said Duke, Earl, and Sir Thomas declare that all the above is true, as they shall answer at the Day of Judgment.
iii. Attestations of the two notaries.
A parchment book of 12 pages, two of which are blank. Each page signed by Suffolk, Southampton, and Wriothesley, whose seals (much injured) are appended. § i. and § iii. Latin, § ii. English.
R. O.
St. P. i., 643.
2. Corrected draft of the declaration (§ 1, ii.), omitting the recitation of the letters, and leaving a blank space for the date, 21 July.
In Wriothesley's hand, pp. 13.
R. O. 3. Later copy, with some errors.
Pp. 4.
29 July. 926. Marillac to Montmorency.
R. O.
Kaulek, 207.
(Almost the
whole text.)
[London], 29 July:—Wrote last on the 21st. Rochepot's affair remains in the same terms, although the final answer is promised every day. Mr. Thomas Cromwell, heretofore condemned by Parliament, this morning was beheaded in the usual place for such executions. Grace was made to him upon the method of his death, for his condemnation was to a more painful and ignominious penalty. With him was beheaded the lord of Hongrefort, aged about 49 years, attainted of sodomy, of having forced his own daughter, and having practised magic and invocation of devils. Heard after midday that Dr. Barnes and some others shall be burnt; and will detain this until evening, so as to inform you of the whole “who are about 42.” It is thought that this same week there will be other executions of those condemned by Parliament, and who are not comprised in the general pardon this King has granted. All had sentence of death or perpetual imprisonment at the King's pleasure. Encloses note of the names of some besides those executed, who deserve to be known.
The brother of the duke of Ferrara, “le seigneur Teko,” (fn. 12) after sojourning here seven days, and being feasted and shown the King's houses, such as Hampton Court and Greenwich, left yesterday evening, to return to the Emperor. This King only gave him two good hackneys, as he did to the prince of Salerno, a sign that he did not come here to negociate.
The new ambassador (fn. 13) of the Emperor, of whom Marillac has written, arrived six days ago, and found a very meagre reception at this Court, where, in truth, he is scarcely liked, as the King, speaking of him to Marillac, seemed not to hold him in good esteem, and Norfolk, who now has chief management of affairs, clearly shows he loves him little, saying to Marillac that he will no longer have his Cromwell to guarantee him in the follies he formerly attempted. Moreover, the poor man is so broken down with long illness that people think he is rather come to make his last testament in England than [to do] great service to his master, who has sent him on this charge, knowing that elsewhere he was useless, being unable to go either on foot or on horseback; and therefore, too, he is lodged near Marillac, beside the river, so as to be able to go to this Court by water. Cannot omit to notice the courtesy of the said ambassador in advertising Marillac of his arrival as soon as he landed (although he concealed it from the others, even from the ambassador, his predecessor, to the surprise of everyone), excusing himself for not visiting Marillac before speaking to this King, to satisfy English ceremony. As soon as he had had audience, he came straight to the writer's lodging, thus forestalling the office Marillac intended to do to him, and said he was charged by the Emperor to communicate all he did here. Replied he had charge from Francis to do the like, as he had done to his (the ambassador's) predecessor. However, the said ambassador told me nothing but that he had saluted this King and presented letters of credence. Since then they have frequently visited each other, to show the amity between their masters. Hopes soon to send notice of what was done in this Parliament, which closed two days ago.
French. Modern transcript, pp. 4.
29 July. 927. James V. to Henry VIII. (fn. 14)
Add. MS.
32,646 f. 130.
B. M.
St. P., v. 182.
As a result of his pains taken to redress and order affairs on the Borders, there have, for a long time past, been no complaints of importance. Took advantage of this tranquility to visit his Isles; and during his absence Henry's officers of the East Marches refused redress to his officers until they should first make redress for a hawk alleged to have been taken out of the bounds of Berwick, and for certain deer. His officers referred the matter to his Council, saying that such questions for wild fowls or beasts were unheard of, and respite was taken. Allows that Henry's officer only does his duty, but thinks that this is a light matter, for there are no such pleasures, as hawks and the like, in Scotland that are not at Henry's disposal. Credence for Rothesay Herald. Edinburgh, 29 July 27 Hen. VIII. Signed.
Pp.
2. Add. Endd.
Royal MS.,
18 B. vi. 94 b.
B. M.
2. Copy in a letter book, from which the letter was printed in the State papers.
29 July. 928. Charles V. to James V.
Lanz, ii. 310. Has received his letters asking for execution in Lower Germany of letters of reprisal long since granted against the king of Portugal, and ordered by Charles duke of Burgundy, the Emperor's great-grandfather (fn. 15) to be executed. Would be glad to gratify James, but considers them out of date; and in any case the king of Portugal ought first to be admonished, whom Charles has always found studious of what is just.
Has informed James by two letters of depredations committed by his subjects in Holland and Zealand. Trusts James will restrain them. Hague, 29 July 1540.
Lat.
30 July. 929. [Covos] to Aguilar.
Add. MS.
28,592 f. 151.
B. M.
The viceroy of Naples. Camarino. Barbarossa. The affair of Madame. Letters from Flanders of the 4th (8th in Sp. Cal.), when the Emperor was in Bruges.
Aguilar must know from many letters how the king of England beheaded Cromwell, who was his favourite. The cause was, they say, because he urged him to be a Lutheran. Please God, it may be a beginning of the King's coming to a knowledge of his duty.
Prince Doria at Messina. Church and Spanish news. Madrid, 30 July 1540.
Spanish. Modern copy from Simancas, pp. 15. See Spanish Calendar, vi. i., No. 114.
[31 July.] 930. Henry VIII. to Wallop and Carne.
R. O. Since his last advertisement of affairs here, things have occurred which are to be declared to the French king and others. Upon the petition of Parliament being declared to lady Anne of Cleves, she agreed to the decision of the matter by the clergy, who gave sentence that the marriage was not vailable. If causes are asked for, they may say, as they did to the cardinal of Ferrare, that the King would not do anything that could not lawfully be bidden by, and it is sufficient that the cause is known to those who had the examination thereof, who in this case are fully to be trusted. Lady Anne approved the sentence, confessing the integrity of her body, and refusing all who would move her to the contrary, and desired to remain here as a servant and subject. Informed her that she could not remain Queen, but, for the honour of her house and respect for herself, he would entertain her as a sister in honourable estate; and sent her a token, for which she wrote a gentle letter of thanks. Has assigned her lands, with two goodly houses and an allowance of 500l., a year, amounting in all to 5,000 marks a year. She is quietly established in her own house as the King's sister, being resolved not to return, as she herself has written to her brother. Sends a small memorial for their better information.
Having received their letters of the 13th, (fn. 16) which state that the ambassadors of Cleve are departed and recount the conversation of Wallop's secretary with the queen of Navarre, desires Carne to take leave of the French king and return, and also to take leave of the queen of Navarre, Wallop asking her to tell Carne the matter which she mentioned as something which the King would be contented to hear, and which would make him laugh.
Draft, pp. 11. Endd.: Minute to Mr. Wa[llop] to Mr. Kerne.
31 July. 931. Pate to Henry VIII.
R. O. Was entertained by the lord of Barro at a pleasant house of his a mile outside the town. He said the Emperor called him always his Englishman. He assured Pate that the Emperor entirely loves the King, and trusted that the families of England and Burgundy would continue friends against all adversaries for ever. He pressed Pate to banquet next evening with the lady Regent, at his house, and he would commend him to her, as he did Mr. Wiat; but he excused himself. The Prince of Salerno spreads an honourable report of the King. The Hay of Hollond, 31 July.
Hol. p. 1. Add. Endd.
31 July. 932. Pate to Norfolk.
R. O.
St. P. viii.
412.
Heard in Antwerp that the people said the dissolution of the King's last marriage had alienated the hearts of the Electors, but that, being wise, he had “contravailed” the Emperor or French king in their place.
Heard also that one of the King's council said that the marriage, if heard in an indifferent place, could not but be legitimate. There is a report, probably untrue, that Andrew Doria has been either slain or taken by Barbarosse. The lord of Barrow tells him that many goodly and rich copes have come from England to sell, causing rumours that there were no masses there. Being sick at Breda, sent for a priest to say mass in his chamber, who was surprised at Englishmen still hearing masses. The lord of Barrow sent him a present of wine before supping with him, and said that the bp. of Rome and Venetians were worthy to be exploded out of Christendom for the peace they made this year with the Turk. He offered his niece to the Emperor in marriage with a million of gold, but “I think he more esteemeth his honour than to couple himself with such one.”
The nuncio sent concerning the case between his nephew and the Emperor's bastard daughter has had no audience yet. Part of his commission is to ask the Emperor not to succour the Perugian exiles. Hay, Zelonde, Friselonde, and Utrecht pay as much to the Emperor as Brabont, viz., 600,000 ducats. He has been ill of gout and tertian fever. The duke of Cleves has been hunting near Utrecht. Some think he wishes to resort to the Emperor for the conclusion of a marriage, though it is said here he will have the king of Navarre's daughter.
The council of Almaine is dissolved, and nothing concluded, the king of the Romans desiring either licence to depart to Vienna, or to call a Council Imperial under the Emperor's authority. The bp. of Trevers is dead. The bp. of Londres (fn. 17) has gone to treat with a town near Denmark, or else hearken how the nobles of Germany are inclined towards what was moved in the last Council. Has been sick of an ague ever since he left Bruges. Considers the air very contagious, as most of the Emperor's train here are very sick.
The bp. of Agregentine, (fn. 18) in Sicily, who is coming to England, is “an honourable prelate, a personage of an humble spirit, of great humanity, of honest learning, and without all fuke and craft.” Being Marquis de Terra Nova he resigned it, upon a scruple of conscience, to his second brother, Constable of the said Isle, who is in great favour with the Emperor. The Hay in Hollonde, 31 July. Signed.
Pp.
3. Add. Endd.
31 July. 933. [James V. to Paul III.]
Royal MS.
18 B. vi. 97b.
B. M.
Although not long ago he sent his secretary, Geo. Hay, with full instructions, the legateship for the cardinal of St. Andrews is of such importance that he writes again to press it. Edinburgh, 31 July 1540.
Lat., p. 1, copy.
Ib., f. 95.
B. M.
2. “Instructions to our weilbelovit familiar clerk and servitor, Maister George Hay, to be schewin in oure name to the Popis halynes.”
He is to show to the Pope the contents of the first instructions sent with him at his departure, and labour to obtain the effect thereof. The King thinks the brief he has received in favour of Maister Robt. Wauchop touching the abbey of Dryburgh, very strange, seeing that the Pope has been moved by inopportune solicitations to act contrary to James' privileges. Considering his conduct and obedience to the Apostolic See in this troublous time of pullulant heresies, thinks that he deserves the increase of his privileges and not their diminution. As a final answer to all the Pope's briefs, James will in no wise consent that his Holiness should provide the abbey of Dryburgh otherwise than to Thos. Erskyn, whom he nominated first thereto. Begs the Pope not to be abused nor circumvented by the clamour and importunity of Wauchop. The premises are to be declared also to cardinals Carpi and Ghinucci and the King's other friends.
He is to complain to the Pope of the cardinal of Trani having taken provision of the parsonage of Glasgow to the injury of “our familiar clerk,” Henry Sinclair, specially by the reservation of the fruits, which the Cardinal holds “dependand upon our said servitour to trouble him quhen he thinkes tyme.” The Pope must cause the Cardinal to renounce all claim thereto, for the King will not allow any stranger to hold a benefice without his licence. Doubts not the Cardinal will defend Duncan, who has been very troublesome during the reigns of the King and his father. Hay must take good heed that Wauchop attempts nothing against the King's privileges, specially touching the deanery of Aberdeen, which the King has provided to his secretary's brother, leaving the provostry of Trinity College to the almoner. Wauchop does not deserve to hold any benefices in Scotland. Holyroodhouse, 31 July 1540.
Pp. 3, copy.
31 July. 934. James V. to Ghinucci.
Ib. f. 97b.
B. M.
Has written to the Pope about the legateship for the card, of St. Andrews. Requests Ghinucci to inform him how the matter proceeds. Edinburgh, 31 July 1540.
Lat., p. 1, copy.
July. 935. Ordnance from the Tower.
Hatfield MS
(Hist. MSS.
Com., Cal.,
i. 65.)
Artillery, &c., delivered from the Tower for the King's service by Sir Chr. Morres, Master of Ordnance, May to July 32 Hen. VIII.
Pp. 2.
— July. 936. A Fellowship at Cambridge.
R. O. Depositions and interrogatories on the part of Thos. Pylson or Pilston against Sir Hugh Rawlyns, priest. (fn. 19)
On 2 Aug. 31 Hen. VIII. Pilson, being in extreme sickness, and not whole of mind and memory, was induced by John Tyndall and others, his enemies, to resign his fellowship in King's Hall, Cambridge, which resignation he revoked, 4 Aug., before Sir Hugh Rawlins, Ric. Odby, notary, Roger Denys, servants to my lord Privy Seal that now is, John Browne and others, alleging that he made the resignation from fear of death, being ill dieted and grievously entreated.
The depositions are by Ric. Odby or Awdeby, Westm., 11 July 32 Hen. VIII., Ric. Griffyn, of London, tailor, 10 July, Thos. Argall, of London, Hugh Rawlyns, Roger Denys, 10 Feb. 31 Hen. VIII., John Worthiall, chancellor of Chichester, Miles Wymbyshe, of London, and Cuthbert Burton.
ii. Also depositions taken before Geoff. Glyn, LL.D., at Trinity Hall, Cambridge, 22 May 1540, on both sides, concerning Pilson's resignation, and an alleged burglary committed by him in John Whitaker's house in Cambridge. The witnesses are—Robert Bradfilde, tailor, John Whitaker, Wm. Graye, Johane Whitaker, Gefferey Blithe, doctor, and Thos. Blythe, B.D., and Wm. Pratt, of Cambridge, bailiff.
