Henry VIII
October 1533, 11-20

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1882

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'Henry VIII: October 1533, 11-20', Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, Henry VIII, Volume 6: 1533 (1882), pp. 514-530. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=77572 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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October 1533, 11-20

11 [Oct.]
Harl. MS. 6,148, f. 33 b. B. M. C.'s Letters, 261.
1259. Cranmer to the Dean Of The Arches.
Touching your advice to grant Edwardes' suit for a new commission to examine witnesses ; you know how he disregarded it when I granted the commissions to both parties before. He would by this find means for more delays, so I refuse to grant it. On this manner of granting commissions we might waste another year. Where you write that Mr. Bedell is prevented by business from attending the examination of witnesses in the case of the abbot of Tiltey and my lord of London's chaplain, "appoint Master Trygonell to be jointly with Mr. Doctor Oliver, instead of Mr. Bedell," in the commission. "The xi. day."
Copy from Cranmer's Letter Book. Add.
11 Oct.
Vesp. F. XIII. 86. B. M.
1260. G. Earl Of Shrewsbury to Cromwell.
My servant Edw. Eyre is summoned to appear before you to make his fine for knighthood. Never knew that he could spend in lands more than 40 mks. a year. At this time I can evil spare him, and therefore desire you to direct a commission to whom you please, to take his oath. Wynfyld, 11 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : Thos. Cromwell, master of the King's Jewel-house. Endd.
11 Oct.
Add. MS. 6,668, f. 392. B. M.
1261. Babington and Pole.
Receipt given by Sir Ant. Babyngton to his cousin John Pole for 29l. 1s. to be delivered to George Pole at London. 11 Oct. 25 Hen. VIII.
Hol.
11 Oct.
R. O.
1262. Ric. Norton, the elder, to Lady Lisle.
Master Basset (fn. 1) , your son, came to me on Friday last in good health and merry. My wife and I thank my Lord and your Ladyship for your wine. For your son's learning I have required the parson of Colmer to be with him at my house every day in the week. There is no common sickness within five miles, except at Faringdon, and there was no sickness in the parish I dwell in these nine weeks or more. Estysted, 11 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : At Calais.
11 Oct.
R. O.
1263. [Flemish News.]
The common bruit is that the King has caused [a new] Pope to be made in England, whereof the Pope of R[ome] hath great grudge ; and if the King will not forsake his new queen, the great excommunication will be openly pronounced this day three weeks. The Pope has also sent word to the French king "th[at he] woll void away all the English dogs out of h[is] Court, or else he will not come to him." It is also said great mortal war will be made against England, and all the King's supporters will be slain by the sword, "but they will not brenne." They intend to make war on Calais, and they have no doubt that Andrea Doria, if the Emperor give him men enough, will conquer England. All that know the King have great pity at his misordering, considering his great nobleness and fame, which is greater than that of any prince since king Arthur. The peace is made between the Easterlings and the Hollanders, and all ships of war of both parties are retained to make war on England. Dated at the top, 11 Oct.
P. 1, mutilated.
12 Oct.
R. O.
1264. Richard Lyst to Cromwell.
I was formerly a lay brother among the friars of Greenwich, now a layman and student at Cambridge. In consequence of the trouble I found among them, I left them the week before Pentecost last. Since then I have been a student in Clare Hall, Cambridge ; of late I have been at St. Audrey's Ely, and taken my first orders, and propose to proceed as a secular priest, and serve God with more quietness than I could among the friars. Between this and Christmas I intend to be in London, for a little business in which I beg your favor. I send you for a poor token some hallowed Tawdrye laces ; and I beg you will send to the noble queen Anne my other letter with the contents. Cambridge, 12 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : Worshipful Mr. Cromwell. Sealed and endd.
12 Oct.
R. O.
1265. Christopher Coo to Cromwell.
I desire you to remember me for the manor of Wodecroft. Will give 380l. in addition to 180l. in hand, and the rest at Midsummer next. I would have the whole year's farm, with the ward, or else have 180l. with the costs, and the half year's farm. I beg you to write, addressed John Abrame, of Boulogne. I wish to be informed if anything is said against me. 10,000 lasts of herring are ready to come into Dieppe, at 6l. the last, all sold. Dieppe, 12 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : To the right worshipful Mr. Cromwell be this delivered at London.
12 Oct.
Harl. MS. 6,148, f. 34. B. M. C.'s Letters, 262.
1266. Cranmer to Mr. Stapleton, Parson of Byngham.
I am glad to hear such good report of your discharge of your pastoral cure. I hear there is a free school with you for the virtuous bringing up up of youth. With this bearer I send my sister's son, Thomas Rosell, apt (as I suppose) to learning, with the request that you will see him "ordered and instruct" as convenient for his age and capacity. Otford, 12 Oct.
Copy from Cranmer's Letter Book. Add.
12 [Oct.]
Harl. MS. 6,148, f. 34. B. M. C.'s Letters, 262.
1267. Cranmer to Mr. Rosell.
Where of late I advised you to send your son to school at Southwell, supposing these parts free from sickness, "I am now advertised that they die there." Wherefore, as I am informed that Master Stapleton, parson of Bingham, of whose good name and conversation I hear much, hath set up a free school in his parish, I advise you to send your son thither, and have written to Stapleton in that behalf. "The xii. day" [of Oct.]
Copy from Cranmer's Letter Book. Add.

Harl. MS. 6,148, f. 34 b. B. M. C.'s Letters, 262.
1268. Cranmer to —.
P.S.—As I am uncertified of the delivery of my letter to you of the 10th inst., which was a summons for you to repair to me at Otford, I will that you do so at once on sight hereof. From my manor of Otford.
Copy from Cranmer's Letter Book.
13 Oct.
R. O.
1269. Harry Huttoft to Cromwell.
I have received your letter, and had the pokes brought into a loft and examined. The wool is of divers sorts. I did not meddle, because Will. Symons was present, and trust no blame will be thrown upon me. To your complaint that I have not certified you of such wools as were laden in the galleys, the weighing and reweighing was specified in the view that was sent you. St. Edward's Day.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : Of the Council. Endd. : Oct.
