Journal, April 1759
Volume 66

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

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Author

K. H. Ledward (editor)

Year published

1935

Pages

25-31

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'Journal, April 1759: Volume 66', Journals of the Board of Trade and Plantations, Volume 11: January 1759 - December 1763 (1935), pp. 25-31. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=77390 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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Journal, April 1759

fo. 102.

Tuesday, April 3. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Oswald, Mr. Jenyns, Mr. Hamilton, Mr. Sloper.

North Carolina.

The draught of a Representation to His Majesty upon the Memorial of the merchants of London and others interested in and trading to the province of North Carolina, complaining of two Acts passed there in 1748 and 1754 for emitting paper bills of credit, having been prepared pursuant to order, was agreed to and ordered to be transcribed.

fo. 103.

Read a Report of the Chief Justice and Attorney General of North Carolina (without date) upon two Acts passed in North Carolina in 1755, the one for appointing sheriffs, and directing their duty in office, etc., the other for regulating orphans, their guardians and estates.

Their lordships took the said Report and Acts into consideration, together with several other Acts passed in the said Province for establishing and regulating Courts and administration of justice, mentioned in the minutes of the 24th of January last; and after some time spent therein, ordered the draught of a Representation to His Majesty to be prepared, proposing that the following Acts may be repealed, viz.
An Act for establishing the Supreme Courts of Justice, Oyer and Terminer, and General Gaol Delivery of North Carolina. Passed in 1754.
fo. 104.
An Act for establishing County Courts, for enlarging their Jurisdiction, and settling the Proceedings therein. Passed in 1755.
An Act to provide indifferent Jurymen in all Causes Criminal and civil, and for an Allowance for the Attendance of Jurors attending at the supreme Courts. Passed in 1755.
An Act to amend an Act for establishing the Supreme Courts of Justice, Oyer and Terminer, and General Gaol Delivery of North Carolina. Passed in 1756.
An Act for regulating Orphans, their Guardians and Estates. Passed in 1755.

fo. 105.

Read a letter from Arthur Dobbs, Esqr., Governor of North Carolina, to the Board, dated December 20th, 1758, inclosing
Governor Dobbs's Speech to the Council and Assembly.
Council's Address to Governor Dobbs.
Assembly's Address to Do.
Titles of twenty Acts passed in North Carolina, December, 1758.

Massachusetts.

Read a letter from Thomas Pownall, Esqr., Governor of the Massachusets Bay, to the Board, dated February 24th, 1759, containing an account of the measures taken to secure the Penobscot Indians in the English interest, and inclosing
Letter from the Penobscot Indians to Governor Pownall.
Governor Pownall's answer to the said letter.

Virginia.

fo. 106.

Their lordships took into consideration a private Act passed in the Colony of Virginia in 1754, intituled,
An Act to dock the Entail of certain Lands whereof Nathaniel West Dandridge, Gentleman, is seized, and for settling other Lands and Slaves of greater Value to the same Uses;
together with Sir Matthew Lamb's Report thereupon; and no objection appearing against the said Act, the draught of a Representation to His Majesty, proposing that it may be confirmed, was ordered to be prepared.

fo. 107.

Friday, April 6. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Oswald, Mr. Jenyns, Mr. Sloper.

Miscellanies.

The Secretary laid before the Board an Account of the petty expences and incidental charges of this Office from the 5th of January to the 5th of April, 1759, amounting to three hundred, twenty seven pounds, seven shillings and one penny; and a letter to the Lords of the Treasury, desiring payment thereof, and of the salaries due to the Secretary and other officers in the service of this Board, was signed.

fo. 108.

Tuesday, April 10. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Jenyns, Mr. Rigby.

North Carolina.

The draught of a Representation to His Majesty upon the Memorial of the Merchants of London and others interested in and trading to the Province of North Carolina, complaining of two Acts passed therein 1748 and 1754 for emitting paper bills of credit, having been transcribed pursuant to order, was signed.

Virginia.

The draught of a Representation to His Majesty, proposing the confirmation of a private Act passed in Virginia in 1754, having been prepared pursuant to order, was agreed to, transcribed and signed.