A bundle of 45 leaves (many of them blank) stitched together Add.: My lord of Chichester “and others of the King's honorable Council, and judges of the Whitt Hawll.” (fn. 20) Endd.
R. O. 2. Interrogatories and depositions on behalf of Rawlyns by John Tyndall, merchant taylor; John Shirif, barber surgeon, Westm., 31 Jan. 31 Hen. VIII.; Robt. Johnson, proctor of the Arches; and John Fuller, servant to Mr. Johnson, proctor of the Arches.
A letter from Thos. Blyth and Wm. Davy to Dr. Thyrlebey, archdeacon of Ely, stating that Hugh Rawlyns was admitted to Pilson's fellowship on producing his resignation, and the King's privy seal ordering his admission. Cambridge, 21 Jan. Signed.
Pp.
20, of which 13 are blank.
937. Officers of Anne of Cleves.
R. O. Warrant for payment of the wages of the following officers of lady Anne of Cleves:—Sir Wm. Goring, chamberlain, 26l. 13s. 4d.; Jasper Horsey, steward, 26l. 13s. 4d.; Wymond Carew, receiver, 20l.; — Chomley, cofferer, 20l.; Ric. Tomewe, clerk comptroller, 13l. 6s. 8d.; Gymmech Shenck, Groisbeck Vresvydour, and Stayl, 46l. 13s. 4d. each.; Shatzfelt, Reck, Menert, and Cheven, 33l. 6s. 8d. each; Dr. Cornelis, physician, 46l. 13s. 4d.; Katherine and Gertrude, Dutchwomen, 10l. each; Mathyew, secretary, 13l. 6s. 8d.; Schoulenburg, the cook, Henry the “boutelyer,” and Craspot, 5l.; Lowys Snyder, Tilman Tappessier, Engelbert, footman, and William, footman, 6l. 13s. 4d. each. Total, 505l. a year.
The strangers are to be paid from Easter and the rest from Midsummer last.
Draft, pp. 7. Not addressed. Endorsed: The minute of a warrant, &c.
938. State Papers found in Cromwell's Keeping.
R. O. “This byll Indented Witnesseth … reigne of our Sovere[ign] … of Duresme and … pill Secretaries int[o the hands of] Sir John [Baker] … boxes which th[e]y ha[ve] found lately in … bilonged u[nto] the late Erle of Essex W … as foloweth”
“In a box …”
“Denmark Saxon”:—
“ (fn. 21) Confirmatio tractatus Pacis inter …
Londini xxxo Junij Anno Domini …
(fn. 21) Confirmatio tractatus pacis Inter …
Regem Dacie dat. Anno D …
(fn. 21) Commissio Georgii ducis Saxon ad …
(fn. 21) Confirmacio ejusdem tractatus 151 [1] …
“In a boxe [m]ar[ked] …
“Fraunce”:—
(fn. 21) "Tractatus arctioris conjunctionis inter reges …
apud Westm. Anno Domini ml vc xxvij.
(fn. 21) Tractatus perpetue p[acis] …
(fn. 21) Tractatus commutacionis (?) … flandrie (?) …
(fn. 21) Collatio c[uju]sdam [trac]tatus inter Johannem …
de dat. anno Domini mlccccc xiijo
“Scotia”:—
(fn. 21) Confirmatio tractatus pacis Londini xj …
(fn. 21) Indentura ejusdem tractatus 1534.
(fn. 21) Indentura de redeliberando Edrington …
Angusie, etc., remaneat in Anglia m …
(fn. 21) Confirmacio ejusdem Indenture …
(fn. 21) Commissio pro pace tractanda [15] 3[.]
(fn. 21) Commissio pro confirmacione ejusdem 153.
(fn. 21) The agrement uppon trewes betwen Engl[and] … bifore the treatie of peace. 1532.
(fn. 21) The commission to treate uppon the same …
"In a boxe marked w …
“I[mper]ator”:—
“ (fn. 21) Commissio tractandi cum rege H. VIIo et duce B[urgundiæ] …
(fn. 21) Tractatus pacis inter eosdem 1480.
Confirmacio ejusdem tractatus 1480.
(fn. 21) Commissio Ferdinandi Regis et Johanne Regi[ne] …
H. viijo. Dat. 1510.
(fn. 21) Tractatus pacis super eodem 1510.
(fn. 21) Confirmacio ejusdem 1510.
(fn. 21) Tractatus amicitie inter Regem H. viijo
(fn. 21) Additio unius articuli ad eundem tractatum …
(fn. 21) Tractatus pacis inter Oratores Pontificis R[omani] …
Hispanie. Dat. apud Machlyn 1513.
(fn. 21) Confirmatio Maximiliani super eodem 1513.
(fn. 21) Transumptum cujusdam tractatus inter Ferdinand [um Regem Aragoniæ et Henricum] Septimum. 1502 et 1503.
(fn. 21) Lre. concesse super dote Katherine per Arthurum p[rincipem Walliæ].”
“In a boxe market with this Ire. L.”
“Lubek”:—
(fn. 21) Obligacio Consulum et Senatorum Urbis Lubic … millium florenorum de dat. xvto Octobris Ann…. [In the margin:
“Nota. War. inde pro redeliberac. ejusd. huic consut.”]
“The same booxes and writinges to be layde and …
Howse at Westm. for his Maties use and …
the said Sir John Baker to thon parte of …
his name the daye and yere above said.
“Allso in the boxe of the …
“Imperator”:—
(fn. 22) Commissio Maximiliani ad tractandum …
(fn. 22) Tractatus pacis inter Maxum et P … cum H. vijo. 1488.
(fn. 22) Confirmacio ejusdem tractatus. 1488.
(fn. 22) Commissio super reformacione monete …
per Carolum Imperatorem. 1522.
(fn. 22) Tractatus super eisdem habitus Cal[eti].”
Strip formed by two pieces of parchment sewn together. About half on the right-hand side destroyed.
2. Lubeck.
R. O. “Henry theight by the … of the Churche of Englande a … greting. Whereas their remayne … tion made to our use beryng date the fyfte … Wherein the Senat and consules of … thousand markes sterling att dayes … payed and caused to be satisfied a … leage our self fully contented W … unto the bringer of the same … be cancelled and made of … you and every of you suffic[ient] … Palace of Westm., the ningthe daye …”
Parchment, p. 1. More than half destroyed. (fn. 23)
Signed at the top by the King. Endd.: “for delivery of the Lubeck obligacion.”
939. Attainders for Treason.
R. O. At the beginning of a Minute Book of the Court of General Surveyors of Crown Lands [Augmentation Book, 313 B.] are the following notices:—
"Johannes Paslow, abbas de Whalley in com' Lanc,' — attinct' de prodicione commiss' xxvii[j] Octobris Anno xxviijo.
“Thomas Darcy dn's Darcye, Robertus Constable miles, Franciscus Bygod miles, Thomas Percye miles, Johannes Bulmer miles, Steph'us Hamerton miles, Greorgius Lumley armiger, Robertus Aske generos', Nich'us Tempest armiger, Will'us Wood, prior de Bridlington, Adam Sedbar, abbas de Jervaux, — attinct' de prodicione commiss' xvijo die Januarii Anno xxviijo R. H. Octavi.”
"Johannes Husey, miles dn's Husey, Thomas Moygne, gent., Georg' Huddeswell, gent., — attinct' de prodicione commiss' primo et secundo diebus Octobris Ao xxviijo R. H. Octavi.
"Mattheus Makerell abbas de Barlinges, — secundo die Octobris, Ao xxviijvo.
"Henr' Marchio Exon' attinct' — in Surr' xxiiijto die Julii, et in London xxvjto die Julii Ao xxv[iij].
"Henr' Pole d'ns de Monte Acuto attinct' in — Sussex' xijo die Maii Ao xxvij.; Buck' xxv. die Febr' Ao xxviij.
“Reginaldus Pole, &c., Michaell Throgmerton, gent., Joh'es Helyard, clericus, Thomas Goldwell, clericus, Robertus Petow, Observaunt, &c. — attinct' xxmo die Julii, Anno r.r. H. Octa. xxviijo.
“Hugo Holand, yoman, — primo die Maii Ao xxviijo.
“Edwardus Nevell, miles, — xijmo die Julii Ao xxixo.
“Georgius Croft, clericus, — primo di Junii Anno xxxo.
“Joh'es Collyns, clericus, — xxjmo die Maii Ao xxixo.
“Ric'us Harryson, abbas de Kyrksted, — die Lune prox' post f'm Mich'is Ao xxviijo.
“Nich'us Carew, miles, — xxmo die Augusti Ao xxviijo.
“Nich'us Heth, prior de Lenton, — xxixo die Junii Ao xxviijo.
“Robertus Hobbes, abbas de Woborn, — xmo die Januar' Ao xxixo.
“Ric'us Whytting abbas Glaston',—iiijto Augusti Ao xxvijmo.
“Hugo Coke, abbas de Reding, attinct' — primo die Marcii Ao xxvijo.
“Thomas Marshall, abbas Colcestr', — xvijo die Septembr' ao xxxo.
“Ric'us Fermour, — vjto die Julii Ao xxxo.
“Margareta Comitissa Sar., xxmo die Decembr' Ao xxxo.
“Egidius Heron, — xxviijo die Januar' Ao xxxo.
“Walter' Hungerford, — xxijdo die Marcii Ao xxviijo.
“Thomas Crumwell, — ultimo die Marcii Ao xxxo.”
940. Elisabeth Cromwell to [Henry VIII].
Vesp. F. xiii.
157.
B. M.
Thanks his Majesty for the mercy he has shewn her poor husband and herself, which has much relieved the extreme indigence brought upon them by the heinous offences of her father-in-law. Has been unwilling to make any suit for fear of being troublesome, until the King is partly relieved from the pressure of his great affairs. Signed.
P.
1. Sealed.
941. Queen Margaret to Henry VIII.
The letters printed in the State Papers (Vol. V., pp. 181 and 183) at the end of July 1540 are of the year 1536. See Vol. XI., Nos. 111 and 339.
942. Grants in July 1540.
July./Grants. 1. Hen. Torkyngton and Katharine his wife, kinswoman and nearest heir of Matthew Stewkeley, deceased, viz., d. and h. of Gerard, father of William, father of the said Matthew. Livery of the posessions of the said Matthew and of his reversionary interest in those whereof Emma Vaughan, now wife of Edw. Vaughan and late wife of Will. Stewkeley, is seised by way of jointure or dower. Westm., 19 June 32 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 1 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 1, m. 37.
2. Rob. Benslyn and Joan his wife. Licence to alienate 60 ac. of meadow and 9 ac. of pasture in Harleston, Reddenhale, Aldburgh, and Wurtwale to John Bunnyng. Westm., 1 July. Pat. 32 Hen VIII., p 2, m. 30.
3. Sir Thos. Denys, of Holcombe Burnell, Devon. Licence to alienate the house, &c., of the late priory of St. Nicholas, Exeter, with the meadow called “Grene meade” in the parish of “Seynt Davidis Downe,” Devon; the two water-mills called “Seynt Nicholas Mylles” without the North gate of the city of Exeter; and the meadows in the tenure of John Maynard near the said mills; to Will. Isam. Westm., 1 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 2, m. 30.
4. Sir Alex. Radclyff. Grant, in fee, for 527l. 10s. 2d., of the messuage, lands, &c., in Maunton in the parish of Eccles, and in Romesgreve, Lanc., which belonged to the late monastery of Whalley, Lanc., and are now in the King's hands by the attainder of John Paslowe, the late abbot; rent, 55s.d. as tenth. Westm., 28 June. 32 Hen. VIII.—P.S. Del. 1 July. Pat. p. 4, m. 24.
5. Thurstan Tyldisley. Grant, in fee, for 326l. 7s. 4d., of the lands, &c., in Swynton, Haughton, Westlakkes, Kepull, Westwood, and Marland, Lanc., which belonged to the late abbey of Whalley, and are in the King's hands by the attainder of John Paslowe, last abbot. Rent, 32s. 2d. Westm., 28 June 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 1 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 4, m. 26.
6. Ric. Legh, rector of the parish church of Centercase in co. Guisnes, Marches of Calais, S.T.B. (ad gradum baccalauriatus in theologia licentiato). Licence to absent himself from his benefice during his incumbency, residing there or in Calais only twice a year (bodily infirmity permitting) for the space of two months. Westm., 19 June 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 1 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 8, m. 34.
7. Sir Alex. Radcyff. Licence to alienate to And. Barton, all his lands, in Rammesgrove, Lanc., which belonged to Whalley monastery, or to John Paslowe, the late abbot. Westm., 2 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 2, m. 31.
8. John Wellisborn. Appointment wrongly enrolled. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 4, m. 13. See Vol. XIV., Part 1, No. 1354 (4).
9. Thos. Bromeley. To be one of the King's serjeants-at-law. Del. Westm., 2 July, 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 21.
10. Hen. lord Mautravers. To be deputy of Calais, with 100l. a year out of the lordships or manors of Marc and Oye, and 104l. a year for “spyall money” out of the same, and a retinue of 31 soldiers for the custody of the said town, viz., one horseman called “a spere,” two riders called archers, and 23 others called “souldyours,” with the same allowances for each as in the times of Sir Ric. Wyngfeld, Sir John Peche, Sir Rob. Wyngfeld, John lord Berners, or Sir Arthur Plantagenet viscount Lysle, late deputies of Calais; and also 10 soldiers over and above the said 31, with the like allowances. Del. Westm., 2 July, 32 Hen. VIII.—S. B. Pat. p. 7, m. 21.