13 Oct.
R. O.
1270. John Copuldyke to Cromwell.
Has received his letter, dated 13 Sept., for this bearer, Fr. Thomas Hamond, to be elected sub-prior of the Friars Austins in London, by the prior and convent of the same, as they are authorised to do. He has been chargeable to me in obtaining his licence from his old Mrs. Genney, a serjeant-of-the-law's wife ; also from my lord of Lincoln and from his provincial, authorising him to take a benefice. He has been diligent in teaching my children, the which I have most pleasure in, next God and pleasure of my Prince. "Now they shall be greatly hindered for fault of a good teacher ; for such another, for my mind, of his conversation and kindness and good disposition in my house, shall be very hard for me to get." Hoped to have been able to have provided for him. 13 Oct. Signed.
P. 1. Add. : One of the King's Council.
13 Oct.
R. O.
1271. Henry Earl Of Essex to Cromwell.
I beg you to remember my matter that my right may be declared before the judges, for I know unless you labor I shall be put off. Also be good master to my servant, the bearer, Will. Clopton, for his lands, which I told you at the coronation were in travers. Stanstead, 13 Oct. Signed.
P. 1. Add. : To my right well-beloved friend, Mr. Cromewell. Sealed. Endd.
13 Oct.
Harl. MS. 6,148, f. 36 b. B. M. C.'s Letters, 266.
1272. The Earl Of Essex to Cranmer.
Where you write me in favor of one Ric. Stansby to be admitted to his declaration against a bill of complaint against him ; no such complaint has been offered to me. Stansby was my baily and copyholder of certain lands in Bilston, Suff. At my court, held of late at Bilston, his misusing of his office and misdemeaning of his copyhold was presented by the whole homage. Wherefore I have seized his copyhold into my own hands, and deprived him of his office. 13 Oct.
Copy from Cranmer's Letter Book. Headed : "By my lord of Essex."

Harl. MS. 6,148, f. 36 b. B. M. C.'s Letters, 266.
1273. Cranmer to the Earl Of Essex.
Have received your letters dated Stansted, 13 Oct., and see you do not intend to wrong Richard Stansby. I desire you to let two well-learned and indifferent men have the hearing of the case, and, if not forfeited, to let Stansby enjoy his lands and copyhold. If the two indifferent men find he hath misordered himself, let him make amends and humbly require your favor. Trusting that, the rather in consideration of his age, you will favor him.
Copy from Cranmer's Letter Book. Headed : "An answer to the same by my Lord."
13 Oct.
R. O.
1274. John Hornyold to Cromwell.
I have received yours, willing me to take an obligation of Harbard Clarveys, or admit him to a bailiwick of two lordships in the bishopric of Worcester, amounting to 200l. The revenues of the said bishopric are received at Michaelmas ; and as Nich. Poyntyes keeps the courts at Gloucester without the assent of my Lord or his officers, as was never used before, to the great trouble of the tenants and damage of my Lord, the rents will not be had till Christmas. This I have certified to you before, and you promised that Poynez (sic) should be reformed ; but he little regards it ; and in the lordship of Henbury Saltmarche, where lately he kept his court, has given orders that none of the tenants there should appear at any time before my Lord's officers. Worcester, 13 Oct. 1533.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
13 Oct.
Royal MS. 18 B. VI. 26. B. M.
1275. James V. to Clement VII.
Recommends George Lokert, professor of theology at the University of Paris, to be dean of Glasgow, vice Jas. Scrymgeour, who died while on the King's business in Flanders. Inververray, 13 Oct. 1533.
Lat., copy, p. 1.

Royal MS. 18 B. VI. 33. B. M.
1276. [James V. to Clement VII.]
A mutilated letter, which seems to be a duplicate of the preceding. Lokhert's name is lost, but the epithets used are the same in both letters. Inverver[ay], ... tertio.
Lat., mutilated, p. 1.

Ibid., f. 33.
1277. [James V.] to the Cardinal [Of Ravenna].
To the same effect.
Lat., mutilated.

Royal MS. 18 B. VI. 33 b. B. M.
1278. James V. to the Cardinal Of Ravenna.
"Jacobus Dei gratia Rex Scotorum, rev[erendissimo patri Benedicto cardi]nali Ravennæ, rerum suarum promotori ... pater reverendissime, multis in rebus ... fidumque liberalemque ad res nostras gerendas e ... Is hoc tempore apud Gallos nostra curat, sed ... carpitur aut certe ad ea negligentius i ... patroni officium esse rati de benemerentibus ... Reverendissimam has dedimus, hoc itidem agentes ... cum sanctissimo, teque per literas egimus quantum ... natus Divi Andreæ. Rursum itaque Joannis Parles et q ... duxit litem illius innocentiæ adversarii opibus oppug ... P. tuæ ex animo commendamus non solum ut defendendam ... etiam a Sanctissimo petas, idque nostro nomine ut pr ... dum teneres agere[mu]s annos ... deremus litis fr ... vehementer cupi ... bris anno trig[esimo tertio]."
Mutilated.

Royal MS. 18 B. VI. 32 b. B. M.
1279. [James V. to —.]
"Tres haulte, tres excellente ... fraternelle dilection Prin[cesse] ... tir per nostre ambassadeur ... grand faveur et cordialle ... ... celle fin ... son oncle ait occasion de ... amour et faveur come affiert l'oncle de monstrer ... [com]bien que la forme de ceste dite tresve puisse ... ux reprinse par raison. Par quoy ce considere ... chosez qu'avez par plesieurs lettres ... escript et donne a entendre au ... t ensuyvre, et estre par faictz a ... t que ladite tresve fut conclue par ... croistre, et regner entre ces deux ... neur avons qui par vos labeurs ... bonne fin."
Mutilated.
