Henry VIII
September 1541, 26-30

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Institute of Historical Research

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James Gairdner and R. H. Brodie (editors)

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1898

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'Henry VIII: September 1541, 26-30', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 16: 1540-1541 (1898), pp. 560-577. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=76259 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


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September 1541, 26–30

26 Sept. 1205. Scotchmen in Northumberland
R. O.
St. P., v. 192.
Commission to Sir Wm. Evers and Sir Cuthbert Ratclif, deputy wardens, and Sir Ralph Ellerker, Sir Robert Bowis, Sir John Wetherington, John Herone, Robt. Collingwode, and John Horseley to enforce the laws made for the expulsion of aliens, the King being informed that many Scottish people exercise husbandry and handicrafts within Northumberland, to the detriment of the King's natural subjects. Also for three of them, of whom Ellerker or Bowes must be one, to survey the waste grounds along the frontier of the East and Middle Marches, devise how many able horsemen the same will bear, what rents they would bring, and what would be the cost of the necessary fortifications. All proceedings to be certified to the Council attending the King's person.
Draft corrected by Wriothesley. Large paper, p. 1. Endd.: “The copy of a commission to the within named touching the East Marches, &c., foranemst Scotland, dated at York xxvjo Septemb. 1541.”
R. O. 2. Memorandum to know my lord of Norfolk's pleasure concerning the expulsion of Scots, viz:—
(1.) If a Scot have married an English woman and have children by her and keep house, having an occupation or mystery; how they shall be ordered? (2) If a Scot be retained with a gentleman in service as falconer, horsekeeper, jakmaker, prentice, or the like? (3) If they affirm they have been banished out of Scotland? (4) If a Scot have married an English woman and have no children? (5) Who shall seize their goods and how their debts shall be paid? (6) If they shall be marked or burned, and in what fashion?
P. 1. Endd.
26 Sept. 1206. Henry VIII. to Sir Ralph Ellerker and Sir Robt. Bowes.
Add. MS.
32,646, f. 229.
B. M.
Hamilton
Papers,
No. 89.
As, by commission of this date, they are appointed to repair to the East and Middle Marches foreanempst Scotland to enforce certain statutes and view certain grounds there, and therefore should be well furnished with attendants, they may (for this purpose only) retain 100 men [each], (fn. 1) besides their household servants.
Draft in Wriothesley's hand, p. 1. Endd.: Minute to Mr. Ellarkar and Mr. Bowys, xxvjo Septemb. 1541.
26 Sept. 1207. Henry VIII. to James V.
Add. MS.
32,646, f. 227.
B. M.
Hamilton
Papers,
No. 88.
The Scots have made spoils and raised fire in England, having burnt houses belonging to Beaucastle fortress and raided 16 miles within English ground, laying an ambush which murdered four gentlemen and three others who went to the rescue of the said spoils. These attemptates declare rather open hostility than any such friendship as James lately expressed. Signifies this by bearer, Berwick pursuivant, requiring speedy redress to be made, the lack or delay of which should force him to provide other means to protect his subjects.
Draft, pp. 2. Endd.: Minute to the king of Scots, xxvjo Septembris 1541, from York.
26 Sept. 1208. Marillac to Francis I.
R. O.
Kaulek, 341.
(The whole
text.)
This King having made his entry into York, two days after Marillac wrote on the 16th, with like solemnity as at Lincoln and elsewhere, Marillac has been daily with Norfolk to resume the subject commenced, in pursuance of Francis's letters and instruction in cipher. Taking care to propose the match as greatly to the advantage of the English, [declared] (fn. 2) that, for the sake of perpetual amity, Francis, having heard from the Admiral what Marillac had proposed and yielding deference to the ladies, would desire lady Mary for Orleans. Found Norfolk more cautious than he had been, fearful of incurring the jealousy of the rest of the Council, and anxious to have the affair communicated to others as well as himself. Reflecting that thereupon they might say the overture came entirely from Francis, and be the more stiff, told Norfolk he had no charge to address himself to others, and durst not contravene Francis's letters, which were that the affair should be kept secret. Norfolk kept him four days waiting for an answer, and meanwhile hourly tried to elicit from him what France would ask, but he would only reply generally that this treaty should extinguish the old disputes about the pensions and establish an amity pure and simple. Finally, Norfolk came to say that he had debated this affair with his master, who was much inclined to it as the highest match he could wish for his daughter, and, when the conditions as to dot and dower were settled, would declare in what degree she should be capable (habille) to succeed him. The Duke added, as of himself, that there would be no difficulty about legitimation, which he presumed Francis would insist on, but as to succession to the crown of England, the young prince of Wales and other heirs both male and female who should be born would be preferred to the said lady, inferring that she would only be preferred to Queen Anne's daughter, Ysabeau. He said his master, as customary in such cases, required that Marillac should have power to treat, under Francis's great seal, before proceeding further; adding that if they did not mean to listen, they would not ask it. Answered coldly that such a power would come better when things were debated and ready to be concluded; and then, doubtless, Francis would give it and also depute personages of importance befitting the affair, for he was young and alone here; but meanwhile it seemed no hindrance to ask what offer they would make, to know thereby the likelihood of agreement. To this Norfolk, after referring again to his master, replied that it was no hindrance to have the said power to discuss conditions, reserving the conclusion to be made as Francis should desire. Not to make too great instance, answered that he would refer again to Francis.
Gathers from his dealing with Norfolk that there will be certain difficulties in this match, viz. (1) on showing Norfolk the advantage of placing the Lady so high, he said Orleans was too great, for he presumed that this King's other Councillors would foresee that if he succeeded to both crowns the English would have a foreign king; adding that the chief hindrance to the Emperor's marrying her was the fear that he might treat England like Naples, and keep a viceroy there, and dilating upon the importance of this match to France, so that Francis should require it more eagerly and be content with less advantage upon hope of such a succession. (2) The English require the conditions settled before saying how they will deliver her, thus leaving a loophole for escape at the last. (3) Although the English allow that a son of France could not marry a bastard, Marillac knows not whether they would confess that her mother was Queen, it being by Act of Parliament forbidden to call her otherwise than Madame, or whether they would style her legitimated by the grace of her father, or whether Francis would take her simply as eldest legitimate daughter of the king of England, knowing that the marriage is undoubtedly approved by the Church.
Begs Francis to send full instruction and decide whether it is best to send Marillac the preliminary power required, that he may feel what offer they would make and what dower they would have assigned, or else to send personages of authority at the risk of making the English think they are being sought. The instruction should state how much of the pensions has been paid, what is due, and what remains for the future, since this affair is to extinguish that dispute; and also whom to negociate with in Norfolk's absence, for he says he will shortly go to his house until All Saints Day, by which time the Court will be at London, and which will be time enough for the answer to this.
In spite of the preparations to receive the king of Scotland and this King's delaying a month here, it is clear now that he is not expected, for this King leaves in two days towards Lincoln and London.
French. Modern transcript, pp. 8. Headed: York, 26 Sept. 1541.
Vienna
Archives.
2. Another copy or abstract (but with material differences and undated) of some passages in the preceding.
See Spanish Calendar, VI. i., No. 185.
26 Sept. 1209. Marillac to the Admiral.
R. O.
Kaulek, 345.
(Abstract.)
Writes to the King the substance of his dealing with Norfolk, and supposes that the Admiral will see the letters, with the obstacle to further progress and the difficulties. Norfolk confessed that his master's greatest hope for the success of this affair was in the Admiral's known inclination to preserve the amity. As the Admiral knows the men and their fashion of negociating, Marillac will only beg him to send ample instruction.
Although the Admiral has little acquaintance with him (who was never in the service of prince or lord and only two or three times in Court, when, returning from the Levant, he sought his despatch to go back to his kinsman, La Forest, who was ambassador par de là), he begs acceptance of his services, as a poor young man who is in sufficiency one of the least of the Admiral's servants, but in fidelity and affection not inferior to the greatest.
French. Modern transcript, pp. 2. Headed: 26 Sept. 1541.
27 Sept. 1210. The Council with the King to Audeley.
R. O. In a matter depending before him, between old Mrs. Coke and one Legate, of Romford, the lady Mary has heretofore been a suitor and has now desired their mediation in favour of Mrs. Coke, who has been an old servant. Beg him stay the matter till their coming together.
Draft in Wriothesley's hand, p. 1. Endd.: Minute to the Lord Chancellor, 27 Sept. 1541; also with the names Sir Edw. Wadham, Sir Walt. Dennys, Mr. Wikes, esquire, Henry Ellys, Sir Nich. Poines servants.
28 Sept. 1211. The Privy Council.
Nicolas'
P.C.P., vii.
247.
Note that on 27 Sept. the King departed [from York] and lay that night at Howlme, in a house sometime Sir Robt. Constable's, and next day came to Leconfield.
Meeting at Leconfield, 28 Sept. Present: Norfolk, Suffolk, Privy Seal, Gt. Chamb., Gt. Admiral, Durham, Treasurer, Comptroller, Mr. of Horse, Vice-Chamb., Wriothesley. Business:—“This day was John Masyn, which was before appointed to serve in the place of the French secretary, admitted and sworn clerk of the Privy Council during the absence of Mr. William Paget.” Dr. Brainsby and Dr. Marshall, chaplains to the bp. of York, and Dr. Dawkins, chaplain to the bp. of Bath, examined as to who devised the articles consulted among the clergy at Pomfret in the commotion time. (fn. 3) Certain gentlemen of the Borders complained of a raid made upon them, and murders, robberies, and burnings by the Scots. Sir Geo. Lawson examined of the order of Berwick, and articles delivered to him to answer.