11. Commissions of gaol delivery.
Hereford City Gaol:—Thos. Havard, mayor, Sir John Baskervyle, John Scudamour, Ric. Warmecombe, Thos. Gybbes, Thos. Gybbons, John Cantourcelly, Hugh Walshe, John Merydyth, Thos. Graunger, Ric. Cotton, and Ric. Palmer. Westm., 2 July.
Town of Estderham, gaol of Thomas bp. of Ely.—Sir Roger Tounesend, Sir Ric. Southwell, Rob. Tounesend, serjeant-at-law, John Gooderyke, Roger Woodhouse, John Wotton, John Robsart, Will. Yelverton, jun., Osbert Mountford, Ant. Thwaytes and Edm. Grey. Westm., 2 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 12d.
12. Commisions of Peace and of Oyer and Terminer.
Lincoln (Kesteven).—Thos. ld. Audeley of Walden, C., Thos. duke of Norfolk, Treasurer of England, Charles duke of Suffolk, President of the Council, Will. earl of Southampton, keeper of the Privy Seal, Thos. earl of Rutland, Edw. ld. Clynton, Sir Walter Luke, Sir Will. Husey, Sir John Thymolby, Sir Rob. Husey, Anth. Myssenden, serjeant-at-law, Francis Broun, Thos. Hall, John Hasylwood, jun., Godfrey Colvyle, Anth. Eyrby, Ric. Markeham, Hamond Sutton, Thos. Whychecote, Blasius Holland, Thos. Brudenell, Ric. Ogle. Westm., 2 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 5d.
13. Somerset.—Thos. ld. Audeley of Walden, C., Thos. duke of Norfolk, treasurer, Charles duke of Suffolk, lord President of the Council, Hen. marquis of Dorset, Will. earl of Southampton, keeper of the Privy Seal, Edw. earl of Hertford, Hen. earl of Bryggewater, J. bishop of Bath and Wells, John ld. Russell, Great Admiral of England, Hen. ld. Mautravers, John ld. Audeley, Will. ld. Stourton, Will. ld. Seyntjohn, Sir Ric. Lyster, Sir Thos. Willoughby, Sir Nic. Wadham, Sir Edw. Gorge, Sir Ant. Hungerford, Sir John Seyntelowe, Sir Thos. Arundell, Sir Hen. Capell, Sir John Newton, Will. Portman, serjeant-at-law, Thos. Clarke, Edw. Rogers, John Wyndam, Thos. Stradling, Ric. Phyllyppes, Nic. Fitzjames, Thos. Dyer, David Broke, Alex. Popham, Ant. Gylbert, Aldred Fitzjames, Roger Basyng, Geo. Gylbert, Will. Vowell, John Porter, Thos. Horner. Westm., 2 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 2, m. 8d.
14. Commission of Sewers.
Hants:—Sir Ric. Lyster, Sir Will. Barkeley, Sir Thos. Lysley, Sir Michael Lyster, Sir Francis Dawtrey, John Paulett, Ric. Paulett, Geo. Paulett, Ric. Andrewes, John Kyngesmyll, Will. Thorpe, James Bettys, Ric. Worsley, John Wyntershull, Hen. Huttofte, John Mylle, Mark Dyngley, Geo. Oglander, Thos. Rice, Thos. Clerke, and Ric. Coke, for the marsh grounds called Newetown marshe, otherwise Bernell marshe, along the sea coast in the Isle of Wight in the north part of the town of Newetown alias Frankevile, and a certain marsh ground called Cadland marshe in the parish of Falley, Hants. Westm., 2 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 5, m. 19d. (In English.)
15. Thos. Bacon, of Hedgesett, Suff. Licence to alienate Culpho manor, Suff., late of Leyston monastery, Suff., to Thos. Wullferston, sen. Westm., July 3. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 31.
16. James Meryng. Lease of the lands in the lordship of Lynbye, Notts, with a mill-dam there, which belonged to Jasper duke of Bedford; term, 21 years; rent, 7l. 2s.d., and 7s. 6d. of increase. Del. Westm., 3 July 32 Hen. VIII. — S.B. Pat. p. 5, m. 17.
17. John Theccher, of Westham, Sussex. Grant, in fee, for 496l. 10s., of the manor of Mersham, Sussex; with appurtenances in Mersham, Fareley, Pett, Ikelesham, and Gestling, Sussex; in as full manner as Sir John Dudley and Joan, his wife, held the same. Rent, 55s. 2d., and with the same liberties as the said Sir John and Joan or Sir Edw. Guyldeforde, deceased, enjoyed therein. Del. Westm., 3 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 5, m. 43.
18. John Dethyke. Grant, in fee, for 240l. 3s. 8d., of two pastures called le Holmes and Baddes fen, near the mill in Wormegaye, Norf., late in tenure of John Lasshebourne; divers lands there late in tenure of John Fyncham; Russhe fen, late in tenure of the prior of Penteney; Normandy fen, late in tenure of the prioress of Blackborough; Busshe fen alias Penteney Busshe fen and Brendysshe fen, Mochelady fen, and Duns tall marsh, late in tenure of the prior of Penteney; Scottis fenne, late in tenure of John Plumpstede; four marshes called Cokkysfen, Nelysfen, Muttysfen, and Parkesfen alias Smalle fennez, late in tenure of John Drake; Churchefen alias Kyrkesfen, late in tenure of John Henson; Little Ladysfen, late in tenure of Thos. Newman; Little fen alias Halle fen, late in tenure of the prior of Penteney; Jamesfen alias Halle fen, late in tenure of James Athall; Maudelyns fen, and the fishery of the water of Gye, late in tenure of the prior of Penteney; all in Wormegay, and formerly belonging to viscount Beamound, dec. Rent free. Del. Westm., 2 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 3 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 7, m. 1.
19. Philip Parrys and Margaret, his wife. Grant of the house and site of the late priory of Fordham alias Bigging, Camb.; the church, steeple, and churchyard; the manor of Fordham, lately called the manor of the prior of Fordham, Camb.; the advowson of the chantry of Fordham; with lands in Fordham, Some alias Soham, and Wyken, Camb., belonging to the said manor; and all other manors, messuages, &c., in Fordham, belonging to the said late priory; in as full manner as Will. Baynton, the late prior, or the late general master of the order of St. Gilbert, enjoyed the same. Also lands in Snaylwell, Camb., now or late in the several tenures of Will. Whitewell, Ralph Rider, Thos. Tapster, and John Chapman, in Newmarket, Camb.; and a messuage in the town of Cambridge belonging to the same late priory.
Also the house and site of the late priory of Bareham alias Barkham in the parish of Lynton, Camb., parcel of the possessions of the late priory of Crutched Friars in London.
Also the rectory and church of Abington alias Magna Abyngton, Camb., belonging to the late priory of Hatfelde Regis alias Hatfelde Brodocke, Essex, with the advowson of the vicarage.
Also the rectory and church of Abyngton alias Parva Abyngton, belonging to the late priory of Pentney, Norf., with the advowson of the vicarage.
Also the messuage, late in tenure of John Stonehowse, in Connyngton, Hunts, belonging to the late priory of Huntingdon; and all lands in tenure of Hen. Hull in Connyngton, belonging to the late priory of Chyksande, Beds, in as full manner as the last prior of Chyksande, or the late general master of the order of St. Gilbert, held the same.
Also the messuage, newly built, with garden adjoining, lately leased to the said Philip Parrys and Margaret, his wife, and to dame Alice More, widow, Chr. More, and Constantia, his wife, John Lucas and Anne, his wife, and now in the tenure of the said Philip, situated within the precinct of the late priory of Friars Preachers, commonly called “lez Blake Freres,” in London; the messuage, late in tenure of John Churchegate, and the garden, late in tenure of Ralph Symonds, within the same precinct.
To hold by certain rents for the different parcels free of all other charges, except the fee of the bailiff of the manor of Fordham. Del Westm., 3 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. (fn. 24) (partly illegible from dirt and stains, and badly mutilated).
20. Commission of gaol delivery.
Durham and Sedbergh gaol: Ralph earl of Westmoreland, Sir Chr. Jenney, John Hynde, King's serjeant-at-law, Sir Will. Eure, Sir Thos. Hylton, Sir Thos. Tempest, Geo. Bowes, and Rob. Meynell. Westm., 3 July.—Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 2, m. 15d.
21. Edmund, bp. of London. Acquittance of all debts touching any of his predecessors in the bishopric of Hereford, to which he was first promoted, and of arrears of first fruits in that bishopric. Also grant to the said Edmund (in order to enable him to discharge the first fruits of his present bishopric, and in consideration that he has no compensation for any dilapidations either at Hereford or at London, and forasmuch as the crown has “divers wayes derived greate revenues and profitts” out of the see since the death of the last bishop of London, besides having the plate and goods of the said bishop received by the King's officers, especially the Treasurer of Tenths and of First Fruits) of the rent called “the olde rent of Powles,” appointed only for the repairs of the said church with all arrears of debt yet ungathered, and such “household stuff and implements of household” as have been delivered to the use of the said Edmund by the Treasurer of Tenths and First Fruits. Westm., 30 June 32 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 4 July—P.S. Pat. p. 4, m. 15. (In English).
22. Sir Thos. Cheyney, treasurer of the Household. To be keeper of the wood of Chestenwode, Kent, with 2d. a day, as enjoyed by John Copynger, out of the fee-farm of the city of London and county of Middlesex. Westm., “vicesimo nono Junii Anno Regni nostri tricessimo secundo.” Del. “quarto die Junii (sic) Aor.r. II. VIII. xxxiio.”—P.S. Pat. p. 4, m. 15.
23. John Cope. Grant in fee for 510l. 8d. of the manor of Eydon, Northt. Rent free. Westm., 28 June 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 4 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 5, m. 46.
24. Will. Conyngesby, serjeant-at-law. To be one of the justices of the King's Bench. Del. Westm., 5 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 1, m. 19, also p. 5, m. 55.
25. Sir Ant. Seyntleger, one of the gentlemen of the Privy Chamber. To be keeper of Ledes Castle, Kent, and door-ward of the same; parker and keeper of Ledes Park, and keeper of Langley Park; with fees, robes, &c., as enjoyed by Sir Thos. Bourchier, temp. Hen. VII., or by Sir Hen. Guyledeford and Sir Edw. Guyldeford in survivorship, or by Sir Edw. Nevell or Thos. ld. Crumwell, late keeper of the Privy Seal. Westm., 25 June 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 5 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 5, m. 30.
26. Convocation. Commission to the archbishops of Canterbury and York, and the other bishops, deans, archdeacons, and the whole clergy of England to investigate in convocation the lawfulness of the King's marriage with lady Anne of Cleves, and whether the King be at liberty to contract marriage with another. Del. Westm., 6 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 7, m. 34d.
27. John Williamson, of Crosthuate, Cumb., yeoman. Licence to alienate the lands called Eskenes, in the parish of Crosthuate, late in the several tenures of John Wilson, sen., John Wilson, jun., and Thos. Wilson, belonging to the late monastery of Fountaunce; to Miles Wylson and Bridget his wife. Westm., 6 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 31.
28. John Williamson, of Crosthuate, Cumb., yeoman. Licence to alienate the lands called Arneclyff Cote, in Arneclyff in Craven, Yorks., late in the several tenures of Will. Knowlle, Oliver Knowlle, and Katherine Abraham, widow, and the sheep pasture or shepegate called Lyonsyde, near Arneclyff in Craven, belonging to the late monastery of Fountains; to Ralph Grymston and Jane his wife. Westm., 6 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 2, m. 31.
29. Francis Salvyn. Livery of lands as s. and h. of Geo. Salvyn. [Westm.,] … July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 7 July. — P.S. (mutilated). Pat. p. 1, m. 29.
30. Michael Kydwelly. Licence to alienate a messuage in Blewbery, Berks, to Walter Bekynsawe and Thos. Serle, to be regranted to the said Michael and Joan his wife. Westm., 7 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 2, m. 30.
31. Sir Ant. Seyntleger, one of the gentlemen of the Privy Chamber. Appointment as Deputy of Ireland. Del. Westm., 7 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. (mutilated). Pat. p. 5, m. 10.
32. Ric. Eggecombe. Livery of lands as s. and h. of Sir Peter Eggecombe and Joan his wife, daughter and heir of James Derneford, with the reversion of those whereof Katherine, late wife of the said Peter, is seised by way of jointure. Del. Westm., 8 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 1, m. 6.
33. Eliz. Pygott, of Whaddon, Bucks, widow. Lease of the site and demesnes of the manor of Whaddon, and the herbage of the “Quenes parke” there; for 21 years; at 6l. rent. On surrender of a former lease granted to the said Elizabeth, and Will. Pygott, of Horewood, Bucks, by the late Queen Consort Jane, dated 24 Nov. 28 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 8 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 3, m 35.
34. Geo. Cornewall. Lease of (1) the site, &c., of the late priory of Leominster, late in the tenure of Ric. Apryce, and (2) two meadows called Somergilds; (3) the orchard of the said late prior, and a pasture beyond the water of Pynnysley, with a garden called Horswall and fishery within the pale of the same, late in the occupation of Will. Cokks, in the manor of Ivyngton. All which premises are in co. Heref., and are parcel of the lands of the late monastery of Readyng, Berks, in the King's hands by the attainder of Hugh, the late abbot, with reservations; for 21 years; rents (1) 20s.; (2) 4l.; (3) 43s. 4d. Del. Westm., 8 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 3, m. 35.