13 Oct.
R. O.
1280. The Pope's Visit to Marseilles.
Has written that the Pope arrived on Saturday last, and was lodged at St. Victor's in le Jardin du Roy. He had 11 ships near the tower furnished by the Emperor. Gives an account of the Pope's reception on Sunday, accompanied by the cardinal Bourbon, many bishops, my lords d'Orleans, d'Angoulesme, Vendosme, and others. All these entered the Pope's chamber, where they stayed a quarter of an hour. My lords Orleans and Angoulesme, on each side of him, conducted him as far as the boat, and as they passed salutes were fired from the vessels and the town, that all the earth seemed to tremble, for there were at least two hundred rounds fired. He was borne in a chair carried by six men, under a canopy of cloth of gold, and the Corpus Domini before him on a beautiful white hackney, covered with a similar canopy. These canopies were carried by gentlemen through the town up to the great church, where Mons. de Vendome and others received the canopy of the Corpus Domini, and Albany and others that of the Pope.
ii. The order of the procession, consisting of religious, Swiss bishops, and others, including 12 or 13 cardinals and 32 bishops. Upon entering the church the Pope gave the benediction. The Dauphin and the Legate took no part in the ceremony. This morning the Legate had gone to meet the King, who was to enter the town today, and have an interview with the Pope. Understands that a gentleman has been sent by the King to the Pope to ask him whether it was agreeable for the King to visit him. The Pope said he could not have a greater pleasure. They were closeted from 9 till 12. The said letters were written from Marseilles on 13 Oct.
Fr., pp. 3. Endd. by Hacket : Copy of a letter that is now of late come from Marseilles to this Court here at Brussels.
13 Oct.
R. O. St. P. VII. 511.
1281. Ghinucci to Cromwell.
As the King has commanded his pension of 1,400 scudi to be paid, it may be consigned to Francesco Gabriel, merchant of Lucca. Rome, 13 Oct. 1533.
Lat., hol. Add.
13 Oct.
R. O.
1282. The Scotch Commissioners to [Clifford].
Have received his letter, dated Berwick, 10 Oct., desiring the meetings to be deferred till the 23rd, and to be on the Middle Marches on English ground. He had written to make his own appointment before, and they had complied : one of them, Master Adam, was on his way to the Borders. When they were at Newcastle it was desired that the meeting should be within 20 days ; now he desires the clean contrary. They think he should begin at the March where he has rule, as the best proof of his intentions, and a good example to the Borders. Cannot alter the days. To meet first at Carham in England is a new invention, and may give occasion to much discord. Pray him to be reasonable, and not give occasion to misdoers to take comfort. Edinburgh, 13 Oct.
Copy, pp. 2. Headed : By the late Commissioners of Scotland.
Cal. B. III. 266. B. M. 2. Another copy.
Pp. 2.
13 Oct.
R. O.
1283. Lawson to Cromwell.
The captains, petty captains, and soldiers who came northwards last daily send to him for their coats, conduct money, and wages for two, and some three days, while they were at Derneton, Durham, and Chester. Requests him to send a warrant to the abbot of St. Mary's, York. Wishes to know the King's pleasure about Cawe Mylles. Thinks now it can be kept for a less charge, if George Douglas keep five or six persons there to watch, taking nothing for his own wages, considering he comes but little there. Will come to London as soon as possible about his accounts. Lord Conyers has often sent to know Cromwell's pleasure touching Rudbye and the last certificate. York, 13 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : Of the Council.
13 Oct.
R. O.
1284. Lawson to Cromwell.
Writes in behalf of his chaplain, the bearer, for a chantry, now void, in the gift of the master and brethren of St. Christopher's guild. Hopes Cromwell remembers the warrant to the abbot of St. Mary's for this last garrison of 2,000 men levied by my lord of Northumberland, of which he has often written. The captain's servants remain here at York making great importunity for the money. Has notified his mind about Cawemills to Cromwell. York, 13 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : One of the King's most honorable Council.
14 Oct.
R. O.
1285. Lawson to Cromwell.
There is a chantry in the gift of St. Christopher's guild, York, vacant, to which the old master would present a priest who will not be admitted. The present master, Wm. Holme, and divers of the brethren, have given their good will to Lawson's chaplain, Sir Wm. Philipson, but he is not yet admitted. The presentation will soon lapse, and be in the gift of the dean and chapter of York. Desires him to write to the Dean and Chapter in favor of Philipson. York, 14 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
14 Oct.
R. O.
1286. Sir W. Courtenay to Cromwell.
The matter concerning Mr. Southwyll, your servant, was concluded before his coming, but I have set him in hand with another kinsman's wife of mine. If he obtain her she shall dispend 50l. of inheritance and 80l. for term of her life. Desires his remembrance for the sheriffwick of Devon this year. Will explain the reasons why he desires it. Powderham, 14 Oct. Signed.
P.S.—I send you your fee for this half year.
P. 1. Add. : Right worshipful.
14 Oct.
R. O.
1287. Philip Parys to Cromwell.
Mr. Lodlo, one of the King's servants, and keeper of my Lord's (fn. 2) park of Stoke, has complained to the King of the words that he says I spake at the prior of St. Swithin's table, when I spoke to him concerning the disorders in the keeping of his game, and for what he said of my Lord. And as I do my duty to my master, he has spoken untruly of me. As my Lord doth especially rest upon you as his friend in his absence, I beg your favor, and that you will ask the King to be gracious to me, and order my accuser to produce his witnesses. Farnam, 14 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : Of the Council. Endd. : "P. — Letters sent in anno xxvio R. H. VIII." (fn. 3)
14 Oct.
Camusat, 12.
1288. Francis I. to the Bailly Of Troyes.
Wrote lately, and sent to him the duplicate of a letter from cardinal de Tournon, to be shown to the king of England, that he might understand the prorogation obtained by Francis from the Pope touching his affair. Last Saturday the Pope arrived near this town, and next day entered it. Yesterday in public consistory Francis did him reverence and kissed his foot. Today his consort will do the same, and to morrow the Dauphin. Then they will commence negotiating. Firmly believes that from the interview will result the repose of Christendom. Has received the Bailly's letter of the 3rd instant, stating that on the preceding day news had reached Henry of the conclusion of the truce between him and the king of Scotland for a year. Trusts that during the interval differences will be amicably settled. As to the conversation which Henry held with the Bailly concerning the words which he desires Francis to use when speaking to the Pope "pour le faict de l'excusateur," the Bailly is to assure him that Francis will not forget to do all that he sees necessary for his affair. Marseilles, 14 Oct. 1533. Signed and countersigned.