Also at Leconfield the same day. Present: as above. Business:—The Border gentlemen dismissed, and Sir John à Fenwicke rewarded with 20l. pension, and Thos. à Fenwick, whose son was slain in the said raid of the Scots, had 20l. in money. A matter ended between Mr. Page and my lord of York's surveyor.
28 Sept. 1212. Sir Thos. Wharton to Henry VIII.
Add. MS.,
32,646, f. 231.
B. M.
Hamilton
Papers,
No. 90.
Received at Carlisle, the 27th inst., at 7 p.m., the King's letters, dated York, 25th inst., about the banishment of 40 Scottishmen by lord Maxwell, spoils made within Wharton's office, burning of John Musgravys houses, and murder of seven men in the Middle Marches. Has already written to the Council of this, and is keeping sure watch. Has appointed an enterprise upon the Scottishmen in the Debateable Ground on Friday night next, with a view to draw inhabitants of the foot of Liddersdale to the fray and train them into an ambush. Can do this without offending the peace, and hopes thereby to discourage other Scottishmen from coming to inhabit there. As to, during this winter, “doing three for one as occasion serveth”; trusts the least of the three shall make little the greatest of theirs. Is just informed, out of Liddersdell, that Lord Maxwell called to his house of Langholme in Eskdale two each of the Armstranges, Elwaldes, and Crosers, and said, “Ye are the men I can trust: I will have some notable act done to the Englishmen to requite the great displeasures we have lately suffered by them.” On 27 Sept., at night, an espial told him that the bp. of Aberdeen and the ambassadors linger in their coming, awaiting news from their Cardinal in France.
The borders of Gillesland, Waistland, Barony of Burgh, and others, are not so well horsed as they have been and should be. Karlisle, 28 Sept.
Signed.
Pp.
3. Add. Endd.: 1541.
29 Sept. 1213. The Privy Council.
Nicolas'
P.C.P., vii.
249.
Meeting at Leconfield, 29 Sept. Present: Norfolk, Suffolk, Privy Seal, Gt. Chamb., Gt. Admiral, Durham, Treasurer, Comptroller, Mr. of Horse, Vice-Chamb., Wriothesley. Business:—Drs. Marshall, Dakins, and Braynsbye commanded to show their advice upon certain articles touching the Supremacy. Letter sent for the bp. of Man.
29 Sept. 1214. Attainted Lands.
R. O. Payments out of the attainted lands in the North for the year ended Mich. 33 Hen. VIII. for which Tristram Teshe, the King's receiver general in Yorkshire, seeks allowance.
A book of reprises similar to those of 31 and 32 Hen. VIII. (See Vol. XIV., Pt. ii., No. 239 and No. 96 of this Volume.)
1215. John Foulberye. (fn. 4)
R. O. Bill, headed “demands of allowance,” containing such items as “my fee,” which is 3l. 0s. 10d.; “the windmill,” 40s.; “scouring of cccc. rod of a water called Foulna,” 40s.; “the arnest (harness) wych ys in mye charge xli and a batyd thys yer iijli so the alouens yes yer ys iijli”; for making a bridge over Blak Dyk for the King, 2s.; driving the moor to search for strays, 5s.; “the fishing of Bubwyth, which is in my charge xxs. and now is letten for vjs.,” 14s.; and the like. Thirteen items; total, 13l. 4s. 8d. Marked as allowed, all but one item of 4s., and signed: per me John Foulberye. Dated at the foot: 33 Hen. VIII.
P. 1.
1216. Yorkshire.
R. O. Bill for repairs done “by me, Thomas Gerge,” upon the King's tenement in Hugate, late in tenure of Robt. Harper, this summer last past, 33 Hen. VIII. Eleven items of woodwork and thatching, four of which are struck out and the total so reduced from 14s. 2d. to 10s. 8d. Headed officially: “allor ao xxxiijo R. H. VIII.”
P. 1.
1217. The Subsidy.
R. O. A note, headed “Termino Michaelis anno xxxijo Regis Henrici viijvi,” of sums of 160l. and 20l. received from the subsidy in Gloucestershire, followed by a note, headed “Termino Michaelis anno xxxiijo R. R. Henrici viijvi,” of 589l 17s.d. received by Sir Thos. Hennage, for the King's private expenses, which remained in the hands of Hen. Everard, now deceased, teller of the Exchequer, out of receipts of various subsidies detailed (this note signed by Henneage).
Pp. 2.
1218. Lord Lisle's Lands.
R. O. Account of the lands and possessions of Arthur Plantagenet viscount Lysley for two years ended Mich. 33 Hen. VIII., viz., receipts:—
i. Parcel of the possessions of viscount Lysley:—Kyngeston Lysley, Berks., sold to Wm. Hyde, life rent for the two years 143l. 8s. 4d. Charleton, &c., Devon, sold to the marquis of Exeter, life rent 154l. Rybbesford, sold to Robt. Acton, life rent 43l. 6s. 8d. City of Worcester, rents 40s. Town of Bristol, rents 63l. 6s. 10d. Kybbworth, Leic., 70l. 23d. Whethyll, Salop, sold to John Smith, baron of the Exchequer, life rent 71l. 8s. Payneswyke and Morton Valaunce, sold to the earl of Essex, life rent, nil (because not to begin until Mich. 1543).
ii. Lands granted to lord Lysley by the King:—Lands and tenements in Calais, 40l. 4d. Annuity out of the Augmentations, 400l. Frithelstoke, Devon, 90l. 19s. 7d.
iii. Lands late of Sir John Bassett, and now in viscount Lysley's hands in right of his wife lady Honor:—Womberleigh, Devon, 67l. 4s. 11d. Tehedy, Cornw., 151l. 19s. 2d.
Total for the two years, 1,306l. 14s. 9d. Fees and other reprises, 79l. 10s. 11d.
“Super,” i.e., arrears (detailed), 622l. 17s. 8d.
Remainder, 604l. 6s. 2d., of which delivered to lord Lysley of the issues of 32 Hen. VIII. before the said lord was arrested, 118l. 16s. 8d., and to Sir Ric. Pollard, by virtue of the King's warrant, 485l. 9s. 6d., of which the said Sir Richard has paid at divers times upon the King's warrants 370l. 12s. 8d., and has 113l. 16s. 10d. in his bands.
Paper roll of 6 leaves, written on one side only.
29 Sept. 1219. Works at Calais.
R. O. “Sir Edwarde Ringelay, knight, comptroller. A book of comptrolment upon the payment of the works at Ca[lais] paid by Richard a Lee, surveyor, f[or the] year beginning in anno xxxij[o and] ending in anno rr. H. viiji xxxiijo.”
[Similar book to No. 98.]
i. The month [30] Sept. to [27] Oct. 32 Hen. VIII.
Names, &c., of 6 masons hard hewers, 2 sawyers sawing timber for a new turnpike at Newnham Bridge, 33 “labourers out of England working upon the wharf of Becham's Bulwark, spreading sand there and filling the tumbrills with dung at the back side of the Susterhous for filling the foresaid wharf,” 12 labourers of Calais working at the wharf by the Crane with the carpenters of the ordinary wages “as digging away the earth and ramming it with clay,” 20 labourers filling the West Jutty by Rysebank “with sea chalk which came for (qu. from?) the cliffs beyond Sandgate,” 12 labourers filling the East Jutty with chalk from Chalkwell Hill, 26 great boys carrying earth out of the new dike about Becham Bulwark up to fill the bulwark, 13 lesser boys likewise carrying earth, 3 labourers making rough mortar “that was left unmade when they left work in the Park,” 4 water bearers to them, 2 labourers appointed by the King's bill, 8 daily labourers, Robt. Williams and Wm. Martyn, clerks.
Long carts carrying chalk from Chalkwell Hill to fill the East Jutty by the Suster House, 8 names; carrying chalk from the cliffs beyond Sand Gate to the West Jutty, 26; carrying clay from the flow mark beyond Newnham Bridge to the Crane by Paradyse wharf to mend the wharf, 5; carrying clay from the said flow mark to the sluice by the Castle, 3; carrying beer and victuals unto Cowbrydge, 6; carrying “morrespykes and divers other artillery unto the said bridge,” 6. Short carts carrying victuals to the said bridge, 6; carrying bricks that were made in the Store House ground to Becham Bulwark, 29; carrying hurdles, masts, spars, maunds, and other necessaries from Becham Bulwark to the Store House, 19; carrying logs from Wm. Baker's kiln “unto the Masondiew ground,” 7; carrying timber to Newnham Bridge to mend the turnpike, 2; carrying guns from the Ordnance House thither, 9; carrying scaffolding, as hurdles, masts, spars, &c., to the East House and to Becham Bulwark for making of the sallow there, 4; tumbrels carrying sand from the sand hills and dung and earth from the dunghill at the Suster House to the wharf by Becham Bulwark, 17.
Emptions:—Smiths' and glaziers' work, 24 doz. of bread, 19 barrels of beer, 3 quarters of beef, 10 muttons, 2 doz. drinking pots, and 4 mats to cover the bread maunds for “the King's retinue at Cowbrydge which were at the breaking up of the said bridge, and making of divers trenches upon the cawsy.” 46 labourers for their day's work in pulling up the Cowbridge and opening four trenches which were filled by the Frenchmen. Boatman, masons of the ordinary wages, watchers, and bell-ringer. Bricks; rent of a barn at St. Peter's ferry; wainscot to make masons' rules; breaking down “the old countermure wall that did stand about Becham's Bulwark.