35. Thos. Lokar, of Bristol, merchant, and Will. Bromley, of London, grocer. Grant in fee, for 229l. 11s. 8d., of a watermill in the tenure of Edw. Warham; the three messuages in the several tenures of Ric. Warham, Roger Warham, and Will. Warham, in Caldebroke, in the lordship and parish of Madley, Salop; the site and chief messuage of the manor of Marshe, in the tenure of Ralph Poyner, in the parish of Magna Wenloke, Salop, with all demesne lands, and tithes on the premises; the site and chief messuage of the manor of Coughley, in the tenure of John Mownslowe, in Magna Wenlok, with all demesne lands, &c., and tithes; a croft and house in the tenure of Reginald Rydley, in the said parish of Magna Wenloke; and a pasture called Jackes field, near the Severn, and other fields (named), in the tenure of Will. Longley, held by copy of court roll, in the parish of Burwardesley, Salop; all which belonged to the late monastery of Wenloke. Rent, 25s. 7d. Del. Westm., 8 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 5, m. 41.
36. Sir Ant. Seyntleger, of Ulcombe, Kent. Grunt, in tail male, of the manor of Kyngesnorth alias Kyngesnoth, Kent, belonging to the late monastery of Feversham, Kent, and all lands enclosed within the said Sir Anthony's park in Ulcombe, which belonged to Feversham, and certain lands, &c., in Ulcombe, parcel of the said manor of Kyngesnoth.
Also the messuages, &c. (specified), called Tonge, in the parishes of Ulcombe, Hedcron and Est Sutton, Kent, which were lately parcel of the lands of the chantry late commonly called “Kents Chauntrey” in the parish church of Hedcron, now in the King's hands.
Also 4 messuages, 2 cottages and 6 acres of land in Leysham, Kent, which belonged to Sir Edw. Nevell, lately attainted.
Also a chief messuage commonly called the “Abbote of Seynt Augustynes house besides Canterburye,” lying in the parish of St. Olavo, Southwarke, Surrey, with a yearly rent of 22s. issuing from certain messuages annexed to the said chief messuage, which the drapers (pannarii) of London now possess; which belonged to the late monastery of St. Augustine without the walls of Canterbury. Rent 35s. Westm., 25 June 32 Hen. VIII. Del. —, (fn. 25) 8 July. Pat. p. 5, m. 44.
37. Edw. Nycoll, of Ryseley, Beds. Pardon for the murder of Will. Barford, whom he assaulted and mortally wounded 24 Jan. 31 Hen. VIII., in the village of Ryseley, between the house of Thos. Forman and that of John Nicoll, as the said William was proceeding to the house of Thos. Huett. Del. Westm., 8 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 7.
38. Sir Arthur Darcy and Mary his wife. Licence to alienate 3 messuages, &c., in Balderston and Osbaldeston, Lanc., to Sir Alex. Osbaldeston for life; with remainder to Richard, son of the said Alexander, with contingent remainder successively to Henry, Thomas, Thurstan and William, sons of the said Alexander, &c. Westm., 8 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 7, m. 11.
39. Commissions of Peace and of Oyer and Terminer:—
Herefordshire.—Thos. ld. Audeley of Walden, C., Thos. duke of Norfolk, Treasurer, Charles duke of Suffolk, lord President of the Council, Will, earl of Southampton, Keeper of the Privy Seal, R. bishop of Cov. and Lich., Walter ld. Ferrers, Sir Nic. Hare, Edm. Marvyn, King's serjt.-at-law, Thos. Bromley, King's serjt.-at-law, Gamelian Clyfton, clk., Sir Edw. Croft, Sir James Baskervile, Sir Ric. Vaughan, Sir Will. Thomas, Roger Wygston, John Pakyngton, John Scudamour, John Vernon, James Vaughan, Thos. Monyngton, Thos. Baskervyle, Rouland Moreton, Miles Ap Harry, Thos. Holte, Ric. Walweyne, Ric. Hassall, Nic. Fitton, Ric. Palmer, Ric. Warmecombe, Thos. Havard, John Beryton, Nic. Chippenham, Rouland Brugge, John Ap Gwyllym, Ric. Wynford. Westm., 8 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 7d.
40. Staffordshire.—Thos. ld. Audeley of Walden, C., Thos. duke of Norfolk, Treasurer, Charles duke of Suffolk, lord President of the Council, Will. earl of Southampton, keeper of the Privy Seal, R. bishop of Cov. and Lich., Walter ld. Ferrers, Hen. ld. Stafford, Edm. Marvyn, King's serjt.-at-law, Thos. Bromley, King's serjt.-at-law, Sir John Dudley, Sir John Gyfford, Sir Will. Bassett, Sir Philip Draycote, Sir John Harecourte, Sir Edw. Aston, Sir Geo. Gryffith, Will. Whorwood, Roger Wigston, John Pakyngton, John Vernon, Walter Wrottesley, Thos. Gyfford, Thos. Fitz-Harbert, Will. Wyrley, jun., Thos. Holt, Ric. Hassall, Francis Bassett, James Leveson, Humph. Wellys, Thos. Skrympshyre, John Persall, Walter Blunte, John Grosvenor, Thos. Moreton. Westm., 8 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 7d.
41. Cornwall. — Thos. ld. Audeley of Walden, C., Thos. duke of Norfolk, Treasurer, Charles duke of Suffolk, lord President of the Council, Hen. marquis of Dorset, Will, earl of Southampton, Keeper of the Privy Seal, J. bishop of Exeter, John lord Russell, Great Admiral of England, Sir Ric. Lyster, Sir Thos. Wylloughby, Sir John Arundell de la Herne, Sir John Chamond, Sir Will. Godolphan, Sir John Arundell, jun., Sir Thos. Arundell, Sir Hugh Trevanyon, John Arundell of Treryse, John Carmynowe, Ric. Eggecombe, Rob. Vyvyan, Hen. Tracarell, Thos. Senytabyn (sic), Wimond Carewe, Walter Borlas, Will. Carneshewe, Rob. Langdon, Thos. Chamound, Humph. Trevalyon, Peter Coryngton, Walter Kendall, Stephen Gayre, Rob. Hyll, John Tubbe, Will. Bere. Westm., 8 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 8d.
Yorkshire (North Riding).—Thos. ld. Audeley of Walden, C., Thos. duke of Norfolk, Treasurer, Charles duke of Suffolk, lord President of the Council, C. bishop of Durham, Will. earl of Southampton, Keeper of the Privy Seal, Ralph earl of Westmoreland, Thos. earl of Rutland, Hen. earl of Cumberland, R. bishop of Llandaff, Will. ld. Dacre of Gylleslande, John ld. Scrope of Bolton, Sir John Nevell ld. Latymer, John ld. Lumley, Sir Chr. Jenney, John Hynde, King's serjt.-at-law, Thos. Magnus, clk., Sir Thos. Tempest, Sir Ralph Ellerker, Sir Will. Evers, Sir Edw. Gower, Sir Will. Middelton, Sir Marmaduke Constable, sen., Sir Ralph Eure, jun., Sir Geo. Lawson, Sir Hen. Gascoign, Sir Nic. Fayirfax, Sir Geo. Conyers, Sir Chr. Danby, Sir Roger Lassales, Sir Rob. Bowes, Thos. Fairfax, serjt.-at-law, John Uvedall, John Norton, Will. Babthorp, Rob. Chaloner, John Barton, Will. Rokeby, John Poleyn, Matthew Boynton, Marmaduke Wyvold, Geo. Conyers, James Foxe, Rob. Menell, Will. Danbye, Will. Tankerd, Ric. Whalley, Hen. Evre, John Thorpe, Thos. Bylbye. Westm., 8 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 8d.
42. Sir John Gyfford of Chillyngton, Staff. Grant, in tail male, of the manor or lordship of Merston alias Marston, near Stafford, which belonged to the late priory of Shene, Surrey; and all tithes in the fields of Foryate, near Stafford, late in the tenure of Thos. Arthur; and all rents and services in Foryate, and Enston, Staff., which belonged to the said late priory; the lands, &c., in Byrcheford, late in the tenures of Will. Jurden and Thos. Harte, parcel of the possessions of the late priory of Routon, Staff.; and croft, &c., in Orslowe, Staff., late in the tenure of Margaret Jobber, parcel of the possessions of the said late priory; and all other messuages, &c., in Merston, Enston and Foryate, which belonged to the said manor, late in the tenure of the said Thos. Arthur. Rent 35s.
Also, grant for 959l. 5s., in fee simple, of the manor of Oune, Staff., belonging to the late priory of Shene, late in the tenure of dame Anne Hyll, widow, deceased, and now in that of Alan Hord; and all lands, &c., in Plardwicke and Westwodd, Staff., which belonged to Shene, late in the tenure of John Blakmare.
Also the manor of Adneston alias Edneston,Derb., parcel of the possessions of the late priory of Tutbury, Staff.; the chief messuage there and lands thereto belonging, late in the tenure of Will. Wetton; the rents and services of 4s. 11d. issuing from the lands of Francis Shyreley, in Shyreley, Derb., belonging to the said late priory; the yearly pension of 6s. 8d. issuing from the vicarage of Shyreley, parcel of the possessions of the said late priory; and all lands, &c., in Netherthrowghmaston, Derb., belonging to the said late priory, late in the tenure of the said Francis, for a yearly rent of 10s.; and the said yearly rent of 10s. and all lands, &c., in Adneston, Shyrley, and Netherthrowghmaston, belonging to the said manor of Adneston; the pastures in Wetton, Staff. and Derb., called Ecton and “Le Halesfeld,” which were in the occupation of the late prior of Tutbury, and were moreover in the tenure of one James Maperley. Also the manor of Normecote, Staff., parcel of the possessions of the late priory of Hulton alias Hylton, and a water-mill in the parish of Stone, Staff., parcel of the same possessions or belonging to the said manor; a messuage, &c., in the said parish, late in the tenure of Thos. Warylowe, parcel of the same possessions, &c.; the parcel of land called “Shepards yarde,” and all the messuages, &c., lying together in the said parish of Stone in the tenure Rob. Aspeden, parcel of the same possessions, &c.; the farm or grange of Kneythton alias Kneyghton graunge and a pasture called Grymes Crofte, Staff., late in the tenure of Geoff. Sayer; the farm or grange of Ellerton graunge, Staff, and Salop, late in the tenure of one Thos. Skrymsher; the farm or grange called Bacheacre alias Battysacre graunge, Staff., late in the tenure of Ant. Baylly; the farm or grange called Slamford graunge, late in the tenure of John Arnolde; the lands, &c., in Seyghford, Staff., late in the tenure of Ric. Damporte; the cottage and tithes of hay in Seighford, late in the tenure of John Smyth; a meadow called “Covents medowe,” and the lands called Churchelands and Bromeslands in Seighford, late in the tenure of Edm. Fosse; the land, &c., in Seighford, late in the tenure of Thos. Greterackes; and a pasture in Gnossall alias Gnowsall, Staff., called Gylberts felde, late in the tenure of John Hodson, parcel of the possessions of the late priory of Routon; the chief messuage and all other messuages, &c., in Grymsyll and Coton, Staff., late in the tenure of Sir Edw. Aston, parcel of the possessions of the said late priory of Routon, &c. Also the rectory of Mylwyche, Staff., belonging to the late priory of Stone, late in the tenure of John Chyonall, &c. Del. Westm., 9 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 1, m. 20.
43. Thos. duke of Norfolk. Grant in fee (in exchange for the manors of Hardewyke, Kencote, Brunesnorton, Wideforde, Coggs, the farm of Coggs and Birdeshurst, sold to the Crown 1 Apl. 31 Hen. VIII., and for 1,000l.) of the site of the late house of the monks of St. Mary, Thetfforde, Norf., and the site of the late priory or cell of Wangforde, Suff.; the manors of Hallwyke in Thetford, Norwike, Santon, Lynforde, Bodney, Watton alias Munkewik in Watton, Kilverston, Bretenham, Aslacton, Snareshill, Totington, and Gatesthorpe, Norf.; the appropriate rectories of St. Mary and St. Nicholas in Thetford; the rectories of the parish churches of Snareshill, Watton, Hokeham, Susted, and Aslacton, Norf., lately belonging to the said monastery of Thetforde; with the advowsons of the said churches of St. Mary and St. Nicholas in Thetforde, Snareshill, Watton, Hokham, Susted, Aslacton, Frammyngham, and Magna Porringlande, Norf., and of the vicarages of Snareshill, Watton, Hokham, Susted, and Aslacton; the manors of Rusheworth, Sileham, Dersham, Yxforde alias Yoxforde, Glemham, Offeton, and Westwike, Suff.; and the rectories of the parish churches of Dersham, Yxforde alias Yoxforde, Wangforde, Reydon, Stoven, Southwolde, and Offetton, Suff., appropriated to the said late monastery of Thetforde, and to the said late priory or cell of Wangforde; with the advowsons of the said churches, and of the churches of Belings and Breset, Suff., belonging to the said late monastery and priory, and the advowsons of the vicarages of the aforesaid churches of Dersham, Yxforde alias Yoxforde, Wangforde, Reydon, Stoven, Sowthwolde, and Offeton; the manor of Dullyngham, Camb., with appurtenances in Yxnynge, Camb., and the rectory and advowson of the vicarage of Dullyngham; a yearly rent of 6l. 13s. 4d. issuing from the manor of Munkwike, Camb.; the rectory, &c., of Dytton, Camb.; the manor of Finchingfelde, Essex, the rectory, &c., of the parish church of Alba Noteley, and all other manors, &c., in Thetforde, Santon, Snareshill, Kilverston, Bretenham, Watton, Totington, Aslacton, Susted, Multon, Waketon, Forneset, Tacolneston, Hempnale, Freton, Tasburghe, Gatesthorpe, Threkeston, Risyng, Elyngham Parva, Bakensthorpe, Lecheham alias Lucham, Assheley, Letton, Saham, Shroppham, Strurston, Colston, Garboldesham, Redlysworthe, Southfelde, Hales, Welles, Emneth, Shelfanger, Wynfarthinge, Waketon, Floredon, Hamworth, Besthorpe, Fersfeld, Norton, Harleston, and Bangham, Norf., and in Wangforde, Rusheworthe, Syleham, Denham, Dersham, Blakesale, Mynnesnere, Sibiton, Dunwyche, Yxforde alias Yoxforde, Glemham, Offeton, Dermondeston, Troston, Lyvermere, Bernham, Belyings, Breset Parva, Melles, Brome, Thurton, Westwyke, Downham, Southwold, Reydon, and Stoven, Suff., which belonged to the said late monastery of Thetforde, or to the said late priory or cell of Wangforde. Rent, 59l. 5s. 1d. Del. Westm., 9 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 4, m. 3.