Fr. Add. :
A M. le Bailly de Troyes, mon ambassadeur, &c.
14 Oct.
R. O.
1289. "Stanislaus Comes, servitor" to —.
Thanks him again for his kindness, which he could not do sufficiently in London, "præ nimia fantasia et iracundia." Will relate the favor whereever he goes, in Spain, and before the Emperor himself. "Quemadmodum pollicitus sum, quicquid hic in itinere ex illo Friderici ducis secretario cognoverim, vestræ dominationi significare non neglexerim in ea re ut præsens perseverat ; nihilque ex eo cognoscere possum, nisi quod multas literas habet nescio quo portat ; ille autem Anglus qui eum in Lundanum conduxit et in Dobra iterum reduxit, qui mihi in satis hilara collacione fassus est quod nunc apud Lutherum fuit ex Rege missus et quod censeo admodum ei placet, nam ipse est — (fn. 4) amicus ubi rediens congressus cum illo secretario Calisiis et ita cum eo recto in Lundanum —* me tandem multo devinctiorem — (fn. 4) vestræ D. comendo." Dover (Dobra), "xiiij. die Octobris sabbato, (fn. 5) anno 1533."
Lat., p. 1.
14 Oct.
R. O.
1290. Sir Wm. Skeffyngton to Cromwell.
This gentleman, my very near kinsman, has moved me to be a means to you for your favor to him. Without it, he will be put to wrong, for his adversary is an attorney at the law and has many shifts, and an unlearned man has not. I thank you for your letters sent me by John Fagan. Skeffyngton, 14 Oct. Signed.
P. 1. Add. : Councillor and Treasurer of the Chamber.
14 Oct.
R. O.
1291. Harry Lord Scrope to Cromwell.
Whereas certain "tunnes" (turns?) are depending between the mayor of York and the master of St. Christ[opher's] guild : I beg your favor for the guild according to the old custom, and to the maintenance of the service of Almighty God. The monastery of St. Agayth. 14 Oct. Signed.
P. 1. Add. : Mr. Cromwell.
[15 Oct. (fn. 6) ] Vit. B. XIV. 60. B. M. 1292. — to [Cranmer?].
* "sal ... ani ... vestr ... di ... iis ... tem ... tate ... virtut ... cuta ... nos disiung ... neque dici neque ... quum certo esset ad me ... [epis]copali sublimitate decorata ... honorari gratia et haberi existima ... Dantiscus suum illum olim commi[li]tonem ... cum amicissime conjunctissimeque in aula Cæsari[s] ... quo humanissime in discessu ex Ratisbona ... nubium, immo usque in ipsum navigium honor ... tus fuit, in ea dignitatis celsitudine et ... nerari summopere cupivit. Solet enim hoc ... amicis, quum amicus quispiam fortunæ p ... tus est conditionem, quod et se illa beato ... tur, non potui itaque committere quin [literas gra]tulatorias, sed ex vera propensione p ... Dominationem vestram Reverendissimam darem, quæ licet secius i ... sera congratulatio debet ab amico repre ... et mihi mutuæ nostræ amicitiæ jure peto con ... et quantæ rerum mutationes interea quo ... abii, successerunt, nemini sunt incognitæ t ... [peri]culosis temporibus, plenus turbis est et ... varia, de iis quæ geruntur, incertis ple ... passim circumferuntur, ut difficulter ex ... elici possint. Ex vestra Britannia ea ... sparguntur, de religione maxime ... Regis vestri, omnem pene excedunt ... piam credere in anim ... * * * [m]emorare quantis animi ... et eruditione sengnius ... non potest vera esse ... ad nostros scribuntur ... novissimo, ut reor, ab ... de re, Dne v. Rma ... rda sunt pro illa nostra ... [con]suetudine per hunc ... cere velit. Quod si adhuc ... [conj]ugio immunis esset, et ego ... in eam observantia hic ... s et Reginam inservire possem ... ius atque accuratius facerem, proinde [D. V.] Rmam latere nolui, esse apud nos filiam virginem vere regiam, ex Sermo Rege (fn. 7) et hodierna regina clarissimis natalibus prognatam, quæ ætatis decimum octavum ingreditur annum ; puella est formosissima, et succi, ut est in proverbio, plena. Nomen illi est Isabella, omnibus virtutibus ornata, atque inde serenissimis parentibus ac regnicolis omnibus longe carissima, neque dos regia tanta virgine digna deest. Et quod dote præclarius, optabiliusque esse debet, futuræ spes fæcunditatis, quam forma corporis non obscuris præ se fert signis. Si, inquam, serenissimus Rex vester adhuc certo matrimonio implicatus non esset, se digniorem reginam, unde regni vestri hæredes, qui omnium votis expetuntur, nascerentur clarissimi, habere non potest. Eam ad rem, si sic sors tulerit, omnem meam diligentiam et operam offero modo D. V. Rma si quid forsan in eo Deus statuere voluerit, de voluntate Smi Regis vestri cui me humiliter commendari rogo, certum me faciat. Neque hoc omittendum censui, illustrissimam istam puellam dono linguarum esse locupletem, præter nativum sermonem ... um Italice et Latine expedite loquitur usa ma ... cta et prudentissima regina et non alio præ ... accedit et lingua Germanica quam iis tem ... puellis non parva ex * * * * absentibus ... cura habe ... D. V. Rmam in eo ... licitatis addi possit, quod nihil ... ab ipsamet Dne V. Rma cognos ... in omnibus habeat neque tam be ... in D. V. Rmam fortuna quin ... esse longe benigniorem, gratum igitur m ... plurium si mihi de statu rerum sua[rum] ... fecerit. De me, si forte parem D. V ... solicitudinem, hæc accipiat. Rediens ... minio ad patriam (quemadmodum pr ... Dni V. R, principibus meis et o ... eram, verum magni brevis est fortuna ... e vestigio sequi solet invidia, qu ... male fui affectus, atque Deo t ... tate duce, superavi omnes inimicos m[eos] iniquissime oppugnabar ab illis, vi ... veritas, summa prudentia et æquitas ... principum meorum suffulta, utque il ... nociorem omnibus efficere possim