North Carolina.

fo. 109.

The draught of a Representation to His Majesty, proposing the repeal of several Acts passed in North Carolina in 1754, 1755 and 1756, having been prepared, pursuant to order, was agreed to, and ordered to be transcribed.

Thursday, April 12. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Stone, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Rigby.

North Carolina.

The draught of a Representation to His Majesty, proposing the repeal of several Acts passed in North Carolina in 1754, 1755 and 1756, having been transcribed pursuant to order, was signed.

fo. 110.

Tuesday, April 24. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Oswald, Mr. Jenyns, Mr. Hamilton, Mr. Sloper.

Trade.

Africa.

Read a letter from Mr. Wood, Mr. Pitt's secretary, to Mr. Pownall, dated the 10th instant, inclosing the following Paper, and desiring he would acquaint this Board, that Mr. Pitt, being entirely deprived of the use of his hands by a violent fit of the gout, was obliged to use this method of conveying his thoughts to their lordships, viz.
fo. 111.
Draught of a letter intended to have been wrote from Mr. Secretary Pitt to this Board, dated the 10th April, 1759, signifying His Majesty's Commands, that their lordships do consider and report their opinion, what advantages in trade may be derived from the acquisition of the River Senegal in Africa; and how those advantages may be most properly obtained, extended and improved.

Their lordships, after some time spent in the consideration of the said letter and the Acts of Parliament of the 23rd and 25th of His present Majesty for extending and improving the trade to Africa, ordered the Secretary to write to Mr. Thomas Cumming, referred to in the said letter, to desire his attendance at their Board to-morrow morning at 12 o'clock.

fo. 112.

Wednesday, April 25. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Oswald, Mr. Pelham, Mr. Jenyns, Mr. Hamilton, Mr. Sloper.

Trade.

Africa.

fo. 113.

fo. 114.

Their lordships took into further consideration the papers mentioned in the Minutes of yesterday; and Mr. Thomas Cumming, attending without pursuant to notice given him for that purpose, was called in; and having been made acquainted with the occasion of his being ordered to attend, he was desired to lay before the Board, whatever he might have to offer respecting the state and situation of the River Senegal, and the establishing a trade there. Whereupon he desired to know, whether he should do it verbally or in writing; and their lordships being of opinion, that the latter would be more proper and eligible, he promised to draw up a state of what he had to offer upon this subject, and to attend the Board with it to-morrow morning, proposing at the same time, if their lordships approved it, to bring with him a person, who resided at Fort Louis for some time, and could give the Board information upon this business; which their lordships approved of, and also directed the Secretary to write to Major Mason, lately in command at Fort Louis, to desire his attendance at the same time. Mr. Cumming was then asked, if he knew of any French papers or documents, respecting the state of the trade in those parts, having fallen into the hands of the English upon the taking of the place, and afterwards transmitted home, he said, he did not; and that all books and papers were restored to the French by an Article of the Capitulation.

Mr. Cumming being withdrawn, their lordships agreed to take this affair into further consideration to-morrow morning.

Plantations General.

Read a Memorial of Daniel Blake, stiling himself late Deputy Surveyor of His Majesty's Woods in North America under Governor Wentworth, complaining of several hardships and personal injuries sustained by him in the execution of that office.

fo. 115.

It appearing to their lordships, upon consideration of the said Memorial, that the injuries and hardships complained of were of a private nature, and that it was not within their power and department to give any relief in, or take cognizance of this affair, as the matters complained of had reference to an officer acting under the direction of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, the petition was laid aside; and the Secretary was ordered to acquaint the petitioner with their lordships' sentiments upon it.

North Carolina.

Read a letter from Arthur Dobbs, Esqr., Governor of North Carolina, dated Brunswick, 22nd January, 1759, containing a variety of matters respecting the proceedings of the Council and Assembly, and the state of the Province in general; and inclosing
fo. 116.
Reports of the Committee of both Houses of Assembly, met at Edenton to examine, state and settle the publick accounts of this Province, the 25th day of November, A.D. 1758.
Reports of the Committee of publick claims, held at Edenton, Monday, November 27th, 1758.