44. Thos. duke of Norfolk. Grant in fee, for 1,329l. 10d. (1) of the reversion and yearly rent of 100s. reserved upon the pasture called Stafferton Parke, parcel of the premises contained in a 21 years' lease of the site and divers possessions of the late monastery of Butley, Suff., which was granted to Will. Naunton of Alderton, Suff., by indenture dated 3 July 30 Hen. VIII.
Also the manors of Alvedon and Stanes, alias Muncks Hall and Stanes, and a tenement called Walters, Suff., belonging to the late monastery of Bury St. Edmund's, Suff., and the advowson of the rectory and parish church of Elvedon, Suff, and all other manors, &c., in the town of Elveden; in as full manner as John Melforde, alias Reve, the last abbot of Bury St. Edmunds, held the same.
Also (2) the house and site of the late priory or cell of Deapyng, Linc., late parcel of the possessions of the abbey of Thorney, Camb.; the rectory and church of Deapyng; the advowson of the parish church of Deapyng; and all possessions of the said late priory or cell, which were lately in the tenure of Eliz. Hollond, one of the daughters of Thos. Hollond of Swynshede, Linc.
To hold by rents of (1) 54s. and (2) 60s. 19d., and charged with the following yearly pensions:—10s. for the livery of the farmer of Elveden and Stanes and Walters; 2s. for three lambs called “markynge lambes”; 8s. 4d. for five unshorn sheep (pro quinque ovibus in lan.) at the sheep shearing there; 4l. 6s. 8d. for the agistment of 200 ewes and 200 hoggs; 20s. for pasture of 10 horses, payable to the said farmer; 6l. 13s. 4d. to the vicar of Deaping; 9s. 6d. to the bp. of Lincoln for procurations and synodals; 13s. 4d. to Henry Lacy, steward of the manors belonging to Deapyng, and 13s. 6d. to Rob. Avelen, bailiff of the same. Del. Westm., 9 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. (Badly mutilated.) Pat. p. 4, m. 26.
45. Ric. Pepper. Lease of the rectory of Estcowton in co. Richmond; parcel of the lands of the late monastery of Bridlyngton, York, now in the King's hands by the attainder of William, the last prior; for 21 years; at 9l. 6s. 8d rent. Del. Westm., 9 July 32 Hen. VIII. — S.B. Pat. p. 5, m. 21.
46. Ric. Cecyll of Lyttill Burley, Northt. Grant in fee, for 433l. 5s., of the house and site of the late priory of St. Michael, near Stamford, Northt.; the church, steeple, and churchyard thereof, &c.; and the “demeane landes” (specified), lying in the parish of St. Martin, Stamford, and in the meadows of Stamford, Worthorpp, and Colyweston, Northt. Also the rectory and church of St. Martin in Stamford, with the advowson of the vicarage, and a messuage called the Covent House in Eston, Northt., in tenure of Thos. Maydwell, the manor of Worthorpp with the advowson of the vicarage of Worthorpp and all appurtenances; all which belonged to the said priory and are worth 23l. 8s. 11d. a year.
Also, the manor of Worthorpp, which belonged to the late monastery of Croyland, Linc.; which came to the crown by the grant of John Welles, the late abbot, and the convent thereof.
Rent 69s. To hold free of charges except 20s. yearly to the parishioners of St. Martin's parish, and 7s. 6d. and 3s. yearly for synodals, &c., of the churches of St. Martin and of Wyrthorpp respectively. Westm. … 32 [Hen. VIII.] Del. 9 July “ao subscripto.” — P.S. (mutilated and partly illegible from damp). Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 7, m. 4.
47. Will. Lygons of Arle, Glouc. Grant in fee, for 52l. 8s. 4d., of the manor of Redgrave, Glouc., which belonged to the late monastery of Lanthonye, near Gloucester; with appurtenances in Cheltenham, Glouc. Rent 6s. Westm., 30 June 32 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 9 July. —P.S. Pat. p. 7, m. 7.
48. Thos. Tyndall. Livery of lands as s. and h. of Sir John Tyndall. Del. Westm., 10 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 1, m. 8.
49. Sir Thos. Wyatt, of Alyngton, Kent. Grant, in fee (in exchange for the manors of Shales Courte, Oxyngton, Rundall, Tymberwood, Baynehurst, Melton, and Poole, Kent, and divers lands, &c., of the said Sir Thomas in Maydeston, Shorne, Higham, Chalke, Melton, Southflete, Denton, Stone, Derrant, and Swaynescombe, Kent, lately sold by him to the crown), of the bouse and site of the late monastery of Boxley, Kent; the church, steeple, churchyard, &c.; the lordships and manors of Boxley, Hoo and Newnham Corte, Kent; with tithes of corn and hay, &c., in the said manor of Hoo; 3 marshes and 8 acres of bushy land in Bylsyngton and Midle, Kent, with all tithes thereon; the water-mill and a meadow called Myddyngham, in Higham, Kent; the lands and pastures called Swaynesdowne, in the tenure of Thos. Dyggs, in Ywadde, near Shepey, Kent; and all appurtenances in Boxley, Boxley Strete, Burley, Burchyn, Sandelyng, Wilstone, Waveryng, Harburlande, Oxfrith, Dunstrete-super-Montem, Testen, Aylesfurde, Halstowe, Estmallyng, Westmallyng, Ryeharsshe, Dytton, Hoo, and Higham, and elsewhere in said co., belonging to the said manors of Boxley, Hoo, and Newenham Corte; all which premises belonged to the said monastery; as fully as John Dobbes, the last abbot, held the same; except the rectory and the advowson of the vicarage of Boxley.
Also, the marsh and marsh lands called Slaye Hill Marshe, in the tenure of Thos. Dyggs, in Newyngton, Kent, belonging to the late monastery of St. Mary of Graces, near the Tower of London; in as full manner as the last abbot held the same.
Also, the manor of Wyndhull, Kent, belonging to the late monastery of Redyng, Berks, with appurtenances in Stoke and Hallstowe, Kent; in as full manner as it came to the King by the attainder of Hugh Coke, the late abbot of Redyng.
Also, the messuage and lands called Thorne, alias Thornelands, in the parish of Aylesford, Kent, belonging to the late monastery of Mallyng, Kent, and all lands there in the tenure of the said Sir Thos. Wyatt; in as full manner as the last abbess of Mallyng held the premises.
Also, the manor of Mylkewell, Surrey, belonging to the late monastery of St. Mary Overey, Surrey; and all messuages, &c., now or late in the several tenures of Hen. Wylde, Joan Wryght, widow, and Will. Fowle, in Lambeth and Camerwell, Surrey, belonging to the said late monastery; and the wood called Mylkewell woodde, in the parish of Lambeth, belonging to the said late monastery; and all messuages, &c., in Camerwell and Lambeth, belonging to the said manor; in as full manner as the last prior held the same.
Also, the lands called “the parsonage lands,” alias the “glebe lands,” of the rectory and church of Camerwell, belonging to the late monastery of St. Saviour, Barmondesey, Surrey; and the lands called Chaunters, alias the Chauntery lands, in the said parish of Camerwell, belonging to the said late monastery; in as full manner as the last abbot of Bermondsey held the same.
Also, the house, site, &c., of the late priory of Crutched Friars (“Fratrum Cruciferorum”) in the City of London; and all the houses, &c., in the several tenures of Sir John Alyn, the said Sir Thos. Wyatt, Philip Denys, Mark Anthonye, Rob. Forde, or any other persons within the site, &c., thereof; and a yearly rent of 6s. issuing from a messuage late of John Merten and now of the said Sir Thomas; in as full manner as the last prior of Crutched Friars held the same.
Also, the advowson of the parish church of Magna Charte next Aysshforde, Kent, belonging to the late priory of Christchurch, Canterbury.
To hold by certain stated rents; with free warren in all the premises.—[S.B.] (Badly mutilated, date lost.) Westm., 10 July. Pat. 32 Hen VIII., p. 2, m. 13.
50. Lincolnshire.—Commission to Geo. Sharrod, Ric. Panell, and Will. Armyn, to make inquisition p. m. on the lands and heir of John Thorney. Westm., 10 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 1, m. 24d.
51. Sir Thos. Wyatt, of Alyngton, Kent. Licence to alienate 3 marshes and 8 acres of wood in Bylsyngton and Mydle, Kent, and all other messuages, lands, &c., in those places belonging to the late monastery of Boxley, Kent, which were granted to him in fee simple by pat. 10 July last; to Walter Hendle, attorney of the Court of Augmentation. Westm., July 11. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 2, m. 31.
52. Charles duke of Suffolk and dame Katharine his wife, d. and h. of Sir William lord Willoughby and Erysby. Livery of the lands of the said Sir William and the reversionary interest of the said Katharine in those, whereof Mary Willoughby, widow of the said William, is seised in fee tail, &c., or of which Sir John Willoughby or Margaret Blakborn, or— (blank) Willoughby, are seised for joint or single lives; without inquisition, &c., on the death of the said William, Katharine, or Mary, or on the death of Sir John Willoughby, John Woodowes, Margaret Blakborne, or — (blank) Willoughby. Del. Westm., 12 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 1, m. 5.
53. Frances Knolles. Grant, in fee, for 553l. 10s., of the manor of Aspryngton, alias Ayshpryngton, Devon, which belonged to the Tottenes monastery, Devon. Annual value, 30l. 15s.; rent, 61s. 6d. Del. Westm., 12 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 4, m. 32.
54. Will, earl of Southampton, Keeper of the Privy Seal. Lease of the manors or lordships of Chalton, Hants, and Crokeham, Berks, which belonged to Margaret late countess of Salisbury, attainted; with reservations; term 21 years; rents 75l.d. for Chalton and 27l. 5s. 10d. for Crokeham. Del. Westm., 12 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 17.
55. Peter Mewtas, a gentleman of the Privy Chamber, and Joan his wife. Grant, in survivorship, of the manor of Brettes, in Westham, Essex, which came to the King's hands by the attainder of Margaret countess of Salisbury; with reservations; rent free. Del. Westm., 12 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat p. 8, m. 31.
56. Sir John Gyfford, of Chyllyngton, Staff., and Elizabeth his wife. Licence to alienate the pastures in Wetton, Staff. and Derb., called Ecton and the Hallefeld, parcel of the possessions of the late priory of Tutbury, Staff., to Rob. Burgoyn and Elizabeth his wife. Westm., 12 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 8, m. 31.
57. Cheshire.—Commission to Sir Peter Dutton, Ric. Bruche, and Gotherus Lye to make inquisition concerning the idiocy of Thos. Percyvall. Westm., 12 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 1, m. 25 d.
58. Jasper Horsey. Reversion in fee simple of a messuage, a mill, and certain land with free fishery of the water of Puddesworthye, in Norton Dawney and Puddesworthye, in the parish of Townstall. Devon, which Henry, late marquis of Exeter, granted to the said Jasper in tail male by charter, 20 March 27 Hen. VIII., at 9l. rent, and the reversion of which is now by the attainder of the said Marquis in the King's hands. Del. Westm., 13 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Endd.: “Jasper Horsey, bill for lands that your Grace giveth him.” Pat. p. 8, m. 33.
59. John Walshe, clk., King's chaplain. Presentation to the parish church of Corymallet, Bath and Wells dioc., vice Geo. Cockson, deceased. Del. Westm., 13 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 34.
60. Lewis ap Watkyns, a yeoman of the Guard and of the Crown. Reversion of the office of one of the King's Serjeants, with 12d. a day, after Walter Chalcot, John Stonner, Will. Rotte, Nic. Jacson, Edw. Goldesborowe, or Thos. Vaughan. Del. Westm., 13 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 35.
61. Sir Chr. Hales, Master of the Rolls. Grant in fee (for 670l. 12s.d. paid by him to Edw. Northe, treasurer of the Augmentations) of the manor of Swalclyff, Kent, the advowson of the church there and land (specified) in the parish of Sesalter “in Borgha de Rake,” Kent, at Fulbroke alias Fulbourne in the parish of St. Mary Northgate, Canterbury, in the parish of Tenterden, Kent, and in the hundred of Downhamford, Kent, adjoining the wood called Thornden, which belonged to Christchurch, Canterbury; and a common in the parish of Hakynton, Kent, of which the common use belongs to the tenants of the manor of Lyttylborne.
Also, the farm called the barton, and the messuage, grange, &c., adjoining it on the west and north sides of the common street from the North gate of Canterbury to Sturry, with a water - mill, lands, &c. (specified), in the parishes of St. Mary Northgate, Canterbury, Hakynton, and Fordwyche, Kent.