quo ... fiant, et cum technis eorum cognoscere ... hinc in causis Reipublicæ nostræ cum ... consiliariis ad comitia R ... conferre multis ad * * * * ... nsos et faventes ... limiam fortassis ... certe non nocebunt ... o amori qui inter ... quandoquidem ex ejusmodi ... fieri solet firmior ... V. Rma in iis si ... ne geri velit mihi ... et in quibus jus ... vel ad digitali crepi ... non gravatæ obsecuturus ... ad D. V. Rmam hac ma ... quæ satis male pingit, nihil rhetori ... patris me coram cum Dne V. R. ut consuevi, pure et simpliciter colloqui, scripserim, cum causa non fuit aliud quam amor meus et observantia in D. V. Rmam perpetuo duratura. Et nisi eam vererer temporaria et prolixiore scriptione mea, quæ calamum ultro currentem impellit, offendi, ex epistola volumen cresceret, non solum de iisdem quibus amor et consuetudo nostra Ratisbonensis scribendi argumenta offert, verum etiam de temporibus et amicis nostris, quos tamen non omnes præterire potui. In primis autem Reverendum Dominum Doctorem Samsonem, cum quo tot annis mihi fuit in Hispaniis et novissime in coronatione Cæsaris Bononiæ summa familiaritas, nobilissimum item dominum Thomam Eliotum equitem auratum, quos duos, ne reliquis D. V. Rmam onerem, ex animo et quoad vires meæ possunt, salvere jubeo, omniaque eis faustissima precor ... Dne V. Rma summopere orans, atque pro mutuæ nostræ amicitiæ jure postulans, ut hanc meam in eos ... tam benevolentiam in notitiam illorum deducere ... lit gravari, si quid hic pro illis maxime ... Dne V. Rma possum, ipse subibo humeris ... gravabit, dominus Deus eandem ... prosperet in omnibus * * *."
Mutilated. Note in the margin : "Letters in Latten."
15 Oct.
R. O.
1293. R. Page to Lady Lisle.
Has written to lord Lisle, asking him to grant a protection to Thos. Stokewytht, who is in danger of trouble here by reason of ill debtors. He will be content to bring victual to Calais for the year, as he is bound to do. Asks her to intercede for him. He dwells near Page, and has a house full of children. The King and Queen are merry. The Parliament will be deferred till January. Greenwich, 15 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add.
15 Oct.
Camusat, 141 b.
1294. Berthereau to the Bailly Of Troyes.
The Pope, on arriving here, went to the Grand Master's garden, where he slept ; and the following day, Sunday, entered the town. The King visited him privately in the evening. The Queen and Dauphin were received in Consistory yesterday, as the King had been the day before. The dukes of Orleans and Angoulesme accompanied the King and Dauphin one day. Thinks the Legate will have his consistorial day tomorrow for the cardinalate. Tomorrow negotiations may begin after the King has been to sea with his galleys. Marseilles, 15 Oct.
Fr.
16 Oct.
R. O.
1295. William Gardiner to Cromwell.
I desire to hear of your welfare. The cause of my writing is that I send by my servant 13l. 6s. 8d. for an obligation I am bound to pay you at Michaelmas. Please return the bond. I sent the money to Edw. Morton, grocer, before Michaelmas, desiring him to pay it to you. He says he brought it to your place, and your servant "ax" him 20l. I am sure this is unknown to you. "When ye did write me in your book into your chamber ye wrote 13l. 6s. 8d." He that was before me paid only 10l. ; and when I desired you that I might pay no more, you said I could better pay 20 marks than he 10l., on which I sealed the obligation in another chamber. Chalfond, 16 Oct. 1533. Signed : Wyll'm Gardiner, late of London, grocer.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Sealed.
16 Oct.
Vienna Archives.
1296. Chapuys to Charles V.
Since my last there arrived a courier, despatched from Marseilles on the 7th inst. by the English ambassadors. The meeting of Parliament, which was appointed for the 4th Nov., has been put off to the 15th Jan. ; I know not whether owing to the arrival of the said courier, or to await the result of this meeting between the king of France and the Pope ; against which, in part, their proceedings will be directed if they do not comply with the King's wishes. Advises the Emperor, therefore, not to hasten the sending of the person or commission which the Queen requested in her last letters.
Nothing new has occurred except that the King has caused the Princess to dislodge from a very fine house to a very inconvenient one, (fn. 8) and has given the former, I know not whether as a donation or otherwise, to lord Rochford, the lady's brother, who has already established his household there. Those who went to summon the said Princess on the King's part, whose names I did not specify in my last, were the earls of Autfort, Exeter, and Surrey (Oxford, Essex, and Sussex), and Dr. Sampson ; who tempted and urged her by prayers and menaces innumerable to abandon the name of Princess. She replied with such great sobriety and wisdom that they could make no reply ; and there was no person in the company that did not shed tears. She would for no urgency hear their charge in private, but in the presence of all,— like her mother, fearing that without many witnesses they might report something to her disadvantage. It is impossible to describe the love this people have for the Princess, but they have been so accustomed to these disorders that they can only leave matters to God. London, 16 Oct. 1533.
Hol., Fr., p. 1. From a modern copy.
16 Oct.
Cal. B. III. 267. B. M.
1297. [Clifford] to the Commissioners Of Scotland.