Total, 357l. 6s. 5/8d.
ii. The month 28 Oct. to 24 Nov. 32 Hen. VIII.
Six “masons extraordinary working in the Masons' lodge hewing of hard stone,” 1 carpenter extraordinary, 2 sawyers extraordinary sawing timber for wharves and jetties, 11 labourers at Becham Bulwark filling and lifting maunds for the boys, 30 boys bearing earth out of the dyke of Becham Bulwark “for filling of the mounte,” 41 labourers filling the West Jutty with chalk from Sandgate, 9 working with the ordinary carpenters “mending of the wharfe in Paradyse and also mending the head of the starlyng of the West Juttye,” 2 watching upom Becham Bulwark, 1 appointed by the King's bill, 2 serving the ordinary tiler, 8 daily labourers, 3 clerks.
Long carts carrying chalk from the cliffs beyond Sandgate to the West Juttye, 34 names; carrying clay to the wharf and the crane beside Paradyse, 4. Short carts carrying hard stone from the Haven to the Masons' lodge, out of John Gattes ship, of Maidstone, 21; carrying logs from the Haven to the Storehouse, out of James Garson's ship of Calais, 15; carrying timber from the King's Carpentry and “packes out of th'Ermytage to the Paradyse”; carrying planks, binders, and posts to the West Juttye at Rysebank to repair the “hedde” there, 6; carrying posts, planks, and joists to the Exchequer to mend the stable there, 4. Tumbrels carrying chalk to fill the “hedde” of the West Juttye, 5.
Emptions:—Locks, keys, and other smiths' work. Freight, &c., of stone and timber in ships, named, from Kent.
Total, 179l. 7s. 10½d.
iii. The month 25 Nov. to 22 Dec.
6 masons, 1 carpenter, and 4 sawyers extraordinary; 11 labourers filling maunds for 30 boys, as before; 41 labourers “filling the West Jutty with chalk that came from Sandgate and repairing of the sea banks,” 2 watching by night on Becham Bulwark, 2 serving the tiler in the storehouse called the Armytage, 1 appointed by the King's bill, 8 daily labourers, 2 clerks.
Long carts carrying chalk from Skales “clyves” to the West Jutty to fill “the starlyng and the hedde there,” 21; carrying clay from the flow water mark beyond Newnham Bridge to mend the sea banks by the Sklewse next the Castle, 11.
Emptions:—Pickaxes and other smiths' work.
Total, 94l. 10s.d.
iv. The month, 27 Jan. to 23 Feb.
23 masons extraordinary “working in the mason lodge hewing of hard stone for Dyvelyn”; 11 carpenters extraordinary making two houses to stand at Guisnes and Newnham Bridge in the brickeries “for keeping of the brick when it is burned”; 11 carpenters working in the Ordnance House stocking guns, making wheels, and repairing necessaries, and 6 sawyers sawing planks for them; 3 sawyers in the King's carpentry sawing joists and rafters for the two houses and “rails for making of the dampnys about Dyvelyn Toure,” 4 wheelers making wheels for artillery in the Ordnance House, 4 armourers cleaning harness and bills, 6 smiths mending iron guns, 8 shoeing cart wheels, 8 bowyers making and mending bows, 10 fletchers making and feathering arrows, 6 joiners making staves, spears, and morrespykes; 4 tilers tiling the Ordnance House and repairing the Storehouse, 4 labourers serving them; 4 thackers thacking a lodge at Myllgate that the hard hewers work in, 4 labourers serving them, 167 labourers out of England “casting down of the hills in the Park and cleansing of the dyke along the south side of the town,” 43 labourers of Calais casting down the sand hills in the Park “and cutting of the doves right on the south side of the town,” 14 labourers repairing the sea banks between Newnham bridge and the Castle, 1 labourer appointed by the King's bill, 8 daily labourers, 5 clerks.
Long carts carrying turfs from the flow water mark beyond Newnham Bridge to the sea banks between Newnham Bridge and the Castle, 11 names; carrying clay from the same to Dyvelyn Bulwark for making of the “dampnys” in the dyke, 11. Short carts (paid by companies, few names given) carrying 476 loads of brick from Wm. Baker's kiln beyond Newnham Bridge to Dyvelyn bulwark; 102 and 88 loads of hardstone from the Haven to the new lodge made by Develyn Bulwark; 279 loads of masts, spars, &c. from the Carpentry to the Mylgate for making of “dampnys” in the ditches there and a lodge at the Waterhouse for the masons to work in, and ordnance out of the King's Wardrobe to the West Brays and Mylbrays; 101 loads of iron and coals from the Storehouse to the Foundry, guns to divers places in the walls, and gunstocks from the Ordnance House to the Warbrobe. Tumbrels carrying rough mortar from Bechams Bulwark to Myllgate and Rysebank, 34 names; carrying clay from Colham to Myllgate, for filling the “dampnys” made in the ditches and making two new limekilns there, and to the Ordnance House, 29; “carrying away earth at the chalk pits for baring of a new pit where chalk must be gotten for this year,” 7.
Emptions: — Pickaxes, bolts, locks, &c. White board for the armoury, “counter lath nail for setting on the sockets of the holbards and black bills,” nail for making the chests where the “cryngilles” lie and nailing posts where the spears hang, spars, gymmeaux to hang on the “prece” in the crossbow chamber, locks to set on “the said presses,” 12 quire of paper, 18 sticks of white and green fringe to the performance of the black bills, trimming the rest of the black bills and “closing the said press,” stocking “of xv. beamys hagbusshes at xiiijd. st. the piece”; ladles for cannon, culverin, bumbard and saker with their rammers and staves; harness nails, white nails for sallets, buckles, canvas “for cartoches and the covering of the hail shot for one of the great bombards,” “merkyn cord,” feathering of arrows, stoups of oyll olyve, glue for setting on of the quarrells' heads; callabers of copper plate to make new shot by for cannons, culverins, half culverins, sakers, fawcons, and fawconets; moulds of brass for the hagbushes, “gret stoon weight” and “fyne gret stoon” for the armoury. Maunds, wainscot, pipes and hogsheads for water, canvas “to make cloths for the carts that carry lime and coal from the Chalk Hills unto Dyvelyn Bulwark,” nails, keys, and other ironwork. Making two limekins by the Waterhouse, sedge to thatch the new masons' lodge there. Freight, &c., of timber and stone from Kent in various ships. Brick. Richard a Lee, surveyor, for his costs going into England and attending upon the King for affairs here from 4 Nov. to 3 Feb., 28l. 5s. 6d.
Total, 526l. 12s. 10¼.
v. The month, 27 Feb. to 26 March 32 Hen. VIII.
19 masons extraordinary in the lodge beside the Waterhouse hewing hardstone for Dyvelyn Bulwark, 6 hard hewers drawing and hewing blocks of chalk for the foundation, 30 bricklayers out of England and 13 of Calais working on the same foundation, with 5 prentices; 16 carpenters with 5 prentices “making gynnes for to drive piles, and pulling up old piles at Dyvelyn bulwark and making of bosses and horsses hiddes and divers other necessaries”; 6 sawyers in the carpentry, 1 tiler working upon the King's ordnance house called the Wardrobe, 3 labourers serving this tiler and an ordinary tiler at the Hermytage; 282 labourers out of England (7 of whom are noted as clerks) casting the foundation and dyke at Dyvelyn Tower and carrying the earth to fill the hollow way and dyke about the “said bulwark”; 26 at the chalk pits, with the hard hewers, digging chalk and carrying rubbish, 15 repairing the sea bank between Callis and Newnhambridge, 59 labourers of Calais, 29 boys cleaning old bricks, 11 lime burners at the kilns without Myllgate, 11 labourers quenching lime, 4 drawing water for quenching lime, 6 rough mortar makers, 8 fine mortar makers, 3 labourers lading carts at the brickery, 1 “cart taker,” 8 daily labourers, 1 clerk.
Long carts carrying chalk from Chalkwell Hill to Duvelyn Bulwark, 30 names; long carts of the Low Country carrying chalk from the Black Hill thither, 104; long carts carrying bricks from Wm. Baker's kiln to Myllgate, 16; short carts carrying bricks “from the said kyls” to the said Bulwark, 15; long carts carrying sea clay from the flow mark beyond Newnham Bridge to “Dvvuelyng” Bulwark “for making the ‘dampnys’ when the foundation of the bulwark was laying,” 10. Short carts carrying bricks from the “brykkyls at Nuhambrydge” to the Bulwark, hardstone from the Haven to Myllgate, logs from the Haven to Newnham Bridge, necessaries within the town, and necessaries from the Storehouse and Carpentry to the works at Myllgate, 114 in all. Tumbrels carrying earth out of the dyke, sand for mortar making, and stone from the East Juttye to Dyvelyn Bulwark, 22.
Emptions:—Iron rings for weights, iron clasps for the stock of the watch bell, bars for windows and other iron work. Coopers' and glasiers' work. Single maunds, paving tile for the Exchequer, scoops for offing water out of the foundation, nails, line for masons' work. Rods and “wyshes” for making a house where the “tarras” lies by the Waterhouse. Watching, lime bricks, stone, logs, thatch, &c.
Total, 761l. 3s. 11½d.
vi. The month, 27 March to 23 April.