A piece of arable land pasture and elderwood called “Hoopelandemede,” in the parish of Chartham, Kent, adjoining a brook there called Bygmanstreme on the east, the great brook there and the lands of John Naylor on the south, the lands of the said John on the west, and the lands of the said John and a certain lane there on the north; 12 acres of land in a field called Wynchepefelde near Canterbury, adjoining the lands of the hospital of St. James near Canterbury, on the south, a footpath leading between Wynchepe and Stopynton alias Stopyngton on the north, the lands late of John Myller, now of the said Sir Chr. Hales, on the east, and a footpath leading from the “Dongeon” to the common street leading from Wynchepe to Stonestrete on the west, and divers parcels of land, &c. (specified and the names of various tenants given) in the parishes of Bleane, St. Mary Northgate, Canterbury, Harbaldowne, Chartham, and Tenterden, Kent; with the reversion and rent reserved upon a piece of meadow called the “Acres” at Boresende, in the said parish of Northgate, in co. of said city, which was leased by the Crown, 8 April 31 Hen. VIII., to John Darkenall, of London, for 21 years, at a rent of 9l. To hold by a rent of 3l. 13s. 4d. Del. Westm., 13 July 32 Hen. VIII. — S.B. (mutilated). Pat. p. 8, m. 42.
62. Ric. Audeley. To be bailiff of the manors and hundreds of Newton, Marnehull, and Bukland, Dorset, which belonged to the monastery of Glastonbury, now in the King's hands by the attainder of Richard, the late abbot; with 10l. a year. Westm., 8 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 13 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 8, m. 48.
63. Irish Coinage.—Commission to Ralph Rowlett and Martin Bowes, masters of the Mint in the Tower of London, and elsewhere in England and in Calais; John Browne, warden; Peter Mewtas, comptroller; Ric. Harry Yong, provost of the “moneyars” of the said Mint; and to John Parmyn and John Hayen, and all other moneyars, coyners, gravers, &c., of the said Mint, for a new issue of coins to be current in Ireland only; to be printed with the arms of England on one side and of Ireland, i.e., a harp crowned, on the other side, and to be made, according to a standard lately devised, of the fineness of 9 oz. of fine silver and 3 oz. of “aley” (alloy) in the lb. troy, i.e., of “aley” 40 dwt. worse in the lb. troy than the sterling money of England (which is made according to indentures 6 April 24 Hen. VIII., with Rowlett and Bowes, masters of the Mint); the said coin to be in number, 144 pieces in the lb. troy, and to be called sixpence Irish; also demipieces of the same to be called threepence Irish, and to be in number in the lb. troy, 288 pieces. Del. Westm., 13 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 4, m. 11. In English.
64. John White, of London, merchant. Licence to export 40,000 lbs. weight of bells or bell-metal. Del Westm., 14 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 33.
65. Dame Elizabeth, late wife of Gerald earl of Kildare and sister of Thos. late marquis of Dorset. Annuity of 200 marks. Her husband Gerald was compelled, by an Act of the Parliament holden at Dublin 24 Hen. VIII. before Sir Will. Skevyngton, deputy of Hen. duke of Richmond and Somerset, Lieutenant of Ireland, and adjourned to Drogheda, to make her an allowance of 300 marks a year (Irish money) by way of jointure out of the issues of the manors of Portlester, Moylagh, Moynalweye, and Ardmolghan, Meath; Lucan, Dublin; and Rathmore, Kildare; and she has surrendered her interest in the said 300 marks a year to the Crown. Del. Westm., 14 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 34.
66. Thos. Atkynson alias Brotton. Lease of a tenement in the lordship of Middelham, York, called Ulshawe, late in the occupation of Ric. a Bewdley, deceased, parcel of the lands assigned by Parliament for the pay of the garrison of Berwick; for 21 years; rent 6l. 13s. 4d. and 3s. 4d. of increase. Del. Westm., 14 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 35.
67. Thos. Grymysdicche. Lease of the tithes of the grange of Acton, Chesh., which belonged to the late monastery of Whalley, Lanc., and came to the King's hands by the attainder of John, the late abbot; for 21 years; rent 35s. and 5s. of increase. Del. Westm., 14 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 35.
68. Warwickshire.—Commission to Ric. Archar and Fulk Grevell, to make inquisition p. m. on the lands and heir of John Fowler. 14 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 24d.
69. Sir Ant. Hungerforde, of Downe Ampney, Glouc. Grant in fee, for 1,935l. 13s. 5d., of the manors of (1) Latton and (2) Eysy, Wilts, which belonged to the late monastery of Cirencester, the rectory and church of Latton with the advowson of the vicarage; and all lands, &c., in the towns, fields, &c., of Latton, Eysy and Crekelade, Wilts, and elsewhere in said co. and in co. Glouc., belonging to the said manors and all possessions of the monastery in Latton, Eysy, and Crekelade; a close of pasture in Downe Ampney, Glouc.; and two messuages, &c., lately leased to Rob. Page and John Brygfelde in Downe Ampney; all which belonged to the said late monastery.
(3) Also, the manor of Alvescote alias Avescote, Oxon, which belonged to the late monastery of Edyngdon, Wilts, and the advowson of the rectory and parish church of Alvescote and all other possessions of the monastery in Alvescote.
(4) Also, the manor of Marston, Wilts, which belonged to the late monastery of Farleigh, Wilts, &c.
With reservation of the rectory of Eysy and chapel of Eton, Wilts, and certain tithes in Water Eton, in the parish of Eysy, belonging to the chapel of Eton; the advowson of the vicarage of Eysy and the first vesture of certain meadows in Latton and Eysy; and the pasture called Jones Lease in the tenure of Gabriel Pleydell in Eysey. Rents (1) 108s. 10d. (2) 34s. 3d. (3) 56s. 3d. (4) 15s. Del. Westm., 15 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. (mutilated). Pat. p. 7, m. 22.
70. Geo. Pierpounte, of Whalley, Derb. Grant in fee, for 617l. 6s. 8d., of (1) the manors of Bondbuske, Langwethe, Howbeke, and Woodhouse, Notts, which belonged to the late monastery of Welbecke, Notts, the yearly rent of 4s. 1d. and service due from Rob. Barker and his heirs, for lands in Bondbuske, and lands in the several tenures of persons named in Bondbuske and Langwethe, Notts, and in said co. Derby, and in Howbecke, Woodhouse, and Cuckney, Notts; and all court-leets, views of frankpledge and free warren within the lands of the said monastery, with tithes of corn in Cuckney, Norton, Hatfeld Graunge, Mylnethorpe, Woodhouse, Howbeke, Bondbuske, and Collingthwatt and other towns in co. Notts, belonging to the rectory of Cuckney, with the advowson of the vicarage of the parish church of Cuckney (except the tithes of the fields of Netherlangwithe, Notts); all which belonged to Welbeck. Annual value, 31l. 17s. 4d. (2) The two messuages and the lands, &c., now or late in the several tenures of Geo. Savage and Joan Turnour alias Joan Roger, widow, in Staveley Woodthorpe, Derb., which belonged to the late priory of Gracedieu, Leic. Annual value, 40s. Rents 64s. and 4s. Del. Westm., 15 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. (very obscure at the beginning, and only a small part of the King's signature barely visible). Pat. p. 8, m. 38.
71. John Gate, of Garnetts, Essex. Grant in fee, for 300l., of the house and site of the late monastery of Bileigh, Essex; the church, steeple, and churchyard, and divers pastures, &c. (specified) in Bileigh, Maldon, Wodeham Water, and Langforde, Essex; the water-mill called “Bileigh Mylle,” with the water-course thereto belonging and the fishery thereof; the two John Haukyn, in Maldon, Essex, and certain lands, &c. (named, and names of several tenants given), in Maldon, Wodeham Water, Ultyng, Magna Totteham and Purleigh, Essex, the rectories and churches of St. Peter and All Saints, Maldon, Essex, with the advowsons of the vicarages; all which premises belonged to the said late monastery.
Annual value 35l. 10s. 11½d.; rent 71s. 2d. free of all other charges except certain rents due on parcels specified to the heirs of Henry late earl of Essex, and a pension of 33s. 4d. a year to the vicar of St. Peter and All Saints in Maldon. Del. Westm., 15 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. (mutilated). Pat. p. 8, m. 39.
72. Sir Thos. Arundell. Licence to alienate the site and chief messuage of Donyngton manor in the parish of Donyngton, Wilts, belonging to the late monastery of Shaftesbury, Dorset; the advowson of the parish church of Donyngton; and all his other lands in the parish; to Matthew Coleherst. Westm., 15 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 30.
73. Humph. Perkyns or Parkyns, S.T.P. Presentation to the parish church of Stanes, London dioc., vice Ric. Gorton, deceased. Westm., 12 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 15 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 8, m. 29.
74. Salop.—Commission to Thos. Bromley, King's serjeant-at-law, Ric. Mytton and Edm. Colle, to make inquisition p. m. on the lands and heir of Roland Edwards. Westm., 15 June. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 24d.
75. Commission of the Peace and of Oyer and Terminer.
Devon.—Thos. ld. Audeley of Walden, C., Thos. duke of Norfolk, Treasurer, Charles, duke of Suffolk, lord President of the Council, Hen. marquis of Dorset, Will. earl of Southampton, keeper of the Privy Seal, John earl of Bath, J. bishop of Exeter, John ld. Russell, Great Admiral of England, John lord Zouche, Sir Ric. Lyster, Sir Thos. Willoughbye, Sir Thos. Denys, Sir John Fulford, Sir John Chamound, Sir Thos. Stukeley, Sir Philip Champernon, Sir Geo. Carewe, Sir John Arundell, John Rowe, serjeant - at - law, Ric. Pollard, John Harrys, serjeant-at-law, Bartholomew Fortescue, Ric. Eggecombe, Ric. Hales, Wimond Carewe, Hugh Stukeley, Ric. Yeard, Rob. Chydley, John Pollard, Humph. Prydeaux, John Amadas, Rob. Brytt, John Whyddon, Lewis Fortescue. Alex. Wood, Anth. Bery, John Ryggeway, John Pasmer, Will. Rowp, Hugh Yeo. Westm., 16 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 9d.
76. The dean and chapter of the cathedral church of Lincoln. Grant of the rectory and church of Byker, Linc., belonging to the late monastery of Butley, Suff.; with advowson of the vicarage. Rent 26s. 8d. free of tenths and first fruits. Del. Westm., 17 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. (badly mutilated). Pat. p. 3, m. 1.
77. Sir Roger Cholmeley of London, serjeant-at-law, and Christiana his wife. Grant (in exchange for the manor of Butleys and lands in Chertesey, Surrey, and 70l.) of—
(1) The marsh lands, &c., formerly in the several tenures of Sir Ric. Cholmeley, deceased, and Gilbert Exham, and now or late in that of the said Sir Roger, in Wolwyche, Kent, and in Estham, Essex, which belonged to the late monastery of Stratford Langthorne, Essex. Also the messuage, lands, &c., late in the several tenures of Thos. Walshe, one of the barons of the Exchequer, and John Greygose, and now or late in the several tenures of the said Sir Roger, and Will. Upchyrche. in Shoredyche and Orgaston, Midd., which belonged to the late priory or new hospital of St. Mary without Byshopps gate, London.
(2) Also the messuage, &c., with cellars, solars, and shops thereto belonging, late in the tenure of John Saxy, deceased, merchant tailor of London, in the parish of St. Martin near Ludgate, London, which belonged to the late college of Acon, London. Tenures:—(1) fee simple (2) in tail; rents, 16s. 8d. and 8s. Del. Westm., 17 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 2.
78. Sir Philip Butler. Grant, in fee, for 769l. 17s.d., of the manor of Aston, Herts, and the advowson of the rectory of Aston, which belonged to the late monastery of Redyng, Berks, and came to the King's hands by the attainder of Hugh, the last abbot. Rent 77s. 11d. Del. Westm., 17 July, 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 34.
79. James Fitz John earl of Desmond, Maurice Fitz John Desmond, John Fitz John Desmond alias Shane Fitz John Desmond. Pardon for all offences against the laws of England or Ireland before 1 June 32 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 17 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 35.
80. Connacius Oneyle of Dungenyn in the earldom of Ulster in Ireland, principal captain of his nation, Felomeus Oneyle alias Felomeus Kegh Oneyle, eldest son of the said Connacius, Frederic alias Ferdorogh Oneyle, Bernard alias Breyn Oneyle, and Connacius alias Con Oneyle, sons of the aforesaid Connacius. Pardon for all offences against the laws of England or Ireland before 1 June 32 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 17 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 35.
81. Charles Howard. Licence to alienate the messuage and two shops with cellars, &c., lately leased to John Worsoppe, citizen and scrivener (scriptor) of London, in the parish of St. Pancras, near Westchepe, London, which belonged to the late college or house of Acon, London, and the three shops and all cellars, &c., lately leased to Thos. Abraham, sen., in the said parish of St. Pancras, near Estchepe, London, to Rob. Fermer of London, leatherseller. Westm., 18 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 8, m. 29.
82. John Wyngfelde, of Stanford, Norf. Grant, in tail male, of Meryfeld manor, Hants, which belonged to the late priory of Newarke by Guyldeford, Surrey, with all appurtenances in Westysted and Ropeley, Hants. Rent, 18s. Westm., 22 June 32 Hen. VIII. Del., 18 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 8, m. 36.
83. Humph. Orme, a page of the Wardrobe of Beds. Lease of the farm of the manor and demesnes of Kylforde, and “Rekwall,” with the herbage of Kilforde park, in the lordship of Denbigh lande; for 21 years from the expiration of a lease to Ant. Knevet, then a gentleman usher of the Chamber, granted 11 April 16 Hen. VIII., for 21 years upon the expiration of a similar lease to Thos. Salter, then a sewer of the Chamber, 11 May 2 Hen. VIII. Rent, 20l. Del. Westm., 19 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 31.