Received yesterday their letter, dated Edinburgh the 13th, charging him with hindering justice for desiring the day of meeting to be deferred, and for wishing to confer first with the officers of Tevidale, and their conference to be on English ground. At the late meeting of the Commissioners at Newcastle it was agreed that the conference should be had 20 days after their departure. Hearing nothing, had written to appoint a day. His demand was for redress of attempts committed within his own rule on the East marches. Had said nothing of the West. If they were as anxious for justice as he, they would think it best that the meeting should be as he proposed ; for to begin at small things, and pretermit great, is an encouragement to offenders. In the proposition for meeting interchangeably it was agreed that England should stand first. Sir Jas. Colvill and Thos. Scott, before the breaking up of the war, had written from Coldstream, Oct. 4, to the earl of Northumberland, stating that they had desired the writer of this to appoint the accustomed place of meeting in England or Scotland. They will find him willing to use all methods for the reformation of attempts upon the Borders. Hopes they will do the same, as they were commissioners for taking the abstinence. Berwick, 16 Oct.
Copy, pp. 5.
Cal. B. III. 46. B. M. 2. Another copy. Headed : "To the late Commissioners of Scotland."
16 Oct.
R. O.
1298. John Graynfeld to Lord Lisle.
Has preferred the warrant for Worthe ; and though my lord of Wiltshire makes great stay, he has promised it shall pass. I will send it to my Lady in eight days. Excuses himself for not having seen Lisle at Calais. Is still very faint of the great fever. It fears him to take the sea. Parliament is prorogued to the 15th Jan. If Highfeld, a spear of Calais, happen to die, begs he will stop the passage, and the writer be advertised of his death before any other man. Wishes to obtain his room for a friend. If his friend can have any vacant room Lisle shall have 20 marks, and his wife a kirtle of velvet of the same price. Is asked by his cousin Chidley that my Lord and my Lady should take into their service a relative. London, 16 Oct.
Pp. 2. Add. Endd.
16 Oct.
R. O.
1299. Bonner to Henry VIII.
Having received your commands touching the stuff and substance of Dr. Benet, and for my own return to the French court, both by your own letters and those of my lord of Norfolk and my great patron Mr. Cromwell, I have put the said stuff in order, and delivered it to Mr. Carne, who will convey it accordingly. I take boat this morning to Avignon and so to Marseilles. Carne can inform you of the painful labor had concerning the retaining of the said stuff. Begs that the courier Thomas, and his servant Harry, who did Benet good service, may be remembered. Lyons, 16 Oct. 1533.
Hol., p. 1. Add. Endd.
16 Oct.
R. O. St. P. VII. 512.
1300. Bonner to Henry VIII.
On the 27th, on the day after the despatch of Thomas, late servant to Dr. Benet, the castellan of Susa came to me and Karne to view all the coffers, sacks, &c. belonging to Benet at the time of his death. On our replying that Benet was your servant and had executors in England, it was said that the duke of Savoy had this privilege over all strangers dying in his dominions, and they insisted on this right, and also on opening Benet's body. On our opposing them, we got rid of them with difficulty. Next day a gentleman came, but without a letter, urging gently that as Benet died intestate, the Duke's pleasure was that an inventory should be taken. We refused without instructions from England. When he demanded the keys, we told him that they were with Benet's steward, who was very sick ; on which he said, that if we would not consent, he would open the doors. We answered that if he did it by commission, we would complain to the Duke, and if without commission, we would charge him with it. Whereupon he proceeded to my chamber, broke open the door, took an inventory of all I had. I told him there was nothing belonging to Benet there ; on which he proceeded to break open other doors, and afterwards sealed them and the coffers.
We complained to the Duke, who was much dissatisfied with what had been done. And in the end, another person was sent, who declared the great benevolence of the Duke toward your Highness, and released the sequestration. But for this opposition of ours, Mr. Benet's uncle would have had very little of his goods. Within three posts of Lyons, Thomas the courier met us with letters from you. On reading which we made all the haste we could, and on reaching Lyons found your letter of the 9th Aug.
Delivered Benet's stuff to Karne, and hasted on to Avignon. Lyons, this Thursday morning, 16 Oct., taking a boat for Avignon.
Hol. Add. Endd.
17 Oct.
R. O.
1301. Gardiner, Bryan, and Wallop to Lord Lisle.
We beg you to secure speedy shipping for this post. The Pope arrived here on the 11th, and has received as much honor as could be devised. Marseilles, 17 Oct.
Commend us to my Lady, Mr. Porter, and other friends. Signed.
P. 1. Add. : Deputy of Calais. Endd.
17 Oct.
R. O.
1302. De Hesdin to Lord Lisle.
I came to Tournehem with Mons. de Beures on his business, and intended to visit you at Calais, but have been attacked by a fever, from which I have now recovered.
Please to send hither Thos. Tisset, (fn. 9) that I may inform the King of some matters of importance. Tournehem, 17 Oct.
Commend me to my Lady. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add. Sealed.
17 Oct.
R. O.
1303. Charles Duke Of Suffolk to Lord Lisle.
I am required, in a process at Bordeaux against the executors of Martin Dupyn, to prove by witnesses before the bailly of Boulogne that at the time of making an obligation I was viscount Lysle, and am now duke of Suffolk. I could bring many witnesses out of England ; but to avoid so much travelling in winter I pray you to desire five or six gentlemen of Calais to go to Boulogne for me, to testify before the Bailly. I send under the seal of the office of arms the exact dates when I was created viscount Lisle and duke of Suffolk respectively. Kaio (Kew), 17 Oct. Signed.
I have desired Lancastre and Ric. Baas to resort to Boulogne on this matter.
P. 1. Add. : Deputy of Calais. Endd.
17 Oct.
R. O.
1304. Margaret Marchioness Of Dorset to Cromwell.
I thank you for your pains in my behalf, and for the reformation of this poor house of Tiltey, now completed by the abbot of Tower Hill, the abbot of Coksale, and Mr. Watkyns, who have deposed the old unthrifty abbot, and chosen a new one of the house. Begs he will thank the abbot of Tower Hill for his zeal. The house, myself, and my son are bound to do what we can to your pleasure. Tyltey, 17 Oct. Signed.
PS. in her own hand : Be good to my poor sister Gylfford.
P. 1. Add. : Of the King's Council.
17 Oct.
R. O. C.'s Letters, 262.
1305. Cranmer to Cromwell.
Begs he will remember Mr. Newman for Mr. Benett's advowson. Otford, 17 Oct. Signed.