21 masons, as in the preceding month, 8 hard hewers at the chalk pits by Skales, 70 bricklayers of England and Calais working at the foundation of the bulwark and “countermurle wall,” with 6 prentices and 1 clerk; 12 carpenters making gynnes and bosses, &c., for the work at Dyvelyn Bulwark and Rysebank and “pulling up of the bridges at Mylkgate,” with 4 prentices; 74 labourers casting the foundation of the dyke at Duvelin Bulwark, 91 “labourers out of England,” 49 “labourers out of England carrying,” 107 “labourers out of England”; 21 labourers of England working at the chalk pits beyond Calkwell Hill “getting out blocks and ‘mollyn’ for the works at Calais and Rysebank;” 72 labourers of the country baring the ground of the quarry at the chalk pits, 54 boys cleaning bricks and bearing brick to the bricklayers, 11 limeburners at the kilns beside the Waterhouse, 6 rough mortar makers, 9 fine mortar makers, 10 labourers “plomping” water for lime quenching, 3 labourers lading carts at the brick kilns, 1 “taylour of cartes in the Havin,” 6 daily labourers, 2 clerks.
Long carts of the High Country carrying chalk from the further pit beyond Calkwell Hill to Duvelyn Bulwark for the foundation and brenning of lime there, 54 names; long carts of St. Peter's carrying chalk from the hither pit at Chalkwell Hill, 26; long carts of the Low Country carrying chalk, 156. Short carts carrying brick, Newcastle coal from the Haven to Dyvelyn Bulwark, “nayles, bordes sparris, tarrys and maundes” from the Haven to the Hermitage, hardstone from the Haven to the Bulwark and to the works at Myllgate, necessaries from the Hermitage and Carpentry to Myllgate “for making of dampnis in the ditch,” logs from the Blokhous to the brickeries, logs from the haven of Dykelond to the Blockhouse and brickery, in all 291 names, various ships indicated. Tumbrels carrying rubbish out of the chalk pits, 11; carrying earth out of the dyke and Fevershams stone from the East Juttye to Duvelin Bulwark, 33.
Emptions:—Iron work, including pickaxes for breaking down of the old bulwark by Myllgate. Tubs, buckets and other coopers' work. Glasiers' work. White board for making barrows. Various shiploads of Newcastle coal, tarras and maunds from Owtryk in Holland, stone from Maidstone and Faversham and logs out of Knell wood. Lime, watching, the Emperor's custom upon tarras, &c., brought from Holland and Thos. Yonge's costs in riding to Owtryk for it, &c.
Total, 959l. 12s.d.
vii. The month 24 April to 21 May 33 Hen. VIII.
17 masons and 8 hardhewers as before; 174 bricklayers out of England and 40 of Calais working upon Duvelyn Bulwark, with 31 rough layers; 7 carpenters in the Carpentry making the middle floor of the mill tower at Guisnes and necessaries for Duvelyn Bulwark and Rysebank, with 6 prentices; 4 sawyers in the carpentry, 1 tiler working in the Castle “tiling the hall and divers lodgings there at the coming of Sir Edward Braye,” with 2 labourers serving him; 619 labourers out of England casting down the brays about Duvelyn Bulwark; 21 English labourers at the chalk pits drawing blocks and “mullyn,” and 20 labourers of the country “paring” the ground and bearing away earth, also 31 labourers of Calais and 81 of England (similarly occupied?); 12 lime burners of Calais, 7 labourers quenching lime, 3 “plompinge” water, 16 making rough mortar, 3 lading carts at the brickery; 1 “taylr of cartes in the Havin,” 6 daily labourers, 1 clerk.
Long carts carrying chalk from the further pit (61 names), from Chalkwell Hill (30), and from the Black Hill at Skalis Clyves (68); carrying brick from Wm. Baker's kiln (16). Short carts carrying bricks from Baker's kiln (16); stone and Newcastle coal out of the Haven, logs out of Dykelonde river or haven, Feversham stone out of the Haven, maunds and hard stone out of the Haven (the freight of 29 ships, from 8 to 20 names in each case); scaffolding from the Hermitage to Duvelin Bulwark (36). Tumbrels carrying earth from the chalk pits, 13; carrying earth out of the dyke to the “hollow weys besides the Waterhous” and stone from the East Juttye, 35.
Emptions:—Many items of smiths' work. Glaziers' work. Brick. Freight of many ship loads (specified) of stone, coal, &c. Watching, prest money to brickmakers out of Buckinghamshire and Berkshire, hurdles, stone, capron spars, single spars, single and double maunds, &c.
Total, 1,476l. 5s.d.
viii. The month 22 May to 18 June.
Long carts “carrying chalk from Saynte Mertyns Hill unto the works at Myllgate called the Black Hill,” 61 names; long carts and tumbrels carrying brick from the kilns of Edm. Carter, [Thos.] Lighton, Nele Robson, and [Wm.] Hunt to Myllgate, about 24 names in each case. Short carts carrying the freights of 38 ships out of the Haven, viz., hardstone, Newcastle coal, tarras and necessaries, “ragge” stones from St. Awstins (fn. 5) and Feversham, Cane stone, and logs, and also carrying bricks out of the Market Place, and maunds, &c., from the Storehouse, many names. Tumbrels carrying sand for making mortar and earth out of the dyke, 13; carrying rubbish out of the chalk pits, 10.
Emptions:—Many items of smiths' and glaziers' work. Line for the bricklayers, boars' grease for the timber waggons, maunds, elm board, shovels, spades, hurdles, brick, freight, &c., of some 30 ship loads of hardstone, coal, &c. (specified). Deals, wainscot, lime, lathes, “an hour glass for the bell ringer that ringeth to work and from work,” pitch, flax for calking water troughs, timber, &c.
Total, 634l. 8s.d.
ix. “A book of payments of emptions and carriages for the King's works at Dyvelin Bulwark,” 19 June to 16 July 33 Hen. VIII.
Similar list of long carts, tumbrels and short carts, about a quarter longer than that of the preceding month. Also similar items of emptions, including the cost of Thos. Yonge's going to Amsterdam to provide 800 of kirk spars and 51 masts.
Total, 954l. 14s.d.
x. Payments, &c., for Dyvelin Bulwark, 17 July to 13 Aug.
Similar list of long carts, &c., about the length of that in § viii. Also similar emptions, including beer given amongst the workmen and labourers to drink.
Total, 922l. 13s.d.
xi. Payments for Dyvelin Bulwark, 14 Aug. to 10 Sept.
Similar account to the preceding, but only about half as long.
Total, 343l. 17s. 6d.
xii. Payments for Dyvelin Bulwark, 11 Sept. to 29 Sept. 33 Hen. VIII.
Similar account, but much smaller.
Total, 95l. 7s.d.
A book in vellum cover of
525 pages (a few blank) numbered in a modern hand from 539 to 1066 as part of a series.
29 Sept. 1220. Works at Rysebank, Guisnes, and Hammes.
R. O. A book similar to the preceding (being a continuation of No. 99), made by Ryngeley, upon payments by Lee for works at Rysebank, Guisnes, and Hammes.
i. Particulars of seven months' pays, from 20 March 32 Hen. VIII. to 30 Sept. 33 Hen. VIII., for work at Rysebank about the building of a new tower to the sea ward by the King's device. Monthly pays amount to 200l. or 300l. except the 2nd (24 April to 21 May) which reaches 541l. 10s. 9 6/8;d. The account after 21 May is only for cartage and emptions and does not show wages.
ii. Particulars of three months' pays (small) for workmen, labourers, &c., employed mostly in making three new mills within the castle of Guisnes from 30 Sept. to about 20 Dec. 32 Hen. VIII. Also one month's pay of 425l. odd, from 27 Feb. to 26 March, for laying the foundation of the mill tower, taking down the vaumure of the keep, bringing chalk from Fynes Hill, and other work at Guisnes.
iii. Particulars of two very small pays for the months from 28 Sept. to 24 Nov. for repair of buildings at Hampnys.
A bound book in vellum cover of 211 pages (many of them blank) numbered in a modern hand 363 to 574 as part of a series.
29 Sept. 1221. Don Diego Hurtado de Mendoza to Charles V.
Add. 28,593,
f. 26.
B. M.
News from Constantinople, &c. Next spring, if the truce between Charles V. and Francis be broken, a Turkish and French fleet will attack Genoa. The French still endeavour to detach Venice from the Emperor. Quarrels between the Dauphin's mistress (fn. 6) and Madame de Estampes. Venice, 29 Sept. 1541.
Spanish. Modern copy from Simancas, pp. 4. See Spanish Calendar, VI. i., No. 193.
29 Sept. 1222. The Comendador Valençuela to Covos.
Add. 28, 593,
f. 28.
B. M.
* * Was lately appointed by the Emperor to be of the Junta about the General Council. The Pope will determine the place and time between this and St. Martin's day. He is now raising 2,000 foot for the Catholic league against the Turk, who will help the Emperor's force in Hungary. Francis I. has sent a gentlemen to remonstrate against the detention of Cesare Fragoso and Rincon, who, he says, were captured by the Emperor's ministers. After much altercation the Emperor has agreed to put the matter in the hands of his Holiness. The Emperor has ordered Granvelle to remain 40 or 50 days in these parts. The business here will take more, especially Siena. The Emperor thought of taking with him the marquis [of Aguilar] and the writer was to replace him, but he is to remain till the Emperor's return. Luca, 29 Sept. 1541.
We are going with the Emperor to La Specia. The Pope will leave on the 21st for Bologna, where he will remain 10 days and then go to Rome.
Spanish. Modern copy from Simancas, pp. 5. See Spanish Calendar, VI. i., No. 194.
30 Sept. 1223. The Privy Council.
Nicolas'
P.C.P., vii.