84. John Corbett, jun., of Sprowston, Norf., and Joan his wife. Grant, in tail, for 176l. 10s. 10d., of the manor of Sprowston, which belonged to the bishopric of Norwich; the liberty and course of a sheep faldage in Sprowston, late in the tenure of Leonard Spencer, the liberty and course of another faldage of sheep called “Rakheth course,” with the lands and pastures thereof; the premises having come to the King by virtue of the Act of Parliament, 27 Hen. VIII. Rent, 19s. 8d. Del. Westm., 19 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 36.
85. Sir Edw. Baynton and dame Isabella his wife. Grant, in fee, of the manor of Bremell alias Brymell or Brymbell, Wilts, which belonged to the late monastery of Malmesbury, Wilts; and all other possessions of the monastery in Bremell, Sprythill, and Foxham, Wilts; with liberties. Rent, 9l. 2s. 4d. Del. Westm., [19 July] (fn. 26) —S.B. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 8, m. 38.
86. Rob. Burgoyn, one of the auditors of the Court-of Augmentations. Grant, in fee, for 73l. 15s., of the tenement in Fogwell Courte in Charterhouse Lane, Midd., with a garden called “Fogwell grounde,” and a pond called “Fogwell ponde,” in the tenure of Jeremy Heydon; and other tenements in Charterhouse lane, in the several tenures of the said Jeremy, Geoff. Person, and Thos. Fitzhewe; all which premises are in the parish of St. Sepulchre, Midd., and belonged to the late Charter House, near London; as fully as Wm. Trafford, the late prior, held them. Rent, 11s. Westm., 17 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 19 July.—P.S. (slightly mutilated). Pat. p. 8, m. 36.
87. Roger Wentworth, of Felsted, Essex, and Alice, his wife. Grant, in fee, for 875l. 11s. 3d., of the manor of Bokkynge, Essex, which belonged to the late monastery of Christchurch, Canterbury; with appurtenances in Bokkynge, Branktre, Stysted, Gosfelde, and Panfelde, and all other possessions of the monastery in Bokkyng; with liberties. Rent, 4l. 17s. 4d. Del. Westm, 20 July 32 Hen. VIII. — S.B. (mutilated). Pat. p. 8, m. 40.
88. Anth. Cotes or Cotys. Lease of the site of the manor of Whitesbury, Wilts, with all the lands thereto belonging (specified), which belonged to the late monastery of Reading, and are in the King's hands by the attainder of Hugh, the last abbot; term, 21 years; rent, 16l. 16s. 8d On surrender of a lease of the same by the late abbot to one Ric. Downore for a term still unexpired. Del. Westm., 20 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 30.
89. Edw. Hopton, a gentleman usher of the Chamber. To be steward of the lordships of Richardes Castle, Heref., and Staunton Lacy, Salop; with fees of 40s. a year. Del. Westm., 20 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Endd.: at the suit of Sir Ant. Wynkefelde. Pat. p. 8, m. 30.
90. Thos. Myntry, the King's scholar. Grant of the prebend of Yeatmester, in the cathedral church of Salisbury, vice Thos. Thirlby, LL.D., promoted to the bishopric of Westminster. Westm., 15 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 20 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 8, m. 30.
91. Rob. Gybbes, jun., and John Glyn, yeomen of the Guard. Grant, in survivorship, of the office of bailiff of the lordship of Steventon, Berks, which belonged to the monastery of Westminster; with the usual fees. Del. Westm., 20 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Endd.: “fee of 4l.Pat. p. 8, m. 30.
92. Geo. Norton. Lease of a fulling-mill in the borough of Karlyon, Marches of Wales; two corn-mills under one roof in the lordship of Karlyon; and a pasture called “lez Marchez Rakwarth and Constablewarth,” there; parcel of the earldom of March in the Marches of Wales; term, 21 years; rent, 16l. 13s. 4d., and 20d. of increase. Del. Westm., 20 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 31.
93. Rob. Marler. To be keeper of the great and little parks of Bardfeld, Essex, and bailiff of the manor of Bardfeld; with the usual fees, as Sir Ric. Long held the same. Westm., 18 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 20 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 8, m. 31.
94. Edm Harvy. To be keeper of the chief house and mansion of the manor of Benyngton alias Bedyngton, Surrey, and of the garden and orchard and park there; and steward and receiver of the manors of Benyngton alias Bedyngton, Bandon, Norbury, and Ravesbury, Surrey; which premises came to the King's hands by the attainder of Sir Nic. Carewe; with fees of 5l. a year. Del. Westm., 20 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 33.
95. Ric. Beste, Humph. Bassett, Rob. Polmorth, John Legge, Peter Beste, Philip Williams, Ric. Lord, John Vincent, Nic. de la Hay, masters of the “Science of Defence,” and Will. Hunt, John Frye, Hen. Whytehed, Gilbert Bekett, Edw. Pynner, Thos. Tourner, Jeffrey Gryffyn, Thos. Hudson, Thos. Tynosey, Hen. Thyklyppes, and John ap Ryce, provosts of the same science. Commission to enquire and search, in all parts of England, Wales, and Ireland, for persons being scholars of the said science of defence (many of whom, regardless of their oaths made to their masters on first entering to learn the said science, upon the cross of a sword in remembrance of the Cross whereon Our Lord suffered, have for their own lucre of their “unsaciable covetous minds,” without sufficient licence, resorted to all parts of England, keeping open schools and taking great sums of money for their labours, and yet have insufficiently instructed their scholars, to the great slander of the masters and provosts of the science and of the good and laudable orders and rules of the same), and to take any scholar so misusing himself before the nearest justice of the peace to be bound in sufficient sureties not to repeat his offences against his said oath and the said orders and rules, or in case of refusal to be committed to gaol. Westm., 20 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm. 20 July.—S.B. (In English.)
96. Thos. Haryngton. Grant (upon security of John Ratclyf and Thos. Talentyre) of the custody of a messuage, a cottage, and lands called Wollakys, in Inglewoode forest, Cumb., and a pasture called Lynge Closse in Betterheskett, in the said forest; for 21 years; at 46s. 8d. rent for “Wollakys,” and 4d. of increase, and 3s. 4d. for “Lynge Closse,” and 2d. of increase. Westm., 21 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 8, m. 31.
97. Hugh Glasier, S. T. B. Presentation to the parish church of Oye, marches of Calais, Terouenne dioc., void by death. Addressed lo T. archbp. of Canterbury. Del. Westm., 21 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S. (Endd.: A presentation to the parsona; of Oye for Sir Hugh Glasier, clk., parso of Hanworthe). Pat. p. 8, m. 32.
98. John Champernoume, Gawen Caro, Francis Knolles, and Geo. Blagge. Licence to export 14,000 lbs. weight of bell-metal. Del. Westm., 21 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 33.
99. Rob. Dyghton, of Stirton, Linc. Grant, in fee, for 178l. 19s. 11d., of the house, &c., of the late priory of Stixwolde, Linc., with demesne lands (named) in Stixwolde, Bukynhall, Blanckeney, and Horssington, Linc., the messuage in tenure of Hen. Cooper in Stixwolde, and the lands and woods called Sowthewoodd, Holmewoodd, Horssington Wood, and Brokeholme Woodd, in Styxwolde, Horssyngton, and Bukenall; all which belonged to the said late priory.
Also, lands (tenants named) in Billinghey, Watersyde, Walcote, Skawpwike and Kirbye, Linc., belonging to the late priory of Cattley.
Also, the grange of Marston and lands (tenants named) in Marston, Line.; Dirrington Grange; the Crabland and other lands (tenants named) in Dyryngton, which belonged to the late priory of Haverholme, Linc.
Also, lands (tenants named) in Carleton Ings, in Carleton Moreland, and Stapulforth, Linc., which belonged to the late priory of St. Katherine without the city of Lincoln; and in Spanby, Skrekington, and Billingburgh, Linc., belonging to the late monastery of Borne.
Also, the messuage in tenure of Rob. Burnett, and the grange in tenure of Rob. Hawson, in Kedyngton, Linc., which belonged to the late monastery of Alvyngham.
Also, all lands in tenure of Rob. Palfreman in Conysby, Linc., belonging to the late priory of Kyme.
Also, the tenements and lands lately leased to Rob. Dakan, in Graves L ne, in the parish of Oxton, Notts, belonging to the late priory of Worksopp, Notts; the grange called Osbarton graunge, in Osbarton, in the parish of Workesopp, Notts, and the grange called Hardwyke grange, in Hardwyke, in the same parish, in the several tenures of Rob. Stokes, Ralph Asteley, and Ric. Matteley; with the wood called Hardewyke woodd.
Also, the close of pasture called Barryclose, in the parish of Patteshull, Northt., formerly in tenure of John Grenden, and all lands lately in tenure of Rob. Pynkerd in the said parish; a messuage, &c., in Escotte, Northt., formerly in tenure of — (blank) Hucchins; two closes and one virgate of land in the towns and fields of Escotte, formerly in the tenure of Hen. Jones, in the parish of Patteshull; which lands in Escott and Patteshull were lately leased to John Mole, of Northampton, and belonged to the late monastery of St. James by Northampton.
Also, the house, &c., of the late priory of Augustinian Friars, in Northampton; the lands in the several tenures of Alice Blande, widow, and Thos. Webster; the land called Chapell yarde, in tenure of Nic. Coker, in Alfreton, Derb., which belonged to the late monastery of Beauchief, Derb.; the lands, &c., now or late in the several tenures of Ambrose Walker and Helen Kente, in Coton and Hardingston, Northt., and the lands called Russhe Hall Holme, in tenure of Nic. Ronde, in Northampton, which belonged to the late priory of St. Andrew, in Northampton, and lands in Pynchebek, Linc., which belonged to the late priory of Spalding, and are in tenure of John Hill, of Pynchebeke. Del. Westm., 23 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. (Badly mutilated.) Pat. (dated 3 July) p. 2, m. 18.
100. Thos. Myldemaye, one of the auditors of the Court of Augmentation, and Avicia his wife. Grant, in fee, for 622l. 5s. 8d., of the manor of Mulsham, Essex, with the water-mill of Mulsham and all appurtenances in Chelmesford, Mulsham, Magna Badowe, Stokk, Wydforde, and Wryttell, Essex, which belonged to the late monastery of St. Peter, Westminster; as fully as Wm. Boston, the last abbot, held it. Rent of 4l. 14d. With liberties, and free of all other charges except 2s. to John Tyrrell and his heirs for “le myllewharf,” 13s. 4d. to the steward (prepositus) or collector of rents of the manor, and 6s. 8d. to the farmer of the demesnes for vesture, yearly. Del. Westm., 23 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 37.
101. Will. Jones, a sewer of the Chamber. Lease of two corn-mills under one roof with the mill-dam or watercourse lately belonging to two old mills in the manor of Kaerlion; a pasture called “lez Merches,” with the pastures of Rakwarth and Constablewarth in the said manor; and a fulling-mill in the borough of Kaerlion; for 60 years from the determination of a 21 years' lease granted by pat. 29 Mar. 10 Hen. VIII. to Griffin ap Roger. Rent 16l. 13s. 4d. Westm., 8 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 24 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 1, m. 30.
102. Baldwin Willoughby, a sewer of the Chamber. Grant, for 155l. 6s. 8d., of the lordship or cell of Kersawe, Lanc., which belonged to the late priory of Lenton, Notts, in the King's hands by the attainder of Nic. Hethe, the last prior. Rent, 39s., as tenth. Westm., 23 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 24 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 8, m. 31.
103. Ric. Warner. To be one of the tellers of the Receipt of Exchequer, vice Rob. Fowler, dec. Westm., 19 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 24 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 8, m. 32.
104. John Osborne. Reversion of the office of clerk comptroller of the King's ships, with fees of 50 marks a year, now held by Thos. Sperte by virtue of the King's warrant dormant directed to Sir Hen. Wyat, treasurer of the Chamber, bearing date 26 Oct. 16 Hen. VIII. Westm., 20 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 24 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 8, m. 32.
105. Will. Buttes or Buttys, physician. Grant, in fee, of houses, &c., within the site of the late house of White or Carmelite Friars, in Fletestrete, London, viz., the chapter house; a parcel of waste ground between the chapter house on the west and the lane called Water lane, leading from Fletestrete to the Thames, on the east; the houses called the “Priours lodging,” and the “Sextrie”; the east side of the dormitory of the said late Friars, and part of the north side adjoining; the house late called the “Olde Quere”; a parcel of empty ground thereto adjoining called the “Woodyarde,” and another parcel of empty ground lying between the church of the said late Friars and the “Olde Quere”; and the empty ground called the “Cloyster greine,” in the middle of the cloister. Rent 2s. Westm., 14 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 24 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 8, m. 34.
106. Salop. — Commission to Thos. Newport, Thos. Vernon, Thos. Gifford, Thos. Lee, John Wigmor, and John Lystar, to make inquisition p. m. on the lands and heir of Griffin Acton, son of Thomas, son of John, late of Aldenham, brother of Thos. Acton, late of Longnor, deceased. Westm., 24 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII., p. 1, m. 24d.
107. Thos. White, chaplain. Grant of the canonry and prebend in the collegiate church of Landewy brevi, in Wales, in St. David's dioc., vice Rob. Barns, clk., attainted. Westm., 21 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 25 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 7, m. 34.
108. Stephen de Haschenperge. Annuity of 75l. for life. Westm., 25 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 26 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 2, m. 3.