P. 1. Add. : Of the Council.
17 Oct.
R. O.
1306. Thos. Wryothesley to Cromwell.
Has not heard that his suit for the allowance given him by the King during absence in his Grace's service is yet sped, and fears lest his friend who helped him at his departure, as he wrote from Lyons, is not satisfied. Begs Cromwell to remember his promise. Apparel, and play sometimes, whereat he is unhappy, have cost him above 50 cr. Marseilles, 17 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : One of the King's Council.
17 Oct.
R. O.
1307. Sir Wm. Lord Sandys to Cromwell.
I beg you will call to your remembrance my motion made to you for my unthrifty son Reynold Sandys, the priest, and also for the farm of Poffeley. I beg also you will make my excuse to the King for not visiting him at this time. He gave me licence of absence to the time of Parliament, which I now hear is further prorogued. It would, therefore, be to my great comfort to continue here. I shall be always willing to requite you for your kindness. The Vine, 17 Oct. Signed.
P. 1. Add. : Mr. Cromwell, of the Council. Endd. : My lord Sandes.
17 Oct.
R. O.
1308. William Elys to Cromwell.
I intended to have waited upon you this time, taking my journey to London on St. Edward's Day. (fn. 10) Riding 12 miles to my lodging, I fell sick and returned home. I have sat on the bench in Norfolk and Norwich 48 years and more. I have been steward of the duchy of Lancaster 24 years, and one of the barons of the Exchequer 16 or 17 years. (fn. 11) With my age of fourscore years and more, as it is said, I shall always be your beadman. "I have here a pastime, as long as it shall please God," and I pray the King that I may die his poor baron. Attylbrygg, St. Luke's Even. Signed.
P. 1. Add. : Right worshipful, &c.
18 Oct.
R. O.
1309. Sir Hugh Trevanyon to Cromwell.
When I was last in London at the Queen's coronation I desired you to have me excused for my appearance this term, on my account as sheriff of Cornwall. This is not possible for me, considering the disease in my legs affecting my knee bone. Such money as I ought to pay at this time into the Exchequer, I have sent to my attorney in the said court. From my house in Cornwall, 18 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : Chancellor of the Exchequer.
18 Oct.
R. O.
1310. Robert Prior Of Ely to Cromwell.
I desire a little leisure for answer to the King's letters. As I am much impeded I cannot attend to you myself, and therefore send you my brother, the bearer, desiring that our privileges may be admitted. Ely, St. Luke's Day.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : To the right worshipful Mr. Cromwell. Endd.
18 Oct.
R. O.
1311. Sir John Rose, Priest, to John Gooddyn.
I thank you for your company from Petherton to Wells. Pray thank Simon Cort. We have tidings from Rome that the King is straitly commanded to put away my lady Anne, and take back his first wife, and their young child to be proclaimed base-born, "by the last day of Sept. next coming," on pain of interdiction of the whole realm. Images are taken from their places, and cast out of the church as stocks and stones of no value. Some will prick them with their bodkins to see whether they will bleed or no. These with many other damnable abusions we have in London. Flesh and fish are cheap, but cheese is dear. London, 18 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : Unto his loving John Gooddyn in North Petherton, fro Saynt Antlyns in London.
18 Oct.
R. O.
1312. William Edwardes to Cromwell.
You have always been my friend, and in the time of my lord Cardinal you did often, in my behalf, speak to him before my face, urging my promotion in consideration of my services to him ; at which time I had pleasant words, promising to do for me ; on trust of which I went with him into the North. How I was handled there it would be tedious to write, nor would it be meet for me to write anything dishonorable of such a man who was once my master ; but, thinking I might rely upon you, I have sent you my letters informing you that I am unkindly used by the abbot of Bury, and especially by my old companion Thos. Rawlyns ; to whom, when I left London for the North, I delivered a deed in trust, of the convent of Bury, for recovery from the Abbot of such money as he owed me for an annual pension of 5l. bestowed upon me many years ago by the King out of the said Abbey at the election of the said Abbot, until I was promoted to a competent benefice. This was the only reward I had from the King for many days of painful service, "as is well known as well to your good mastership as unto all those as had then the handling of the King's great causes and affairs." By collusion with the Abbot, Rawlyns has surrendered to him the bond, and has obtained for a sister's son of his, a scholar of Cambridge, a good benefice in Suffolk. So I am defrauded of 25l. and my proper promotion. I beg you will call the Abbot and Rawlyns before you to make me some amends, as I dislike to summon them before any other judge. I beg you to pardon me if I have not written to you or visited you before. I am entangled here in exercising the Dean's jurisdiction in his absence, and may not leave my prebend without breach of the statutes. I have therefore desired my "old lovier," Mr. Peter Vannes, and my kinsman Mr. Richard Watkyns, to intercede for me. Hereford, 18 Oct.
Hol., pp. 3. Add. : Sir Thomas Cromwell, knight, of the King's Privy and Secret Council.
18 Oct.
R. O.
1313. Sir Richard Musgrave.
A statute staple of 2,000 marks given by Sir Will. Musgrave, of Edynghall, Cumb., to Thomas Cromewell, master of the King's jewels, Ric. Cromewell, and John Gostwike, 18 Oct. 25 Hen. VIII.
Copy, p. 1. With memorandum beneath for execution against Sir Ric. Musgrave, son and heir of the said William.
18 Oct.
Harl. MS. 6,148, f. 34 b. B. M. C.'s Letters, 263.
1314. Cranmer to the Bishop Of Hereford.
Understands from the petition presented to him by the bearer, the parson of —, that, by procuration of Mr. Robert ap David Lloyd, the Bishop's receiver, divers parishioners of the said "complaintiff" were moved to refuse their tithes and oblations, and the parson himself sequestered. The sequestration was committed, amongst other temporal men, to one Howell Abowan, who so wasted the fruits thereof that, when the complaintiff was restored, he could get no restitution of the fruits. After the Bishop's final determination, things seemed to go right again ; but the said David Lloyd has again raised the old variance, the tithes are withdrawn, and — (fn. 12) denied to the parson for reformation of the same. Exhorts the Bishop to execute with justice his former determination. Is loth to take upon himself the redressing of grievances in the Bishop's diocese. Otford, 18 Oct.