Jamaica.

Read a letter from Henry Moore, Esqr., Lieutenant Governor of Jamaica, dated the 25th January, 1759, containing his observations upon two Acts passed in a late session of Assembly in that island; and transmitting
Minutes of Council from 13th February to 26th August, 1758.
Minutes of Council in Assembly from 13th June to 17th of the same month, 1758.
Minutes of Council from October 2nd to November 23rd, 1758.
fo. 117.
Minutes of Council in Assembly from September 19th to November 22nd, 1758.
Minutes of Assembly from September 19th to November 22nd, 1758.
Twenty Acts passed in 1758.

Ordered, that the said Acts be sent to Sir Matthew Lamb for his opinion upon them in point of law.

Thursday, April 26. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Oswald, Mr. Jenyns, Mr. Hamilton, Mr. Sloper.

Trade.

Africa.

fo. 118.

fo. 119.

fo. 120.

fo. 121.

fo. 122.

fo. 123.

fo. 124.

Their lordships took into further consideration the form or draught of a letter from Mr. Secretary Pitt, signifying His Majesty's Commands, that this Board do report an opinion, what advantages may be derived from the acquisition of the River Senegal, and how those advantages may be most properly and effectually obtained, extended and secured; and Mr. Cumming attending without was called in, and produced to their lordships a Paper, intituled, "Remarks upon the trade of the River Senegal, tending to shew the propriety of a joint stock company with exclusive privileges for carrying on that trade and the reasonableness of giving the preference, in case such a measure is approved, to those who advised and assisted in the execution of the expedition for the reduction of this important river"; and for other information Mr. Cumming referred to Mr. Johnson, who being also attending without was called in, and being examined as to his knowledge of the state of the river and the nature of the trade, gave information, the substance of which was as follows; viz. that he went out to Senegal with the four companies of Talbot's Regiment stationed there in capacity of Agent Victualler; that he arrived there in July 1758; that he thinks the best method of carrying on the trade will be by an exclusive joint-stock company, and grounds his opinion upon facts collected from a variety of French Papers which he had the perusal of, and from his own observation during his residence there; that the river is navigable at all times for vessels of fifty or sixty tons up to Podore, a factory seventy leagues up the river above Fort Louis, and that such vessels may go twelve leagues higher than that without the assistance of the land floods in the rainy seasons; that he went up there to purchase cattle and corn for the garrison; that from the best judgement he was able to form, the quantity of gum annually carried off by the French might amount from 400 to 800 tons; that the gum is brought by the Moors to a place called the Desert, about fifteen leagues above Fort Louis, where it is purchased of the Dermancous or Priests, who manage the trade, at stated times, and brought down in small vessels of fifty or sixty tons to Fort Louis to be shipped off; that there is another place called the Cock, five leagues higher up the river, where gum is also purchased of the Moors. But that there is no settlement at either of those places; that the number of slaves annually shipped off may amount to about one thousand, two hundred, all of which come from Galam, a factory three hundred leagues above Fort Louis; from whence also the gold comes, which may amount annually to about fifty two pounds for the benefit of the company, and as much or more on account of the company's agents and officers; that he knows of no trade for wax, and very little ivory; that the floods continue about four months, in which time the slaves and gold are brought down from Galam; that the Moors and Negroes were very desirous of having trade with us; but that little or no trade has been carried on either for gum, slaves or gold since the taking of Fort Louis, there not being more than forty or fifty slaves purchased in seven months, which he purchased and sent to the West Indies; that the goods carried out on Mr. Touchit's account were for trade at Portonderie, which belonged to the King of Liggibilli—that there were no other goods for trade at Senegal, except what belonged to the captors, who had an agent there to dispose of them; and when he came away in February, the Dermancous had made a demand of a vessel for trade, and one was proposed to be sent up to the Desert to fetch the gum. Mr. Johnson then produced a copy of a tariff or treaty of trade made by Major Mason in June last with the Dermancous, by which the usual presents as well as the rates and prices of goods and gum are ascertained nearly upon the same foot as settled by the French tariff. Mr. Johnson likewise produced a paper, intituled, Demand of Goods for the Senegal trade for one year, specifying the several species and quantities, with observations thereon; which paper he informed their lordships had been framed from such lights as he could collect from French papers of trade, which fell into his hands. Mr. Johnson further informed their lordships, that the garrison of Fort Louis, before his arrival with the four companies of Talbot's Regiment, consisted of two hundred marines; that there were not accommodations for two hundred, which, together with the unhealthiness of the climate, want of proper necessaries, fresh water, etc., had been the occasion of great mortality, insomuch that the four companies, which upon their arrival were one hundred each, did not exceed, when he left the place, forty six men each.