109. Rob. Dighton, of Stirton, Linc. Licence to alienate a close called Baryclose in the parish of Patteshull, Northt., formerly in tenure of John Grendon; and lands there late in tenure of Rob. Pynkerd; a messuage, &c., in Escotte, Northt., formerly in tenure of — (blank) Hucchins; two closes in Escotte, in the parish of Patteshull, and lands formerly in the tenure of Hen. Jones there; which premises were lately leased to John Mole, of Northampton, and belonged to the monastery of St. James near Northampton; also the house, &c., of Augustinian Friars in Northampton; and the lands in the several tenures of Ambrose Walker and Helen Kent in Coton and Hardyngston, Northt., and the lands called Russhe Hall Holme, in tenure of Nic. Ronde in Northampton, which belonged to the late priory of St. Andrew, Northampton; to John Mole. Westm., 26 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 32.
110. Will. Sharyngton, page of the King's robes, and Eleanor his wife. Grant, in fee, for 783l. 13s. (1.) of the house and site of the late abbey of Lacok, Wilts, the church, steeple, and churchyard of the same, &c.; also the lordship and manor of Lacok, and the rectory and church of Lacok, with the advowson of the vicarage with appurtenances in Lacok, Calne, Beawley, Chippynham, Natton, Bowdon, Benaker, Whitley, Wyke, Cossam, Lakham, Rowdon, Stanley, Chyttowe, Bromham and Meltysham alias Melkysham, Wilts, and all other possessions of the abbey in Lacok, Calne and Melkesham, as fully as Joan Temmys, the late abbess, held the same.
(2.) Also, all messuages, lands, &c., in the tithing of Sendrewe in the parish of Melkesham, Wilts, which belonged to the late monastery of Ambresburye.
Rents (1) 5l. 18s. 10d.; (2) 6s. free of all charges, except a yearly fee of 40s. to Thos. Mardytt, as bailiff and rent-collector of the manor of Lacok, and 20s. to the vicar of Lacok. Del. Westm., 26 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. (Mutilated.) Pat. p. 7, m. 23.
111. Sir Ralph Sadleyr, one of the King's principal secretaries. To be keeper or clerk of the Hanaper of Chancery vice Thos. Crumwell earl of Essex, attainted, with a yearly rent of 40l., and 18d. a day for riding expenses when required to ride. Del. Westm., 26 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 29. Vacated on personal surrender 24 Oct. 37 Hen. VIII., in order that the office might be granted to the said Ralph and one John Hales.
112. Will. Poulet, lord Seint John. To be master of the Court of Wards, established by an Act of the Parliament of 31 Hen. VIII. (32 Hen. VIII. c. 46), with fees of 133l. 6s. 8d. a year. Del. Westm., 26 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 32. Vacated on personal surrender, 18 Nov. 34 Hen VIII., in order that the office might be granted in a different form.
113. Sir Thos. Wryothesley, one of the King's secretaries. Grant, in fee, of the great mansion late in tenure of Sir Ric. Riche, within the close of the Augustinian Friars in London, with a great hall, a bakehouse, a stable, and 2 gardens adjoining, and tenements near, in the several tenures of the said Sir Richard, Will. Shurland, and Ric. Duke; and all the messuages, &c., [within] the site of the said Augustinian Friars, which belonged to Thos. earl of Essex, attainted. To hold to the said Sir Thomas and his heirs by a rent of 5s. Del. Westm., 26 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 8, m. 38.
114. Ant. Carsidony, a native of Florence. Grant of the prebend of Netherbury in Salisbury cathedral. Westm., 25 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 26 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 8, m. 32. Rym. XIV., 701.
115. Hereford.—Commission to James Vaughan, Ric. Palmer, and Ric. Warnecombe, to make inquisition, p. m., on the lands and heir of Will. Baskervyle. Westm., 26 July. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 1, m. 24d.
116. Hugh Hunteley. To be clerk of the Peace and of the Crown in co. Monmouth. Westm., 25 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. 27 July.—P.S. Pat. 32 Hen. VIII. p. 2, m. 3.
117. John lord Russell, K.G. To be Great Admiral of England, Wales, Ireland, Calais, Normandy, Gascony and Acquitaine; with the usual fees, &c. (detailed), as enjoyed by Will, earl of Southampton, the late Great Admiral. Del. Westm., 28 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 3, m. 2.
118. John Hennege. Grant (in exchange for the lands of the said John and Anne his wife in Densanger, Wyken, and Pouxly, Northt., and 99l. 10s. 10d.) of (1) the reversion of the messuage called Bevys Markys and garden thereto adjoining in the parish of St. Katharine, Christechurche, London, late of the monastery of St. Edmund's Bury, Suff.; which were granted by pat. 7 June 32 Hen. VIII. to Sir Thos. Hennege and Katharine his wife in survivorship.
(2) Also, lands in Cotes, Wyllyngham, Fyllyngham, and Ingham, Linc., in tenure of Ralph and Ric. Fyssheburne, which belonged to Welbek monastery, Notts; and a house in the parish of St. Botolph, in the city of Lincoln, in tenure of Thos. Burton, which belonged to Haverholme monastery, Linc.
(3.) Also, lands in tenure of John Closby in Barton-upon-Humber, Linc., which belonged to Nonne Ormysby monastery, Linc.
(4.) Also, the house and site of the late priory of the “White Freres,” in Kyngeston-upon-Hull; and the orchard and garden in tenure of Hen. Thrynstoo, adjoining the west side of the said late priory; the close of pasture in tenure of the said Henry, on the west side of the said site and south of the said garden, and the three gardens adjoining the west side of the said site, viz., between the said close on the south and “Le White Freres Strete” on the north, in the several tenures of Will. Crokhey, John Dove, Thos. Browne and John Danyell; the messuages, &c., late in tenure of John Goodale, on the west side of the said three gardens, viz., at the west end of the “White Freres Strete” on the north, and next the “Beverley gate” of the said town and the town wall, on the west; the messuage in tenure of Sir Edw. Madyson, without the Beverley gate; and all gardens and pastures adjoining the said messuage and tenement lying between Busshe dyke on the south and the close of land of Stephen Clarre on the north, and next the highway on the east, and the common sewer on the west; and the yearly rent of 12d. issuing from the messuage called Trynytie house in the said town on the south side of the said late priory; all which belonged to the said late priory.
(5.) Also, the messuage in the parish of St. Stephen, Walbroke, London, between the tenement in which Ric. Wheler formerly dwelt on the south, and the tenement which Thos. Rede, stainer, formerly held on the north, which messuage belonged to the late priory of Newarke-next-Guyldeforde, Surrey.
(6.) Also, grant to the said John Hennege and Anne his wife, of lands in Westwykham, Linc., in tenure of the said John, which belonged to Sixhill priory.
The two closes of pasture next the mill of Donyngton in Donyngton and Benyngworth, Linc., in tenure of the said John; and the close of land in Panton, Linc., in tenure of the rector of the parish church of Estbarkworth; which closes belonged to Bolyngton priory, Linc.
Tenures: parcels (1–5) in fee simple to the said John; and (6) in fee simple to him and his wife, by stated rents for the several particulars. Del. Westm., 28 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. (Mutilated). Pat. p. 3, m. 3.
119. James Joskyn, of London, and Joan his wife. Grant, in fee, for 322l., of the manor of Withginhall alias Wiginghall, Herts, which belonged to the late monastery of St. Albans; with appurtenances in Watford, Herts and Midd.; in as full manner as Ric. Boreman, the last abbot, held the same. Rent 35s. 10d. Del. Westm., 28 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 3, m. 4.
120. John Bakere, the Attorney-General, and Elizabeth his wife. Grant, in fee, of the messuage called Delmynden in the parish of Cranebroke, Kent; and lands (specified and tenants named) in Cranebroke, Bemynden (or Benynden), Hedcrone, Stapleherst, and Frythenden, Kent, which premises were granted by Thos. Crumwell, late earl of Essex and Keeper of the Privy Seal, to the said John and Elizabeth, by charter dated 31 Aug. 31 Hen. VIII., in accordance with a deed of bargain and sale dated 1 Aug. 31 Hen. VIII.; but should be forfeited, along with the other possessions of the said Thomas, on account of the heresies and treasons committed by him before the said grant, viz., on the 31 Mar. 30 Hen. VIII., and whereof he was attainted. Del. Westm., 28 July 32 Hen. VIII.—S.B. Pat. p. 7, m. 24.
121. Benedict Kyllegrewe. Lease of the chief messuage, &c., of the manor of Doultyng, containing several acres in Estbraddon, Haydon, Dichefurl and Doultyng, late in the occupation of John White; parcel of the possessions of the late monastery of Glastonbury, Somers., in the King's hands by reason of the attainder of Ric. Whityng, the late abbot; for 21 years; at 10l. rent. Del. Westm., 28 July 32 Hen. VIII. — S.B. Note on the back: This lease was made without fine or increment at the King's command as related by Ant. Denny, one of the gentlemen of the Privy Chamber. Pat. p. 8, m. 30.
122. Thos. Paston, a gentleman of the Privy Chamber. Grant of the prebend of Blewbery in the cathedral church of Salisbury. Hampton Court, 28 July 32 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 29 July.—P.S. Pat. p. 2, m. 3.
943. Anne of Cleves.
R. O. Form of consent to be given by the duke of Cleves to the divorce of his sister as decreed by Convocation and accepted by herself.
ii. Speech (beginning “Reverende Domine, etc.”) to be delivered by the bp. of Bath [to the Councillors of the duke of Cleves?] if the Duke refuse his consent:—Regrets these delays. If the Duke had given us a hearing from the first you would have had the lady whom you so greatly desire here present or at least not far off on the way hither. The difficulties raised here have already so influenced the King as to make some change, and these news will doubtless make more. We have found you so intent on consultations and on quarrels with friends that even from the first we should have expected what now proves to be the case. These things have compelled the King to adopt a new policy, which I greatly regret. But I have discharged my mission and must ask my congé.
Lat., pp.
3.
R. O. 2. Speech (apparently an alternative to the preceding, to be delivered jointly by Clerk and Wotton) the same at the commencement down to the passage about “the difficulties raised here.” You will ask, what difficulties? Did not the Duke say he would be content with justice? This showed little conformity, for an enemy might say it. It seemed only an excuse for meanwhile consulting other people. This has made the King adopt new plans. Defend their writing to the King to this effect as they thought it would make the King more anxious to satisfy the Duke. Matters turned out otherwise, and the King, seeing difficulties, has determined to adopt, another plan, viz., to keep the lady in England. Haste was required as the approbation of Parliament, the dissolution of which was at hand, was necessary. The King therefore made new proposals to the Lady, not without inconvenience to himself, assigning her 1,000l. a year, more than he would have done if she had returned. The Duke ought not to feel aggrieved, nor to despair of the kindness of the King, who has shown his desire to content him by sending ambassadors and letters and offering friendship and treaties.
Would like to know the Duke's intention about a reciprocal league. The King is willing to promise pay for 3,000 foot for 2 or 3 months in the case of invasion. Ask what the Duke will do in return.
Lat., pp. 4. In the same hand as the preceding, with one correction in Clerk's hand.
R. O. 3. Heads of a speech referring to the terms of the treaty, and making similar complaints, with intimation that the King has changed his purpose and made a new arrangement with the lady for her retention in his kingdom, treating her far more liberally than when she was to return, both by increasing her dote to 1,000l. and otherwise. But the Duke need not despair of the King's benignity, for we expect his Majesty's final answer every day. Meanwhile we desire to know the Duke's mind as to a mutual league, in which the King is content to help him with 3,000 foot against invasion; what aid the Duke will give in return. If we be asked to name our demands, we must reply that we know not what to ask of them, as we know not the Duke's resources. The Prince's good will towards the King is not to be despaired of.
Lat., pp. 3. In Clerk's hand. Injured by damp.

Footnotes

1 See the conclusion of No. 883, from which it may be inferred that this draft is earlier than the others.
2 Kaulek reads “aux presches,” i.e. at their sermons.
3 One of the transcripts reads the word “ami (?),” the other “absent,” while Kaulek reads it “Turin” with a double query “(??)” and supplies in brackets the preposition “à.” The two Marshals in question were Claude d'Annebault, Commander in Piedmont, and Robert Stuart Sieur d'Aubigny.
4 Vittoria Farnese, daughter of Pier Luigi.
5 Cancelled.
6 Down to this point the draft has been altered by Wriothesley to form the minute of a letter to Wallop and Karne directing them to declare these proceedings to the French king. The whole letter thus altered is printed in the State Papers as if to Clerk and Wotton.
7 In margin “De die non constat hic.”
8 Giovanni Morone, afterwards Cardinal, at this time nuncio with King Ferdinand.
9 Printed wrongly, “23,” in Morrin's Calendar, p. 66.
10 No. 905.
11 In the instructions given to Lord William Howard in the year 1541 it is stated that his real name was Dick Hosier. See St. P., viii. 513.
12 Kaulek reads “Petro.” “Teko” might be a corruption of Montecchio, which was the title of Alfonso, a younger brother still. But the brother referred to in the text was Francesco.
13 Chapuys.
14 See Hamilton Papers, No. 55.
15 Abavus is the word in the text, but it ought to have been proavus.
16 23rd,
17 John Vesalius, archbp. of Lunden.
18 Pietro Tagliavia, bishop of Girgenti (Agrigentum).
19 See Vol. XIV., Part ii., No. 255.
20 This address, of course, only applies to the Cambridge depositions in § ii.
21 Marked by a dot prefixed.
22 Marked by a dot prefixed.
23 This document is on the same file as that immediately preceding.
24 Only a part of the King's signature just visible.
25 Place of delivery omitted.
26 Date illegible on the S.B.