Copy from Cranmer's Letter Book. Add. : The bp. of Harwarde.

Harl. MS. 6,148, f. 35. B. M. C.'s Letters, 263.
1315. Cranmer to Mr. Pallgrave. (fn. 13)
Where you write for the agreement of the fruits of your benefice of St. Dunstan's, concerning the last quarter in the vacation time, and for the oblations offered there upon your church holiday ; I refer you to Pottkyns, who has the ordering of such matters for me. Where you write that you can no further pay "out of hand" so much money, but require days of payment ; "Sir, as touching that, I suppose you may better bear your necessity than I may mine," considering the charges I have been put to. "Therefore I reckon you will rather endanger yourself to your friends than now to require any such commodity of me, being so far behindhand."
Copy from Cranmer's Letter Book. Add. : Mr. Pallgrave, parson of St. Dounston's in the East, at London.
19 Oct.
R. O. St. P. VII. 515.
1316. Ghinucci to Henry VIII.
Three or four days ago wrote to the King from Marseilles, where he had arrived with the pontifical court. Offers his services. Marseilles, 19 Oct. 1533.
Lat., hol. Add. Endd.
19 Oct.
R. O.
1317. Edward Karne to Cromwell.
Bonner and I received on the 12th the King's commandment, with letters from the duke of Norfolk and you concerning the conveyance of Mr. Benet's goods and accounts to the hands of Mr. John Benet, his uncle and executor, which accordingly I received by inventory before the departure of Dr. Bonner to the French court, who left Lyons on the 16th. I am now on my way home. Bonner and I had much ado to save the goods, as I shall explain at my coming. La Paleyse, 19 Oct. 1533.
Hol., p. 1, mutilated. Add.
19 Oct.
R. O.
1318. Leonard Smyth to Lady Lisle.
Immediately on coming to London, gave her letter to lady Howard, who said she would send the gold shortly, but had no fine sables.
Left Mr. White's letter with his host. My Lord Chief Baron has delivered my Lord's patent of Clarington to Mr. Wyndesore. Has done little about Mr. Seymour and Mr. Dudley, as the former is not in London. Lord Lisle's pleasure shall be well debated and known before anything is concluded. Sends the tryacle. My lord of Surrey says the earl of Oxford is not yet come to the Court, but when he does, he will remember his promise to lady Lisle. London, 19 Oct.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : At Calais.
20 Oct.
R. O.
1319. Robert Tomlynson to Cromwell.
I am a poor brother of the Company of the Staple, and now through age and sickness am reduced to poverty, and am not able to occupy the Staple, but to bring home what I have there to support myself, my wife and eight young children. I have in Calais about 10 or 11 serplers of wool, for which I have been unconscientiously assessed to the King 90l., which would beggar me. I would be content to pay, as others do, 20l. or 30l. I beg your favor in this matter, and for your pains I send you 10l. to buy a nag. Boston, 20 Oct, 1533.
Hol., p. 1. Add. : Right honorable, &c., at London.
20 Oct.
R. O.
1320. Thos. Woodhouse, of Waxton, to Cromwell.
Has received his letter summoning him to appear before the Council. Asks for respite till 10 days after All Saints, as he is bound for the reappearance of a Scottish prisoner who has escaped. Waxton, Norfolk, 20 Oct.
Hol., p. 1, mutilated. Add. : Of the Council.
20 Oct.
R. O.
1321. John Cokeson, Water-bailiff of Calais, to John Whalley.
Desires to be recommended to "my singular good master and yours," who will doubtless refuse and contemn the Mayor's answer to his letter about the grant to Cokeson of the lands left by Michael Streyll to his wife Parnell, an alien. The Mayor states that she can inherit the lands, as she was born in Calais. But by a decree of Henry VII., in his 15th year, no one is English unless he has resided at Calais by three descents ; and if any person of alien extraction, even though the family have resided there for three descents, marry a stranger, they and their children are considered strangers ; those who have continued here since the destruction of Gascoyne and Guyan, and not remarried with strangers, are reputed English, and a man whose father or mother is a stranger shall be reputed a stranger. Quotes the King's grant to him of the said lands. "These scabbed aldermen and mayor, infected with the same scab, woll that this in no wise should be known," but that all men born in the town should be able to inherit land ; by which the King sustains considerable loss. Calais, 20 Oct.
The Mayor, on receipt of my master's letter, has commanded Cokeson's tenants not to pay rent, as they have done this six years.
Hol., pp. 3. Add. : To, &c. John Whalley, dwelling in Cheapside, at the sign of the Bell.
20 Oct.
R. O.
1322. De Calonne to the Deputy Of Calais.
On leaving Calais I went to Picardy with the gentleman who had the two goshawks. Since my coming, his father Mons. de Lincheul (?) has sent me the mewed goshawk in reward for a falcon which I gave him. As you wish for a goshawk, if you will send me a good hackney for my wife, I will send it to you. Landretun, 20 Oct. Signed.
Fr., p. 1. Add.

Footnotes

1 John Basset.
2 The bp. of Winchester.
3 According to this endorsement the date should be 1534 ; but, apart from the fact that Cromwell is not addressed as Secretary, it is clear this letter was written when Gardiner was abroad.
4 Blanks in orig.
5 The 14th Oct. 1533 was a Tuesday, not a Saturday.
6 According to a modern marginal note the date is 15 Oct. 1533.
7 Sigismund, king of Poland.
8 From Beaulieu, apparently to Hertford Castle. See No. 1207.
9 Tichett.
10 13 Oct.
11 This statement is perplexing. No mention of Ellis as baron of the Exchequer occurs in this Calendar before the year 1525. Foss says that he held the office in 1523 ; but unless he was appointed at least six or seven years earlier even than that date, the facts are not in harmony with the style of address used in this letter.
12 Blank in MS.
13 John Palsgrave, who was instituted to the rectory of St. Dunstan's in the East, on the 3rd Oct. 1533.