fo. 125.

fo. 126.

fo. 127.

fo. 128.

Mr. Cumming and Mr. Johnson being withdrawn, Major Mason, who attended without pursuant to order, was called in; whose information was in substance as follows; that no trade had been carried on at Senegal since we took the place, no vessels for trade being arrived, except two or three small vessels from Plymouth, Exeter and Liverpool, which only brought out some bad spirits which had helped to destroy the soldiery; that the Moors and negroes were very desirous of trade; that he had settled tariffs with two Moorish and five negroe nations; that when he came away, there were four ambassadors down at Fort Louis from Galam to desire trade; and that he had brought over and delivered to Mr. Pitt a letter from the Serutic king desiring trade; that the goods sent out by Mr. Touchit were for trade at Portonderie; that there were some goods belonging to the captors; and one or two vessels were preparing to go up to the Desert to purchase gum with them, when he came away; that he thinks the trade of Senegal can only be carried on by an exclusive company, as the French carried it on; for that separate traders, by raising the price upon one another, would introduce such confusion as would spoil the trade; that, from the best information he could collect, the French dealt annually for about one thousand, seven hundred slaves, which were taken off by their East India ships, and carried to their settlements there; that these ships, upon their arrival off the Bar, sent up their cargoes of goods to Fort Louis, and went and lay at Goree to take in the slaves; that the gum, which he thinks may amount annually to one thousand tons, was carried off by ships chiefly from Marseilles, which return thither again directly with their cargoes; that the gold trade amounted one year with another to about seventy mark; that March, April and May are the three principal months for the gum trade, which is brought by the Moors from the gum forests through the Brachna country to a place called the Desert, where the trade is managed by the Dermancous or priests; that a tribute must be paid to the Brachna king, the Desert and the Cock, the two places of trade, being in his country; that Portonderie belongs to the King of Liggibilli, who wanted to settle a tariff of trade with him, but said, that the merchants who traded at Portonderie, gave a better price for the gum than he had settled with the Dermancous; that there being no trade carried on, the free negroes, mulattoes and other people, who have habitations on the island, upon which Fort Louis is built, and who may amount to between two and three thousand, were in the greatest distress for want of employment; that if the trade of Senegal was neglected, it could go nowhere but to Gambia; that the distance between the two rivers is not more than seventy or eighty miles, and in some places not so much; and that he thinks, that higher up above Galam, they are one and the same river; that there are two fine gold mines above Galam; and that from accounts of the natives, there is reason to think, that a considerable trade for gold is carried on at the head of these rivers by caravans from Grand Cairo.

fo. 129.

Major Mason being withdrawn, their lordships entered into a further consideration of this business; and after some time spent therein, ordered the draught of a letter to Mr. Secretary Pitt to be prepared, desiring that the Board may have such papers and documents respecting the French trade in the River Senegal, as have been transmitted or delivered to him by Major Mason, Mr. Cumming and Mr. Johnson; and the Secretary was ordered at the same time to write to the Secretary to the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty for such papers and documents of the like nature as may have been transmitted or delivered to that Board.

fo. 130.

Friday, April 27. Present:—Earl of Halifax, Mr. Oswald, Mr. Jenyns, Mr. Rigby, Mr. Sloper.

Trade.

Africa.

The draught of a letter to Mr. Secretary Pitt, desiring that the Board may have such papers and documents respecting the French trade in the River Senegal as have been transmitted or delivered to him by Major Mason, Mr. Cumming and Mr. Johnson, having been prepared pursuant to order, was agreed to, transcribed and signed.