249.
Meeting at Leconfield 30 Sept. Present: Norfolk, Suffolk, Privy Seal, Gt. Chamb., Gt. Admiral, Durham, Treasurer, Comptroller, Mr. of Horse, Vice-Chamb., Wriothesley. Business:—Letter sent to Sir Thos. Wharton to answer certain complaints against him. Drs. Marshall, Dakins, and Braynsbye brought their answers to the articles, and were dismissed. Robt. Colewell, Scot, who “had been a certain time prisoner,” released with a passport to pass into France within one month.
30 Sept. 1224. Cromwell's Injunctions.
Bonner's
Register,
f. 30b.
Mandate of bishop Bonner to his archdeacons for the observance of Cromwell's Injunctions of 5 Sept. 1538. Dated 30 Sept. 1541, 33 Hen. VIII. [See Burnet, IV. 346.]
1225. The French Ambassador's ‘Man” to Chapuys.
Spanish
Calendar, VI.
i., No. 187.
In his last letter, of 17 Sept., (fn. 7) Francis wrote to his ambassador, from Lan en Bresse, of the shameful defeat of king Ferdinand near Buda, accusing the Emperor for not having gone to his brother's assistance, and believing that the Turks had now got possession of Vienna; also that the disaster would not have happened but for the capture of Rincon and Fragoso; and further, that he had word from Vincentio Maggio whom he had sent to the Levant to represent him at the court of the Grand Turk, that the said Turk on hearing of Rincon's arrest had arrested Laschi, ambassador of Ferdinand, shut him up in a tower at Belgrade and sold his horses. Lastly, that the duke of Savoy and his son bad parted in anger from the Emperor.
The latter was in the Tyrol ready to enter Italy at the head of 15,000 lanzknechts, exclusive of the Spanish infantry he had with him. These, however, being raw levies might well be countermanded, as a gentleman (fn. 8) from the Levant had written to the Sieur de Bois-Rigault, his ambassador in Switzerland. Cannot remember the gentleman's name, but it begins with N. Can recognise him, however, by the contents of the letter he himself wrote to Bois-Rigault which the writer has read through. Its substance was, that as the aforesaid 15,000 lanzknechts who are under the command of count Frederic and of his brother, (fn. 9) refuse to march where the Emperor desires them, it would be easy to make them desert. That is why the Frenchman [from the Levant] had written to Bois-Rigault that if Francis wished to secure the services of these 15,000 lanzknechts and 1,000 more who had been refused to pass the last muster, the thing was practicable. Thinks the letter was written at Zel.
Note [by Chapuys]:—Thinks the above letter a mere invention, as Francis usually minimises the Emperor's forces as much as possible, whereas here he does the contrary.
Original (in cipher) at Vienna.
1226. Grants in September 1541.
Sept./Grants. 1. John Stowe, an officer of the “Woodyarde.” To be bailiff of the lordship of Torsey, Linc., parcel of the lands late of ld. Darcye, attainted; vice Sir John Nevell, attainted. Culleweston, 2 Aug. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 2 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 6, m. 38.
2. Bishopric of Gloucester. Letters patent reconstituting the late monastery of St. Peter, Gloucester (surrendered by charter of Gabriel Moreton, the late prior), as a cathedral, and giving the name of city to the town of Gloucester. The said town with the neighbouring towns and hamlets of Dudston and Barton Regis to be a county by itself, as at present separated from the county of Gloucester, with the same liberties as Thos. Payne, the present mayor, and the burgesses enjoy therein; and the said city, county of the city, and county of Gloucester to be separated from the jurisdiction and dioceses of the bp. of Worcester, the [arch] bishop of York, and the bp. of Hereford. And whereas the town of Bristol, in the county of Gloucester, is situated partly in the diocese of Bath and Wells, and partly in that of Worcester, that part of the said town which helonged to the diocese of Worcester shall belong henceforth to the diocese of Gloucester.
John Wakeman, clk., to be the first bishop of Gloucester; and he and his successors to have the hall covered with lead, commonly called the leadhall, a pantry, a buttery, a kitchen, and various other tenements within the precincts of the said late monastery, to be the bishop's palace; and certain stables and shambles, &c., in the parish of St. Mary de Lode.
The first dignitaries are to be as follow: —Will. Jenyns, clk., S.T.B., dean; Nic. Wotton, archdeacon of Gloucester, who shall hold the second dignity in the cathedral; Ric. Browne, clk., LL.B., first prebendary; Hen. Wyllys, clk., S.T.B., second prebendary; John Radleigh, clk., S.T.B., third prebendary; James Vaughan, clk., A.M., fourth prebendary; Edw. Benet, clk., fifth prebendary; John Huntley, clk., late prior of Tandrich, Surrey, sixth prebendary. And the said dean and prebendaries shall be called the dean and chapter of the cathedral of Holy Trinity, Gloucester, and shall have the whole of the site, circuit, precinct, &c., of the said late monastery, except what is above granted to the said Bishop. Pontefract castle, 30 [August] 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 3 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 2, ms. 37–39.—Rym. xiv., 724.
3. John Wakeman, clk. Writ to the archbp. of Canterbury to consecrate him as bishop of the new see of Gloucester. Pontefract, 30 Aug. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 4 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 6, m. 38.— Rym. xiv., 731.
4. Bishopric of Gloucester. Grant to John Wakeman, bp. of Gloucester, and his successors, in frank-almoigne, of the manors of Maysmore, Brokethorpe and Harescombe, Preston, Longeford and Droiscort, in co. city of Gloucester; the manor of Rudge and Farleigh, Glouc.; and the manors of Hopemeleshull, Dewchurch, and Kylpeke, Heref., with appurtenances in Brokethorpe, Harescombe, Preston, and Brokeworth, in co. city of Gloucester, in the parishes of St. Mary de Lode and SS. Oswald and Mary de Lode, in the city of Gloucester, and in Standyshe, Glouc., and Dewchurche, Heref., and elsewhere. Also the site of a mansion called the Vyneyarde and a pasture, &c., adjoining called the Park, in tenure of John Arnolde, in the parish of St. Mary de Lode; a meadow, &c., in the same parish, parcel of the demesne lands of Barton Abbats; that part of the manor of Lassington, in the co. city of Gloucester, which belonged to the late monastery of St. Peter's, Gloucester; and one moiety of the woods called “Wolrigge” and the “Pershe,” in the parish of St. Mary de Lode. The rectories and advowsons of vicarages of Hartpury, Masmore, and Upton St. Leonard's in said co. city of Gloucester; Camme, Northlache, Kemysford, Welford, Southcerney, and Standishe, Glouc.; Dewchurch, Kylpeck, Glasebury, Devennok, Cowern, and Evvias Harrold, Heref., and Newport, in the commote of Wenlock, in Wales; and the chapels of Camme, Glouc., Pyperton, Heref., and Maysmore, co. city of Gloucester. Tithes, glebes, pensions, &c. in Standishe, Culdrup, Hardwik, Overoxlinch, Ranwik, Parva Harsfeld, Netheroxlinch, Sall, Putley, Farley, and Ampney St. Cross, Glouc.; and in Devennock, Wentworth, and Talgarth, Heref. Pensions (specified) from the rectories and churches of Kemisford, Teynton, Rencombe, and Nyndesfeld, Glouc., and Newport in the commote of Wenlock. The portions of tithes arising, growing, or renewing in Aldesworth, Lynton, and Shipton Solas, Glouc., in the several tenures of Geo. Daston and the farmer of the rectory of Aldesworth; and all the portions of tithes growing or renewing in Ashe, Leomynster, Fenne, Farne, Byrches, Strode and Lake, Heref. And the presentations of all chaplains, singers, or stipendiaries of the chapels of Maysmore, Camme, Stynchecombe, and Pyperton. Glouc., co. city of Gloucester, and Heref. All which premises belonged to the said late monastery.
To hold by a yearly rent of 33l. 16s. 4d. free of first fruits pro hac vice, and exempt from all other charges except the fees of certain officers and allowances to clerks, including 2s. 2d. a year paid to the archdeacon of Brecon, St. David's dioc., for procurations and synodals. Pontefract Castle, 30 Aug. 33 Hen. VIII. Westm., 4 Sept.—P.S. (injured). Pat. p. 2, ms. 35–37.
5. The dean and chapter of the newly erected cathedral of Gloucester. Grant of the manors of Tuffley, Ablode, and Saunthurst, Barnewood and Croneham, Mattysdon, and Wotton, in co. city of Gloucester; Churcheham, Rudforde, Culne Rogers cum Ablington, Colneaylwyn, Estlatche Martyn alias Burethropp cum Cotes, Tyberton, Tayneton, and Bulley, Glouc.; Ullyngyswyke and Monkehide alias Hida Monachorum, Heref.; Tregoff and Pennon, in co. Morgan and Glamorgan, Wales; and Lynkynholte, Lyttleton, and Wallopp, Hants. Also the tenement or hospice called the Whyte Harte in Holbourne, near London, Midd., with a yearly rent of 8s., which used to be paid out of it to the Carthusian monastery, near London; certain meadows in co. city of Gloucester; a moiety of woods called Wolrygge and le Perche in the parish of St. Mary, Loode, in said co. city of Gloucester; and divers woods in the same county, and in the parish of Churcheham, Glouc., and in Lynkynholte and Lyttleton, Hants; and a yearly rent or fee-farm of 4l. issuing from the manor of Wallopp, Hants. All water courses and all buildings and other possessions within the city and suburbs of Gloucester which belonged to the late monastery of St. Peter there. The rectory, church and chapel of Barnewood, the rectory and church of Bukethropp (or Brokethorpp), the rectory and parish church of St. Mary near the gate of the said late monastery, and the rectory and church or chapel of Gracelane there, all in co. city of Gloucester, and the rectories and churches of Churcheham and Colneaylwyn, Glouc.; Lancarvan, co. Morgan and Glamorgan, and Chippingnorton, Oxon. All which premises belonged to the monastery of St. Peter's, Gloucester.
