Hundred of Henstede

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Francis Blomefield

Year published

1806

Pages

417-418

Citation Show another format:

'Hundred of Henstede', An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk: volume 5 (1806), pp. 417-418. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=78199 Date accessed: 20 September 2014.


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THE HUNDRED OF HENSTEDE.

The hundred of Henstede, anciently called Hénesteda, or Heinestede, in Domesday Book, takes its name from the Saxon words [hine], a husbandman, and [steda] a place or mansion; and so signifies the place or dwelling for the husbandmen, which shows as if this part was cultivated before the adjacent part of the country, which is no wonder, if we consider that the old Roman Castrum or Castre is in it, which was a defence for them against all invaders.

In the Confessor's time, the Abbot of St. Bennet at the Holm had a freeman, who held 5 acres, &c. (fn. 1) the rest of the hundred being the King's, at both the Confessor's and Conqueror's Surveys, all the churches were valued in their several manors. The fee of the hundred is, and always was in the Crown, and have in different ages been leased out to divers persons, as in 1327, John to de Clavering, lord of Horseford, and it continued with that honour some time; it was then worth 8l. per annum, "without oppressing the country," (as the words of the records say) and the Earl-Marshal, by his bailiff, held pleas De vetito Namio (withernam) and had free-warren in all his demeans in the hundred: the town of Amringhale was exempt from the hundred, as belonging to the Prior of Norwich; as also, the towns of Trous and Newton, on the same account: King James I. demised it to Sir Charles Cornwaleis, Knt. Charles, eldest son of Sir William Cornwaleis, Knt. and Thomas Cornwaleis, second son of Sir Charles, for their lives, and the longest liver of them, with all its rights, court letes, felons goods, &c. at the yearly rent of six pounds and nine pence halfpenny farthing, or 10l. increased rent for the whole hundred, which paid yearly, clear of all deductions, 56l. 9s. 2d. to every tenth, and is all in the deanery of Brook, and archdeaconry of Norfolk.

The annual payment of each town in this hundred to the land tax, at 4s. in the pound.

l.s.d.
Ameringhall8314
Bixley4514
Bramerton7440
Castor St. Edmund8000
Framlingham-Earl53148
Framlingham-Picot6806
Holveston32134
Kirby-Bedon144134
Great and Little Poringland8568
Rocklands11054
Saxlingham - Nethergate136134
Saxlingham-Thorp44134
Shottisham All-Saints11694
Shottisham St. Mary, St. Martin, and St. Buttolph142134
Stoke-Holy-Cross110188
Surlinghams144134
Trowse with Newton11200
Wicklingham5540
Yelverton50134
1670172

The quarterly payment for each town, for quarterage, vagrant-money, &c. for a 600l. levy each quarter.

l.s.d.
0110
0106
0130
0130
070
080
060
110
0183
0130
0136
070
0126
0146
0136
0190
0190
0106
070
11189

Footnotes

1 Hund. de Henesteda, i. liber homo Sancti Benedicti T. R. E. v. acr. et ii. bord. et dim. car. et val. sol. omnes ecclesie sunt in pretio cum manerijs.