The rectories and churches of Fayreforde and Eastlatche, Glouc.; Sherston and Aldryngton, Wilts; Marlowe Magna, Bucks; and Lantwytt, Lamblethyan, Lantryssam, Penmarke, and Cardiff, with the chapel of St. Donat, and others to the said rectories annexed, co. Morgan and Glamorgan, which belonged to the late monastery of Tewkisbury, Glouc.
Portions of tithes in Barton Abbatis, in the parish of St. Mary de Loode, and in the manor of Senebrig, in co. city of Gloucester; portions of tithes of Upledon and Hyneleden. Ablode and Santhurst, Wotton, Ewrendgesfeld, and Kingsfurlong, in same co.; and of the rectories of Hilmerton, Wilts; and Okeborne, Bucks (sic); which belonged to the said late monastery of Gloucester.
And the portion of tithes in the rectory of Faireford, Glouc., which belonged to Tewkisburye.
A yearly rent of 20s. issuing from the rectory of St.John the Baptist in Gloucester; a pension or yearly rent of 10s. issuing from the rectory or church of Mattysdon, in co. city of Gloucester; a pension of 13s. 4d. issuing from the rectory or church of St. Nicholas, Gloucester; a pension of 10s., payable by the wardens of the royal college of Brasenose, Oxford; a pension of 53s. 4d. from the rectory or church of Alcannynge, Wilts; a pension of 20s. from the rectory or church of Lydyard Tregoz, Wilts; a pension of 4l. from the rectory or church of St. Peter de Mancroft, in the city of Norwich; and a pension of 40s. from the rectory of St. Martin in the Vintry, in London. All which belonged to the said late monastery of Gloucester.
The advowsons of the rectories and churches of Mattyttysdon, in co. city of Gloucester; Rudforde, Culne Rogers cum Ablyngton and Tayneton, Glouc.; and Lynkynholte, Hants; and of the vicarages of Brokethropp, in co. city of Gloucester, and Holy Trinity in Gloucester; Churcheham with the chapel of Hyneham, and Colnealwyn; all which belonged to St. Peter's. And of the vicarages of Fayreforde, Glouc.; Sherston and Aldryngton, Wilts; Marlowe Magna, Bucks; Lantwitt, Lamblethyan, Lantrissam, Penmarke, and Cardiff, with the chapel of St. Donat, co. Morgan and Glamorgan, which belonged to Tewkesbury.
To hold by a yearly rent of 90l. 14s.d. free of first fruits and tenths.
Also pardon and release to Will. Jenyns, S.T.B., the dean; Ric. Browne, LL.B., first prebendary, Hen. Wyllys, S.T.B., second; John Rodley, S.T.B., third; James Vaughan, A.M., fourth; Edw. Bennett, clk., fifth; and John Huntley, clk., late prior of Tandriche, Surrey, sixth prebendary; of first fruits and tenths due on the several portions.
This grant is subject to certain reprises for pensions, portions, fees of officers, &c. Pontefract Castle, 30 August 33 Hen. VIII. Del. [Westm., 4 Sept.]—P.S. (much mutilated). Pat. p. 7. m. 7–11.
6. Peterborough Cathedral. Letters patent reconstituting the monastery of Peterborough as a cathedral, with one bishop, one dean, and six prebendaries, and a diocese consisting of the town of Peterborough (henceforth to be called a city), and the whole co. of Northampton separated from the dioc. of the bp. of Lincoln. John Chamber, clk., S.T.B., the late abbot, to be the first bishop; and the said bishop and his successors to have the site and ambit of the house called the “Abotts Lodgyng” alias the “Abbotts side” in Peterborough in which the said late abbot dwelt, with other houses there, &c., for the episcopal palace.
The new establishment to be as follows: Francis Abree, S.T.B., to be dean; Matthew Whyttalls, S.T.P., first prebendary; Will. Judde, S.T.B., second prebendary; Robt. Peerson, S.T.B., third prebendary; John Barlowe, A.M., fourth prebendary; John Cheney, clk., fifth prebendary; and Ric. Whitte, clk., sixth prebendary. The said dean and chapter to have all the site, &c., of the said late monastery, except the parts above assigned for the bishop's palace. Pontefract Castle, 25 Aug. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 4 Sept.—P.S. (slightly mutilated). Pat. p. 3, m. 11. Rym. xiv., 731.
7. For the new see of Peterborough. Significavit of the nomination of John Chamber, S.T.B., as bishop. Addressed to Thos. archbp. of Canterbury. Pontefract Castle, 27 Aug. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 4 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 3, m. 12. Rymer, xiv., 736.
8. Bishopric of Peterborough. Grant to John bp. of Peterborough, and his successors, in frank-almoigne, of the manors or lordships of Burghbury alias Boroughbery, Eye, Syngleholt, Northam, Wytheryngton alias Wirryngton, Walton, Paston, Gunthorp, and Southorp, Northt., and the manor of Thurleby, Linc., with appurtenances in Peterborough, Eye, Singlebolt, Northam, Withrington, Walton, Paston, Gunthorp, Sowthorp, Dodesthorp, Estefeld, and Newerk, Northt., and in Thurlby, Stowe, and Walcot, Linc., the hundred “de Nasso Burgi” alias “the Nesse of Borough,” Northt. Divers parcels of demesne lands of the late monastery of Peterborough; lands called “Officers londs” alias the “Covente lands” of the said monastery and the farm of the “Spittle” within the lordship of Burghbury, and in Dastropp, Estfelde, and Newarke, members and hamlets of Burghbury, and in Peterborough; tithes within the town and fields of Eye in the said parish of Peterborough; a tithe-barn in Eye, and all portions of tithes of corn and hay in the parish of Paston, a tithe-barn in Gunthorpp and portions of tithes and pensions in the parishes of Hepston, Eton, Wittering, and Paston, Northt.; all messuages, &c., in the parishes of St. Gregory the Bishop near the cathedral of St. Paul, London, and of St. Bride, in the suburbs of London, which belonged to the same late monastery. And all other lands in Burghbury, Eye, Singleholt, Northam, Withington, Paston, Walton, Gunthorpe, Barnacke, Helpston, Badington, Sowthorp, Walcote, Ufford, Mylton, Eton, and Wittering, Northt., and in Thurleby, Stowe, and Walton, Linc., which belonged to Peterborough monastery.
Also the advowsons of the rectories of Caster, Barnacke, Paston, and Polebroke, Northt., Scotter, Linc., and Southcolingham, Notts, of the vicarage of the parish church of Peterborough, of the deanery of the college of Irtlingborough, and of the chanters or chaplains therein, and of the free chapel of St. John the Baptist upon the Hill of the town of Stamforde, Linc., and Northt.
To hold by a yearly rent of 33l. 10s. 8d. free of first fruits pro hac vice, and free of all pensions, rents, annuities, &c., except fees of officers, “regards” due to tenants and the following pensions, viz.—4l. a year to the chaplain of Eye; 6s. 8d. a year to Francis Quarrells by virtue of a patent lately granted to him; 6s. 8d. a year for the hunting of the fields and for strays in the hundred of the Nesse of Borough; and 10s. a year to the farmer of Thurlebye for fuel. Pontefract Castle, 25 Aug. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 4 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 3, m. 13.
9. Will. Gunson. Licence to export 200 dickers of tanned leather. Pontefract Castle, 28 Aug. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 4 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 6, m. 38.
10. The dean and chapter of the cathedral church of Peterborough. Grant, in frank-almoigne, of the lordship of Peterborough, Northt.; the lands called “Officers lands” alias the “Covent lands” within the said town; the manors of Longthorp, Caster, Sutton, Glynton, Peykyrke, Maxey, Northborough alias Norborough, Stamforde, Irtlingburghe, Stanwigg, and Pokebroke, Northt.; Eston, Leic.; Fyskerton, Repham, Scothorne, Sudbroke, Scotter, Walcote, and Grantham, Linc.; Northcolingham and Southcolingham, Notts; and Overton, Bottylbrige, and Alwalton, Hunts; with appurtenances in Peterborough, Castor, Peykyrke, Maxey, Northburghe, Stamforde (in the parish of St. Martin), Irtlingborough, Stanwig, Pokebrooke, Northt.; Eston, Leic.; Fyscarton, Repham, Scothorne, Sudbrocke, Scotter, and in Stamforde beyond the Bridge, Boston, Walcote, Aldebrough, and Grantham, Linc.; Northcolingham and Southcolingham, Notts; Overton, Bottylbrygge, and Alwalton, Hunts; and elsewhere in England. The whole hundred called Scotter hundred; divers pastures and woods in the parish of Peterborough, parcel of the demesne lands of the late monastery. The rectories and churches of Maxey, Northt.; Eston, Leic.; and Northcolington, Notts. Portions of tithes and pensions in the parishes of Caster, Peykyrke, Maxey, Norborgh, Thornehawe, Ufforde, Barnack, Irtlingburghe, Stanwigge, Pokebroke, Woodforde, and Stokedale, Northt.; Fyskerton, Scotter, and Caarby, Linc.; and Southcolingham, Notts. The advowsons of the rectories of Peykyrke, Norburgh, Stanwigge, and All Saints in Irtlingburgh, Northt.; Alwalton, Hunts; and Fiskerton, Linc.; and of the vicarages of Maxey, Northt.; Northcolingham, Notts; and Bringhurst, Leic. All which premises belonged to Peterborough mon. And all lands, &c., in Longthorp, Caster, Ailesworthe, Upton, Sutton, Glynton, Peykyrke, Belseyes, Martham, Maxey, Norborowe, Stamforde, Thornehawe, Offord, Barnacke, Weland, Irtlingburgh, Stanwigg, Pokbroke, Woodforde, and Stokedoile, Northt.; Eston, Leie.; Fyskerton, Repham, Scothorne, Sudbroke, Scotter, Walcote, Aldebrough alias Alkburgh alias Aldeborowe, Grantham, Stamforde beyond the Bridge, Boston, Caarby, Linc.; Northcolingham and Southcolingham, Notts; Overton, Bottilbrige, Alwalton, Wyttelesmere alias Wyttelsey and Yaxley, Hunts; and the parish of Welle, Norf. and Suff.; which belonged to the said late monastery.
To hold by a yearly rent of 102l. 16s.d. in full satisfaction of first fruits and tenths.
Also special release of first-fruits of their several portions to the present dean and prebendaries, viz. — To Francis Abree, S.T.B., now dean; Matthew Whitalles, first prebendary; Will. Judde, S.T.B., second prebendary; Rob. Peerson, S.T.B.; third prebendary; John Barlowe, A.M., fourth prebendary; John Cheyney, clk., fifth prebendary; and Ric. White, clk., sixth prebendary.
The grantees to be liable for the following charges (besides the said rent), viz., all fees hitherto granted to officers on the premises; 30s. 8d. a year due to the archdeacon of Northampton for synodals and procurations issuing from the spiritualities in Peterborough; 19l. a year due to the vicar of Peterborough as his stipend for the support of himself and a chaplain to be assigned to him; 22d. a year in reward to the tenants of the manor of Glynton for carrying wood there; 8d. a year in reward to the tenants of the manor of Irtlingburgh; 8d. a year in reward to the tenants of the manor of Stanwigge; 26s. 8d. a year due to the chaplain of Armeston by ancient custom; 10s. 7d. a year due to the bp. of Lincoln for procurations and synodals issuing from the rectory of Eston; 6s. 8d. a year issuing from the said rectory and due to the said bishop; 6s. 8d. a year due to the archdeacon of Leicester for indemnities, issuing from the same rectory; 6s. 8d. a year to be given to the keeper of the woods of Fyskerton; 8l. a year due to the vicar of Northcolingham as his stipend; 20s. a year to the dean and chapter of York; and 10s. 7d. a year to the archdeacon of Nottingham for procurations and synodals. Pontefract Castle, 26 Aug. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 5 Sept.—P.S. (mutilated.) Pat. p. 3, ms. 14–17.
11. Ely cathedral. Letters patent reconstituting the late priory of St. Peter and St. Etheldreda, Ely (surrendered by charter of Robert, the late prior, and the convent there) as the cathedral church of the Holy Trinity, Ely, and the episcopal see of Thos. Godryke, bp. of Ely. The cathedral establishment to consist of one dean priest and 8 priest prebendaries. The first dignitaries to be the following:— Rob. Steward, dean; Ric. Coxe, S.T.P., first prebendary; Matthew Parker, S.T.P., second prebendary; Will. Maye, LL.D., third prebendary; Will. Lyson, LL.D., fourth prebendary; Giles Ayer, S.T.B., fifth prebendary; John Customs, sixth prebendary; Rob. Hamond, seventh prebendary; and John Warde, eighth prebendary. The dean and chapter to have all the site, circuit, &c., of the said late monastery or priory, except the bishop's palace, and the entire government of the church, except the appointment of the prebendaries and of 6 paupers there living on the King's bounty. Pontefract Castle, 30 Aug. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 10 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 2, m. 31.
12. The cathedral church of Holy Trinity, Ely. Grant, in frank-almoigne, to the dean and chapter of the said church, of the manors of Brame, Wycheford, Wentworth, Wycham, Mexall, Sutton, Minrowe, and Leurington, alias Leverington, in the isle of Ely, Camb.; Fodeston, Norf.; Swaffham, Northo in Shodicampys, Wratting, Stapleford, Newton cum Hawkston, Melborne, Meldreth, Caxstones, and Cottingham, Camb.; Burdeux, Essex; Stokking and Bluntesham, Hunts; Lakinghithe, Wynston, Barougham, Stoke, Kingeston, and Meltoune, Suff.; with all appurtenances in Ely, Wycheford, Wentworthe, Wicheham, Mepall, Sutton, Wisbiche and Leverington in the said isle of Ely; and in Fodeston, Norf.; Swafham, Northo, Shodicampes, Wratting, Stapleford, Newton cum Hawkstone, Melborne, Meldrethe, Caxstounes, and Cottingham, Camb.; Lyttlebury, Essex; Bluntesham, Hunts; and in Lakinghith, Wynston, Barrougham, Stoke, Kyngeston, and Melton, Suff.
All messuages in the town of Ely which belonged to the late monastery; and certain granges or dairies and lands (specified, and divers tenants named) in Ely, Lyttleporte, Thetford in the parish of Stretham, Marche, Wemylington, Doddinton, Wycheford, and Wentworth, Camb.
Also the house, &c., of the late cell of Molycowrte and Boxtedes, and its lands in Outwell, Camb. and Norf.; a yearly rent of 46 quarters of salt collected and delivered by the tenants of the town of Terington, Norf.; lands (tenants named) in Wiggenhall, Lynne, and Downeham, Norf.; Thriplowe, Camb.; and in Kentford and Nedeham, Suff.; the yearly rent of 5s. issuing from the manor of Coveney, belonging to lord Scroupe, in the isle of Ely; and all those herrings and the yearly rent of 40l. 16d. out of the farm of those herrings granted to the said monastery by the King's progenitors, and payable by the burgesses of Dunwiche, Suff.; the five hundreds and half hundred of Plomesgate, Carleford, Wilford, Trylling, Colneys, and Lose, Suff., in tenure of Rob. Holdiche; the close in Holborne in the suburbs of London near the manor of the lord bp. of Ely, in tenure of John Goderick and Will. Bryan; the hospice or diversorium called the Bell within Newgate, London, in the parish of St. Awdoen, late in tenure of Thos. Martyn; the tenement in the corner opposite “Graciousestrete,” in the parish of All Hallows, London, in tenure of Thos. Wright; the two tenements at Brokenwarf in the parish of St. Mary Somerset, London; the tenement in the parish of St. Michael in Woodestrete, London; and the yearly rent of 46s. 8d. from two tenements at Brokenwharf. And all lands in Ely, Downeham, Wisbiche, and Elme, Camb.; Emmeth, Norf.; Upwell, Camb. and Norf.; and Pulham, Norf.; which belonged to the late monastery of Ely.
Also the rectory of the Holy Trinity and St. Mary the Virgin, Ely; the chapels of Chetsham and Stumpney in the town of Ely; the rectories and churches of Wicheforde, Wicheham. Sutton, and Wisbiche in the said isle of Ely; Swafham, Wratting, Stapleford, Hawkston, Melborne, Meldreth, Foxston, and Impyngton, Camb.; and Lakynhithe and Wynston, Suff.; the oblations or spiritual profits called “Ely farthings” yearly collected from the churches and towns in the said isle of Ely and co. Camb.; the portions of tithes in Stumpney in the said isle and co., and in Hadham Parva and Lytlebury, Essex; which belonged to the said late monastery.
A pension or yearly rent of 10l. 13s. 4d. commonly called “Candilcorne sylver” paid by the bp. of Ely; and other stated pensions or yearly rents severally issuing from the rectories or churches of Whaddon, Staunton Longa, Wikham, Grancestre, Caxtons, and Bassyngborne, Camb.; and of Downeham, Wisbiche, Barugham, and Melton aforesaid.
And the advowsons of the churches of Stoke near Ipswich, Melton, Barugham, Lakingheth, and Wynston, Suff.; Wentworth, Mepall, Wycham, Sutton, and Wichforde in the isle of Ely; Melborne, Meldreth, Hawkston, Newton, Stapleford, Wratting, and Swafham, Camb.; the advowson of the vicarage or parish church of St. Andrew in the town of Cambridge.
All which premises belonged to the late monastery of St. Peter and St. Ethelreda, Ely.
To hold by a yearly rent of 135l. 7s.d. free of tenths and first fruits.
Also pardon and release to Rob. Steward, now dean of the said cathedral, Ric. Coxe S.T.P., Matthew Parker S.T.P., Will. May LL.D., Geo. Ayer S.T.B., Will. Lyson LL.D., John Custons, clk., Rob. Hamond, clk., and John Warde, for the first fruits and tenths of the deanery and prebends in the said churches, &c.
A number of rentcharges reserved, to which the grantees are liable. Westm., 10 Sept. Pat. 33 Hen. VIII., p. 2, ms. 40–43.
13. Rob. Wyntersell alias Wyntereshull. Licence to alienate the manor of Catteshull alias Catteshill, Surrey, to John Gontour and Will. Legge. Westm., 10 Sept. Pat. 33 Hen. VIII., p. 5, m. 7.
14. Morgan Phillipp alias Wolff, the King's goldsmith and one of the stewards of his Chamber, and Elizabeth his wife. Grant (A) of the reversions of the lands given in the following grants by the Crown:—(1.) 24 Jan. 30 Hen. VIII., to the said Morgan and Elizabeth in survivorship of the reversion of two tenements (boundaries given) now made into one in Chepisside in the parish of St. Vedast, London, which were, 4 Dec. 9 Hen. VIII., leased by Will. Tynbigh, formerly prior of the Carthusian house or priory near London, to Roger Mulward, of London, goldsmith, for 40 years, at 4l. rent; and were then in tenure of Thos. Calton, of London, goldsmith. (2.) 4 Nov. 32 Hen. VIII., to the said Morgan, of a tenement in tenure of Roger Banks, in Watlingstrete in the parish of All Hallows, Bradstrete, London, which belonged to the late Carthusian monastery near London; a tenement, &c., in tenure of John Haywoode, and formerly leased to Thos. Yong, in the parish of St. Peter in Woodstrete; and a tenement in tenure of Will. Page, in the parish of St. Mary Le Bow in Chepe, London, which, belonged to the late priory or new hospital of St. Mary without Bysshoppisgate.
(B) Also grant to the said Morgan and Elizabeth of the quit or free rent of 6s. belonging to the late monastery of Stratforde Langthorne, Essex, and issuing from those demesne lands divided into three parcels, and a tenement in the parish of — (blank), Essex, late in the tenure of Thos. Jacquett and now in that of the said Morgan; the tenement called Upphall, leased to Miles Bowdishe, in the parish of Barking, Essex, which belonged to Barking mon.; and certain lands in the parish of Layton, Essex, which belonged to the late priory of Halywell, Midd.
(C) A meadow and certain closes of pasture, named, in the parish of St. Mary, Aburgeveney, Monmouth, which belonged to the late priory of Aburgeveney; and the two messuages in the parish of St. Matthew in Westchepe, London, in the several tenures of John Messam and Ric. Staverton, which belonged to the late priory of St. Helen in London.
To hold the premises as follows:—(A) to the said Morgan and Elizabeth and the heirs male of the body of the said Morgan; (B) to the said Morgan and Elizabeth and the heirs and assigns of the said Morgan for ever; and (C) to the said Morgan his heirs and assigns for ever. Westm., 12 Sept. Pat. 33 Hen. VIII., p. 2, ms. 12–14.
15. Geo. Owen, M.D., and John Harrys, John Smith, and Ric. Prune, merchants, of Bristol. Next presentation to the parish church of St. Mary, Spetisbury, Dorset. This next presentation was granted by John, late prior of Wytham, to Thos. Sylke, Alice his wife, John Sylke, and Philip Gruffyth, merchants and burgesses of Bristol, and Sir John Hussey, and came to the King's hands by the attainder of the said Sir John Hussey and the dissolution of the late priory of Wytham. Ampthill, 9 July 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 13 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 6, m. 37.
16. Will. Walker, one of the King's chaplains. To have the pension of Bath and Wells, in the King's gift by reason of the preferment of Dr. Knight to the see of Bath and Wells, until he is promoted to a “liefull” benefice. Enfield, 3 July 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 13 Sept.—P.S.
17. Thos. Barnaby. Licence to export 200 woollen cloths. Lekenfeld, 7 Sept. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 14 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 6, m. 38.
18. Ralph Fane and Elizabeth his wife. Licence to alienate the manor of Butlers and certain lands, &c., in Magna Wakeryng, Magna Shobery, Hadleygh, Raurith, Estwood, Legh, Sutton Magna, Rocheford, Prytwell, and Hawkewell, Essex; to Ant. Tuttesham, to be regranted by him to the said Ralph and Elizabeth and the heirs of the said Elizabeth for ever. Westm., 15 Sept. Pat. 33 Hen. VIII., p. 5, m. 10.
19. Will. Hall, clk. Presentation to the perpetual vicarage of the parish church of Gedney, Linc. dioc., void by death. Pontefract Castle, 2 Sept. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 15 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 4, m. 10.
20. Herefordshire.—Sir James Baskervile and Thos. Baskervile, jun. Commission to make inquisition on the lands and heir of John Harley, deceased. Westm., 16 Sept. Pat. 33 Hen. VIII., p. 4, m. 1d.
21. Sir Edm. Knyvett and Anne his wife. Licence to alienate a moiety of the manor of Stowebeden, Norf.; to Sir John Spelman, justice of the King's Bench. Westm., 18 Sept. Pat. 33 Hen. VIII., p. 5, m. 8.
22. John Poyntz. Licence to alienate the manor of Sturdon, Glouc., to John Smyth, of Bristol, merchant. Westm., 19 Sept. Pat. 33 Hen. VIII., p. 4, m. 44.
23. Ric. Staverton, a gentleman sewer of the Chamber. To have the stewardship of Great Marlowe, Bucks, with fees of 4l. a year, in as full manner as Sir Ric. Weston enjoyed the same. — (place of issue omitted), 18 Sept. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 20 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 9, m. 37.
24. John Brykket, “master cooke for our mowth.” To be steward of Caversham, Oxon, in as full manner as Sir Ric. Weston lately held the same. — (place of issue omitted), 17 Sept. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 21 Sept. Pat. p. 9, m. 37. Vacated on surrender 4 July 36 Hen. VIII., in order that the office might be granted to Ric. Blounte.
25. Will. ld. Parre. To be steward of the honor of Raylegh, Essex, and bailiff of the said honor and of the hundred of Rocheforde alias Racheforde, Essex, in the King's hands by the attainder of Thos. Crumwell, late earl of Essex; with fees of 10l. a year as bailiff of the said hundred, out of the issues of the said honor and of the manor of Raylegh and the lordships and manors of Estwodbury, Thundersley, and Lovedon, Essex. Also lease to the said William of the honor and manor of Raylegh and the lordships and manors of Estwoodbury, Thundersley, and Lovedon, parcel of the said honor; for 40 years from Mich. 32 Hen. VIII., at 99l. 6s. 8d. rent, and 13s. 4d. increase. Also lease to the said William of the parks of Railegh and Thundersley, Essex, with the herbage and pannage; for 40 years from Mich. 32 Hen. VIII.; at 26l. 13s. 4d. rent. Pontefract Castle, 1 Sept. 33 Hen. VIII. Del Terlyng, 25 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 6, m. 39.
26. Will. ld. Parr. Release of 20l. 13s. 4d. a year out of the rent, of 100l. a year reserved upon the lease of Raylegh, Estwoodbury, Thundersley, and Lovedon, granted by the preceding. Pontefract Castle, 2 Sept. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Terlyng, 25 Sept.—P.S. Pat. 33 Hen. VIII., p. 6, m. 43.
27. Edw. Dudley. Grant of the manor of Kayncham in Holderness, Yorks., late of Edw. duke of Buckingham, attainted, and which Ric. Grey, deceased, held for life. Hull, 11 Sept. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Terlyng, 26 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 6, m. 40.
28. Will. earl of Southampton, keeper of the Privy Seal. To be chief steward of the honor of Petworthe, Sussex; keeper of the “Wodeaxe” in the said honor; feodary of the same honor; master forester, parker, and master of the hunt of deer in all forests, chaces, parks, and warrens parcel of the said honor; and keeper of all the said forests, chaces, &c., and the lodges in the same. Pontefract Castle, 2 Sept. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. [Westm., 27 Sept.]— P.S. Pat. 33 Hen. VIII., p. 8, m. 15.
29. Ric. Breme. Grant of the rectory and advowson of Edelesborough, Bucks, which belonged to the late Carthusian priory or house near London; and the rectory lands in tenure of Thos. Dene. Pontefract Castle, 31 Aug. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 29 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 2, m. 20.
30. John Wellesbourne, a gentleman of the Privy Chamber. Grant, in fee, of the manors of Myxbury and Fulwell, Oxon, which belonged to the late monastery of Oseney, Oxon, and the warren of coneys in Myxbury, and a water-mill in Fulwell; the manor of Barton and Herteshorne alias Beggars Barton, and the messuage and farm of Barton Harteshorne alias Beggars Barton, Bucks; the one messuage and one virgate of land now in the tenure of the said John Wellesbourne, in Westbury, Bucks; and all lands in Newton Pursell, and the portion of tithes in Westbury which belonged to the said late monastery.
Also, the rectory and advowson of the vicarage of Westbury, Bucks, which belonged to the late monastery of Elnestowe, Beds; and all lands in Lekehampsted and Morton, Bucks, and in Takeley, Oxon, late in tenure of the said John Wellisbourne, which belonged to Elnestowe.
The lands in Ludwell, in the parish of Glyton, Oxon, which belonged to the late monastery of Kenelworth, Warw. Rent 4l. 9s. Grafton, 16 July 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 29 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 3, m. 10.
31. Ric. Leseley, S.T.B. Presentation to the perpetual vicarage of Cumner, Salisbury dioc., void by death. Wreseley Castle, 6 Sept. 33 Hen. VIII. Del. Westm., 30 Sept.—P.S. Pat. p. 2, m. 24.

Footnotes

1 See No. 1404.
2 Word omitted.
3 The Northern Rebellion of 1536.
4 See also No. 389.
5 St. Augustine's, Canterbury.
6 Diana of Poitiers.
7 See No. 1186. This abstract, however, contains some details which do not appear to be in that letter. But Chapuys's suspicion (see his note at the end) is not justified, as the same number of lanzknechts is given in both documents.
8 Chevalier Tiveaugan (?). See No. 1186.
9 Frederic Count Palatine and the Elector Palatine.